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Thursday, June 26, 2014

Rick Cerone: “Robinson Cano . . . what a fool!”

You can’t spell Encore Rick (that’s what we used to yell to him after his 1980 outlier season) without Rick Cerone.

Former Yankees catcher Rick Cerone was on SiriusXM’s Fantasy Sports Radio channel with hosts Scott Engel and Adam Ronis today, and he had some pretty strong opinions about Robinson Cano signing with the Mariners:

  Host/Scott Engel:  “Robinson Cano in Seattle, why is he not hitting for power?”

  Rick Cerone:  “Big ballpark.  Big mistake.  No backup.  No protection in the lineup.  I mean, what a fool.  Robinson Cano, I liked him as a Yankee.  What a fool.  Got bad advice.  Yeah, he took more money but you know how much more money and exposure he could’ve had playing in New York, come to the lights.  He’s going to go up to Seattle, we might see him once or twice in an All-Star Game.  He’s only got four home runs.  Four home runs for how many million, 200 and something million dollars?”

Repoz Posted: June 26, 2014 at 05:00 PM | 259 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: mariners, yankees

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   1. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 26, 2014 at 05:24 PM (#4736827)
I can't explain it, but as a 'kid' <12 yrs. I hated Rick Cerone.
   2. madvillain Posted: June 26, 2014 at 05:37 PM (#4736845)
As someone in love with NYC but that chose to move away after 5 years there let me just say this: the insufferable notion that anyone that chooses not to live there is insane is probably the most annoying thing about the place.

NYC is ####### amazing, it's probably the greatest city in the world but there are other places man.
   3. I Am Not a Number Posted: June 26, 2014 at 05:42 PM (#4736848)
While Cano's HR and RBI numbers are off from his days in New York, his OPS+ of 133 is in line with his previous 5 seasons. And his new team has a better record than his old team. And he's maximized his salary dollars, which is apparently important to him (and no one else's place to judge).

So yeah, the very definition of a fool.
   4. Walt Davis Posted: June 26, 2014 at 06:11 PM (#4736865)
As someone in love with NYC but that chose to move away after 5 years there let me just say this: the insufferable notion that anyone that chooses not to live there is insane is probably the most annoying thing about the place.

Sure ... but even I have to admit that if I was making $24 M a year with tens of millions in the bank already ... the annoying parts of NY are non-existent. Where else would you want to live? Sure, I'd have my second house in some idyllic coastal spot and maybe another up in some mountains somewhere to get away from it all but if I could afford everything NY has to offer and afford to pay other people to deal with the annoyances ... pretty irresistible.

As a regular human being, different story.

That said, I'm willing to make mistakes that get me paid 10/$240 M.
   5. Dillon Gee Escape Plan Posted: June 26, 2014 at 06:24 PM (#4736878)
What is it with New York catchers and being pricks?
   6. AuntBea Posted: June 26, 2014 at 06:30 PM (#4736886)
the annoying parts of NY are non-existent
It's very crowded here, loud, and dirty, with a dearth of natural beauty. $24 million a year isn't even enough to be able to avoid all that. If I made $24M per year with millions in the bank, I can guarantee that my wife would demand we live somewhere else. But it's still a great city.
   7. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: June 26, 2014 at 06:39 PM (#4736891)
New York is an amazing city in many ways, but there are a lot of reasons why somebody might rather live somewhere else than NY, more money or not. I think what is being implicitly argued here is that we assume Robinson Cano would be an "NYC" kind of guy. I have no idea if this actually true - for all I know, he tolerated NYC during his time with the Yankees, and if another team offered him similar money, he was always going to leave.



   8. Al Kaline Trio Posted: June 26, 2014 at 06:52 PM (#4736906)
Cano has seen how the media and Yankees management treats players. That and the money meant Cano goes bye bye.
   9. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: June 26, 2014 at 06:56 PM (#4736911)
Sure ... but even I have to admit that if I was making $24 M a year with tens of millions in the bank already ... the annoying parts of NY are non-existent. Where else would you want to live? Sure, I'd have my second house in some idyllic coastal spot and maybe another up in some mountains somewhere to get away from it all but if I could afford everything NY has to offer and afford to pay other people to deal with the annoyances ... pretty irresistible.


But that's all true pretty much any major city you go to. Seattle isn't some place where the local redneck is making you squeal like a pig and unless Cano really needs to have Broadway accessible he can get what he wants. $24 mil a year makes a lot of things available to you.
   10. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: June 26, 2014 at 06:59 PM (#4736914)
As someone in love with NYC but that chose to move away after 5 years there let me just say this: the insufferable notion that anyone that chooses not to live there is insane is probably the most annoying thing about the place.

it's not so much about choosing to leave NYC, it's having the gall to leave the YANKEES that some peeps are insufferable about (especially the Yankee brass). If some star player wanted to leave the Mets, no one would give 2 sh!ts about it
   11. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 07:05 PM (#4736916)
It's very crowded here, loud, and dirty
Were I a celebrity--ha!--the crowded would be the part that would be both the draw and the repulsion. It's so crowded that people can walk around and barely be noticed. But it's also so crowded that there's always a chance one idiot around you is going to be an #######.

