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Tuesday, September 03, 2013

Primer Dugout (and link of the day) 9-3-2013

Pittsburgh Gazette Times, September 3, 1913:

Reversing the decision of Umpire Brennan, President Thomas J. Lynch of the National League announced [yesterday] afternoon that the game of Saturday, August 30, between the New York and Philadelphia clubs will count as a victory for the Philadelphia team.

Umpire Brennan awarded the contest to the Giants by a 9 to 0 score when the Philadelphia management was unable to clear a section of the bleachers back of center field, claiming that the moving spectators were a handicap to the New York batters. The decision nearly precipitated a riot…
...
President Lynch in his decision states that Umpire Brennan exceeded his authority in declaring the game forfeited…

I wonder which would be more likely in 2013: An umpire declaring a forfeit or a protest being upheld.

Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 06:26 AM | 30 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: dugout, history

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   1. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 06:32 AM (#4533156)
Today's Birthday Team.

George Stone is not really a center fielder but had good speed and could probably have faked it. His arm was just awful, but otherwise he had the physical tools to handle center.

The other option is to play Stone in LF, move Gonzo to RF, bench Clark, and play Ced Landrum in CF. Yuck.

Anyway, Stone is one of my favorite obscure ballplayers. He was a little guy, hit everywhere he ever played but never got a real shot at a MLB job until he hit .406 with 62 extra-base hits in 1904 as a 27-year-old in the American Association. That's 62 extra-base hits in the dead ball era.

The Browns gave him their every day left field job in 1905 and, as a 28-year-old rookie, Stone led the American League in hits and total bases. The next season, he led the AL in batting average, on-base, slugging, and total bases. Stone was out of baseball by 1912, the victim of malaria, an ankle injury, and a late start to his major league career.

And despite Miserlou's objection in last year's dugout, Alan Bannister stays at shortstop, though Gonzales will be activated as a defensive replacement with some regularity.

C: Harry Decker
1B: Ed Konetchy
2B/Manager: Eddie Stanky
3B: Dave Berg
SS: Alan Bannister
LF: Luis Gonzalez
CF: George Stone
RF: Dave Clark

SP: Art Fromme
SP: Tom Brewer
SP: Nate Robertson
SP: Sandy Consuegra
SP: Morrie Martin
RP: Eric Plunk

Utilityman: Rene Gonzales
   2. BDC Posted: September 03, 2013 at 09:05 AM (#4533182)
Watching the Twins' Glen Perkins save a game in Arlington on Sunday makes me wonder if the irrational trend against left-handed closers is beginning, slightly, to reverse. The species had virtually died out in 2011, but since then Chapman and Perkins have emerged, and now I see somebody named Rex Brothers is closing for Colorado.
   3. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: September 03, 2013 at 09:09 AM (#4533185)
   4. Chris Fluit Posted: September 03, 2013 at 09:36 AM (#4533200)
George Stone is not really a center fielder but had good speed and could probably have faked it. His arm was just awful, but otherwise he had the physical tools to handle center.

The other option is to play Stone in LF, move Gonzo to RF, bench Clark, and play Ced Landrum in CF. Yuck.

Anyway, Stone is one of my favorite obscure ballplayers. He was a little guy, hit everywhere he ever played but never got a real shot at a MLB job until he hit .406 with 62 extra-base hits in 1904 as a 27-year-old in the American Association. That's 62 extra-base hits in the dead ball era.


Stone is one of my favorite obscure ballplayers as well. His 1906 season for the St. Louis Browns is one of the great offensive seasons of all-time: .358 batting average, .417 on-base percentage and .501 slugging percentage to lead the league in all three slash categories. He was also first in total bases (291), OPS (.918) and OPS+ (193).

I also think you made the right call moving Stone to center, even though he only played one game there in the majors. I'd rather have a speedy guy with a weak arm in center than in left. Kind of like Johnny Damon before he got old.
   5. Guapo Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:21 AM (#4533261)
According to mlb.com, if Bartolo Colon beats the Rangers tonight, it will be his 20th all-time win vs. Texas, which will be the most all-time. Can you name the three other pitchers with 19 career wins against Texas?

Guy # 1 did it even though he spent part of his career in Texas (roughly a season and three-quarters).

Guy # 2 did it even though he only pitched one season in the AL West during his career.

