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Sunday, February 03, 2013

Raissman: With A-Rod drama, Yanks need to focus on Jeter’s comeback

Woodrow Lafayette Pershing Truesmith: “Did you ever see a statue blow over?” (re: Broken not Bracken file)

The organization has Derek Jeter to lead it out of this mess with Alex Rodriguez.

The captain’s presence and persona are uplifting. They can cleanse any muck surrounding the organization. In order for fans to keep the faith, they need a reason to believe, a face they can trust. Jeter, the transcendent one, is that man.

“Invariably consumers turn to sports for relief and distraction from life’s problems and setbacks,” said a network executive with ties to baseball. “Alex’s woes are not exactly uplifting. The Yankees should embrace Derek Jeter’s image, wrap their corporate arms around it. He is going to be huge for them on so many levels going forward this season.”

...The focus must be on Jeter. The story of his comeback, the story of the old guy trying to extend his career at a high level, is more than compelling, especially with all the doubters chiming in. Yankee fans will once again want to see Jeter stick it to everyone. They will pay to see it. Then again, Jeter was always an attraction. This will only magnify his presence, which will also be of great value to the suits running YES. They should ride Jeter and promote — ad nauseam — the story of his comeback.

Jeter has an $8 million player option for 2014. His last negotiation was a bitter one. It included a media backlash, with Jeter being accused of wanting to be paid “because he’s Derek Jeter.” Jeter has lived up to his contract. The next time around, it’s worth considering his value as the face of the franchise. It must be factored in. His contract would be a bargain.

The Yankees need Derek Jeter.

For moments like these.

Repoz Posted: February 03, 2013 at 10:04 AM | 57 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: yankees

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   1. Dale Sams Posted: February 03, 2013 at 11:09 AM (#4360997)
"What is the secret of the Grail? Who does it serve?"

Gardner: You, my lord.

"Who am I?"

Gardner: You are my lord and king. You are Jeter.

"Have you found the secret that I have lost? "

Gardner: Yes, you and the land are one.
   2. Koot Posted: February 03, 2013 at 11:17 AM (#4360999)
I have never understood how Jeter has such a hold over everyone in the media. It's like listening to a teenage girl talk about the boy she has a crush on. Except the media has been doing this for 15 years, and teenage girls grow up.
   3. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 03, 2013 at 11:37 AM (#4361009)
I have never understood how Jeter has such a hold over everyone in the media. It's like listening to a teenage girl talk about the boy she has a crush on. Except the media has been doing this for 15 years, and teenage girls grow up.

The media love narratives, and Jeter's got a great one. You just notice it more because the Yankees are on national TV so much more than any other team, and he's been an everyday presence in the lineup for the past 17 years, and in the postseason in 16 of them. Cal Ripken used to get the exact same treatment every time the Orioles were on FOX or ESPN. Mo gets it just as much today, in proportion to the number of innings he appears on the screen.
   4. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2013 at 11:46 AM (#4361012)
What narrative does Jeter have? He doesn't do anything but bang hot women and leave them fruit baskets the next morning!
   5. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 03, 2013 at 12:02 PM (#4361018)
If being the recipient of more BTF snark per season isn't proof of Da Power of Da Jeter Narrative, you might want to ask Repoz why he keeps posting all these articles.
   6. AJMcCringleberry Posted: February 03, 2013 at 12:12 PM (#4361021)
The story of his comeback, the story of the old guy trying to extend his career at a high level,

Isn't this ARod's story too?
   7. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: February 03, 2013 at 12:38 PM (#4361044)
The story of his comeback, the story of the old guy trying to extend his career at a high level,

Isn't this ARod's story too?


Except that people see Jeter as having done things the right way, and ARod - very often - has been seen as doing things the wrong way.

I'm not fan of ARod, but even I'll have to acknowledge what a remarkable talent he's been. He's just really hard to like.

