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Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Pujols has knee surgery, likely out for season

From MLB.com:

The surgery, which was performed by Dr. Neal ElAttrache in Los Angeles, generally keeps players out for 6-8 weeks. Pujols, 38, is batting .245/.289/.411 with 19 home runs and 64 RBIs in 117 games this season.

Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: August 29, 2018 at 08:30 PM | 139 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: albert pujols, angels

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   101. jmurph Posted: August 30, 2018 at 04:33 PM (#5736524)
Once you pass having your basic needs met (decent housing, clothes, food, etc.) happiness doesn't vary much, if at all, by income level. i.e. people making $1M a year are no happier on average than people making $100K. This result is very consistent in studies.

For the record this is an oft-repeated idea that is almost certainly very wrong. Good overview here.
   102. PreservedFish Posted: August 30, 2018 at 05:16 PM (#5736547)
For the record this is an oft-repeated idea that is almost certainly very wrong. Good overview here.


This seems open to interpretation. The daily questions ("did you experience worry yesterday") may be better than the supposedly holistic alternative, asking people to imagine the best possible life, which seems very fraught for this exercise, practically begging perfectly happy people to imagine what life would be like with mansions and butlers and private planes.

Either way, it's probably almost impossible to phrase the claim perfectly. What is happiness? Perhaps happiness rises at extreme incomes, but its opposite, the lack of sorrow/stress/etc, doesn't change at all. What should we be measuring?

The Vox article has its own agenda - it uses a lot of data that is, at best, orthogonal to the central question. All of the country-by-country comparisons, for example, have nothing to contribute, because even in Luxembourg the average salary looks like it's around or below $75k. To have any meaning, it would need to show that there are multiple countries where everyone makes well over $75k, and that they are no more happy or satisfied than the countries that make merely $75k.
   103. PreservedFish Posted: August 30, 2018 at 05:24 PM (#5736552)
Think of it this way. I've seen the example of televisions used to illustrate how adaptable the human mind is. That is, once you buy a bigger television, you quickly adapt to it, and your permanent enjoyment is not in any way increased.

Guy A has a 30" television
Guy B has a 60" television

If you ask them both how much they enjoyed the Game of Thrones premiere, they both might say they loved it. You might reasonably conclude that the television size didn't make a substantial difference in the way they experienced the show.

But if you ask them both to rate their enjoyment in comparison to a dream Cribs-style personal movie theater, then maybe Guy A gives his set a lower grade. Now you conclude that Guy A is less satisfied. And perhaps he is, when he thinks about it.

Which question more accurately assesses television happiness?
   104. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: August 30, 2018 at 05:25 PM (#5736553)
2019: when he's back in the lineup, he will have a mild comeback, it will be enough to convince everyone he should stick around.

AKA Dead Cat Bounce
   105. Rally Posted: August 30, 2018 at 06:44 PM (#5736605)
“Once you pass having your basic needs met (decent housing, clothes, food, etc.) happiness doesn't vary much, if at all, by income level. i.e. people making $1M a year are no happier on average than people making $100K. This result is very consistent in studies.“

Maybe 10 million makes you no happier than 1 million. I wouldn’t know. But 100K ain’t cutting it these days, especially supporting a family on one income.

In any case I don’t get this line of thinking as it relates to Pujols. Will Pujols be happier making 330 million instead of 250? Why are we not asking instead whether Arte Moreno will be happier with a net worth of 3 billion instead of 2.9?
   106. Omineca Greg Posted: August 30, 2018 at 08:57 PM (#5736678)
Mavis Grind is an excellent isthmus. Check it out with an aerial view. That's 108 feet from the North Sea to the Atlantic. I would totally swipe right on that isthmus...

If there were a Tinder for isthmi, which I'm pretty sure there is not.

It turns out Shetlanders don't use Tinder properly, there's not enough people there for casual, anonymous lovemaking.

Tinder in a big city often feels like a bottomless pit of unfamiliar faces, making it prime swiping territory for singles. But what happens when the majority of profiles you see are familiar faces?

In the Shetland Islands, which has a population of around 23,000, people who aren't in the market for a date join Tinder just to be nosy and see what everyone else is doing.

In the Shetland Islands — an archipelago 300 miles to the north of Scotland — swiping on Tinder feels much like scrolling through your Facebook feed. You'll see familiar face upon familiar face, be they friends, family members, colleagues, ex-partners, and neighbours.

