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Thursday, June 05, 2008

Rush vocalist makes donation to Negro Leagues Museum

Close to 200 baseballs, all autographed by former Negro Leagues baseball players or backers, have been donated to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum by a somewhat surprising fan ... Rush singer/bassist Geddy Lee.

Really Repoz should write this intro, not me.

Mike Webber Posted: June 05, 2008 at 04:32 PM | 466 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: memorabilia, music, negro leagues

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   1. ColonelTom Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:02 PM (#2807399)
"Living in the limelight, the universal dream..."
   2. Halofan Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:05 PM (#2807415)
If you choose no to donate, you still have made a choice...
   3. Maury Brown Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:13 PM (#2807470)
All I can say is YYZ and Stick it Out. La Villa Strangiato!
   4. SoSH U at work Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:20 PM (#2807509)
Nothing more than to point out this is pretty cool. Well done Geddy.
   5. GGC don't think it can get longer than a novella Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:24 PM (#2807538)
Really Repoz should write this intro, not me.


No. Their songs are longer than 2:30.

But I would have mentioned something about a donation from the J. Paul Geddy Foundation.
   6. Free Kila Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:27 PM (#2807556)
I wonder what the trees think of this.
   7. Cabbage Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:33 PM (#2807599)
I hate that band.
   8. WillYoung Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:38 PM (#2807634)
I saw Geddy Lee attending a Twins game a few weeks ago. I just assumed he was there to cheer on Morneau.
   9. Kurt Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:45 PM (#2807669)
Why is this surprising? They've been baseball fans for years - wasn't there a map of "Warren Cromartie Stadium" on the back cover of Signals?

Edit: oops - it was was Warren Cromartie Secondary School.
   10. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:48 PM (#2807688)
Band credits on the back cover of Signals:

Geddy Lee - Bass guitars, synthesizers, vocals, Pitcher
Alex Lifeson - Electric and acoustic guitars, Taurus pedals, First Base
Neil Peart - Drums and percussion, Third Base

Back on topic, this is a wonderful thing for Lee to do.
   11. Repoz Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:51 PM (#2807712)
Didn't Geddy Lee post here and Stern's site under the name High Pitch Eric Milton?
   12. Mike Webber Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:51 PM (#2807713)
Why is this surprising?


Well, maybe because the person that wrote the article writes for the entertainment section rather than the sports section.

This is one of those cool things you think about sometime, "If I had a bunch of cash, who would I donate to, and what would I give then..."

Obviously if I had the cash I would buy an O.J. Mayo for Kansas State, but you know I was really thinking of something more humanitarian, this donation would be right up there.
   13. SoSH U at work Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:54 PM (#2807724)
Why is this surprising? They've been baseball fans for years - wasn't there a map of "Warren Cromartie Stadium" on the back cover of Signals?


I've been a baseball fan for years. I don't have a collection of 200 baseballs signed by Negro Leaguers to give to the Negro League Museum, and if I did, I might keep them for myself.

And nice work as fact-checking cuz, Vortex.
   14. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:59 PM (#2807749)
I must admit, when I scanned the headline and saw "Rush" and "Negro", I thought this was going somewhere completely different.
   15. Ryan Lind Posted: June 05, 2008 at 07:59 PM (#2807750)

Alex Lifeson - Electric and acoustic guitars, Taurus pedals, First Base


, Traffic Cop.
   16. Charter Member of the Jesus Melendez Fanclub Posted: June 05, 2008 at 08:04 PM (#2807770)
I have no idea what Rush sounds like but I have the feeling I would hate them.
   17. Mike Webber Posted: June 05, 2008 at 08:05 PM (#2807779)
I have no idea what Rush sounds like but I have the feeling I would hate them.


Charter are you done with junior high for the summer, or did school just let out?
   18. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 05, 2008 at 08:07 PM (#2807786)
I have no idea what Rush sounds like but I have the feeling I would hate them.


Assuming you have ears & a brain, I think that's a pretty safe assumption on your part.
   19. GGC don't think it can get longer than a novella Posted: June 05, 2008 at 08:16 PM (#2807824)
I'd describe Rush as prog rock that leans towards Zeppelin-style hard rock. Early albums had epic songs (as in lengthy.) Peart is one helluva drummer. Lee has a high-pitched whine for a voice. Lifeson did guitar solos that some consider virtuoso while others might call them masturbatory.