with a dearth of natural beauty
this strikes me wrong, though. A rich guy should have one of those floor-through apartments where he can see Central Park from one side, the harbor from the another, and the Hudson from the other two. Throw in the Hamptons house, and you're pretty good on natural beauty.
   12. AuntBea Posted: June 26, 2014 at 07:09 PM (#4736921)
A rich guy should have one of those floor-through apartments where he can see Central Park from one side, the harbor from the another, and the Hudson from the other two. Throw in the Hamptons house, and you're pretty good on natural beauty.
This is nothing like actually walking outside your large house directly into nature. Different things for different people.
   13. AuntBea Posted: June 26, 2014 at 07:11 PM (#4736925)
Were I a celebrity--ha!--the crowded would be the part that would be both the draw and the repulsion. It's so crowded that people
Some people (like me for example) simply enjoy the absence of people. I would much rather go to a restaurant with nobody in it than a crowded one, all else being equal.
   14. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 07:19 PM (#4736933)
The other thing about NYC and LA is the surrounding world of very famous people. Which is a negative if you want to stand out. Or if you don't like other famous people. But for some a positive, as you can live in a swirl of movie stars and rock singers in both places if you want. Melo certainly seems into that part of it, hitting the big galas and posing with people who are stars in other professions.
   15. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: June 26, 2014 at 07:37 PM (#4736947)
Perhaps Cano yearns for the simple pleasure of being able to drink a 32oz Coke when he feels like it.
   16. cardsfanboy Posted: June 26, 2014 at 07:47 PM (#4736960)
Sure ... but even I have to admit that if I was making $24 M a year with tens of millions in the bank already ... the annoying parts of NY are non-existent. Where else would you want to live? Sure, I'd have my second house in some idyllic coastal spot and maybe another up in some mountains somewhere to get away from it all but if I could afford everything NY has to offer and afford to pay other people to deal with the annoyances ... pretty irresistible.


Not in a condo or apartment, some place with a back yard, a basement, driveway, nice bar-b-que pit, where I can drive my car to work in less than 20 minutes, where entertainment/shopping options are also less than a 20 minute drive away, and where traffic is easy to avoid provided you just don't time it during the two bad hours of the day. I just do not get people wanting to live in a big city, the burbs is where it's at. (as 12 says, different things for different people)

Perhaps Cano yearns for the simple pleasure of being able to drink a 32oz Coke when he feels like it.


Lol....everyday I go to work, I buy a 54(?) ounce soda for my work day. $1.46(unless I keep the cup from the previous time then it's $1.00 or if the Cardinals win, I can get a 44 ounce for $.50) I couldn't imagine how inconvenient it would be to have to buy 4+ sodas everyday. I figure only in North Korea and New York is that an issue.
   17. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 07:56 PM (#4736972)
The law was struck down, by the way. Freedom reigns!

And yes difft strokes difft folks, but celebrities live in places where entertainment/shopping options are a three-minute walk away in NYC, not a 20-minute drive away. Melo's commute is 20 minutes from the southern edge of the UWS to the Garden. Jeter's I think was 20-30.
   18. Greg K Posted: June 26, 2014 at 08:06 PM (#4736982)
My ideal place to live is probably somewhere where I can walk 20-30 minutes into a city centre with shops, bars and (most importantly) a fairly wide variety of restaurants, but have my house or apartment in a fairly quiet neighbourhood without much hustle and bustle.

Of course this may just be the fact that I'm a soft touch whose really liked everywhere I've ever lived and the above merely describes my last place of residence. If I lived in Siberia for a year I'd somehow have convinced myself that it's my ideal. On the other hand I've never really had an inkling that I'd like to live in a big city, though they are great to visit.
   19. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 08:11 PM (#4736986)
My ideal place to live is probably somewhere where I can walk 20-30 minutes into a city centre with shops, bars and (most importantly) a fairly wide variety of restaurants, but have my house or apartment in a fairly quiet neighbourhood without much hustle and bustle.
Something like one of the neighborhoods on the perimeter of Cambridge? I could see that. (Cambridge, UK, obviously.)
   20. Greg K Posted: June 26, 2014 at 08:15 PM (#4736995)
Something like one of the neighborhoods on the perimeter of Cambridge? I could see that. (Cambridge, UK, obviously.)

That could work too I imagine! My personal experience example was Nottingham, but I'd bet other British or European towns fit that general outline quite well too.

Of course, living in a neighbourhood on the perimeter of Cambridge would likely mean my career was going fairly well, so it would have that going for it.
   21. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 26, 2014 at 08:23 PM (#4737007)
Different people like different things. I wouldn't like living in New York because there aren't any Spitfires on display in museums there (there is one in New Jersey, but it's privately owned). Seattle is a different story. There are three museums in the area with Spitfires, two of which are flyable and which do so several times a year. You can have all of your restaurants, night life, shopping, etc. in New York. I really don't care about any of that whatsoever. NYC doesn't have Spitfires, and that makes Seattle an infinitely better place for me to live.
   22. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 08:38 PM (#4737018)
Lots of Cambridge people pooh-pooh it, or commute out from London, but Cambridge to me is gorgeous.
   23. Buck Coats Posted: June 26, 2014 at 09:37 PM (#4737066)
Got bad advice. Yeah, he took more money but you know how much more money and exposure he could’ve had playing in New York, come to the lights.


Presumably Cano's aware of how much money and exposure he could get in New York, considering he just played there for 9 years. Is Cano starring in lots of ads? Not that I've noticed.
   24. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: June 26, 2014 at 09:43 PM (#4737071)
New York is an awesome city, but its not like Seattle is Bumblefuck, Arkansas. Its probably in my top five favorite American cities too.


it's not so much about choosing to leave NYC, it's having the gall to leave the YANKEES that some peeps are insufferable about (especially the Yankee brass). If some star player wanted to leave the Mets, no one would give 2 sh!ts about it


This is probably true.
   25. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 09:57 PM (#4737083)
New York is an awesome city, but its not like Seattle is Bumblefuck, Arkansas. Its probably in my top five favorite American cities too.

Ooh, these always get me thinking. I think that's right. NYC is tops for me and CHI probably second. I love to visit LA but don't think I'd be all that happy living there. SF, I like less as a place to visit but would like as a place to live. So I can see Seattle coming in about 4th or 5th on my list. Had families who commuted by ferry from one of the islands. On a pretty day, it was almost unbearably beautiful.
   26. Walt Davis Posted: June 26, 2014 at 09:58 PM (#4737085)
But that's all true pretty much any major city you go to.