   8. michaelplank has knowledgeable eyes Posted: February 03, 2013 at 12:52 PM (#4361061)
“Invariably consumers turn to sports for relief and distraction from life’s problems and setbacks,” said a network executive with ties to baseball. “Alex’s woes are not exactly uplifting. The Yankees should embrace Derek Jeter’s image, wrap their corporate arms around it. He is going to be huge for them on so many levels going forward this season.”


Was there some particular reason this guy needed anonymity?
   9. Rough Carrigan Posted: February 03, 2013 at 12:59 PM (#4361069)
The captain’s presence and persona are uplifting. They can cleanse any muck surrounding the organization


I hope Raissman isn't a hypocrite. If he sneers at someone bringing their sick mother to Lourdes or venerating an image of the virgin Mary that seems to appear in a piece of toast he should be reminded that his near worship of Jeter is barely any less silly.
   10. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 03, 2013 at 01:04 PM (#4361076)
What narrative does Jeter have?

I agree. I'm a Yankee fan, have watched him since he came up, and I don't care for Jeter.

   11. Ray (RDP) Posted: February 03, 2013 at 01:18 PM (#4361087)
Many of us noted at the time that Jeter never offered to move off the position so that the better shortstop could play there. For the good of the team.

It was Evil ARod who moved to third, and Sheffield - not The Captain - who offered.
   12. bobm Posted: February 03, 2013 at 01:27 PM (#4361099)
Many of us noted at the time that Jeter never offered to move off the position so that the better shortstop could play there. For the good of the team.

It was Evil ARod who moved to third, and Sheffield - not The Captain - who offered.


Exactly. Some "Captain"
   13. Lassus Posted: February 03, 2013 at 01:29 PM (#4361102)
Jeter sincerely cannot be the most important thing the Yankees need to focus on this year.
   14. escabeche Posted: February 03, 2013 at 01:29 PM (#4361103)
Question: if Jeter is implicated in PED use, does NY media turn on him, or is that the point where "no big, everybody did it" takes over?
   15. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2013 at 01:38 PM (#4361119)
They would turn on him ferociously.
   16. Ray (RDP) Posted: February 03, 2013 at 01:57 PM (#4361135)
But I do think "no big deal, everybody did it" is where this is all headed, eventually.

And ultimately to "yeah, society has accepted growth hormone and these other substances for health/anti-aging purposes, so we don't care about this stuff anymore."
   17. Morph Posted: February 03, 2013 at 02:02 PM (#4361140)
Many of us noted at the time that Jeter never offered to move off the position so that the better shortstop could play there. For the good of the team.

It was Evil ARod who moved to third, and Sheffield - not The Captain - who offered.


A-Rod's lower-body may have fallen apart even quicker if he continued playing shortstop.

I've never thought this situation was as black and white as many of the posters on BTF construed. Rodriguez was a much better athlete than Jeter back in '04, and the transition to third-base may have been easier for him. Jeter has a slow first step, and the Yankees may have taken that into consideration and not even broached the idea of him switching positions. So, what then? Should the Yankees have moved Jeter to second-base, where he had no experience? Would they risk him getting injured learning the pivot? What else? Move him to center? Lofton and Bernie were competing for the position that Spring Training.

The idea that Jeter had some kind of moral failing because he didn't want to give up his position is ridiculous. The Yankees had won five pennants and four World Series titles with Jeter playing short. I think he could be forgiven for thinking he had something to do with it.
   18. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2013 at 02:05 PM (#4361142)
My favorite line from the movie The Other Guys is the background line of "You shoulda shot ARod!"
   19. Dale Sams Posted: February 03, 2013 at 02:25 PM (#4361153)
Question: if Jeter is implicated in PED use, does NY media turn on him, or is that the point where "no big, everybody did it" takes over?


I think it would be more "Baseball is doooooomed"...and actually I think attendance would take a hit.
   20. The District Attorney Posted: February 03, 2013 at 02:26 PM (#4361154)
Move him to center? Lofton and Bernie were competing for the position that Spring Training.
Bernie was no longer defensively adequate in CF, and surely a 37-year-old, no-longer-all-that-great Kenny Lofton would have been happy to be the fourth OF on a defending AL champion, super-loaded team.

