Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Tuesday, August 28, 2012

Harper: Rafael Soriano blows off media after blowing save, proves he’s not in Mariano Rivera’s class

One thing for sure: Soriano doesn’t handle himself in defeat the way his predecessor did. Nobody was more accountable or classier when he did blow one than Rivera.

Soriano should have paid more attention.

Because after giving up the three-run home run to Colby Rasmus with two outs in the ninth that put the Blue Jays ahead — temporarily, before they won the game in the 11th — Soriano bolted the clubhouse.

He was gone before the Yankees’ PR people could even find him to ask if he would answer questions from the media.

And don’t get this wrong: it’s not a media issue, it’s an accountability issue. It’s about being a professional in a clubhouse that has oozed professionalism since the day Derek Jeter showed up some 16 years ago.

...No question about that. You can even make a case that Soriano has been the Yankees’ MVP this season, especially considering that he was replacing such a legend.

Oy. Okay, back to the stupid.

...And indeed, there was something about Soriano’s blown save that felt rather ominous — and it had nothing to do with his no-show in the clubhouse.

Rivera’s shadow looms large for a guy who’s never done it when it really matters.

Repoz Posted: August 28, 2012 at 09:33 AM | 96 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: yankees

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: August 28, 2012 at 09:41 AM (#4219947)
It’s about being a professional in a clubhouse that has oozed professionalism since the day Derek Jeter showed up some 16 years ago.


Jeter has lost control of the clubhouse.
   2. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2012 at 09:43 AM (#4219950)
That's not all Jeter's clubhouse oozes!
   3. DKDC Posted: August 28, 2012 at 09:44 AM (#4219953)
This collapse will be even more fun to watch than Boston's.
   4. ...and Toronto selects: Troy Tulowitzki Posted: August 28, 2012 at 09:54 AM (#4219959)
This collapse will be even more fun to watch than Boston's.

I dearly hope this happens. Would be the best thing about the '12 season.
   5. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2012 at 09:56 AM (#4219960)
This collapse will be even more fun to watch than Boston's.

I can't believe it will actually happen. They've got a relatively easy schedule for September so I think they'll be fine.
   6. God Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:06 AM (#4219965)
It would be so great if the Orioles, Rays, and A's all made the playoffs.

Die, Yankees.
   7. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:08 AM (#4219966)
Richard Plays "Ray" Update!

Since we're discussing it, I am still very confident of the Yankees winning the AL East. Their "real" Magic Number is 30* and they have 34 games left. They play Toronto nine more times--including five at Yankee Stadium--and Minnesota three times. They also play the Orioles, who don't scare me even a tiny bit, seven times. Outside of Baltimore, they play contenders nine more times (3-game sets home-and-home vs. TB, hosting Oakland).

*MLB lists it as 32, but the Rays and Orioles play each other three times, so that's the difference

If the Yankees can go .500 in that stretch, which I would call a conservative estimate, that means TB (who still need to play the Rangers and White Sox nine more times) would have to go 22-13 to force a tie, and 23-12 to win outright.

Confidence Level: High


   8. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:09 AM (#4219967)
Screw the media. If the guy doesn't want to talk immediately after the game, give him space.

   9. BDC Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:12 AM (#4219971)
it’s not a media issue, it’s an accountability issue


If it were really an accountability issue, Soriano would have bribed the official scorer to assign those runs to somebody else, and remove his appearance from the boxscore. Seeing as how he probably didn't do that, it's … a media issue :)
   10. NJ in DC (Now with temporary employment!) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:15 AM (#4219972)
You can even make a case that Soriano has been the Yankees’ MVP this season, especially considering that he was replacing such a legend.

First Jeter, now this. Who does Robinson Cano need to kill to get some attention?
   11. Loren F. Posted: August 28, 2012 at 11:05 AM (#4220029)
First Jeter, now this. Who does Robinson Cano need to kill to get some attention?


Mike Trout.
   12. TomH Posted: August 28, 2012 at 11:26 AM (#4220072)
"It’s about being a professional in a clubhouse that has oozed professionalism since the day Derek Jeter showed up some 16 years ago."
Oh, JUST. SHUT. UP.

Bernie, Paul, Andy and Mo were sooooo unprofessional in 1995, until the 21 yr old shows up when Tony Fernandez went on the DL. Tony wasn't hitting for crap in '95, but Jeter's oozing professionalism helped the Yankees go 2-10 in the first dozen games he played at shortstop. Why they sent him back to the minors, I'll never know; no wonder the Mariners beat them in the playoffs that year!!


   13. TomH Posted: August 28, 2012 at 11:28 AM (#4220075)
oh, and shooty, I never did thank you for the high-laripus link you made the other day on my behalf to the Lego-Tianamen square picture. My whole family had a fine giggle.
   14. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2012 at 11:37 AM (#4220088)
oh, and shooty, I never did thank you for the high-laripus link you made the other day on my behalf to the Lego-Tianamen square picture. My whole family had a fine giggle.

Aw Tom, that makes my day!
   15. Dale Sams Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:00 PM (#4220110)
U mad media?
   16. Morph Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:02 PM (#4220111)
Got to say, the enmity expressed for guys working on tight deadlines and just trying to write the best stories they can is a little comical. I've never encountered a sportswriter who went out of his way to attack a player. It's a breach of professionalism for Soriano, because his teammates have to answer for his unaccountability. He brings needless attention to himself by blowing off the press. Face the failure and move on.
   17. Nasty Nate Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:11 PM (#4220116)
It's a breach of professionalism for Soriano, because his teammates have to answer for his unaccountability. He brings needless attention to himself by blowing off the press. Face the failure and move on.