No. It really isn't.

You can't get the jazz you get in NY anywhere else in the world. There are probably only a couple of places where you can get the classical music. It's got some of the absolute greatest art museums in the world. It's got some of the greatest high-end restaurants in the world and some of the greatest low-end restaurants in the world with an absolute totality of the world's ethnic cuisines. If what you want is to be seen at trendy clubs with trendy celebs, NYC is the place to be. High-end culture, low-end culture, trendy culture -- it's all centered in NYC.

Sure, if your idea of paradise is 24/7 on a Montana ranch then NYC isn't going to fit the bill. But there's a reason only 15 people live in Montana. And, fine, live in the Hudson Valley and helicopter into the city every day. If you've got the money, you can have all the natural beauty you want and NYC. This easily beats all the natural beauty you want and Seattle.

It's crowded? OK, that means my driver has to deal with a lot of traffic (true in any city) while I'm sitting in the back listening to music, watching TV/DVDs, playing video games, talking to my agent, ordering a gift basket. And my thugs will have to push more people out of the way when I go into the restaurant to my private table (if I want one).

Those things all matter to schmucks like us. I've chosen natural beauty over urban culture but I can't really afford both and/or I don't want to commute 2 hours each way to get both. I'm not big on crowded, dirty cities but then, if I'm in a city, I can't really afford to avoid those things (except maybe, maybe for a week's vacation). If I could spend most evenings, or even just the evenings for the 4-5 months a year I'm not working, in music clubs I would.

We have to make choices, Cano really doesn't. Of course that means he can live in NYC in the offseason and/or after he retires.

Anything you can get in Chicago you can get in SF or Seattle (except probably good pizza ... where NYC tends to fall flat too). But NYC is a different scale from anywhere besides maybe London or Paris -- in terms of quality, quantity and variety. It just is. And I say that as a guy who spent most of my life believing you could get in Chicago anything you could get in NY.
   27. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:02 PM (#4737087)
I would say LA has many though not all the things you mention, Walt. High and low end places to eat, for sure. Possibly more trendy clubs and celebs.
   28. Sonic Youk Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:07 PM (#4737092)
Chicago has probably 80% of the things I love about NYC, but just destroys New York in terms of price and livability.

Speaking as a broke 20 something, its pretty baffling how much other broke 20 somethings love moving there.
   29. McCoy Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:27 PM (#4737104)
But that's all true pretty much any major city you go to. Seattle isn't some place where the local redneck is making you squeal like a pig and unless Cano really needs to have Broadway accessible he can get what he wants. $24 mil a year makes a lot of things available to you.

Not even close. NYC is extremely unique when it comes to US cities it simply has a different vibe and energy than any other city in the country. LA probably comes the closest in terms of strength of vibe and energy but they are not the same vibe and energy at all. I've lived in 5 or major US cities in my life while visiting several others and none of them are like NYC at all.
   30. Bhaakon Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:34 PM (#4737111)
Not even close. NYC is extremely unique when it comes to US cities it simply has a different vibe and energy than any other city in the country. LA probably comes the closest in terms of strength of vibe and energy but they are not the same vibe and energy at all. I've lived in 5 or major US cities in my life while visiting several others and none of them are like NYC at all.


It has something, but it's an acquired taste. I certainly can't stand spending more than a week or so there at a stretch.
   31. dejarouehg Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:40 PM (#4737118)
A rich guy should have one of those floor-through apartments where he can see Central Park from one side, the harbor from the another, and the Hudson from the other two. Throw in the Hamptons house, and you're pretty good on natural beauty.


Well, that would be between one and two years income.

I've lived in NY my entire life and have never understood the arrogance of fellow New Yorkers who think that it's the end-all be-all. (I do confess to suffer from, "The Grass is Always Greener" syndrome and am convinced Chicago is the greatest city on the planet since I have never been there in the winter.) Other than parts of LA and some select suburbs, is there anywhere in this country where you get so little for $1Million?

NY is obnoxiously expensive and who needs the scrutiny?

   32. dejarouehg Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:41 PM (#4737120)
Anything you can get in Chicago you can get in SF or Seattle (except probably good pizza ... where NYC tends to fall flat too).
This one I have to call bullsh*t on. New York pizza crushes Chicago's. (Don't know about the other two.)
   33. Sonic Youk Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:48 PM (#4737128)
Yea, Chicago barely has any decent by-the-slice places anywhere, much less on every corner like NYC. And the deep dish vs NY style isn't even a real angle. Pretty sure people in Chicago eat deep dish pizza about as much as people in Boston eat baked beans.
   34. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:48 PM (#4737129)
I've lived in NY my entire life and have never understood the arrogance of fellow New Yorkers who think that it's the end-all be-all. (I do confess to suffer from, "The Grass is Always Greener" syndrome and am convinced Chicago is the greatest city on the planet since I have never been there in the winter.) Other than parts of LA and some select suburbs, is there anywhere in this country where you get so little for $1Million?
San Francisco...maybe even more so
Parts of Boston
Washington DC is closing in
Honolulu...but that's a different issue

NYC is expensive but the gap between Manhattan and the next-most expensive city has been shrinking, I think, in part because of the huge influx of money into the DC and SF areas, and in part because Brooklyn has slowed the rate of increase in Manhattan by drawing away people who would otherwise have lived here.
   35. PreservedFish Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:51 PM (#4737137)
My impression is that most veteran baseball players live in Westchester or Connecticut. Cano is a bachelor and friends with Jay-Z so he might be more of a bright lights big city type.
   36. GregD Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:57 PM (#4737143)
Jeter lived on the east side, right? A-Rod for a while at 15 CPW, which would be one place I would strongly consider were I absurdly wealthy. Matt Harvey lives downtown, I think.
   37. Randomly Fluctuating Defensive Metric Posted: June 26, 2014 at 10:57 PM (#4737145)
If Rob Refsnyder turns out to be an above average player, and the Mariners become a steady contender over the next few years, I think everyone comes out looking pretty good. The Mariners were in a position where they needed a radical move, and the Yankees might have been wary about another contract taking a player already over thirty into his forties. I loved watching Cano and I wish him the best. I was just in Seattle and cheered for him. Yes, Seattle is a gorgeous city.
   38. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 26, 2014 at 11:28 PM (#4737162)
its not like Seattle is Bumblefuck, Arkansas.