Marjolein Robertson — who's lived on her family's croft in Shetland her whole life — says that Tinder is pretty popular on the islands, but she's fairly certain no one's using it right.

Many Shetlanders — even those in committed relationships — join Tinder just to be nosy and find out who's looking for love. Much like your curtain-twitching neighbours snooping on you as you return home from a date.

"Like most other Shetlanders, I got Tinder to see who else is on Tinder," says Robertson. "I don't think we're using it right."

She says that Tinder in Shetland "makes no sense" because you're likely to know half the people — sometimes more — you swipe through. She says if you decide to swipe right on someone you know, it'll be perceived as "pretty serious" from the get-go. "Because you probably already know them really well and are going to their sister's wedding that weekend," she adds.

"Many folks in relationships, even married, are all on Tinder. I'm talking both halves of the couple," says Robertson. "They're not there to swing, they're there to see who else is there. It's just a lot of people hanging around looking at other people."


more at link

I know the Shetlands came up pretty organically on this thread, didn't have to try hard to work it in at all, but who knows when that may happen again. So, here's my chance for one last Shetland picture...

Royal Bank of Scotland in Scalloway.
   107. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 30, 2018 at 11:55 PM (#5736752)
Royal Bank of Scotland in Scalloway.

Quite thrifty on labor costs, it would appear.
   108. Baldrick Posted: August 31, 2018 at 12:49 AM (#5736769)
Pujols is also very active with his foundation. That $87 million might not make a lot of difference in his standard of living, but it could make a huge difference in his foundation and what he may want to accomplish with that long after he does retire.

"If I put up with a couple more years of struggling with my body, I can have many millions of dollars which will allow me to do a lot of great things in the world" is a pretty good deal.
Everybody's conception of pain and effort is different, but I think we may overstate the punishment involved in training and playing baseball. I mean, sure, for me it would be inconceivable at 59 and would have been at 39. (Cripes, at 19 or 29, what am I saying.) But we all know aging amateur athletes who are paid nothing, in fact put lots of money into their sports, who spend half their time injured and half abusing themselves to run the next marathon or similar challenge.

This is also a great point. I have friends who run marathons and the training is absolute torture. They don't even have a good explanation for why they do it, apart from the fact that running marathons gives them an excuse to travel to cool places like Iceland to run in their marathons.
   109. Baldrick Posted: August 31, 2018 at 12:54 AM (#5736772)
Maybe 10 million makes you no happier than 1 million. I wouldn’t know. But 100K ain’t cutting it these days, especially supporting a family on one income.

The median household income in the US is about $60,000.
   110. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: August 31, 2018 at 04:34 AM (#5736790)
Royal Bank of Scotland in Scalloway.

Quite thrifty on labor costs, it would appear.

In very rural/remote/low density areas in the UK, it is typical for banks to share staff across multiple branches, and have each open only for a fraction of a week. It is a way to provide service to those areas, which would not normally justify the cost of a full staff. For a place like the Shetlands, they are likely shipping in full-time staff from a branch on the mainland to fill that slot.
   111. Fancy Crazy Town Banana Pants Handle Posted: August 31, 2018 at 04:36 AM (#5736791)
If he's no longer worthy of a roster spot, it's up to the Angels to put him on the A-Rod plan.

You mean convince MLB to go to some lengths, using extremely shady and sleazy practices, to uncover some questionable evidence of steroid use by Pujols? So he ends up suspended for a year, and they get out of paying his salary?
   112. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: August 31, 2018 at 09:00 AM (#5736840)
Maybe 10 million makes you no happier than 1 million. I wouldn’t know. But 100K ain’t cutting it these days, especially supporting a family on one income.

In most places in the U.S. $100K is very comfortable. Especially if it's one income. One income families save a ton on expenses by having one spouse concentrating on household production. A couple with one person making $100K and one $0, is far richer than a couple with two $50K incomes. Just think of all the extra labor they have available.
   113. bunyon Posted: August 31, 2018 at 09:09 AM (#5736843)
But in most/a lot of those areas (where 100K is very comfortable), 100K jobs are sparse.
   114. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: August 31, 2018 at 09:18 AM (#5736847)
But in most/a lot of those areas (where 100K is very comfortable), 100K jobs are sparse.