Dimino is a big fan, as are some other Primates. "Subdivisions" rocked. I think it was in some odd time signature too. Something like 13/16, but I may be thinking of a Genesis song.
   20. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 05, 2008 at 08:53 PM (#2807944)
I'd describe Rush as prog rock that leans towards Zeppelin-style hard rock. Early albums had epic songs (as in lengthy.) Peart is one helluva drummer. Lee has a high-pitched whine for a voice. Lifeson did guitar solos that some consider virtuoso while others might call them masturbatory.


They do a nice cover of Crossroads
   21. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: June 05, 2008 at 09:08 PM (#2807997)
Didn't Geddy Lee post here and Stern's site under the name High Pitch Eric Milton?
"Who's high pitch? This is Gary Weinrib!"
   22. Padraic Posted: June 05, 2008 at 09:32 PM (#2808103)
guitar solos that some consider virtuoso while others might call them masturbatory.


Are these things mutually exclusive?
   23. The importance of being Ernest Riles Posted: June 05, 2008 at 09:37 PM (#2808113)
I think it was in some odd time signature too. Something like 13/16, but I may be thinking of a Genesis song.

Many of their songs are written in a non-traditional time signature.
   24. Answer Guy Posted: June 05, 2008 at 09:40 PM (#2808120)
"Subdivisions" rocked. I think it was in some odd time signature too. Something like 13/16, but I may be thinking of a Genesis song.


13/8 is the verses in Genesis' "Turn It On Again."

"Subdivisions," which resembles "Turn It On Again" in many ways, does go into some odd time signature during parts of the chorus and instrumental interludes (I'm counting 12/8 listening to the chorus) while the verses shift between standard 4/4 and 7/8. Rush does like time and tempo changes even in many of their shorter numbers. Both songs have a similar synth-heavy sound, change time signatures a lot and nonetheless have enough pop hooks that to get airplay on classic rock stations. ("Turn It On Again" is currently being used in a GMC Truck commercial.)
   25. Greasy Neale Heaton (Dan Lee) Posted: June 05, 2008 at 09:52 PM (#2808134)
"Superconductor" is in several different time signatures, IIRC. I think I remember the band joking that it's a song you'd break your leg trying to dance to.
   26. Answer Guy Posted: June 05, 2008 at 10:10 PM (#2808159)
I think most prog rock is designed for people who can't dance, since its rhythms put everyone on equal footing as far as being able to move to the music.
   27. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 05, 2008 at 10:10 PM (#2808160)
Any chance this thread gets 2112 posts?
   28. Answer Guy Posted: June 05, 2008 at 10:13 PM (#2808164)
Any chance this thread gets 2112 posts?


Hehe. Only if someone brings up politics or steroids. I don't think the Red Sox, Yankees, Mets, or basketball could get us there.
   29. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 05, 2008 at 10:15 PM (#2808165)
I think most prog rock is designed for people who can't dance, since its rhythms put everyone on equal footing as far as being able to move to the music.


I can't dance, I can't talk.
The only thing about me is the way I walk.
I can't dance, I can't sing
I'm just standing here selling everything.

Of course, they weren't a prog rock band by that time.
   30. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 05, 2008 at 11:26 PM (#2808312)
"Superconductor" is in several different time signatures, IIRC. I think I remember the band joking that it's a song you'd break your leg trying to dance to.


No doubt. A very good example of Math Rock.
   31. Chase Utley, Shooty's Favorite Robot (Joey Belle) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 12:22 AM (#2808443)
It's all about "Subdivisions", "Closer To The Heart", and Alex Lifeson appearing on an episode of The Trailer Park Boys.
   32. Darren Posted: June 06, 2008 at 12:30 AM (#2808463)
Was it a big money donation?
   33. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 06, 2008 at 12:40 AM (#2808476)
Was it a big money donation?


In the end, it was the best they could. Circumstances required them to treat this with kid gloves, so afterimage of the limelight of some working men finding their way through the camera eye didn't end up face up in Xanadu under the trees.
   34. Dr Stankus and the Semicolons Posted: June 06, 2008 at 05:07 AM (#2809256)
Geddy Lee. Best bass player ever.
   35. Fred Garvin is dead to Mug Posted: June 06, 2008 at 05:24 AM (#2809326)
Geddy Lee. Best bass player ever.