It's a self-serving media-created equation that states that 'talking to the media after a game' = 'taking accountability'. The rest of us don't have to buy it.
   18. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:16 PM (#4220120)
It's a breach of professionalism for Soriano, because his teammates have to answer for his unaccountability. He brings needless attention to himself by blowing off the press. Face the failure and move on.
How do his teammates need to answer for his unaccountability? I've heard this several times but it doesn't make sense. Maybe if Soriano is there reporters don't ask Jeter or Swisher or whoever about the ninth, but it seems like you give the exact same answer either way, some variation on "Soriano has been great for us all year, everyone has a rough day, not worried about it, blah blah blah." That doesn't strike me as asking a lot of the players.
   19. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:23 PM (#4220126)
This collapse will be even more fun to watch than Boston's.


If you guys need me to weigh in with a prediction, I will. Yankees fans: I'm offering a prediction that the team will collapse to the highest bidder; I understand that you would feel much more comfortable about things if I were to predict a collapse.

I see no reason not to make as much money off of my well-earned reputation in the prediction business as I can.

---

As to Soriano, perhaps he was unavailable for interviews after the game because he was busy tucking his shirt back in?
   20. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:25 PM (#4220128)
Or gee, you can write your article and handle the situation as CBS did:

Soriano left the clubhouse without speaking to reporters.


Harper sounds like a 6 yr old who needs a time-out.
   21. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:26 PM (#4220130)
I think there is something to it but I not nearly as much as the media makes it out to be. The fact is it is entirely media driven;

Step one: Go to ask player about failure

Step two: Player is unavailable

Step three: Ask other player about failure AND being unavailable

Presto! Writer can then take victory lap for bothering the other player. The fact is that while there is absolutely zero reason for the writers to ask Jeter et al about Soriano's failing (it was his failing, not their's) they will do it and that probably does bother them a bit. I don't think it bothers them nearly as much as the self-important writers would like to believe but I'm sure it's a bit annoying.
   22. Morph Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:31 PM (#4220134)
How do his teammates need to answer for his unaccountability? I've heard this several times but it doesn't make sense. Maybe if Soriano is there reporters don't ask Jeter or Swisher or whoever about the ninth, but it seems like you give the exact same answer either way, some variation on "Soriano has been great for us all year, everyone has a rough day, not worried about it, blah blah blah."


It's an inconvenience. The writer has to run quotes about Soriano's performance that aren't straight from the source. The player has to answer questions about somebody else's performance. Is it a big deal? Of course not. But it's not ideal.

It's a self-serving media-created equation that states that 'talking to the media after a game' = 'taking accountability'. The rest of us don't have to buy it.


Ah, yes, the 'self-serving' media. Working crazy hours and under deadline pressure every time we cover a game. Expecting the professionals we cover... to act like professionals. All I'm suggesting: see it from the media's side, just a little. I feel the judgment is harsh. I'm not asking for anyone to change their mind, but consider the other guy's perspective.
   23. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:31 PM (#4220135)
It doesn't really matter what they write. All people want to see are the headlines.
   24. Smiling Joe Hesketh Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:36 PM (#4220140)
The idea that the media are there to hold players accountable is ludicrous on its face. A player is accountable to his team and his teammates. The media is there to write the story about the game, not to whine that a player didn't make their ####### job easier for them.

All the writer has to do is say "Soriano declined to speak to reporters." Period. That's it. No interpretation necessary. God ####### forbid a player is simply frustrated by his performance and doesn't feel like rehashing it to a festering mob of scribblers.

Christ. This disgusts me. And I'm a Red Sox fan to boot, but this is really asinine.
   25. Morph Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:36 PM (#4220141)
Presto! Writer can then take victory lap for bothering the other player. The fact is that while there is absolutely zero reason for the writers to ask Jeter et al about Soriano's failing (it was his failing, not their's) they will do it and that probably does bother them a bit. I don't think it bothers them nearly as much as the self-important writers would like to believe but I'm sure it's a bit annoying.


You need quotes to help describe the key moment of the game. That's it. It's not about 'bothering' anyone. It's just a reality of the job. If there's no supporting quote for Soriano's blown save, the editor is going to be pissed.
   26. Smiling Joe Hesketh Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:37 PM (#4220142)
#22, your fallacy is that speaking to reporters is acting the professional. It is no such thing. They are not obligated to talk to you. Ever. If they do it should be considered a bonus.
   27. Smiling Joe Hesketh Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:38 PM (#4220143)
We can see the key moment of the game ourselves. We don't need Soriano to utter pablum like "he hit a good pitch" or "I missed my spot" to understand that.
   28. Nasty Nate Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:44 PM (#4220149)
Ah, yes, the 'self-serving' media. Working crazy hours and under deadline pressure every time we cover a game. Expecting the professionals we cover... to act like professionals. All I'm suggesting: see it from the media's side, just a little. I feel the judgment is harsh. I'm not asking for anyone to change their mind, but consider the other guy's perspective.
- - -
You need quotes to help describe the key moment of the game. That's it. It's not about 'bothering' anyone. It's just a reality of the job. If there's no supporting quote for Soriano's blown save, the editor is going to be pissed.


Ok, but if the player is unnecessarily unhelpful to the reporters, criticize them for that if you think it is newsworthy - but it is ridiculous to then take it to the next level and try to make it into a complaint about accountability and being a bad teammate.

Furthermore, these guys often get killed for what they do say, with it easier for a guy to make a mistake if English isn't his first language.
   29. Matt Clement of Alexandria Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:46 PM (#4220151)
You need quotes to help describe the key moment of the game.
Quotes can help sometimes. At other times, though, you can describe the key moment in the game by writing words that describe the moment. Locking yourself into only one strictly defined narrative model isn't good writing.

It seems to me that game stories regularly feature non-insightful blather from players as space-filler. When a player has something interesting to say about a particular moment in the game, that's great. When a player says, "I didn't make my pitch, and I hate to let the boys down, but I'll go out and get 'em next time", that's no more useful to a good game story than if the player hadn't spoken to the media at all.
   30. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:47 PM (#4220152)
If there's no supporting quote for Soriano's blown save, the editor is going to be pissed.