$100K in HH Income is the 80%-ile. If someone in the top 20% of U.S. HHs isn't comfortable, the word has no meaning.
   115. jmurph Posted: August 31, 2018 at 09:22 AM (#5736848)
The Vox article has its own agenda - it uses a lot of data that is, at best, orthogonal to the central question.

Sure, but this is pretty clear to me:
Same goes for a Gallup poll question asking Americans, "Generally speaking, how happy would you say you are — very happy, fairly happy, or not too happy?" Only 35 percent of people in households making under $10,000 a year reported being very happy. Eighty-three percent of people in households making $250,000 to $500,000 did. And 100 percent of people making more than $500,000 did. There was no point at which more money didn't correlate with more happiness.

It's also just extremely intuitive if you think about it. Unless one's passion is personally experiencing poverty on a daily basis, more money leads to more things that bring people enjoyment. Whether that means actual things or experiences. Travel, dining out, giving more to the organizations/causes you care about, being able to help family/friends if desired. Comfort and piece of mind about the future/retirement. Etc.

I think the tradeoffs snapper points to are important to consider, of course. If I can work 40 hours for 80K, or 80 hours for 120K, it's quite possible, maybe even likely, that I'd be happier staying at the 40/80K level.

   116. jmurph Posted: August 31, 2018 at 09:23 AM (#5736849)
$100K in HH Income is the 80%-ile. If someone in the top 20% of U.S. HHs isn't comfortable, the word has no meaning.

This is my favorite recurring topic here, it's the best. The zop thread from a few months ago was the platonic ideal of a perfect BBTF thread.
   117. McCoy Posted: August 31, 2018 at 09:24 AM (#5736850)
100k jobs seem to be aplenty in the Atlanta metro area.


I mentioned it before but we’re planning on going down to one full time warmer for the first handful of years of our child’s life. Crunching the numbers and it would seem to us silly to spend money on a nanny and day care so that we can both work. In the end we would see our child less and spend almost the same amount as I would make as a full timer after taxes.
   118. JL72 Posted: August 31, 2018 at 10:01 AM (#5736861)
I mentioned it before but we’re planning on going down to one full time warmer for the first handful of years of our child’s life. Crunching the numbers and it would seem to us silly to spend money on a nanny and day care so that we can both work. In the end we would see our child less and spend almost the same amount as I would make as a full timer after taxes.


I assume you looked at it, but the one thing some people forget in this calculation is the loss raises, promotions and the like. A neighbor couple did the calculations, decided she should take 4 yrs off to raise their child, then was flabbergasted difficult it was to get a job at her old salary and level. Ending up taking a small step back when she reentered the work force.

She says she does not regret her decision, but does wish she had factored it in, if only to be mentally prepared.
   119. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: August 31, 2018 at 11:18 AM (#5736904)
I mentioned it before but we’re planning on going down to one full time warmer for the first handful of years of our child’s life. Crunching the numbers and it would seem to us silly to spend money on a nanny and day care so that we can both work. In the end we would see our child less and spend almost the same amount as I would make as a full timer after taxes.



I assume you looked at it, but the one thing some people forget in this calculation is the loss raises, promotions and the like. A neighbor couple did the calculations, decided she should take 4 yrs off to raise their child, then was flabbergasted difficult it was to get a job at her old salary and level. Ending up taking a small step back when she reentered the work force.

She says she does not regret her decision, but does wish she had factored it in, if only to be mentally prepared.


Two other things to consider - the social needs of the parent, and the development of the child. Yeah, work can suck, but so can staying home alone all day with your kid. Work can be a nice release from parenthood. Also, kids can develop differently by themselves versus in a daycare or preschool. In the end it probably doesn't change all that much, but a kid entering kindergarten after being in preschool is pretty different then a kid whose been with their parent.
   120. jmurph Posted: August 31, 2018 at 11:24 AM (#5736907)
I assume you looked at it, but the one thing some people forget in this calculation is the loss raises, promotions and the like.

Yeah I'm not trying to give unsolicited parenting/life advice, but for many people it's more complicated than just a straight number crunch. In any kind of major metro area the 2nd income has to be wellllll above the median to offset 2 kids in daycare- 3 or more and you can forget about it. So for many couples it's always going to make financial sense to have one person stay at home. But in addition to the job market reentry thing to worry about, loss of raises, etc., people also just have varying relationships to working/their careers. Maybe one parent doesn't make as much but their job is immensely satisfying and rewarding and it will significantly affect their happiness to lose out on it for a year or more. That matters for a lot of people.