I love Rush and Geddy is a great bassist. Hell, I even play a Geddy Lee signature Fender Jazz Bass.

To say he's the best ever is a stretch, though. Listen to Jaco Pastorius, James Jamerson, or even Flea. Sting is probably better. My favorite, though, may be Paul McCartney because so much of what he brought was revolutionary at the time (and now commonplace).

Again, this isn't to say that Geddy is bad. He's among the top, but not #1.
   36. Lassus Posted: June 06, 2008 at 05:30 AM (#2809332)
...or even Flea

Always a fan, saw them play in 1989 for 5 bucks, but Flea isn't even in the top 10 IMO.
   37. Robert S. Posted: June 06, 2008 at 05:31 AM (#2809333)
What about the voice of Geddy Lee? How did it get so high? I wonder if he speaks like an ordinary guy?
   38. PerroX Posted: June 06, 2008 at 05:35 AM (#2809336)
Rush was one of the first concerts I ever went to as a kid.

Smokiest damn place I've ever been in my life. Probably what a house fire is like.

Still have affection for the band and my nerdy teenage self who was once a fan.


Spirit of Radio
   39. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:30 AM (#2809353)
Rush is awesome. I get to see them in concert for the first time this summer.
   40. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:56 AM (#2809358)
Rush is pretty godawful. Well, mediocre is a better term. The golden standards for prog are Genesis (1970-1980, though the next two albums Abacab and Genesis were excellent as well, just not very prog anymore), King Crimson (1972-1974, specifically Red and U.S.A.), and Yes (1969-1977, particularly The Yes Album, Close To The Edge, and Going For The One). There are few albums in any genre that are better or more inspiring than Genesis' Selling England By The Pound. ELP has a few decent songs but no really fantastic albums (their first comes closest). And their most beautiful track, "Trilogy," is more or less ruined by its ploddingly goofy final third.

By the way, John Entwistle is the best rock bassist ever. Let's ignore jazz bassists...that's a whole 'nother beast.
   41. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:27 AM (#2809382)
Rush is pretty godawful. Well, mediocre is a better term.


Actually, in their synth phase, from Permanent Waves through Presto, they were a pretty good band, with a melodic sensibility that doesn't show itself in their other incarnations, and they really reigned in the excesses. Their albums weren't the most consistent, but you can put together a good 80-minute CD of highlights from that period. I wouldn't call it prog, though.

The golden standards for prog are Genesis (1970-1980, though the next two albums Abacab and Genesis were excellent as well, just not very prog anymore), King Crimson (1972-1974, specifically Red and U.S.A.), and Yes (1969-1977, particularly The Yes Album, Close To The Edge, and Going For The One). There are few albums in any genre that are better or more inspiring than Genesis' Selling England By The Pound. ELP has a few decent songs but no really fantastic albums (their first comes closest). And their most beautiful track, "Trilogy," is more or less ruined by its ploddingly goofy final third.


Can't disagree on any of that, although I think Crimson's In the Court of Crimson King is every bit as good as claimed, and I still think Starless and Bible Black is their best album. I also think Relayer is my favorite Yes album, mainly for "The Gates of Delirium", which is an absolute sonic knockout. Selling England is the prog album, though, hands down. I'd also throw Camel in there, although their albums were inconsistent as hell. There aren't many better prog tracks than "A Song Within a Song" from A Live Record, which kills the studio version...

Best rock bassists:

1. Peter Hook (Joy Division/New Order)
2. Paul McCartney
3. John Entwistle
4. Tony Butler (Big Country)
5. Chris Squire (Yes)
   42. Halofan Posted: June 06, 2008 at 09:04 AM (#2809387)
I just recalled that Geddy Lee sang OH CANADA when the Blue Jays played in the world series.
   43. RMc's desperate, often sordid world Posted: June 06, 2008 at 12:07 PM (#2809415)
"Take off...to the great white north...!!"
   44. Craig Calcaterra Posted: June 06, 2008 at 12:52 PM (#2809434)
You can tell a lot about a guy based on the following things:

1) his favorite sport;
2) his choice of beer; and
3) how he feels about Rush.