Guy # 3 played his entire career for one AL West team.
   6. BDC Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:33 AM (#4533267)
#1 is Blyleven. I didn't get the other two, but should have :(
   7. SoSH U at work Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:40 AM (#4533270)

Guy No. 2 - Jack Morris?
Guy No. 3 - Dennis Leonard?
   8. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:42 AM (#4533272)
#3 JR Richard?

   9. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:43 AM (#4533273)
(raises an eyebrow)
   10. Guapo Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:43 AM (#4533274)
BDC and SoSH U got all three.
   11. Kiko Sakata Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:44 AM (#4533275)
Is #2 Jack Morris?
   12. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:44 AM (#4533276)
Ripping off SoSH's idea - Mark Splittorff?
EDIT: Never mind.
   13. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:45 AM (#4533278)



Watching the Twins' Glen Perkins save a game in Arlington on Sunday makes me wonder if the irrational trend against left-handed closers is beginning, slightly, to reverse. The species had virtually died out in 2011, but since then Chapman and Perkins have emerged, and now I see somebody named Rex Brothers is closing for Colorado.


Six lefty relievers have 200 career saves. Can you name them? Five are pretty easy. The sixth is a surprise to me.
   14. SoSH U at work Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:49 AM (#4533280)
Wagner, Franco, Charlton, Orosco, Myers, Lyle
   15. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:49 AM (#4533281)
Wagner, Franco, Myers and Lyle are on the list. Charlton (97 saves) and Orosco (144) are not.
   16. SoSH U at work Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:52 AM (#4533283)
Righetti and Plesac?

   17. Kiko Sakata Posted: September 03, 2013 at 11:58 AM (#4533284)
Six lefty relievers have 200 career saves. Can you name them? Five are pretty easy. The sixth is a surprise to me.


Was John Hiller left-handed (and did he pick up that many saves way back when)?
   18. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:01 PM (#4533290)
Got Righetti, didn't get the other guy.
EDIT: Hiller is lefty, but only had 125.
   19. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:03 PM (#4533292)
The active career leader for lefty saves is Chapman (72), 199th all time, 33rd among all active players.
   20. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:08 PM (#4533294)
According to mlb.com, if Bartolo Colon beats the Rangers tonight, it will be his 20th all-time win vs. Texas, which will be the most all-time. Can you name the three other pitchers with 19 career wins against Texas?

I searched BB-ref for this and this stat is correct.

But it has to be limited to 1972 - 2013, or else you get Dave McNally's 27 wins against the New Senators and Rangers combined. That's a lot!

There are 55 pitchers with 20 or more wins against the Phillies. Five of them since 1972. In the post-1972 category, you get no prizes for guessing which pair of teammates are tied for the lead.
   21. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:11 PM (#4533301)
Righettis is right, but Plesac (158) is not.

Hint on the sixth: He was an active MLBer last year.
   22. SoSH U at work Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:12 PM (#4533302)
One last guess - Tug McGraw.

Edit: Written before I saw the hint - Tug topped out at 180.
   23. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:14 PM (#4533303)
Hint on the sixth: He was an active MLBer last year.

Not Darren Oliver, the other guy. Arthur Rhodes. Was he a closer back in the 90s?
   24. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:16 PM (#4533304)
McGraw was a bit short - 180 saves

Rhodes had just 33 saves, mostly scattered here and there througout his career. In 2004, he was briefly the A's closer in their disastrous "bullpen by committee" that was lampooned by mainstream writers.

FWIW, Oliver had just seven saves.
   25. Tom Nawrocki Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:20 PM (#4533308)
Brian Fuentes.
   26. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:21 PM (#4533315)
Yup.
   27. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:28 PM (#4533323)
Yep, Fuentes. Fuentes has 204 career saves. I totally forgot this, but he led the league in 2009 with 48 saves for the Angels. Its the second most saves a lefty has ever tallied (behind Randy Myers 53 in 1993).

Others southpaws in the 150 saves club: Mitch Williams (192), Steady Eddie Guardado (187), McGraw (180), Ron Perranoski (179), and Plesac (158).
   28. Juilin Sandar to Conkling Speedwell (Arjun) Posted: September 03, 2013 at 12:37 PM (#4533335)
Steady Eddie Guardado (187)

He was going to be my guess. I'm amazed that Fuentes has 200+ saves...I guess I don't really concentrate enough on the AL West!
   29. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 03, 2013 at 06:14 PM (#4533606)
Since there was no Dugout yesterday, it's now been four full-slate days of baseball since I last wrote up a game. Sadly (but conveniently for me), out of the 60 games played in that span, only three of them were 90th percentile or better. So I don't feel too exceedingly guilty about not doing a full recap of the best game of each of the four days. I will, however, link the weekend games.