"The Yankees" should have moved Jeter to CF for A-Rod. But I can't blame that on Jeter unless someone in the know reports that that's how it went down. It's entirely possible that one or both of A-Rod and the front office thought Jeter at SS would be best, and thus Jeter was never asked to move. If you do want to blame one entity, I guess you can blame the front office -- it's not really either A-Rod's job to insist that the guy move, or Jeter's to volunteer. I do think moving Jeter would have been better, not only on the field, but to put a bullet into the True Yankee/"Torre's guys" vs. False Yankee thing, which ended up blossoming into a humongous problem. I'd be quite curious to know what exactly was said during the A-Rod negotiations. But I've certainly never seen anything to challenge the notion that, at least by the time A-Rod got to NY, he knew he was playing 3B and was fine with it.
   21. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: February 03, 2013 at 02:28 PM (#4361156)
If being the recipient of more BTF snark per season

Jeffy Delta would beg to differ.

   22. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 03, 2013 at 03:21 PM (#4361188)
It was Evil ARod who moved to third, and Sheffield - not The Captain - who offered.

Exactly. Some "Captain"


A captain never abandons his ship.
   23. Cowboy Popup Posted: February 03, 2013 at 03:31 PM (#4361194)
Yankee fans, and fans of the game, should be watching Jeter's comeback because the added uncertainty of his ankle injury and his contract situation means this could be Jeter's last year. It probably won't be, but this is the first time that's really been a possibility.

I've never thought this situation was as black and white as many of the posters on BTF construed.

Of course it wasn't. The fact that Jeter is still contributing at SS while A-Rod can't stay on the field ought to be vindication for the front office's foresight in playing them where their bodies and skills were best suited. But so many people here made up their mind in 2004 and 9(!) seasons of evidence (including two MVPs for A-Rod, a surprisingly productive decline phase from Jeter, 8 out of 9 years winning 94 games or more with this alignment, A-rod's gradual loss of mobility) that the Yanks made a good call won't convince them otherwise.

Moving A-Rod to third and keeping Jeter at SS has worked out extremely well for the Yanks, and it more than justifies the Jeter staying put without needing to delve into the player's involvement in management's decision. But in some people's minds, Jeter playing SS is an affront to the game (or something equally silly) and the decision to move A-rod is just something they use to affirm theories they want to believe anyway.

"The Yankees" should have moved Jeter to CF for A-Rod.

Can you make even a semi-plausible argument to support this? Are the Yanks really better off in 2007 with an aging Jeter in CF, A-rod getting moved to third anyway, Damon still on the Red Sox and a gaping hole at SS? SS is one of, if not the hardest position to fill through free agency (maybe catcher is harder?).

There is no way A-rod would have stuck at SS and the free agent/trade market for SS's hasn't been all that impressive since the trade (other than Reyes' availability last year). And I don't remember the Yanks trading away any stud SS prospects over the last nine years. The problem with the argument that the Yanks should have done something different is that the decision didn't take place in a vacuum, the Yanks had to make decisions regarding acquiring the 9 best position players they could. Picking up quality CFers has proved to be much easier over the last decade than picking up quality shortstops.
   24. PreservedFish Posted: February 03, 2013 at 03:39 PM (#4361200)
Playing Jeter at shortstop in 2013 may indeed be an affront to the game. I've been a Jeterdefense apologist for a decade (he never looked that bad to me, and I felt that statheads were always letting the numbers influence their "scouting") ... but he looked ghastly, just atrocious at the position late last year.
   25. Cowboy Popup Posted: February 03, 2013 at 03:44 PM (#4361202)
Playing Jeter at shortstop in 2013 may indeed be an affront to the game. I've been a Jeterdefense apologist for a decade (he never looked that bad to me, and I felt that statheads were always letting the numbers influence their "scouting") ... but he looked ghastly, just atrocious at the position late last year.