Not sayin' there are any right or wrong answers. Just sayin' that, if you know that stuff about someone, you can pretty much figure out most other things worth knowing.
   45. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 06, 2008 at 12:56 PM (#2809437)
Actually, in their synth phase, from Permanent Waves through Presto, they were a pretty good band, with a melodic sensibility that doesn't show itself in their other incarnations, and they really reigned in the excesses. Their albums weren't the most consistent, but you can put together a good 80-minute CD of highlights from that period. I wouldn't call it prog, though.

Keeping in mind that I know nothing about music theory (I have no idea what people are talking about with the ratios above), my understanding is that Rush adapts (or attempts to adapt) to popular music. So the were Zeppelin-esque when they started, then moved to prog rock, then to synth in the 80's. Did they try to incorporate grunge in the 90's? I didn't like grunge and I didn't like 90's Rush either.

IOW, you can't really say that they don't fit into certain categories without discussing which time frame you're talking about. And it's not surprising to think that they were good in one era but not like them in another.
   46. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:00 PM (#2809440)
Geddy Lee. Best bass player ever.


How odd -- till now, I've never realized that "Geddy Lee" is apparently the English translation of "Jean-Jacques Burnel" (Stranglers bassist).
   47. Greg Pope thinks the Cubs are reeking havoc Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:00 PM (#2809441)
OK, Craig:

1. Baseball
2. Don't drink beer
3. Love Rush up through Roll the Bones

What can you tell me?
   48. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:03 PM (#2809444)
For me --

1) baseball.
2) couldn't stand it even back when I could (& did) drink.
3) one of those hideous bands that helped make punk necessary.
   49. Craig Calcaterra Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:11 PM (#2809450)
OK, Craig:

1. Baseball
2. Don't drink beer
3. Love Rush up through Roll the Bones

What can you tell me?


Obviously everyone here is going to answer baseball. I probably should have changed "beer" to "choice of alcoholic beverage" because that probably tells you more. That said:

Greg is conflicted: His love of baseball and Rush is consistent with a somewhat Canadian mindset (Canadians are hockey people, but they love their baseball), but his aversion to beer would likely keep him barred from the country.

Let me guess: you're from Port Huron, Michigan, and you gaze longingly across the Blue Water Bridge, wishing you'd be accepted in your spiritual home?
   50. GGC don't think it can get longer than a novella Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:11 PM (#2809452)
Rush adapts (or attempts to adapt) to popular music. So the were Zeppelin-esque when they started, then moved to prog rock, then to synth in the 80's. Did they try to incorporate grunge in the 90's? I didn't like grunge and I didn't like 90's Rush either.


I suppose that if they were around back in the '50s, they would have incorporated the Bo Diddley Beat on those songs. I don't recall a grunge phase, but there's a rap on "Roll The Bones".
   51. Craig Calcaterra Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:12 PM (#2809454)
For me --

1) baseball.
2) couldn't stand it even back when I could (& did) drink.
3) one of those hideous bands that helped make punk necessary.


You're the bizarro Repoz from the straightedge universe?
   52. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:16 PM (#2809457)
Does that mean I should start posting as Zepor? Arkansas & Alabama probably are the Bizarro New York ...
   53. salfino Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:27 PM (#2809466)
Best rock bassists:

1. Peter Hook (Joy Division/New Order)
2. Paul McCartney
3. John Entwistle
4. Tony Butler (Big Country)
5. Chris Squire (Yes)


I don't know what your definition of "rock" is, but James Jamerson is in the R&R Hall of Fame (so I guess he counts) and is to the bass what Babe Ruth is to the Louisville Slugger. McCartney is a very underrated, according to Lennon when he was not generous in his praise of Paul.
   54. Van Lingle Mungo Jerry Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:31 PM (#2809469)
A conversation about the best rock bassists that doesn't include Les Clayool is not a conversation worth having.

Tommy The Cat. And, yes, that's Waits on guest vocals.
   55. salfino Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:33 PM (#2809471)
So the were Zeppelin-esque when they started, then moved to prog rock, then to synth in the 80's.