Maybe that's the justification for the article. Harper got reamed by his editor because Soriano wouldn't talk to him (never mind he didn't talk to anyone else).
   31. Matt Clement of Alexandria Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:50 PM (#4220154)
If there's no supporting quote for Soriano's blown save, the editor is going to be pissed.
This is understandable, but blaming the player for the stupidity of the editor doesn't make much sense to me.
   32. Rafael Bellylard: Built like a Panda. Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:52 PM (#4220156)
Hard to blame the guy who might be most directly responsible for getting a paycheck every couple of weeks.
   33. SoSH U at work Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:56 PM (#4220160)
Maybe that's the justification for the article.


There is no justification for it. Regardless whether you think Soriano should speak to the media after the game*, columns like this are never a good idea. It comes across, rightfully so, as whining about something the overwhelming majority of readers couldn't give a #### about.

"Oh, the poor guy who didn't pay to go the game and got fed free food throughout couldn't get a word with Rafael Soriano. The tragedy of it all."

* My take: It's mildly inconsiderate to your teammates to routinely bail from media obligations after a game where you (or the team) has performed poorly. Yes, no one really has an obligation to answer questions, but there are guys in the clubhouse who don't see it that way. And if you're making them face additional questions because you don't want to, repeatedly, that's not the most teammatey way to behave.

   34. Morph Posted: August 28, 2012 at 12:57 PM (#4220161)
Quotes can help sometimes. At other times, though, you can describe the key moment in the game by writing words that describe the moment. Locking yourself into only one strictly defined narrative model isn't good writing.

It seems to me that game stories regularly feature non-insightful blather from players as space-filler. When a player has something interesting to say about a particular moment in the game, that's great. When a player says, "I didn't make my pitch, and I hate to let the boys down, but I'll go out and get 'em next time", that's no more useful to a good game story than if the player hadn't spoken to the media at all.


I don't disagree with any of this. That's why I'm not actively seeking a career in journalism. It's stressful and you are locked into rigid models of presenting information. You have to rely on stuff that, in different circumstances, would be totally inconsequential. If I had the cash, I'd launch a sports website that tackled beat reporting completely differently. Grantland is trying right now, but I'm not sure it's working. I think writing an entire article about this incident is a little over the top. A simple 'Soriano blew off the press,' at the end of the piece would have sufficed. But for as whacked out* as journalism admittedly is, it is part of the reality of being a professional athlete. Soriano ignored that reality last night, and had he succeeded, he would have accepted that reality. Accepting reality, no matter the outcome, is a sign of maturity. You see, the funny thing is, this piece is really about two people who got pissed off and didn't follow normal protocol. Because Harper is essentially riffing on Soriano blowing off the press. It's not a 'pure baseball' article at all.

*Because you can't be the one reporter who calls his editor and says, "Ya know what, I'm kind of tired of milling around the locker room for quotes. It's a waste most of the time." Bam. Fired.
   35. Dale Sams Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:00 PM (#4220162)
You know, NY has had a ton of injuries too, just like Boston...of course, NYs back-up plan isn't Nick Punto.
   36. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:02 PM (#4220166)
...And indeed, there was something about Soriano’s blown save that felt rather ominous — and it had nothing to do with his no-show in the clubhouse.


The most ominous thing about that ninth inning last night was that it raised the possibility that the line drive off Soriano's pitching hand the in Sunday's game in Cleveland was more serious than it'd appeared at the time.

----------------------------------------------------------

You need quotes to help describe the key moment of the game.

If a writer or TV man can't describe the key moment of a game in far more eloquent words than the player, he shouldn't have been hired in the first place. 99 times out of 100 all you're going to get out of a player is a filibuster of meaningless cliches that you can cut and paste from a hundred free websites.
   37. Smiling Joe Hesketh Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:03 PM (#4220168)
Bah, Nick Punto was never a backup plan.

The Sox have not had their projected starting lineup together for a single game this year.

Obviously this is all Valentine's fault. I'm in favor of loading him into a spaceship and firing him off in the general direction of the sun.
   38. Smiling Joe Hesketh Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:05 PM (#4220171)
If I were a player I'd fill out a MadLibs and leave it for the reporters.

I ______ my pitch. (missed/didn't make/overthrew).

He put a good ________ on it (swing/charge/spin)

Bobby Valentine is a ________ (dink/pocket dictator/history's greatest monster).

Done. Head home and the reporters have their pablum. Everyone's happy.
   39. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:08 PM (#4220174)
Yes, no one really has an obligation to answer questions


I'm not sure about this. Isn't it in the team rules somewhere? The same place that establishes the clubhouse as off-limits but the locker room as OK for reporters?

Regardless, if an organized group of players gave a longstanding cold shoulder to the local press, I think the manager would come down on them.
   40. Benji Gil Gamesh Rises Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:09 PM (#4220176)
But for as whacked out as journalism admittedly is, it is part of the reality of being a professional athlete. Soriano ignored that reality last night, and had he succeeded, he would have accepted that reality. Accepting reality, no matter the outcome, is a sign of maturity.


And as whacked out as professional athletes sometimes are, they are part of the reality of being a journalist. Harper ignored that reality last night, and had he succeeded in getting a meaningless and uninteresting quote, he would have accepted that reality.

And no, I don't care that Soriano makes a gazillion more dollars than Harper. Writing a hatchet piece like this is a much greater sin than failing to speak to reporters.

And finally, 99% of the time, I simply do not give a #### about quotes in game stories, and I really don't think many other people do either.
   41. SoSH U at work Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:14 PM (#4220181)
I'm not sure about this. Isn't it in the team rules somewhere? The same place that establishes the clubhouse as off-limits but the locker room as OK for reporters?


On an individual level? No. Players are under no obligations to answer questions.* Steve Carlton went a decade without speaking to the press and suffered no league consequences. (He later revealed, if Pat Jordan is to be believed, that he was doing us all a favor through his silence).

If a team decided en masse to stop talking to reporters (which i believe has happened), the FO or league will likely step in.