Yeah, he looked really bad out there last year and I doubt destroying his ankle will make him better out there. But 9 years after the trade, that's besides the point of the original decision. He still put up 2.1 BWar and 3.2 FWar last year, so he's still contributing.
   26. MikeTorrez Posted: February 03, 2013 at 03:46 PM (#4361204)
Bernie was no longer defensively adequate in CF, and surely a 37-year-old, no-longer-all-that-great Kenny Lofton would have been happy to be the fourth OF on a defending AL champion, super-loaded team.


Lofton ended up being the 4th OFer and wasn't happy. He even implied that Torre was a racist afterwards.
   27. The District Attorney Posted: February 03, 2013 at 03:47 PM (#4361206)
Lofton ended up being the 4th OFer and wasn't happy. He even implied that Torre was a racist afterwards.
Okay, then trade him. :-)
   28. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: February 03, 2013 at 04:19 PM (#4361229)
Was there some particular reason this guy needed anonymity?

Most modern "journalists" are lazy cowards. This is not a new thing.
   29. AROM Posted: February 03, 2013 at 05:28 PM (#4361282)
"I have never understood how Jeter has such a hold over everyone in the media. It's like listening to a teenage girl talk about the boy she has a crush on. Except the media has been doing this for 15 years, and teenage girls grow up."

Plenty of the teenage girls who swooned for rookie Jeter are moms now. Some even have teenage kids of their own.
   30. bobm Posted: February 03, 2013 at 06:11 PM (#4361307)
Plenty of the teenage girls who swooned for rookie Jeter are moms now. Some even have teenage kids of their own.

But did their mothers also get gift baskets? ;)
   31. Walt Davis Posted: February 03, 2013 at 06:48 PM (#4361334)
Was there some particular reason this guy needed anonymity?

Sure, the writer didn't want us to know that it was the assistant vice president for hair shellac.

Anyway, to the topic ... Centering it all around Jeter's comeback takes the rather substantial risk that Jeter's comeback is a total flop. 39, coming off a broken ankle, his first season under 10 steals, struggling to keep the ISO over 100. Suppose he starts out like 2011 -- 270/330/353 in the first half? Even the O's stopped trotting Cal out there every day.

Granted, Jeter might be the only thing they've got left (other than "hey, we're still a damn good team") but "only the Jeter can save us" is asking an awful lot from the guy.
   32. NattyBoh Posted: February 03, 2013 at 09:31 PM (#4361564)
I have never understood how Jeter has such a hold over everyone in the media. It's like listening to a teenage girl talk about the boy she has a crush on. Except the media has been doing this for 15 years, and teenage girls grow up.


IIRC Candy Maldonado was the Yankee who had a thing for teenage girls. "Hey little girl, want some candy?"
   33. Ulysses S. Fairsmith Posted: February 03, 2013 at 10:54 PM (#4361702)
If Derek Jeter ate a baby on live television, the New York media would blame the baby.

And A-Rod.
   34. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 03, 2013 at 11:54 PM (#4361847)
Raissman: With A-Rod drama, Yanks need to focus on Jeter’s comeback
On a player lucky to put up two wins?

Of course it wasn't. The fact that Jeter is still contributing at SS while A-Rod can't stay on the field ought to be vindication for the front office's foresight in playing them where their bodies and skills were best suited.
The FO's failure to move Rodriguez off 3B while his body crumbled to dust is condemnation of the FO's lack of foresight. No idea what they could have been thinking.

Moving A-Rod to third and keeping Jeter at SS has worked out extremely well for the Yanks


???

They managed to brutally misjudge Rodriguez's durability, to the point where there's a good chance they'll be punting $100m plus. You're omitting something rather serious. I'm hard-pressed to call the FO's handling of the situation anything other than an incredibly expensive failure.
   35. Random Transaction Generator Posted: February 03, 2013 at 11:58 PM (#4361852)
IIRC Candy Maldonado was the Yankee who had a thing for teenage girls. "Hey little girl, want some candy?"


You're thinking of Luis Polonia.

Candy Maldonado never played for the Yankees, and was generally considered a stand-up guy.
(I'm a Jays fan who remembered his contributions in 1992.)
   36. I Am Not a Number Posted: February 04, 2013 at 12:19 AM (#4361875)
Seems like Raissman is bucking for one of those famous gift baskets.