No. Rush was never "Prog." But Prog people tend to like them, which is where the confusion comes in. Plus their lyrics are suitably dense and pass for some sort of deep thinking if you're stoned enough (I guess).
   56. salfino Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:37 PM (#2809473)
The Rush-Prog connection is appreciating musical skill over musical sound.
   57. Van Lingle Mungo Jerry Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:40 PM (#2809477)
Oh yeah, Tony Levin too.
   58. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:42 PM (#2809478)
A conversation about the best rock bassists that doesn't include Les Clayool is not a conversation worth having.


ah, beat me to it mungo
   59. cheng Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:47 PM (#2809485)
Not really a "rock" guy (though you could call him that, among many, many other things) but the best bassist alive has to be Victor Wootten. Check out some of his stuff on YouTube, he really should be more famous than he is.
   60. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 01:51 PM (#2809488)
1. Peter Hook (Joy Division/New Order)


Speaking of whom (sort of), a couple of nights ago I watched Control & was quite impressed, though probably the fact that Joy Division is one of my favorite bands ever biased me in the film's favor anyway. Anyone else seen it?
   61. Charles S. will not yield to this monkey court Posted: June 06, 2008 at 02:08 PM (#2809507)
Rush was one of the first concerts I ever went to as a kid.

Smokiest damn place I've ever been in my life. Probably what a house fire is like.

Still have affection for the band and my nerdy teenage self who was once a fan.


I could have made exactly the same post. You weren't at the New Haven Coliseum in December 1982, were you?
   62. Van Lingle Mungo Jerry Posted: June 06, 2008 at 02:14 PM (#2809515)
Ditto for me on Rush. I saw them at the Brendan Byrne arena on the Moving Pictures tour in the fall of '81 and even in such a high-ceilinged venue, it felt like being in one of those (formerly) smoky Ukrainian bars in the East Village.
   63. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 02:20 PM (#2809522)
wow, the random things you learn from the intertubes ... screwing around with links off the "Tommy the Cat" video, i learned that Claypool auditioned for Metallica after Cliff Burton died. It's pretty obvious why it didn't happen (different styles, influences and talent levels) but damn if i wouldn't have bought a ticket to watch whatever they might have come up with. Just one of those weird musical intersections that never stuck, like Tony Iommi playing in Jethro Tull for a short time (1 show) before going back to the band that would soon become Black Sabbath
   64. Clemenza Posted: June 06, 2008 at 02:24 PM (#2809524)
I just listened to Power Windows last night. I happen to think it's a often overlooked Rush album and quite good.

I can vividly remember listenting to my brother's tape of Exit...Stage Left and replaying YYZ a dozen times in a row. They started to lose me after Presto.

1) Baseball
2) Guiness
3) Love 'em
   65. JC in DC Posted: June 06, 2008 at 02:52 PM (#2809565)
Rush is pretty godawful. Well, mediocre is a better term. The golden standards for prog are Genesis (1970-1980, though the next two albums Abacab and Genesis were excellent as well, just not very prog anymore), King Crimson (1972-1974, specifically Red and U.S.A.), and Yes (1969-1977, particularly The Yes Album, Close To The Edge, and Going For The One). There are few albums in any genre that are better or more inspiring than Genesis' Selling England By The Pound. ELP has a few decent songs but no really fantastic albums (their first comes closest). And their most beautiful track, "Trilogy," is more or less ruined by its ploddingly goofy final third.

By the way, John Entwistle is the best rock bassist ever. Let's ignore jazz bassists...that's a whole 'nother beast.


Agree completely. And while I think McCartney's underrated, he's not really in the top 5 in terms of bass playing alone. He's excellent, but Tony Levin's got to be there, I like the Hook pick, as I said in the Lounge, Mark King (Level 42) is very underrated, I think Flea is overrated, I'd rank Les Claypool above him, and you gotta have space for Jack Bruce, no?

The Ox shortly before the Rock Star Diet (coke, whores, and red wine) did him in.
   66. jolietconvict Posted: June 06, 2008 at 03:08 PM (#2809592)
i learned that Claypool auditioned for Metallica after Cliff Burton died. It's pretty obvious why it didn't happen (different styles, influences and talent levels) but damn if i wouldn't have bought a ticket to watch whatever they might have come up with.