My wife and I both did it for a year each the first time around- both of us loved it, both of us slipped right back into our careers, both of us finished degrees while we did it. But I know lots of people who love their kids no less than we do who couldn't imagine choosing to stay home with them all the time, and I get that. I also have a friend who had a similar experience to the one JL72 describes. She was the executive director of a mid-level nonprofit, took I think 3ish years off, then struggled to find anything comparable to her previous role. Ended up taking an almost identical position to one she had held like 7 or 8 years previous (at a different org), much lower on the org chart.

EDIT: beaten to some of this by jacksone
   121. JL72 Posted: August 31, 2018 at 11:37 AM (#5736915)
Yeah I'm not trying to give unsolicited parenting/life advice,


This is a good point, because I definitely was not trying to give advice or comment one way or the other on anyone's decision. But McCoy's brought to mind my neighbors issues and how she and her husband worked to make a decision. Lots of factors that everyone needs to weigh to figure out what is best for them.
   122. jmurph Posted: August 31, 2018 at 11:42 AM (#5736923)
Oh I swear that wasn't a shot at you at all- it was totally a half-apology from me for doing exactly that.
   123. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: August 31, 2018 at 11:48 AM (#5736929)
Lots of factors that everyone needs to weigh to figure out what is best for them.


Agreed. And I am sure McCoy has done that. 3rding the 'not trying to step on your toes' caveat. Parenting is hard, and while there are a few no-no's, there is a TON of grey area.
   124. jmurph Posted: August 31, 2018 at 11:50 AM (#5736930)
Parenting is hard, and while there are a few no-no's, there is a TON of grey area.

I'm really only good for "don't repeat this terrible mistake we made," not nearly as many "oh we totally nailed this, do it this way."

But they're both okay so far! They're bendy, it turns out, mentally and physically.
   125. McCoy Posted: August 31, 2018 at 12:01 PM (#5736942)
I assume you looked at it, but the one thing some people forget in this calculation is the loss raises, promotions and the like. A neighbor couple did the calculations, decided she should take 4 yrs off to raise their child, then was flabbergasted difficult it was to get a job at her old salary and level. Ending up taking a small step back when she reentered the work force.

She says she does not regret her decision, but does wish she had factored it in, if only to be mentally prepared.


Certainly. The plan right now is that I currently work for a large corporation that has a lot of units that are run rather independently throughout the world and locally. So I'll step back and try to keep a part time status with the corporation. Filling in a couple of shifts here or there throughout the metro area during busy weeks or when there are shortfalls in staffing levels. Then when I'm ready to comeback I can comeback when there is an opening at my current level or better. But yeah, I'm aware that should that not come to fruition I'm setting my pay back a few years. We're also in a position where my wife could be getting a promotion and a 20% raise and since she makes more money than I do that would go a long way toward easing our problems now and in the future. Now of course there is an issue that her job will no longer exist in the near future and if so then obviously I don't quit and we'll have to look long and hard at the numbers again to see what we'll have to do on either just my salary or both of us working with her at a new job.


Two other things to consider - the social needs of the parent, and the development of the child. Yeah, work can suck, but so can staying home alone all day with your kid. Work can be a nice release from parenthood. Also, kids can develop differently by themselves versus in a daycare or preschool. In the end it probably doesn't change all that much, but a kid entering kindergarten after being in preschool is pretty different then a kid whose been with their parent.


I live less than a mile from a rather up and coming restaurant scene in our town and I figure once we get everything settled and I can pick up some shifts part time in our downtown area. Bartending, serving, cooking, hosting, cashiering. Whatever, and that will get me occasionally out of the house and give some of my own spending cash.


My wife really enjoys working and she doesn't want to give up on her career. I don't really care about mine one way or the other. All I've ever really wanted was a comfortable life and I have that at my current level. I have no real desire to move further up the ladder and I get paid really well to do what I do. My wife actually works from home but she also travels a lot. So in our situation it won't be a situation where a parent is completely raising the child by themselves and the other is away at work. For us it would be more like we raise the child together and throughout the day or week my wife will have to go into another room and work or I'll have to take the child out to the playground for a few hours and occasionally she'll be gone for 3 or 4 days on a work trip.
   126. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: August 31, 2018 at 01:03 PM (#5736980)
I'm 46, and I recently changed my diet and exercise routine dramatically because I was having problems playing softball.