They can cleanse any muck surrounding the organization.

Pulitzer.
   37. LargeBill Posted: February 04, 2013 at 12:24 AM (#4361880)
Ya know, I hate the Yankees as much as any Indians fan, but I'm almost coming around to question the constant Jeter bashing. Is he as great as his sycophants in the NY media make him out to be? No, but he isn't as bad as some of us make him out to be in response to the hyperbole. It is similar to the Obama reaction. Obama is not what the sycophantic media pretends he is, but he also isn't the anti-Christ others act like he is. He is just another politician who has fooled the easily fooled. Jeter is a very good player who has been very healthy and has been media savvy. An honest evaluation of Jeter is far from both camps. He is not Smith or even Vizquel defensively. He also is not Ripken or A-Rod offensively. However, he is darn good (not great) offensively and defensively.
   38. Cowboy Popup Posted: February 04, 2013 at 12:52 AM (#4361901)
The FO's failure to move Rodriguez off 3B while his body crumbled to dust is condemnation of the FO's lack of foresight. No idea what they could have been thinking.

So do you agree it is good thing they moved him off of SS? I can't imagine staying at short would have helped him age more gracefully.

They managed to brutally misjudge Rodriguez's durability, to the point where there's a good chance they'll be punting $100m plus. You're omitting something rather serious. I'm hard-pressed to call the FO's handling of the situation anything other than an incredibly expensive failure.

If you want to argue that signing him until 42 was a mistake, be my guest. But that's not what I was talking about. The question as I understand it is whether the decision to move A-rod off of SS was as bad a decision as some primates make it out to be. If your argument is that A-rod can't stay healthy at 3rd 7 years later, then it's a good thing they didn't keep him at SS. I'd rather have my team bet on Kevin Youkilis contributing for a huge chunk of time this year than Eduardo Nunez. And I bet A-rod would have gotten more money if he was still at SS in 2007.
   39. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 04, 2013 at 01:02 AM (#4361904)
Obama is not what the sycophantic media pretends he is, but he also isn't the anti-Christ others act like he is.
If the thread is going political, what is this sycophantic media to which you refer? Names and dates, please.

Pretty sure the bloom has been off that particular rose since, oh, 2009.
   40. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 04, 2013 at 01:07 AM (#4361906)
The FO's failure to move Rodriguez off 3B while his body crumbled to dust is condemnation of the FO's lack of foresight. No idea what they could have been thinking.

So do you agree it is good thing they moved him off of SS? I can't imagine staying at short would have helped him age more gracefully.


CP--I have zero problem with the idea that Arod at 3B and Jeter at SS, initially, was a perfectly cromulent move. And, yes, as quickly as he broke down at 3B I shudder to think what would have happened to him at SS. It's just that when you depict the FO's handling of Arod's positioning as exemplary that I have to call foul. Given how quickly he's fallen apart while they've kept him at 3B rather than moved him to DH, I think it's fair to say 'dumb luck' rather than 'foresight' wrt to the 3B/SS situation was what really was operating.

edit: sorry if that came across as nitpicking, or as stretching your claims further than you intended them to go; it's just that I've been appalled for a while now at how badly and obviously the Yankees have handled Arod, which I don't think could have resulted from anything other than a total misevaluation of his condition. We all saw him struggling, then suffering. I still don't get it, and it would no longer surprise me, if he comes back, if they just run him right back out to third. It really wouldn't.

   41. Cowboy Popup Posted: February 04, 2013 at 01:16 AM (#4361910)
It's just that when you depict the FO's handling of Arod's career as exemplary that I have to call foul.

But I don't think their handling of his career is exemplary. I think their decision to move him to third and keep Jeter at SS, which is was harshly criticized at the time, and is still being criticized in this thread (see posts 11, 12, 20) was actually fairly prescient.

I am of the opinion that moving him to third was the right move and the FO should get credit for that, and then signing him to a ten year, 300 million dollar contract, was insane and the FO/ownership should be held accountable for it. I don't think those two opinions conflict with each other.