Hey, now -- Bumblefuck is an OK place to be from. Obviously, I'm biased, but to me being able to say that "I grew up in a place with no traffic lights" is at least more distinctive than being able to say "I grew up in a city with a bunch of concrete & people & noise."

   39. Bhaakon Posted: June 27, 2014 at 02:29 AM (#4737223)
Hey, now -- Bumblefuck is an OK place to be from. Obviously, I'm biased, but to me being able to say that "I grew up in a place with no traffic lights" is at least more distinctive than being able to say "I grew up in a city with a bunch of concrete & people & noise."



Something like 4/5ths of Americans live in a city or suburb these days, so a truly rural origin is definitely the minority.
   40. ptodd Posted: June 27, 2014 at 03:15 AM (#4737231)
Cano only had 6 HR in his last 289 PA last year
   41. BrianBrianson Posted: June 27, 2014 at 05:28 AM (#4737239)
Are you guys kidding? If you're making $24 million a year, you could afford to live right downtown in Cambridge. Portugal Place, say, or Beaufort Place. I guess I could see the appeal of say, Riverside bridge where you can be right on the water - but I don't there there are any good pubs extremely close to there - you'll end up at the Geldart or Hopbine or something.
   42. vivaelpujols Posted: June 27, 2014 at 05:54 AM (#4737241)
Walt I think it's silly to say NY is better than Seattle. I agree with you that it has better food, better museums (what are the odds cano gives a #### about museums?) and better clubs, but it's kind of like saying that Kershaw's no hitter was better than Ryan's. At a certain point the culture is high enough that the intangible value of a given city may matter more. People in seattle are much more laid back than people in New York, there's more space, better air quality. I'm not saying that I'd choose seattle over ny if money wasnt an issue but I can easily see why someone would.

Also I can't believe you said "who cares about traffic, he has a driver and a gameboy". Travel still is a waste of time, it's just easier in canoe case. I sure wouldn't want to take a 2 hour plane ride everyday even if I had the best ####### plasma in the country.

But the biggest reason for why someone might not want to live in NY after already living there for 6 years is that people like variety.
   43. dejarouehg Posted: June 27, 2014 at 07:00 AM (#4737245)
San Francisco...maybe even more so
Parts of Boston
Washington DC is closing in
Honolulu...but that's a different issue

NYC is expensive but the gap between Manhattan and the next-most expensive city has been shrinking, I think, in part because of the huge influx of money into the DC and SF areas, and in part because Brooklyn has slowed the rate of increase in Manhattan by drawing away people who would otherwise have lived here.


I stand corrected.

Jeter lived on the east side, right?


Yes, he did have a place near the UN (and still might). My partner built out an apartment in the building and when the Yankees were home there were different rules as to what hours you were allowed to work.
   44. Shooty Is Disappointed With His Midstream Urine Posted: June 27, 2014 at 07:57 AM (#4737251)
I love and hate living in New York. I love that I can walk to the AMNH or the Met or the Guggenheim or whatever anytime I want. The food is great and there's always something going on. On the other hand, the crowds and the multitudes of people can be like death from a thousand papercuts sometimes. I can see people loving it here and understand why so many come here and I can see why so many people leave. I think I'd prefer to live in London, actually. It seems like there's a little more breathing space there for such a monster city.
   45. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: June 27, 2014 at 08:28 AM (#4737263)
NYC is ####### amazing, it's probably the greatest city in the world but there are other places man.


NYC, like London, is just an amazing city. To visit. Unless you're super rich (which admittedly Robbie Cano is) or a 20-something willing to scrape by in order to be in the center of something all the time, it's not really a living place.
   46. Bitter Mouse Posted: June 27, 2014 at 08:33 AM (#4737265)
it's not really a living place


"Nobody goes there anymore. It's too crowded."
   47. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 08:36 AM (#4737266)

That could work too I imagine! My personal experience example was Nottingham, but I'd bet other British or European towns fit that general outline quite well too.

Of course, living in a neighbourhood on the perimeter of Cambridge would likely mean my career was going fairly well, so it would have that going for it.


Greg, I'm going to London with the family in a couple of weeks. Any suggestions on things to do? Kids range from 10 to 16, so not real young. Obviously I'm looking at Big Ben, Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge. We're renting an apartment in zone 1, whatever the heck that means and won't have a car (I drove in London last year and it was one of the most stressful things I've done).

EDIT: Or anyone else with London experience of course...
   48. Fancy Pants Handles lap changes with class Posted: June 27, 2014 at 08:44 AM (#4737268)
I love and hate living in New York. I love that I can walk to the AMNH or the Met or the Guggenheim or whatever anytime I want. The food is great and there's always something going on. On the other hand, the crowds and the multitudes of people can be like death from a thousand papercuts sometimes. I can see people loving it here and understand why so many come here and I can see why so many people leave. I think I'd prefer to live in London, actually. It seems like there's a little more breathing space there for such a monster city.