Check out the video on youtube of les playing master of puppets on bass.
   67. aleskel Posted: June 06, 2008 at 03:16 PM (#2809601)
By the way, John Entwistle is the best rock bassist ever

totally agree. I can't thik of another bassist who completely carried his band's sound without calling any attention to himself.
   68. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 03:32 PM (#2809619)
Check out the video on youtube of les playing master of puppets on bass.


heh. i did. that's where i saw the story of the Metallica audition for the 1st time. supposedly that's the song Les chose to audition with. me? i'd like to hear his interpretation of "Orion". damn pity the bus didn't take Lars.
   69. JPWF13 Posted: June 06, 2008 at 03:39 PM (#2809634)
The best bass player I ever heard live was Stu Hamm, long time ago, playing with Joe Satriani at a dive in Bayshore New York, 15-20 years ago? Good god I'm getting old
   70. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 03:45 PM (#2809642)
and you gotta have space for Jack Bruce, no?


i'll second that. to listen to live cream is to appreciate just how much of cream's sound was bruce and baker and how often bruce's bass had the lead ... and how often they were dragging clapton's sorry ass around.

is eric clapton the don sutton of hall-of-fame guitarists? undeniably good, but only occasionally great? that's probably selling him somewhat short, but i don't know if there's another supposed "pantheon" guitarist who bores me with anything approaching the same consistency
   71. JC in DC Posted: June 06, 2008 at 03:57 PM (#2809658)
I love these discussions, b/c they're so preference-driven, and you start to recall guys you hadn't even thought of, but who, once mentioned, are incredibly gifted artists.
   72. Dr Stankus and the Semicolons Posted: June 06, 2008 at 05:50 PM (#2809792)
@34 was an Orgazmo reference.

Shoulda put it in quotes.

I've got no use for Rush. Even as a mopey teenager.
   73. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:02 PM (#2809801)
1) his favorite sport;
2) his choice of beer; and
3) how he feels about Rush.

1) Duh.
2) Like to vary but if I had to choose one it would be a Black and Tan. Guiness by itself is too thick.
3) I was phasing out of my "Prog Rock"/mainstream Classic Rock days when Rush came on the scene. They were critically acclaimed but I never heard enough to know if I would really like them or not. So I never bought anything; in fact, I can not tell you the name of 1 Rush song or album. Just this morning I heard an ad on the radio about the super-phenomenal, life-changing event that will be an up-coming Rush concert. They were playing some song in the background, and once the caterwauling singing started, I realized why I never listened to them.
EDIT: It is a pretty cool thing that Geddy Lee did.
   74. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:03 PM (#2809802)
is eric clapton the don sutton of hall-of-fame guitarists? undeniably good, but only occasionally great? that's probably selling him somewhat short, but i don't know if there's another supposed "pantheon" guitarist who bores me with anything approaching the same consistency
Outside of Cream, Blind Faith, and Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (in other words, outside of '66-'70) I have no use whatsoever for Eric Clapton. Most overrated "great" guitarist ever. I find Peter Green to be far more interesting, both as a guitarist and as a songwriter.
   75. JC in DC Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:13 PM (#2809815)
Outside of Cream, Blind Faith, and Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (in other words, outside of '66-'70) I have no use whatsoever for Eric Clapton.


Jesus H. Whatever. What a horrible horrible argument. And what about his stint in the Yardbirds?
   76. Dr Stankus and the Semicolons Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:16 PM (#2809820)
Outside of Derek Jeter's stint with the Yankees, I've got no use for him
   77. The Good Face Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:23 PM (#2809828)
Would that the BBTF crowd was half as passionate about beer as obscure musicians.
   78. Fred Garvin is dead to Mug Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:24 PM (#2809830)
By the way, John Entwistle is the best rock bassist ever. Let's ignore jazz bassists...that's a whole 'nother beast.

Entwistle is great, no question about it. So is John Paul Jones, for that matter.
   79. Sexy Lizard Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:27 PM (#2809835)
This has long been one of my favorite "is this for real?" sort of public service announcements: Celebrity Winter Advice with Geddy Lee. I don't like Rush at all, but I like them as humans a lot.
   80. Sexy Lizard Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:39 PM (#2809866)
I love Joy Division, but the notion that Peter Hook might be a top 10 rock bass player is absurd. The whole thing about Joy Division bass lines is that they are so simple that they're among the first ones that a blossoming bass player learns to play. When I was 16 I had my girlfriend playing "New Dawn Fades" with 2 minutes of first picking up a bass. Then if you listen to a live recording you hear him screwing up these dead simple lines. Now, the lines are great and compelling and he plays them with verve, but that's songwriting, not playing. Then by the third New Order record he's really gone towards playing melody lines rather than things that might be qhat I'd call "rock bass playing". And it's really hard to find a lot to call "rock" in New Order starting with Low Life anyway.