Given how quickly he's fallen apart while they've kept him at 3B rather than moved him to DH, I think it's fair to say 'dumb luck' rather than 'foresight' wrt to the 3B/SS situation was what really was operating.

That's a reasonable interpretation of it as well. I'm hesitant to attribute decisions of this magnitude by a relatively smart front office as dumb luck. Making a bad decision later doesn't discount the good decision made years earlier.
   42. Pokey Reese's Pieces Posted: February 04, 2013 at 01:27 AM (#4361913)
IIRC Candy Maldonado was the Yankee who had a thing for teenage girls. "Hey little girl, want some candy?"


Yeah, that would be Polonia, or Mel Hall. But, hey, don't let a mere 2.5 seconds of Googling keep you from posting a totally made-up thing.
   43. McCoy Posted: February 04, 2013 at 02:01 AM (#4361923)
How dare you besmirch the good name of Candy Maldonado in your futile quest to make a funny!
   44. Barnaby Jones Posted: February 04, 2013 at 03:33 AM (#4361940)
So do you agree it is good thing they moved him off of SS? I can't imagine staying at short would have helped him age more gracefully.


Is SS more dangerous than 3B? It's certainly more difficult, but 3B has it's fair share of awkward flopping and diving. I guess the 2B turn is a difference.
   45. Dan Posted: February 04, 2013 at 03:54 AM (#4361941)
SS seems like it would be less harsh on the hips than all the dives at third base. Additionally, if ARod hadn't bulked up after being moved to third, maybe his hips don't take as much wear and tear from carrying the additional weight around. Maybe if he'd stayed at SS he'd still be playing 150 games per year. Or maybe he'd have broken down quicker and already have retired. Well never know.

But I think it's facile to say moving him to third was the right move since he ended up breaking down 8 years after the move and assume we know that he'd be in the same situation if he'd stayed at short.
   46. Cowboy Popup Posted: February 04, 2013 at 04:23 AM (#4361945)
Is SS more dangerous than 3B? It's certainly more difficult, but 3B has it's fair share of awkward flopping and diving. I guess the 2B turn is a difference.

SS is involved in more plays too. More bending over to get ground balls, plenty of charging and diving in its own right, fielding relay throws far more often. I would think the increased activity, plus the turn as you mention, would lead to extra wear and tear on a body.

Well never know.

Which is kind of my point. We can only evaluate what happened, and what happened was pretty good for the Yanks. So how can the move be a blunder?

SS seems like it would be less harsh on the hips than all the dives at third base.

I don't know that there are less dives at SS. After all, Jeter is practically known for diving. Seems there are plenty of dives to go around the infield, and the increased ball traffic up the middle probably makes up for the shorter reaction time at the corners in terms of generating dives.

But I think it's facile to say moving him to third was the right move since he ended up breaking down 8 years after the move and assume we know that he'd be in the same situation if he'd stayed at short.

That's not what I'm saying. I list several reasons why the move has worked out well and one of them is that with A-rod's recent fragility, it sure is nice that the guy who has been on the field 150 games a year is the guy who stayed at SS. Of course we can't possibly know what would have happened in some alternate universe. All we know is that the move worked out well in real life.

What's facile is pretending that we know things would have been better if A-Rod stayed at short and Jeter had moved to 3rd or CF, and then assigning blame to the respective parties involved for that decision. And people here do that all the freaking time. What we do know is that both A-rod and Jeter provided high quality play at their respective positions for years after the switch was made. And that the player that is currently more durable is at the position where it is harder to find quality replacements and subs. So we can look at what actually happened and say that the move worked out well for the Yanks. That makes me the claim that the move was some sort of wrong decision (for whatever reason it was made) pretty hard to support.
   47. jyjjy Posted: February 04, 2013 at 04:33 AM (#4361947)
I agree with the doubt about 3B being less hard on the body than SS. Throw on top of that moving him off his natural position to learn a new one mid-career that he never looked nearly as comfortable at... Personally I would bet the change more likely contributed to his medical problems rather than helping mitigate such but yeah, who knows?