Pfft, you just want to be able to go to Spurs matches.
   49. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:00 AM (#4737271)
That could work too I imagine! My personal experience example was Nottingham, but I'd bet other British or European towns fit that general outline quite well too.


I lived in Nottingham for four months on an overseas gig, a few years back. I give the town a lot of ####, just because it's Nottingham (knife-crime capital of the UK!) but truth be told, it wasn't a bad experience at all. (Granted, expense account living makes many places 'not bad.')

I think London would be a lot like NYC, as a longterm living locale. After a month of so of "OHMYGODWECANGODOALLOFTHISANYTIME!!!" I suspect I'd fall into a "I really would just like a quiet night at home that doesn't cost 20 pounds for carry out." That, and as much as I love the UK, I seriously dislike the *houses* and flats I've seen normal people living in. (The hotel rooms are hotel rooms, and pretty nice depending on where you are. But the flats and houses all feel like their recently reconstructed from WWII bombing runs.)
   50. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:08 AM (#4737274)
Something like 4/5ths of Americans live in a city or suburb these days, so a truly rural origin is definitely the minority.


Where do I apply for reparations?
   51. villageidiom Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:13 AM (#4737277)
As someone in love with NYC but that chose to move away after 5 years there let me just say this: the insufferable notion that anyone that chooses not to live there is insane is probably the most annoying thing about the place.
No matter where you are in the world, someone there will emphatically tell you there is no better place than where you are. If you are in San Antonio, someone will tell you it's so much better than "the big city", which is defined as anything larger than San Antonio.

Everywhere you go, you will find insecure people. They need to believe they have made the right choices. Part of that is to deny any possibility that any other choice could have been right, for them or for anyone else, ever. You see it with religion, and politics, and culture, and food, and places to live. And it's damned annoying.

NYC is a great city. That should be good enough.
   52. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:18 AM (#4737278)
No matter where you are in the world, someone there will emphatically tell you there is no better place than where you are. If you are in San Antonio, someone will tell you it's so much better than "the big city", which is defined as anything larger than San Antonio.

Everywhere you go, you will find insecure people. They need to believe they have made the right choices. Part of that is to deny any possibility that any other choice could have been right, for them or for anyone else, ever. You see it with religion, and politics, and culture, and food, and places to live. And it's damned annoying.

NYC is a great city. That should be good enough.


This is true all the way around. I live just outside of Boston and I can't imagine living anywhere else. For a variety of reasons I think it is wonderful here and there is nothing I wish I could do that I can't do.

But that's largely a function of my upbringing (growing up here). I'm not so naive as to think that other parts of the country aren't delightful. If I had grown up in rural Mississippi I would probably love it there too.
   53. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:19 AM (#4737279)
Also I can't believe you said "who cares about traffic, he has a driver and a gameboy". Travel still is a waste of time, it's just easier in canoe case. I sure wouldn't want to take a 2 hour plane ride everyday even if I had the best ####### plasma in the country.

Remember, a Yankee player doesn't have to commute at rush hour, and he doesn't have to commute into Midtown. He can live in any number of fancy Westchester or Northern NJ towns, or the Upper East or Upper West side and be at the Stadium in under 30 minutes.
   54. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:31 AM (#4737282)
No matter where you are in the world, someone there will emphatically tell you there is no better place than where you are.


Not Memphis.
   55. Hal Chase School of Professionalism Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:31 AM (#4737283)
Part of that is to deny any possibility that any other choice could have been right, for them or for anyone else, ever. You see it with religion, and politics, and culture, and food, and places to live.


And baseball fandom.
   56. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:36 AM (#4737286)
Best place I ever lived was the Back Bay in Boston. I am 100 percent cognizant of the fact that where I live now (North Jersey) is not as good as that. However, it is no longer even remotely affordable. And my job is here. Alas.
   57. bobm Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:39 AM (#4737287)
Jeter lived on the east side, right? A-Rod for a while at 15 CPW, which would be one place I would strongly consider were I absurdly wealthy. Matt Harvey lives downtown, I think.


NY Daily News: A-Rod's plan to return to posh 15 Central Park West gets a cold reception
   58. BrianBrianson Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:39 AM (#4737288)

EDIT: Or anyone else with London experience of course...


Depends on your own preferences, but I really like the National Museum. Natural History, too. If you like museums (I do) - they're free, so if you don't like 'em, you can easily up and leave. Buckingham Palace from the outside is so unbelievably drab, the inside might be better (but I can't work myself up to pay given the drabness of the exterior - assuming you pay to get in?).

The National Portrait gallery is boring as all hell, except the sculpture of Victoria and Albert, which always makes me ball. It's right off Trafalger square, so perhaps you'll be around anyhow.
   59. Non-Youkilidian Geometry Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:47 AM (#4737291)
Greg, I'm going to London with the family in a couple of weeks. Any suggestions on things to do? Kids range from 10 to 16, so not real young. Obviously I'm looking at Big Ben, Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge. We're renting an apartment in zone 1, whatever the heck that means and won't have a car (I drove in London last year and it was one of the most stressful things I've done).

EDIT: Or anyone else with London experience of course...

If you're looking for tourist attraction-type stuff, a trip to the Tower of London and a ride on the London Eye are worthwhile. If your kids can handle museums and the like, the British Museum is great and there are all sorts of excellent art galleries. Take a double-decker bus -- if you're going before the end of July you can still take a ride on one of the old Routemasters (Route 9H).

I personally love just walking around London and seeing all the places I've heard and read about over the years. The underground and bus network is excellent and you won't miss having a car.
   60. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:48 AM (#4737292)
If I had grown up in rural Mississippi I would probably love it there too.


Let's not get crazy, now.

(I don't love rural Arkansas, btw, but it's an interesting place to be from. If I lived there now, I'd probably lose my mind -- the couple of hours I spend visiting there every December is quite enough for me. Even so, yeah, it's home.)
   61. Ray (RDP) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:50 AM (#4737294)
NYC is ####### amazing, it's probably the greatest city in the world but there are other places man.