* Now teams may take a player who's gone quiet and try to talk him out of it. And if you're Willie Bloomquist, you're probably not afforded the opportunity. But if you're Steve Carlton good, you can clam up for as long as you can get guys out.
   42. Morph Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:19 PM (#4220183)
People seem to get really emotional about sports journalism.
   43. Devin has a deep burning passion for fuzzy socks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:23 PM (#4220188)
This was just a bad day for the Daily News. You also had Filip Bondy saying there's nothing interesting about the U.S. Open except for the Williams sisters, and Dick Weiss devoting an entire column to complaining about Penn State not playing "Sweet Caroline" at football game any more.

At least there was no Lupica column in the sports section.
   44. BDC Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:24 PM (#4220190)
Steve Carlton went a decade without speaking to the press

Albert Belle wasn't talking, either, for much of his career. I remember, during my brief window as a credentialed columnist, walking into the Orioles' clubhouse and being surprised that Albert Belle was talking to teammates and staff like any other player, being a perfectly nice guy. From reports, you'd have figured that he sat silent in a corner, brooding menacingly.
   45. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:25 PM (#4220195)
I think Erik is right though I don't think it's a particularly enforced rule.

Look, if Soriano was particularly nasty in blowing off the press, then I think it's fair to be critical, if Jeter or another teammate(s) had said "wow, this is bullshit that Raffy won't answer those questions" again, fair enough. Otherwise, I find this to be whining of the highest order.

Peter Abraham does this in Boston. I swear he doesn't care what guys say but he goes out of his way to let us know when someone speaks or doesn't speak. It's pretty uninteresting stuff.

I get where Matt Waters is coming from on this. The writers are held accountable for this stuff to their editors and that sucks for them. That doesn't mean it's meaningful to the rest of us though.
   46. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:25 PM (#4220196)
And don’t get this wrong: it’s not a media issue, it’s an accountability issue. It’s about being a professional in a clubhouse that has oozed professionalism since the day Derek Jeter showed up some 16 years ago.


The reason this makes no sense is that the word "accountability" is out of place here. Everyone could see that Soriano blew the save, so him standing up and saying "Yes, I blew the save" is of no moment.

What is he supposed to do, act like Dennis Rodman did when Rodman's wife found him in bed with another woman, and be like "Huh? There's no girl here in the bed with me. Your eyes are deceiving you."

"What are you talking about? I didn't blow the save; we won."
   47. Randy Jones Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:28 PM (#4220198)
Peter Abraham does this in Boston. I swear he doesn't care what guys say but he goes out of his way to let us know when someone speaks or doesn't speak. It's pretty uninteresting stuff.


That's because Pete Abraham is a total no talent assclown. So glad he is covering the Red Sox now and not the Yankees.
   48. Dale Sams Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:32 PM (#4220202)
Peter Abraham does this in Boston


"I chased Beckett's car down the street! Can you believe that?"
   49. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:40 PM (#4220214)
What is he supposed to do

Answer questions from the press like a professional. It's part of his job.
   50. Smiling Joe Hesketh Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:45 PM (#4220217)
No it is not.
   51. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:45 PM (#4220219)
I think Erik is right though I don't think it's a particularly enforced rule.



I'm getting a tattoo that says this.
   52. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:54 PM (#4220229)
No. His job was to pitch. He did that.
   53. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:56 PM (#4220234)
"What are you talking about? I didn't blow the save; we won."
This would be the greatest interview technique in history. Absolute denial of all failures. "Boy, that ball Rasmus hit really gave me a scare but Andruw made a great play on it."
   54. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:57 PM (#4220236)
No it is not.


Yes, it is -- certainly implicitly and likely in the standard player contract. All you guys are doing is writing out of the baseball business the parts you don't like, but that isn't reality.(*)

The free publicity teams and players get from the NY Daily Newses of the world is an invaluable part of the business model of a major league baseball organization.

(*) In something of a whiny, footstomping way -- "My heroes don't have to do anything they don't want to do -- so there!!!!"
   55. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 01:58 PM (#4220237)
No. His job was to pitch. He did that.

In fanboy fantasyland, yes. In the real world, no.
   56. Dale H. Posted: August 28, 2012 at 02:03 PM (#4220245)
If I were a player I'd fill out a MadLibs and leave it for the reporters.

I ______ my pitch. (missed/didn't make/overthrew).

He put a good ________ on it (swing/charge/spin)

Bobby Valentine is a ________ (dink/pocket dictator/history's greatest monster).

You forgot to end it with "Cliche ... Cliche ... Another cliche. Gotta go!"
   57. Bruce Markusen Posted: August 28, 2012 at 02:23 PM (#4220269)
Matt, I am in complete agreement with you. The hostility expressed toward beat writers trying to get a quote or two from a key player after a game has long been an unfortunate and mean-spirited theme here at BTF.

Players are never the ones in the wrong here, it's always the blasted mainstream media.
   58. Nasty Nate Posted: August 28, 2012 at 02:28 PM (#4220274)
The hostility expressed toward beat writers trying to get a quote or two from a key player after a game has long been an unfortunate and mean-spirited theme here at BTF.


The hostility is not for trying to get quotes, it's for writing hatchet jobs like this one in the face of a 'no comment.' This article on Soriano seems more mean-spirited than any scoffing at media complaints.
   59. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 02:30 PM (#4220278)
{i]Players are never the ones in the wrong here, it's always the blasted mainstream media.


It's a mixture of fanboyism and the school of thought exalting "analysis" as the dominant form of baseball writing and coverage.

Neither is particularly appealing or persuasive.
   60. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:05 PM (#4220323)
It wasn't "no comment," Soriano just left the clubhouse.

Soaking up the adulation of the press when things go well, but fleeing when they don't is rather gutless.
   61. Nasty Nate Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:07 PM (#4220327)
It wasn't "no comment," Soriano just left the clubhouse.


same exact thing
   62. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:26 PM (#4220347)
same exact thing

Nope. Then the writer can't say something like, "When asked about the pitch to _________, Soriano refused to comment."(*)

(*) Or, "said 'no comment'".
   63. The Yankee Clapper Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:29 PM (#4220352)
He was gone before the Yankees’ PR people could even find him to ask if he would answer questions from the media.