Less exercise? More beer?
   127. Blastin Posted: August 31, 2018 at 01:07 PM (#5736984)
This is also a great point. I have friends who run marathons and the training is absolute torture. They don't even have a good explanation for why they do it, apart from the fact that running marathons gives them an excuse to travel to cool places like Iceland to run in their marathons.


I just...enjoy it?

The training is the journey, the race is the victory lap. I wake up at 5 all year to train, but I know if i didn't I'd be less happy.

Not sure how he feels, but I understand that his pain is worse yet his reward is greater, when the Angels are actually good (so, uh, nevermind?)
   128. McCoy Posted: August 31, 2018 at 01:13 PM (#5736990)
Frank Thomas played with pain and ended up getting a ring. Of course he was on the DL for most of the season when they won it. But whaddya gonna do?

Scottie Pippen played with bones spurs for years. He probably couldn't afford to retire though. That guy spent money like a drunken sailor in port.
   129. Rally Posted: August 31, 2018 at 01:54 PM (#5737009)
Pippen wasn't making big money, at least compared to other NBA stars, during his time with the Bulls. He signed a very team friendly long term contract early in his career. Didn't really cash in until he went to the Rockets and then Blazers.
   130. Rally Posted: August 31, 2018 at 02:03 PM (#5737011)
In most places in the U.S. $100K is very comfortable. Especially if it's one income. One income families save a ton on expenses by having one spouse concentrating on household production. A couple with one person making $100K and one $0, is far richer than a couple with two $50K incomes. Just think of all the extra labor they have available.


I don't live in those places, but the metro DC area. I'm not complaining, it's comfortable, I'm certainly not asking for charity. But the question being answered was "i.e. people making $1M a year are no happier on average than people making $100K".

I can assure you that a million dollars a year would result in a massive change in lifestyle. I'd probably buy a nice big house with a few acres in the 750K-1M range, get new cars when the old ones turn 3 instead of when they turn 10 or 15 (or 25 in the case of the 93 Corolla I drove last year). We'd save a lot of money while also not worrying about the cost of vacations.

Would it make me happier? I have no way of knowing but it would be nice to try.
   131. PreservedFish Posted: August 31, 2018 at 02:08 PM (#5737012)
get new cars when the old ones turn 3 instead of when they turn 10 or 15


This seems like an good example of why wealth doesn't always buy happiness, in several ways.
   132. vortex of dissipation Posted: August 31, 2018 at 04:04 PM (#5737051)
Royal Bank of Scotland in Scalloway.


From the Scalloway wikipage:

Scalloway Castle was built in 1600 by Patrick Stewart, 2nd Earl of Orkney. The remains of the castle are the most notable feature of the village, located near the quay. (The castle is usually locked, but a key can be borrowed from the nearby Scalloway Hotel or from the adjacent Scalloway Museum.)


Assuming they're open.
   133. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: August 31, 2018 at 04:08 PM (#5737055)
$100K in HH Income is the 80%-ile. If someone in the top 20% of U.S. HHs isn't comfortable, the word has no meaning.
Adjust for the economic context. $100K jobs in Southern California are relatively plentiful, but that's in part because it's so damn expensive to live in Southern California. The combined income of our household is a shade over $150K, so that's comfortable. In previous years when we made less than $100K, money was always tight and things were very stressful. It's a lot easier to be happier when you're not constantly stressed about the thin margin between having a house and not.

Less exercise? More beer?
More targeted exercise, less than 50g carbs a day, no processed sugars. Down 12 pounds in six weeks. Feeling lighter on my feet defensively. Still can't hit, but that's just because I'm mentally weak.
   134. Omineca Greg Posted: August 31, 2018 at 07:04 PM (#5737109)
To be fair to the bankers of Scalloway, it's only a 15 minute drive to Lerwick, which at 7000 people is the biggest city (I guess technically it's a burgh) in the Shetlands. So anyone with a car (or who wants to take the bus) can go to the branch in Lerwick. Checking, I see the Lerwick branch is open 6 days a week (although only 3 hours on Saturday). It's nice to have a branch in Scalloway for those who don't want to make the trip into the Big City, even if it is only open an hour a week.