Sure, but none of them are any good.
   62. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:50 AM (#4737295)
If I had grown up in rural Mississippi I would probably love it there too.

Let's not get crazy, now.


Northern Mississippi is beautiful, lush, and riddled with quaint old colorful towns. I love it there.
   63. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 09:53 AM (#4737297)
The underground and bus network is excellent and you won't miss having a car.

Do I buy like a 3-day pass or something? Or just pay each time? I'm a suburbs guy so I have very little experience with mass transit.
   64. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:04 AM (#4737300)
Northern Mississippi is beautiful, lush, and riddled with quaint old colorful towns. I love it there.


Sounds a lot like parts of southern Arkansas. My hometown is too beat-down & not old enough (it was founded a couple of decades after the War to Keep People Like YR Up North Where They Belong, Dammit, But If They Want to Leave Their Money With Us That's A-OK), really, to qualify as "quaint old colorful," at least in my eyes, but the county seat does.

My exposure to Mississippi is largely limited to the central portion, driving across the state on I-20 (where I always get a kick out of seeing exit signs for Flora & Flowers just a few miles apart, not to mention one for Bovina), & the Gulf Coast. Sounds like I've missed out.
   65. bunyon Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:07 AM (#4737303)
The National Portrait gallery is boring as all hell, except the sculpture of Victoria and Albert, which always makes me ball. It's right off Trafalger square, so perhaps you'll be around anyhow.

Disagree, but it fits with the "different strokes" vibe of the discussion. I love the Gallery. Grabbing a sandwich and coffee and sitting out in Trafalger square is a nice way to pass an hour. Hyde Park is incredible, especially late afternoon.

The Imperial War Museum is awesome, as well. It was much better than I'd expected. You should go to St. Paul's and then walk across the bridge to Tate's. Tate's wasn't my taste but if it is, it's the best in the world for that.

Shopping at the market in Camden is cool.

Depending on interest, I really enjoyed Greenwich Observatory. You could probably find a boat down the river to see it.

I personally love just walking around London and seeing all the places I've heard and read about over the years. The underground and bus network is excellent and you won't miss having a car.

Yeah. Make a point of just finding some local pub and having a long afternoon/evening of dinner and drinks. The great tourist stops are really cool, yes. But London has an excellent vibe outside of those. I think you can get 3- and 7-day oyster cards upon arrival. Depending on where you're staying, Zones 1 and 2 should suffice.

Touring the Tower is cool. Lots of history and has a neat feel. There is a bit of Roman wall nearby. Probably the most accessible piece of wall I've seen in London.

The British Museum is top-notch. You could easily spend weeks there. Of course, you say 10-16, so probably not. But you could pop in, see the Rosetta Stone and then do one wing or something.



   66. Moeball Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:11 AM (#4737308)
Bill James' comments on Rick Cerone BITD:

"As a catcher, the Yankees have replaced the late Thurman Munson with Rick Cerone. Cerone is to catching more or less what Thurman was to aviation...". Ouch!

I've visited NY, had a great time. With a zillion things available you can do just about anything you care to.

Here's one that the local NY Primates could probably come up with - a T shirt that says on the front "Top 10 things to love about NY". On the back it could say "Top 10 things to hate about NY". The funny thing would be if you could come up with 10 things that could go on both lists, depending on your perspective. When I first got there I was going, "Wow, I'm in Manhattan and there's a Jewish deli on every corner!" After seeing 437 Jewish delis I was going "There's a Jewish deli on every stinking corner - seriously?" I'm sure those of you who live there have your own love/hate relationships with all things NY that you see on a daily basis.

Oh, one thing I would be remiss if I didn't mention: those of you who are regulars at Yankee Stadium - where did they put Monument Park in the new place? I know it was out beyond CF in the old stadium. The sad thing was that I had to explain to a lot of Yankee fans who all of the people were that are honored there. Outside of Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Joe DiMaggio and Mickey Mantle, most of the Yankee fans I saw there didn't recognize the other names. That's sad. They thought Yogi Berra was some TV personality and didn't realize he was a tremendous baseball player. And any Yankee fan who doesn't know who Ed Barrow is...well, they have to live with themselves so I guess that's punishment enough.

But what do I know? I live in San Diego.
   67. Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:17 AM (#4737313)
the sculpture of Victoria and Albert, which always makes me ball.

With any willing party who happens by, or do you have dedicated partner for such occasions?
   68. BrianBrianson Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:17 AM (#4737316)
Make a point of just finding some local pub and having a long afternoon/evening of dinner and drinks


Indeed, if you come to England and don't spend time in the pubs, I don't know why you bothered.

And maybe, buy a can of beer and drink it walking down the street. It's ... an experience.

With any willing party who happens by, or do you have dedicated partner for such occasions?


Err, me wife ain't mind me dancing with strangers, but of course I meant it gets me right in the feels (as the young people say).
   69. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:19 AM (#4737318)
New York is a great city if you can afford it. End of story.
   70. The kids disappeared, now Der-K has too much candy Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:21 AM (#4737321)
After seeing 437 Jewish delis I was going "There's a Jewish deli on every stinking corner - seriously?"

I fail to see how this could ever be a problem.
   71. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:24 AM (#4737322)
Remember, a Yankee player doesn't have to commute at rush hour, and he doesn't have to commute into Midtown. He can live in any number of fancy Westchester or Northern NJ towns, or the Upper East or Upper West side and be at the Stadium in under 30 minutes.