Probably had to visit a sick friend in the hospital.
   64. Bob Tufts Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:33 PM (#4220357)
It's easy to talk to the press (and make their job easier) when you win. Getting in front of a microphone and camera after you screwed up - well, it takes awhile to get your head together and be calm and coherent.

I came into a game and gave up an Astroturf-aided bloop triple to right field by Jim Gantner that cleared the bases and put Milwaukee ahead 7-4. I was asked a question after the game and said "If I come in and don't get the lefties out, it's a knife in the back to my team".

Be truthful, be honest - and publicly take ownership of your error as much as you want to take credit for the victory. Also realize that "sports journalism" is akin to the old George Carlin routine where he mentions "jumbo shrimp" and "military intelligence".
   65. Dangerous Dean Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:46 PM (#4220381)
I was never a good enough baseball player to even have realistic fantasies about making a MLB team. But if I had, I would have known that it would be my job to talk to the media after games. They'd want to know what pitch I hit out for the big homer and I imagine that I would have been pretty good at those quotes. I can imagine, too, that if I had grounded a mistake pitch into a game-ending double play with the winning runs in scoring position they'd ask why I miss such a hittable pitch. Sure the 1st scenario is easier than the 2nd, but they'd BOTH be part of my job. Part of being a professional athelete is answering those questions.
   66. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:57 PM (#4220398)
There's obviously an arrangement between ballclubs and media. They need each other, and to that end, the ballplayers' end of the bargain is to help promote the team, through cooperation with the media. That that has to include "facing the music" after a frustrating failure is something I don't agree with. There are plenty of opportunities for writers to get quotes from players beyond these situations.

But, it's a competitive world, and like the company that made 20% gains this quarter last year, this year they have to make 10% more than that this quarter or else the sky will fall, the same goes for reporting. So sad. They need to provoke the reader more than the last time. It sucks.
   67. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 03:58 PM (#4220404)
By the way, I'm pretty sure this is the second time we've had this stupid argument about Soriano. Clearly, the man doesn't like to talk after he blows it.
   68. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:00 PM (#4220413)
Here we go, Joel Sherman writing--more or less--the exact same column in April 2011: Soriano's silent treatment speaks volumes

EDIT: Incidentally, I remember that game. It made me, at the time, apocalyptically angry.
   69. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:02 PM (#4220415)
Clearly, the man doesn't like to talk after he blows it.

Which is why, as the Daily News noted, he's unprofessional. I'd add "gutless," but I can see why the Daily News wouldn't use that word.
   70. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:08 PM (#4220423)
Matt, I am in complete agreement with you. The hostility expressed toward beat writers trying to get a quote or two from a key player after a game has long been an unfortunate and mean-spirited theme here at BTF.

Players are never the ones in the wrong here, it's always the blasted mainstream media.


A quote from a defeated Soriano that says "You're right; I blew the game" serves utterly no purpose, and is demanded by the media only as an attempt to bring the player to his knees before the morally superior media and fans, and acknowledge that he has a character flaw because he got beat by other players in the league.

And if he doesn't capitulate, he is attacked.

If you're a fan who needs such a quote from him after the game, you deserve pity, and you have mine.
   71. AJMcCringleberry Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:11 PM (#4220424)
People who care that a player didn't talk to the media: The media
People who don't care: Everyone else
   72. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:17 PM (#4220427)
A quote from a defeated Soriano that says "You're right; I blew the game" serves utterly no purpose,

It serves a lot of purpose. It adds color to a newspaper story about a major league baseball game and a well-written story about a major league baseball game has a lot of value to a lot of people. Just because you want to reduce Soriano's effort to "He pitched 1 inning and gave up 3 runs," and denude it of all context and color doesn't mean everybody else does. And, in fact, very few people do.

And if he doesn't capitulate, he is attacked.

Boo-#######-hoo.

People who care that a player didn't talk to the media: The media
People who don't care: Everyone else


I think you mean:

People who care about things I don't care about: Nobody.
People who care about things I care about: Everybody.
   73. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:23 PM (#4220432)
How about this: You shouldn't care about things I don't care about, and you suck if you do?

Obviously, I'm kidding, but I disagree with you. I don't find his talking to the media after failure gutless. He's a ballplayer, not a public speaker, and maybe he's afraid of saying something that will make his life more difficult. I'd rather he said nothing than some pre-fabbed canned statement fed to him by a PR expert. And a "no comment" is unnecessary, to me, for reasons Ray spelled out earlier.
   74. The Long Arm of Rudy Law Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:27 PM (#4220437)
"What are you talking about? I didn't blow the save; we won."


With that, he would become my favorite player.
   75. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:29 PM (#4220440)
He's a ballplayer, not a public speaker,

But he's a "public speaker" when things go well. It's not failing to speak to the press that makes him gutless; it's failing to speak to the press only when he ##### up.
   76. DKDC Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:29 PM (#4220443)
I was never a good enough baseball player to even have realistic fantasies about making a MLB team.


That says more about your imagination than your talent. I haven’t played organized baseball in over 13 years, but I still haven’t given up the dream.
   77. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:38 PM (#4220450)
It serves a lot of purpose.


Yes, but not in the way you think.

This is about bringing the person to his knees. And weak-minded people feel better about themselves if a person is brought to his knees before them. The fact that the person's "crime" is that he didn't perform in a baseball game makes the behavior from these people all the more sad. They have elevated the importance of a baseball game in their life to an unhealthy, pathetic state. (At least, the fans have. The media figure is just being a jackass in order to make his column sound interesting because he's not talented enough to write about something better. And he gets the added benefit of seeming Important to pathetic fans.)