That said Jeter clearly should have been Younted as soon as it became obvious Bernie could no longer handle center but that has little to do with A-Rod. Jeter has/had the perfect skill set for it with good speed, arm and instincts; even the strongest part of his game at SS was how he handled fly balls. That they STILL didn't do it with the best SS in history joining the team was simply inexplicable.

Move Bernie to left where he likely would have still been adequate for a while, Jeter to center where I suspect he would have been pretty good and leave A-Rod at short where he was a plus defender... or let him learn to be mediocre at third while Jeter and Bernie continue to suck it (on an arguably historic level) at their old positions.

You guys can claim prescience on the part of management for knowing A-Rod would breakdown and not Jeter or that it is easier to find a CF than SS but I'm going to stick with it was quite obviously stupid and remains such.
   48. MuttsIdolCochrane Posted: February 04, 2013 at 07:01 AM (#4361955)
"An honest evaluation of Jeter is far from both camps. He is not Smith or even Vizquel defensively. He also is not Ripken or A-Rod offensively."

Putting Ripkin and A-Rod in the same sentence offensively as if they're equal or even similar is just not right, as is contending that Jeter is not Ripkin offensively. Jeter leads Ripkin lifetime in BA (by 37 points!), OBP (by 42!), OPS (by 42), OPS+ (by 5), and even in straight slugging percentage Jeter comes out on top.
   49. Greg K Posted: February 04, 2013 at 07:57 AM (#4361958)
Putting Ripkin and A-Rod in the same sentence offensively as if they're equal or even similar is just not right, as is contending that Jeter is not Ripkin offensively. Jeter leads Ripkin lifetime in BA (by 37 points!), OBP (by 42!), OPS (by 42), OPS+ (by 5), and even in straight slugging percentage Jeter comes out on top.

I'd agree. I'd say what makes Ripken so much better than Jeter is his defence (which seems a bit under-appreciated among casual fans), not so much his batting.
   50. eddieot Posted: February 04, 2013 at 10:39 AM (#4362010)
They should ride Jeter and promote — ad nauseam — the story of his comeback.

Yes, Bob, the Yankees sure haven't promoted Jeter enough during his career. It's about time they unveil the best-kept secret in baseball.
   51. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 04, 2013 at 06:51 PM (#4362649)
At what point was it clear to everyone but Yankees' management that Rodriguez needed to move to DH? Hindsight is easy, but he did look pretty beat up during 2008 to me.
   52. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 04, 2013 at 07:10 PM (#4362675)
At what point was it clear to everyone but Yankees' management that Rodriguez needed to move to DH? Hindsight is easy, but he did look pretty beat up during 2008 to me.

2009 worked out pretty well.

   53. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 04, 2013 at 07:48 PM (#4362708)
In what sense? For a mere mortal, sure, but it was Rod's worst season since he was a juvenile.

When your bajillion dollar man misses 38 games the year after missing 24, your FO just might want to note that trend.
   54. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 04, 2013 at 08:47 PM (#4362751)
Did you catch any of the 2009 playoffs?
   55. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: February 04, 2013 at 09:02 PM (#4362769)
Maldonado is a really good guy. It's horrible to make that kind of accusation without any evidence at all.

Many of us noted at the time that Jeter never offered to move off the position so that the better shortstop could play there. For the good of the team.

It was Evil ARod who moved to third, and Sheffield - not The Captain - who offered.



Why do you believe that Jeter would have come onto BBTF and told us about his offer?
   56. RollingWave Posted: February 04, 2013 at 09:13 PM (#4362777)
The Yankees/ Redsox this year is so going to be comparable to the current Lakers / Celtics situation right...?


(I think Yankee will likely still be in play for the wildcard but that isn't saying much. then again the AL West now have 2 god awful team to beat up on which may make it easier for them to get both wild card.)
   57. Jack Carter, calling Beleaguered Castle Posted: February 04, 2013 at 10:50 PM (#4362801)
Sure. He was terrific. Doesn't seem he had to be ground down at 3B all season in order to hit like that, though.

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