Just out of curiosity, how many current Yankees live in either the City or the Bronx? In the early dynasty years it was common for players to live there. By the 1950's the entire team lived either upriver (Lake Success, etc.) or in Jersey or Connecticut. In the 70's Reggie lived in Manhattan, but how many others? And other than Jeter, how many of his teammates have city addresses?
   72. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:28 AM (#4737324)
After seeing 437 Jewish delis I was going "There's a Jewish deli on every stinking corner - seriously?"


I fail to see how this could ever be a problem.

There used to be hundreds of used book shops and pool rooms in the city. Now there are but a tiny handful of either of them. AFAIC that's more of a problem that the presence or absence of the 147,023rd restaurant.
   73. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:28 AM (#4737325)
New York's alright if you like saxophones.
   74. Ray (RDP) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:29 AM (#4737326)
Just out of curiosity, how many current Yankees live in either the City or the Bronx?


No idea but at least Jeter, ARod, and Brendan Ryan. Clemens lived in the city during his time here as well.

I got in a cab a few weeks ago and the driver had just taken Ryan from the upper east up to the stadium for the game.
   75. Emperor Penguin Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:35 AM (#4737332)
Just out of curiosity, how many current Yankees live in either the City or the Bronx? In the early dynasty years it was common for players to live there. By the 1950's the entire team lived either upriver (Lake Success, etc.) or in Jersey or Connecticut. In the 70's Reggie lived in Manhattan, but how many others? And other than Jeter, how many of his teammates have city addresses?

Chuck Knoblauch used to ride the train to the Stadium. I think he lived on the UES.
   76. Emperor Penguin Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:36 AM (#4737335)
There used to be hundreds of used book shops and pool rooms in the city. Now there are but a tiny handful of either of them. AFAIC that's more of a problem that the presence or absence of the 147,023rd restaurant.

The pool establishment at 207th and Broadway looks to have been significantly snazzed up lately.
   77. GregD Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:38 AM (#4737338)
Greg Pope, are your kids into Harry Potter? If so or if you like history and some sights, the trip to Cambridge is cool. At King's Cross, there's some tourist stuff for the mythical Track 9 3/4. The ride to Cambridge is easy. When you get there, you want to get to the Eagle (you can sit where Watson & Crick celebrated the discovery of DNA) and pay entry to a few of the main colleges and walk a couple of the bridges or take a quick punt. It'll take you most of a day by the time you get out there and go around, but you could easily be back in London for dinner.

If you're not at all into history or your kids aren't into Harry Potter or you're squeezed for time, you're probably better off not going though. It's a place I plan to take my kids pretty soon because they are, alas, both history nerds and HP obsessives.
   78. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:41 AM (#4737342)
my kids pretty soon because they are, alas, both history nerds and HP obsessives.


So ... do they live in their mother's basement or in your mother's basement?
   79. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:42 AM (#4737344)
Thanks for the London info, everyone.

We're staying within walking distance of the Tower, and we want to see at least one cathedral. So St. Paul's looks convenient. Probably spend a day in that area, then another day over by Big Ben.

Museums are hit and miss for my group, although more positive as they've gotten older. One of them learned about the Rosetta Stone, so may be interested in that.

Probably not looking for a whole evening of pub drinking, though. :)

If we go to Greenwich, I think all of the kids will be asking where Thor fought Malekith. But they might enjoy it anyway.

So the zones are for mass transit? I'm going to need some help with that one. Also, figuring out how to get 6 people with luggage from Heathrow to central London.
   80. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:43 AM (#4737345)
There are very few Jewish delis left in NY.
   81. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:48 AM (#4737350)
Greg Pope, are your kids into Harry Potter? If so or if you like history and some sights, the trip to Cambridge is cool.

Absolutely! We're going on the Studio Tour and have our tickets already. Is that what you're talking about, or is there someplace else?

EDIT: I see by the map that they're nowhere near each other. So is there HP stuff in Cambridge?
   82. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:49 AM (#4737351)
Also, not that we're going to be drinking, but any specific pub recommendations in the area around the Tower, and around Big Ben? While I'm fine to just wander in somewhere, suggestions are always welcome.
   83. Shooty Is Disappointed With His Midstream Urine Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:49 AM (#4737352)
There are very few Jewish delis left in NY.

Sadly, true. Most of the delis are just corner stores with a bunch of Boar's Head in a refrigerator.
   84. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:51 AM (#4737354)
There used to be hundreds of used book shops and pool rooms in the city. Now there are but a tiny handful of either of them. AFAIC that's more of a problem that the presence or absence of the 147,023rd restaurant.

The pool establishment at 207th and Broadway looks to have been significantly snazzed up lately.


There are a scattering of good rooms that sprouted up since The Color of Money kicked off a mini-revival of the game, but they're almost all gone now, and very few of them have been replaced. And none of them are remotely comparable to McGirr's on 8th and 44th, or the 711 on Broadway and 43rd, where you could get played the moment you stepped through the door. But the real golden age of pool was in the 1920's, when Manhattan alone had over 1000 rooms, and press coverage of the major tournaments and exhibitions was up there with coverage of baseball and horse racing.
   85. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 27, 2014 at 10:55 AM (#4737358)
Chuck Knoblauch used to ride the train to the Stadium.


...until 1999, when he started having problems putting the fare money into the slot at the turnstile. Kept bouncing quarters off Keith Olbermann's mom's head.
   86. BrianBrianson Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:20 AM (#4737369)
EDIT: I see by the map that they're nowhere near each other. So is there HP stuff in Cambridge?


Not really, other than colleges that have the look of it. Cambridge is just pubs and museums and colleges, and our best museum is shut 'til 2016. Architecture, maybe.
   87. bunyon Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:23 AM (#4737374)
If we go to Greenwich, I think all of the kids will be asking where Thor fought Malekith. But they might enjoy it anyway.