This is what the Red Sox collapse was about last September for a lot of people. Players were treated with scorn, because they were eating chicken wings or drinking beer on their off day. And they had the temerity - the unmitigated gall - to lose.


   78. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:52 PM (#4220470)
This is about bringing the person to his knees.

No, it's about getting a baseball player to provide a quote about a baseball game. The purpose of doing that is as stated in 72, above.

They have elevated the importance of a baseball game in their life to an unhealthy, pathetic state.

It's their job to write about baseball games; it pays their bills, feeds and educates their children, and keeps the engine of consumption purring.

Nor is writing about baseball games anything to apologize for; it's a perfectly decent and honorable pursuit with a long and commendable lineage. It's more likely that you are struggling with the issues of relative self-worth you're projecting onto them. Everything in your worldview seems to reduce to a fierce, practically twilight, struggle between the deserving and the undeserving -- certainly you insist that all social relations be deconstructed by that template.

And you have the inherent worth completely backward -- the man who can merely throw a baseball fast offers less than the man who can write stories people want to read, and far more closely approaches the state you've called unhealthy and pathetic.(*) It's not really even a close call.

(*) Reading and writing being far more lofty and noble pastimes and talents than throwing a ball and passively watching people throw a ball.
   79. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:56 PM (#4220477)
Nor is writing about baseball games anything to apologize for; it's a perfectly decent and honorable pursuit with a long and commendable lineage. It's more likely that you are struggling with the issues of relative self-worth you're projecting onto them. Everything in your worldview seems to reduce to a fierce struggle between the deserving and the undeserving -- certainly you insist that all social relations be deconstructed by that template.


To the extent Soriano could expound on what pitches he was trying to throw and whether they hit the right location, etc., that might have been mildly interesting. (And even there, "I made good pitches and they just hit them" doesn't always fly - see Ian Kennedy.) But this wasn't about that. It was about "accountability." Literally standing in front of his locker and taking #### for pitching poorly.

   80. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2012 at 04:56 PM (#4220480)
He's not hired as a public speaker, so there's where we disagree.

Ray, I think the writers deserve some sympathy here. I think they're pressured from above to get the controversial comment.
   81. Bob Tufts Posted: August 28, 2012 at 05:18 PM (#4220509)
Soriano could have used this handy cheat sheet.

From baseballalmanac - Reporter responses by Phillies pitcher Don Carman from 1990 that he posted on his locker:

1. I'm just glad to be here. I just want to help the club any way I can.
2. Baseball's a funny game.
3. I'd rather be lucky than good.
4. We're going to take the season one game at a time.
5. You're only as good as your last game (last at-bat).
6. This game has really changed.
7. If we stay healthy we should be right there.
8. It takes 24 (25) players.
9. We need two more players to take us over the top: Babe Ruth & Lou Gehrig.
10. We have a different hero every day.
11. We'll get 'em tomorrow.
12. This team seems ready to gel.
13. With a couple breaks, we win that game.
14. That All-Star voting is a joke.
15. The catcher and I were on the same wavelength.
16. I just went right at 'em.
17. I did my best and that's all I can do.
18. You just can't pitch behind.
19. That's the name of the game.
20. We've got to have fun.
21. I didn't have my good stuff, but I battled 'em.
22. Give the guy some credit; he hit a good pitch.
23. He, we were due to catch a break or two.
24. Yes.
25. No.
26. That's why they pay him _____ million dollars.
27. Even I could have hit that pitch.
28. I know you are but what am I?
29. I was getting my off-speed stuff over so they couldn't sit on the fastball.
30. I had my at 'em ball going today.
31. I had some great plays made behind me tonight.
32. I couldn't have done it without my teammates.
33. You saw it... write it.
34. I just wanted to go as hard as I could as long as I could.
35. I'm seeing the ball real good.
36. I hit that ball good.
37. I don't get paid to hit.
   82. Benji Gil Gamesh Rises Posted: August 28, 2012 at 07:12 PM (#4220645)
The hostility is not for trying to get quotes, it's for writing hatchet jobs like this one in the face of a 'no comment.' This article on Soriano seems more mean-spirited than any scoffing at media complaints.
This. THIS. THIS!
   83. dr. scott Posted: August 28, 2012 at 07:18 PM (#4220652)
This is understandable, but blaming the player for the stupidity of the editor doesn't make much sense to me


Well, it may not be logical out of context, but as others have stated, in general you will always do better in your job by crapping on the people below and doing what your boss wants than the other way around... no matter how stupid your boss is.

My wife, bless her heart, still has trouble with this one. After 10 years on the job since grad school, im just now figuring this out. Turns out asking questions in all hands meetings that make your CEO look stupid, is not a good promotion strategy, no matter how many people give you secret high faves afterwards.

   84. Walt Davis Posted: August 28, 2012 at 07:53 PM (#4220679)
it’s not a media issue, it’s an accountability issue.

Hilaripus.

Ray, I think the writers deserve some sympathy here. I think they're pressured from above to get the controversial comment.

Writer, pressured from above to ask dumb questions and then to write defamatory articles if they don't get answers, deserves our sympathy.

Player, pressured from above and from media and possibly from teammates to answer dumb questions chooses not to ... gutless.

Sure, makes perfect sense.

As to "professional" -- yes, it can generally be considered part of the modern pro athlete's job to speak to the media. That doesn't mean they have to speak to them every time, answer every question or go in front of the media when they're agitated in some way (pissed at themselves, pissed at the umpire, etc.).

If Soriano never speaks to the media, you could call that unprofessional. If Soriano sometimes chooses not to speak to the media, that's not unprofessional.

For a writer to pen a hatchet job about Soriano because he wasn't available to answer questions is unethical and therefore highly unprofessional.