Friday: A's 4, Rays 3. Oakland allowed the Rays an early 1-0 lead, which was erased on a Kurt Suzuki 3-run homer in the fifth. Tampa rallied to tie in the eighth, with James Loney's double sending the equalizer across, but a Jed Lowrie RBI double in the bottom of the inning promptly broke the tie.

Saturday: Braves 5, Marlins 4 (11). A pair of early homers gave Miami a 3-1 lead; the Braves tied it in the sixth on BJ Upton's 2-run homer. RBI singles from Logan Morrison and Brian McCann in the seventh made it 4-4 (and the Braves left the bases loaded in the bottom of the inning); the game stayed scoreless from there until Upton walked it off with a single in the eleventh.

Sunday: Nats 6, Mets 5. Washington was playing catchup all day after the Mets scored 3 in the first 2 innings. They didn't make it all the way back until a 3-run rally in the eighth (with the last two runs coming with two out) provided the final margin.

And finally, Monday: Dodgers 10, Rockies 8. One genuine Coors special.

The Dodgers had Clayton Kershaw, the best pitcher in the universe, going, and the Rockies gifted them a run in the first. Chad Bettis started the game by walking Carl Crawford, then allowed a single to Yasiel Puig. One out later, Hanley Ramirez drew a walk, and Andre Ethier then reached on a Jordan Pacheco error, bringing Crawford home with the game's first run.

Having been handed an early advantage, Kershaw did not exactly put in his best work. He walked Josh Rutledge and allowed him to steal second. DJ LeMahieu singled, as did Michael Cuddyer (scoring Rutledge) and Willin Rosario (scoring LeMahieu). Nolan Arenado proceeded to hit into a double play, which brought Cuddyer home for a 3-1 lead, but also largely bailed Kershaw out of a fairly disastrous inning. Kershaw tried to make up for the damage in the second with a one-out single, which was followed by a Crawford hit, but Puig then lined out and Kershaw was doubled off of second. The Rockies also put a pair of runners on in the bottom of the inning when Charlie Blackmon singled and Bettis reached on an error, but Kershaw retired the next three hitters to strand the runners.

LA drew closer in the top of the third on a walk by Ethier and singles by Mark and AJ Ellis. Ellis's single also moved Ellis to third, but Ellis was then caught stealing second, which is a lovely bit of play-by-play to decipher. In the fourth, Juan Uribe singled and moved around to third on a pair of outs before being left there with the tying run. Kershaw got back into trouble in the bottom of the fourth, as Pacheco led off with a double and Blackmon singled, but Bettis helpfully wasted an out by bunting Blackmon to second (with Pacheco staying at third - my least favorite sac bunt, although at least this one was with nobody out) and Rutledge and LeMahieu were also retired to end the inning.

In the fifth, the Dodgers finally recaptured the lead. An Ethier double and an Ellis walk (AJ, not Mark) put runners at first and second with two outs. Uribe then singled to tie the game. In a rather remarkable move, the Rockies then pulled Bettis; the move is remarkable because Kershaw was on deck, and you'd think they'd at least give their pitcher a chance to face his counterpart. It became even more remarkable when Kershaw greeted reliever Jeff Manship with a go-ahead two-run single, giving himself a 5-3 lead.

What his bat provided, Kershaw's arm promptly gave away again. Cuddyer led off the bottom of the fifth with a single, Arenado doubled him home, and Pacheco then singled Arenado around to tie the score at 5. But the Dodgers struck back just as fast in the top of the inning. Puig led off by reaching on an Arenado error, Adrian Gonzalez singled him to third, and Ramirez's sac fly restored the lead to the visiting team. Ethier then tripled the size of the advantage with a two-run homer. The LA bullpen took over in the bottom of the inning; Brandon League put runners on the corners with nobody out (a Jonathan Herrera double and a Rutledge single), but worked his way out of the jam with no runs coming across. Jeff Francis was perfect in the seventh and eighth, while Brian Wilson shut the home team down in the seventh.