Indeed. When that scene appeared I was happy to note that I had stood in the very spot. They'd get a kick out of that. You say history nerd but if they have some just general nerd, you can stand in eastern and western hemisphere simultaneously. There is a lot of maritime history (can't remember the name of the museum) in Greenwich.

And, given their history nerdom, I re-emphasize the Imperial War Museum. You might also consider the War Rooms.
   88. bunyon Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:32 AM (#4737378)
So the zones are for mass transit? I'm going to need some help with that one. Also, figuring out how to get 6 people with luggage from Heathrow to central London.

Yeah, the city is divided into concentric (more or less) zones. Zone 1* is the interior. It is very likely a tourist staying in zone 1 will never leave zone 1. Zone 2 is next out, etc. As a tourist, I've never travelled to zone 3 or 4 (I've passed through them, leaving or coming into the city, obviously).


* I am NOT a Londoner. Been there a number of times and love it, but I may very well miss some details.


As for getting from Heathrow, depends on money and time. There is a train to, I think, King's Cross. From there, take the tube to where ever you're going. Easy enough. If you have the money, you can get a cab but for six people with bags, I don't know if that would work. Won't be a lot of fun but it won't be hell, either (the train that is). Ten is the youngest? Shouldn't be too hard to have them each take a bag, right? Don't buy anything from anyone in the train stations. My wife nearly got sold on some very expensive cheap perfume.
   89. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:42 AM (#4737385)
Train to King's Cross should work fine for the group. Overall they're responsible and well-behaved, and each has their own luggage.

So once I get to King's Cross, I buy a (single or 6?) Oyster card and then take the tube all around? The place we're staying in advertised Zone 1, so we should be good there.
   90. Swoboda is freedom Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:42 AM (#4737386)
If we go to Greenwich, I think all of the kids will be asking where Thor fought Malekith. But they might enjoy it anyway.

Definitely worth it. I lived in London for 5 years, but never went there. Last year, my family and I went to London and it was a highlight. Take a walk on the south embankment. After doing the London Eye, you can catch the boat out there. The boat trip is pretty interesting, they point out various important buildings and where celebrities live etc. Greenwich was beautiful and interesting. Good for an afternoon. You can catch the train back.
   91. GregD Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:43 AM (#4737388)
EDIT: I see by the map that they're nowhere near each other. So is there HP stuff in Cambridge?
Not organized stuff but it is what much of the look was modeled on and has some amazingly beautiful old colleges.
   92. Random Transaction Generator Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:45 AM (#4737389)
Another suggestion for London is to go on one of the "Jack the Ripper" night time walking tours. It's interesting to hear the history and see the locations while walking through London.

I also give a hearty "YES" to visiting the Imperial War Museum, specifically the Churchill War Rooms. I could have spent all day in there.
   93. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:53 AM (#4737393)
Another suggestion for London is to go on one of the "Jack the Ripper" night time walking tours. It's interesting to hear the history and see the locations while walking through London.


It looks like the walking tours are a pretty popular item in London. I've seen the Ripper ones advertised and the Harry Potter one as well (among others). They look really interesting.
   94. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:54 AM (#4737394)
After doing the London Eye, you can catch the boat out there. The boat trip is pretty interesting, they point out various important buildings and where celebrities live etc.

That's awesome. I didn't even think about a boat cruise, but it looks like it really fits the bill. Maybe I can do that one on the first day and they can see the sights that we'll be visiting later.
   95. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:56 AM (#4737395)
Another suggestion for London is to go on one of the "Jack the Ripper" night time walking tours. It's interesting to hear the history and see the locations while walking through London.

Concur. Took a tour given by one of the Yeoman Warders from the Tower. Excellent.

Unfortunately, it stays light out too damn late in Summer in those latitudes, so you'll miss the full creepy effect. It would be more fun in winter.
   96. bunyon Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:56 AM (#4737396)
I buy a (single or 6?) Oyster card and then take the tube all around?

I think you need a card for everyone. But you might check if an under 12 can go on an adult's card ( doubt it, though).

And the tube does just about anything you'd ever need. The tube is awesome. If you cna't go by tube, walk.
   97. Swoboda is freedom Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:59 AM (#4737399)
That's awesome. I didn't even think about a boat cruise, but it looks like it really fits the bill. Maybe I can do that one on the first day and they can see the sights that we'll be visiting later.

And the boats have a bar. We had a nice cold Stella as we cruised up the Thames.
   98. Non-Youkilidian Geometry Posted: June 27, 2014 at 11:59 AM (#4737400)
We're staying within walking distance of the Tower, and we want to see at least one cathedral. So St. Paul's looks convenient. Probably spend a day in that area, then another day over by Big Ben.

Westminster Abbey is near the Houses of Parliament and is worth checking out if you're into tombs of famous people, but St. Paul's is more impressive as a building.

Central London is surprisingly compact, so I wouldn't necessarily restrict yourself to spending a full day near St. Paul's and another day near Parliament - they're not really very far apart and walking or taking the bus around London is half the fun.

EDIT: I'm also not a Londoner but have been there several times, including last fall.
   99. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 27, 2014 at 12:04 PM (#4737402)
Central London is surprisingly compact, so I wouldn't necessarily restrict yourself to spending a full day near St. Paul's and another day near Parliament - they're not really very far apart and walking or taking the bus around London is half the fun.

Yeah, I'm trying to get a feel for how much we can get done in a day. I don't want to schedule too little in a day if things are close. But also don't want to leave too much to the last day and then find we run out of time.
   100. bunyon Posted: June 27, 2014 at 12:05 PM (#4737403)
Unrelated, I just read that Avengers 2 is filming in London at the moment. Not sure if you could accidentally on purpose come across them or not but it might make the kids happy.


Second the notion that walking from the Tower to Parliament is a good idea. (Especially if one gets a crown at the end. Just don't walk the other way.)
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