But, ohhh, his mean editor made him do it. Fine, the editor is unethical and unprofessional. And the publisher. But hopefully it helped keep a few of those meagre ad dollars rolling in which makes it OK.
   85. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2012 at 07:59 PM (#4220681)
I never said the player was gutless. I defended Soriano.
   86. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:09 PM (#4220768)
I never read those standard game-recap-with-player-and-manager-quotes-type newspaper articles any more, so can someone please tell me if Soriano is a good quote when he wins?
   87. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:20 PM (#4220773)
I can't recall ever reading a Soriano quote
   88. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:22 PM (#4220775)
I can't recall ever reading a Soriano quote

"Low and outside is my pitch, so that's what I swing at."
   89. Bruce Markusen Posted: August 28, 2012 at 10:51 PM (#4220801)
As much as poor Soriano is being defended here, the reality is that some (if not most) of the Yankee players get ticked when a player doesn't make himself available to the media when things go bad. That's been the Yankee clubhouse culture for a long time, going back to Joe Torre.

So while Soriano's disappearing act matters little to the people here, it does matter to the Yankee players.
   90. bobm Posted: August 28, 2012 at 11:02 PM (#4220804)
2012-2016 BASIC AGREEMENT ...

ATTACHMENT 34
REGULAR SEASON
CLUB/MEDIA REGULATIONS

The following are Major League Baseball’s regulations for Club/
Media Relations. They are to be observed by all parties:


1. All accredited press, radio and TV representatives shall have pregame
access to the clubhouse from three hours and 30 minutes
prior to game time until one hour prior to game time, except that:
(a) the media shall not have access to the clubhouse when a club
is on the field for batting practice; and (b) the media may not
return to a clubhouse once a club has taken batting practice. The
media shall have pre-game access to the clubhouse for a minimum
of 50 minutes prior to the time that a Club mandates that all players
take the field for batting practice or other related activities
(e.g., stretching). If a Club does not take batting practice, it may
not close the clubhouse until the media has been granted a minimum
of 50 minutes of access. Unless necessary to satisfy the
50-minute requirement, no Club may provide pre-game access
prior to three hours and 30 minutes prior to game time. The media
shall have access (outside of the clubhouse) to the Club’s manager,
players or coaches after batting practice to discuss newsworthy
events (such as lineup changes, injuries, and workouts) that
occur after the clubhouse closes.
2. Absent unusual circumstances that require a team meeting immediately
following a game, the working media shall have access to
both clubhouses no later than 10 minutes following the final out
of each game (including doubleheaders and day/night split admission
games). When such unusual circumstances exist, and such
instances are expected to be rare, the working media shall have
access to the clubhouse no later than 20 minutes following the
final out of the game. The Commissioner’s Office reserves the
right to require access to the clubhouse 10 minutes following the
final out of all games if the “team meeting” exception is abused.

3. The working media’s access following a game shall be for a
period no longer than one hour unless reasonable access to players
is not provided during that time; provided, however, that cardcarrying
members of the Baseball Writers Association of America
(“BBWAA”) will have unlimited access after the post-game opening
of the clubhouse. If reasonable access is not provided, the
clubhouse must remain open. Members of the media, other than
BBWAA members, may make arrangements with the club PR
Director for extended access.
4. Media credentials are not transferable.
5. Clubhouses, the dugouts and the field are off-limits except to
appropriate club, Commissioner’s Office personnel and media
bearing appropriate credentials. Club credentials are not to be
issued to unauthorized personnel. The Commissioner’s Office
reserves the right to revoke inappropriately issued credentials.
6. Players will be available to the media before and after games for
interviews. These periods should not be limited except for the pregame
period described in #1 above, and the post-game period
described in #2, above. Upon request by the media, players who
had key roles in the first game of a doubleheader are to be made
available for a time between games.

7. The trainer’s room and players’ lounge may be off-limits to the
media, but each club controls these areas, and it is vital these areas
not be used as a sanctuary for players seeking to avoid the media.
It is very important to our game that ALL players are available to
the media for reasonable periods and it is the player’s responsibility
to cooperate.
8. Ropes or other restraining barriers are not permitted to bar the
media.
9. A general code is to be observed by the media so uniformed personnel
may do their work unimpeded. Media are to be allowed in
foul territory, in an unrestricted manner, in an area that is to be not
less than the territory between first and third bases, and which territory
includes the area around the batting cage, except the dirt
area around the batting cage.
10. Under no circumstances shall any club discriminate in any fashion
against an accredited member of the media based upon race,
creed, sex or national origin.
11. Physical abuse or threats directed to members of the media
(and/or official scorers) by baseball personnel will not be tolerated.
Disciplinary action, including fines and suspensions, will be
considered in any cases that arise. While in the clubhouse, members
of the media are expected to be doing business. Members of
the media are expected to conduct themselves in a professional
manner and to respect the privileges and environment of restricted
areas and working press areas at all times. Any media member in
violation of this conduct policy is subject to revocation of his or
her privileges and may be subject to immediate ejection.
12. Visitors in the clubhouse, including accredited media members,
should conduct themselves in a professional manner. There shall
be no seeking of autographs, no touching or removing of equipment
or personal items from lockers, and no sampling of players’
food spreads. Clubhouses are work places. Clubhouse business
should be conducted as expeditiously as possible with a minimum
of disruption of regular game routines. Members of the media
should not excessively linger in the clubhouse when not interviewing
players. Members of the media who violate the code of
conduct set forth in this paragraph shall be subject to sanctions,
including the loss of their accreditation as provided for in paragraph
17 below.
13. Live TV and/or radio interviews with uniformed personnel during
the course of a game are not authorized or permitted, nor is attaching
a microphone to any uniformed personnel permitted without
approval from the Commissioner’s Office. Microphones may not
be placed in or adjacent to dugouts and/or bullpens in a manner
that will allow uniformed personnel’s remarks or conversations to
be overheard during the course of a game without the prior
approval of the Commissioner’s Office.
14. Live telephone interviews are not allowed from the clubhouse or
the field without prior approval of the club. Mobile telephones
with digital photography capabilities are prohibited.
15. Telephones from both dugouts to the press box are to be maintained
in working order for the purpose of providing information
regarding special circumstances to the media during the course of
a game. Explanations of injuries should be made as soon as possible
(to both the media and fans in the stadium).
16. BBWAA members are not required to sign in for clubhouse or
other restricted area access but may be logged in by club personnel,
subject to individual club policies. Other accredited media
may be required to sign in for clubhouse access, subject to individual
club policies.
17. Any club whose personnel violate these regulations will be disciplined.
Any member of the media who violates these regulations
will lose his or her accreditation.
[Emphasis added]


AND:

SCHEDULE A
MAJOR LEAGUE
UNIFORM PLAYER’S CONTRACT ...