Facing Ronald Belisario, Colorado rallied in the eighth. Blackmon doubled with one out, and pinch hitter Corey Dickerson doubled him home. Rutledge then singled to score pinch runner Tyler Chatwood (normally a pitcher), and LeMahieu's single put the tying run at third with one out. Cuddyer then hit into a double play, however, ending the inning, and the Dodgers pulled away in the ninth. Ethier doubled against Matt Belisle, and Ellis (Mark) reached on a bunt hit. Ellis (AJ) then grounded to third, with Ethier being thrown out at home but the Ellises ending the play on first and second. Uribe then singled, scoring one Ellis and moving the other to third, and Crawford's two-out automatic double extended the lead to 10-7. Rosario's leadoff homer in the bottom of the ninth provided the final margin before Kenley Jansen closed the door.

Kershaw went 5 innings and gave up 11 hits and 5 runs - but had 2 hits and 2 RBI of his own. Only in Coors Field.
   30. Eric J can SABER all he wants to Posted: September 03, 2013 at 07:42 PM (#4533641)
Remarkably, baseball went through a near-identical drought of excitement in the August-September changeover in 1977. Here are the best efforts from that period:

8/30/77: Yankees 6, Mariners 5 (11). A Chris Chambliss RBI double and a Bob Stinson sac fly had the game in a 1-1 tie going into the bottom of the fifth. Graig Nettles untied it with a 3-run homer in that inning; the Mariners picked up a run against Ed Figueroa in the sixth, but he shut them down in the seventh and Thurman Munson padded the lead to 5-2 with an RBI single. Seattle finally tied it up in the eighth with four singles and a sac fly, but Sparky Lyle came in and shut the Mariners down the rest of the way, and Mickey Rivers won it with an 11th-inning homer.

8/31/77: Indians 4, Red Sox 3. Boston scored three single runs (a Carlton Fisk homer and Jim Rice driving in Yaz twice); Cleveland rallied in the seventh on two singles and two doubles, the second of which tied the game. The Sox stranded two in the eighth, allowing a pinch hit Jim Norris double to give the Indians the lead in the ninth, and Boston wasted a leadoff double from Fisk in the bottom of the inning to cement the loss, which put them 4 back of the Yankees.

9/1/77: Brewers 1, Tigers 0. There were only two games on September 1, 1977. One of them turned out to be this delightful surprise pitcher's duel between Fernando Arroyo and Jerry Augustine, both of whom lost 18 games in 1977. Arroyo ended up being the one who padded his loss total in this one, courtesy of an Ed Kirkpatrick RBI double in the fourth inning and his teammates leaving 9 men on base, including the bases loaded in the eighth (despite Ron LeFlore getting caught stealing earlier in the inning).

9/2/77 (honorable mention): Royals 3, Brewers 0. Not much winning-and-losing drama in this one, but Paul Splittorff had a no-hitter until there were two outs in the eighth, which is fun.

9/2/77: Cardinals 6, Giants 4. John Denny vs. Bob Knepper. Both had long careers and were impressively inconsistent, I think even by pitcher standards. Denny was in the middle of a 5-year run in which his ERA+ went 95, 141, 86, 120, 79; Knepper, meanwhile, was about to kick off a stretch of 131, 76, 87, 151, 75, 106.

Inconsistent or not, both pitchers kept the game scoreless through three. That run of success ended when Jerry Mumphrey reached on an error in the fourth and Hector Cruz followed with a 2-run homer. The Giants wasted a single and a walk in the bottom of the inning, but broke up Denny's shutout in the fifth when Vic Harris doubled and Derrel Thomas singled. They then took their first lead in the next inning on a Gary Thomasson three-run homer.

Knepper held his first lead with a perfect seventh, and reliever Buddy Schultz matched that effort in the bottom of the inning. In the eighth, a Keith Hernandez double and a pair of productive outs brought the score within 4-3, and also chased Knepper in favor of Randy Moffitt. Another 1-2-3 effort from Schultz set the stage for the game's final rally in the ninth, as pinch hitters Dave Rader and Dane Iorg singled and doubled, respectively, to tie the game. Garry Templeton's single brought in the go-ahead run, and Templeton made it to third on an error, allowing him to add an insurance run on a Ted Simmons hit. The Giants would get the tying run on against Butch Metzger in the ninth, but Jack Clark and Thomas were retired to end the game.

Hey, Dane Iorg tied the game with a pinch double! That's probably the most important pinch at bat he'll ever have in a Cardinals game, right?

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