Scalloway helped kill Nazis, so they're cool with me. If you don't know the story, it's a good one. Fishing boats sailing supplies and secret agents to Norway, and then bringing refugees back to Scalloway.

There are villages in Western Canada where the only policing is RCMP officers...for three hours...once a fortnight. Crazy.
   135. Hysterical & Useless Posted: September 01, 2018 at 09:42 AM (#5737343)
I think that's a much harder decision to make than fans let on. It's why David Wright keeps trying to come back, it's why Willie Mays went to the Mets. Baseball players want to play and until everyone says no, they'll keep playing.


FTR, Willie Mays had an OPS+ of 145 in 69 games for the Mets in 1972 (131 for the season as a whole); it was only the following year, his last, that his hitting slumped to Pujols recent level. The trade was made to allow him to finish his career in New York, the city where he was better-loved than any player in history.

McCoy, if you can get the stay-at-home parent gig, TAKE IT. Best job I ever had. Of course, I was only doing temp work at the time, making little better than minimum wage, so there wasn't a lot of economic sacrifice involved. BUT for most humans, the people you will love most in the course of your life are your children. So getting to spend lots and lots and LOTS of time with them, during their most formative years, is absolutely, breathtakingly great. Yes, it can be hard; yes, you will need breaks from it;* yes, you will make mistakes.** But you will never regret it.

*I found one day a month was generally sufficient.
** Fortunately, since the way you do things is your kids' primary frame of reference, 98% of your mistakes will seem completely normal to them. And most of the rest they will regard as charmingly eccentric.
   136. Tim M Posted: September 01, 2018 at 11:36 AM (#5737369)
For me the hardest part would be after a lifetime of being idolized as "the best", to keep going out there as among the worst, for all the world to see (didn't last year Pujols set the "record" for only guy in history to be both best and worst in a season or something) it just has to suck. Like, worse than not having the extra millions level suck.

Remember Mickey Mantle lamenting how his average slipped below .300 at the end, Albert is in real danger of that too, one more identical season to 2018 puts him at .29978. .299 with 99.something WAR, that would be some salt in the wound.
   137. Hysterical & Useless Posted: September 01, 2018 at 11:54 AM (#5737377)
Scalloway helped kill Nazis, so they're cool with me. If you don't know the story,


That's one of the plot lines of the "Shetland" TV series (available on Netflix and highly recommended).
   138. Swoboda is freedom Posted: September 01, 2018 at 01:41 PM (#5737402)
This is also a great point. I have friends who run marathons and the training is absolute torture. They don't even have a good explanation for why they do it, apart from the fact that running marathons gives them an excuse to travel to cool places like Iceland to run in their marathons.

I have run over 15 marathons. I didn't mind training for them. I would usually run 6 miles when I wasn't training for a race, so it was pretty easy to ramp up. The longer runs can get a little boring (anything over 12 miles), but the race was usually a little hard. After 18-20 miles, the body starts to break down a bit. The real torture was the next day, being so sore.

Of course, now I can't run anymore. My knees are shot.
   139. DanG Posted: September 01, 2018 at 09:53 PM (#5737537)
Lowest WAR, 60+ G at 1B in 2018

Player       WARWAAOPS+  PA  Tm   BA  OBP  SLG
Chris Davis  
-1.9 -3.5   55 466 BAL .173 .251 .314
Greg Bird    
-0.6 -1.6   79 295 NYY .198 .285 .388
Ian Desmond  
-0.4 -2.0   82 507 COL .228 .296 .429
Ryon Healy   
-0.1 -1.6  100 439 SEA .248 .280 .451
Josh Bell     0.1 
-1.4  107 483 PIT .261 .350 .400
Lucas Duda    0.1 
-1.1   96 347 TOT .240 .308 .410
Albert Pujols 0.4 
-1.3   90 498 LAA .245 .289 .411
Justin Bour   0.6 
-0.9  114 469 TOT .228 .345 .414
Eric Hosmer   0.6 
-1.1   94 574 SDP .253 .315 .392
Wilmer Flores 0.7 
-0.6  111 397 NYM .272 .325 .431 
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