Baseball Promotion
3.(b) In addition to his services in connection with the actual playing of
baseball, the Player agrees to cooperate with the Club and participate in
any and all reasonable promotional activities of the Club and Major
League Baseball, which, in the opinion of the Club, will promote the
welfare of the Club or professional baseball, and to observe and comply
with all reasonable requirements of the Club respecting conduct and
service of its team and its players, at all times whether on or off the field.


http://mlbplayers.mlb.com/pa/pdf/cba_english.pdf
   91. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2012 at 11:49 PM (#4220821)
As much as poor Soriano is being defended here, the reality is that some (if not most) of the Yankee players get ticked when a player doesn't make himself available to the media when things go bad. That's been the Yankee clubhouse culture for a long time, going back to Joe Torre.


From what I can tell, this is a fiction created by the media.

What has happened to Soriano here is a microcosm of what happened to the Red Sox after last year's collapse: They lost ballgames. So they were bad people.
   92. Lassus Posted: August 29, 2012 at 12:18 AM (#4220835)
From what I can tell, this is a fiction created by the media.

As Bruce has interacted with players, and the media, and has for years, and is, well, a bit of a curmudgeon himself, I'm going to trust his reports on this one.
   93. Smitty* Posted: August 29, 2012 at 12:25 AM (#4220842)
On the point of soriano's absence causing a nuisance for teammates: if Jeter is the leader he's made out in the press to be then this shouldn't be a problem. Talking to the press is not Soriano's main job function. Pitching is. If skipping out if talking to the press after a bad game helps him deal with the stress of the job better, than a leader like should be glad to cover for him. I face analogous situations all the time in my job. I'm in a non-management leadership position. Sometimes that means stepping in to talk to clients (a non-primary job function of the people I'm leading) in situations where the conversation can't be handled by the project's lead, for a variety of potential reasons. I never mind doing this, because it helps my teammates handle their primary job function better.
   94. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 29, 2012 at 12:29 AM (#4220844)
if Jeter is the leader he's made out in the press to be then this shouldn't be a problem.


Agreed, but Jeter was already shown not to be such a leader, almost a decade ago when ARod joined the team.
   95. Smitty* Posted: August 29, 2012 at 01:07 AM (#4220865)
Ray,
Fair enough. If he's not such a leader, he shouldn't portrayed as such
   96. bigglou115 Posted: August 29, 2012 at 01:13 AM (#4220870)
So while Soriano's disappearing act matters little to the people here, it does matter to the Yankee players.


I'm fine with it if the players want to hold Soriano accountable, or even if the fact that Soriano irks his fellow players by dodging the media becomes a story on its own. This story is not framed in those terms, its framed in terms of Soriano not allowing himself to be held accountable to the media. Soriano doesn't owe the media anything.

That said, I'm very sympathetic to the idea that the system creates this situation where if a player doesn't talk the writer almost has to call him out on it because otherwise he can't appease the men upstairs. I can feel bad for a guy, and still wish that he had the moral fortitude to stand up against a dumb system.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Martin Hemner
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogFG: Brian McCann Probably Couldn’t Be Given Away For Free
(12 - 4:06pm, Aug 21)
Last: catomi01

NewsblogOT: Politics, August 2014: DNC criticizes Christie’s economic record with baseball video
(4763 - 4:05pm, Aug 21)
Last: Ray (RDP)

NewsblogMegdal: Humble shortstop Marty Marion should be in Hall contention
(30 - 4:02pm, Aug 21)
Last: Yeaarrgghhhh

NewsblogPosnanski: The Royals might actually know what they are doing
(70 - 3:58pm, Aug 21)
Last: SoSHially Unacceptable

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread August, 2014
(467 - 3:58pm, Aug 21)
Last: Mefisto

NewsblogCubs place struggling Edwin Jackson on the disabled list
(2 - 3:58pm, Aug 21)
Last: Brian C

NewsblogLA Times: Angels' Garrett Richards Suffers Knee Injury in Win Over Red Sox
(39 - 3:47pm, Aug 21)
Last: Cargo Cultist

NewsblogOMNICHATTER 8-21-2014
(17 - 3:46pm, Aug 21)
Last: Every Inge Counts

NewsblogNick Swisher undergoes surgery, is out for the year
(5 - 3:41pm, Aug 21)
Last: Bug Selig

NewsblogCurt Schilling Reveals He Was Diagnosed With Mouth Cancer in February, Believes Chewing Tobacco Was the Cause
(33 - 3:33pm, Aug 21)
Last: Bug Selig

NewsblogGiants plan to protest bizarre loss at Wrigley
(90 - 2:43pm, Aug 21)
Last: Charles S. will not yield to this monkey court

NewsblogAstros slugger Chris Carter: The most 2014 player of 2014
(10 - 2:38pm, Aug 21)
Last: The District Attorney

NewsblogKepner (NYT): Astros’ Jose Altuve Doesn’t Let Height Be a Disadvantage
(35 - 2:11pm, Aug 21)
Last: silhouetted by the sea

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread - August 2014
(280 - 1:35pm, Aug 21)
Last: Gold Star - just Gold Star

NewsblogIwakuma gives Mariners a second true ace
(27 - 1:33pm, Aug 21)
Last: The District Attorney

Page rendered in 0.5807 seconds
52 querie(s) executed