If someone had told me that Bernard Sumner was the worst guitar player ever in a great band then I might agree.
   81. Hysterical & Useless Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:44 PM (#2809874)
1) Baseball; the only other sport that matters at all is tennis, 'cause I like to play it. Rarely watch.
2) The signature beverage of Arthur Guiness Son & Co
3) Never cared for Rush, much as my younger brother (incidentally, the biggest Beatles fan I ever met, though he was only 8 when "Abbey Road" came out) tried to get me to listen to them

Amen re: Jack Bruce, terrific musician. Also, Jack Casady was a very well-regarded bassist back in the old days.
   82. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:45 PM (#2809875)
I've got no use for Rush. Even as a mopey teenager.

I don't see what being a mopey teenager has to do with Rush.
   83. tribefan Posted: June 06, 2008 at 06:54 PM (#2809893)
1. Baseball, #2 football only if wagering
2. Newcastle
3. Like Rush a lot, but could do without hearing Spirit of the Radio ever again.

I don't see what being a mopey teenager has to do with Rush.

Exactly, mopey teenagers should be listening to Joy Division.

And what about his stint in the Yardbirds?

Sonny Boy Williamson summed it up nicely:

"Those English kids," Williamson famously said of the Yardbirds and other British blues groups like the Animals and the Stones, "want to play the blues so bad—and they play the blues so bad"
   84. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:00 PM (#2809900)
This has long been one of my favorite "is this for real?" sort of public service announcements: Celebrity Winter Advice with Geddy Lee. I don't like Rush at all, but I like them as humans a lot.
Thank you for posting this link. It's a real gem.
   85. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:04 PM (#2809905)
And what about his stint in the Yardbirds?

Sonny Boy Williamson summed it up nicely:

"Those English kids," Williamson famously said of the Yardbirds and other British blues groups like the Animals and the Stones, "want to play the blues so bad—and they play the blues so bad"
Exactly right. The Yardbirds were MUCH better as a pop-rock group with Jeff Beck than they ever were with Clapton enforcing blues orthodoxy upon them. For my money, Fleetwood Mac was pretty much the only Brit blues group who could actually do the genre justice, and that's mostly down to Peter Green's incredible guitar ability (superior to Clapton in both technical skill and emotional content) and searing voice. Mac also made a fascinating transition in 1969-1970 to blues-based hard rock with "Oh Well," Then Play On, and "Green Manalishi," but their early straight blues records (especially the debut) are the cream of the crop for the bluesboom.
   86. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:05 PM (#2809909)
New Order's best album is clearly Power, Corruption & Lies (since it has three of their best non-single songs in "Age Of Consent," "Your Silent Face," and "Leave Me Alone"), but it's also got a lot of dross too. I eagerly await the day they remaster Substance: there's your New Order fix right there.
   87. The importance of being Ernest Riles Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:17 PM (#2809920)
You can tell a lot about a guy based on the following things:

1) his favorite sport;
2) his choice of beer; and
3) how he feels about Rush.


You can definitely tell if he's Canadian.
   88. Tracy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:21 PM (#2809926)
Outside of Cream, Blind Faith, and Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (in other words, outside of '66-'70) I have no use whatsoever for Eric Clapton.

Jesus H. Whatever. What a horrible horrible argument. And what about his stint in the Yardbirds?


My thought echoes Esoteric - Clapton has been coasting since about 1972. Give me Richard Thompson any day.
   89. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:26 PM (#2809930)
Clapton has been coasting since about 1972

I agree but what an early peak. Granted he had some help (Bruce, Baker, Winwood, D. Allman just for starters).
   90. Answer Guy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:26 PM (#2809933)
I don't see what being a mopey teenager has to do with Rush.


It's music that's almost custom-made for mopey teenagers who hate dance music. And I say this as someone who still likes them, even in his 30s. I played drums and grew up in New England in the 80s; that combination pretty much meant you were a Rush/Peart fan.

Rush would definitely adapt their sound some to rock music trends, though it didn't seem crass commercialism so much as it did an attempt to stay out of the creative ruts they would otherwise be more prone to falling into.

Their first album, recorded without Neil Peart, is mostly unremarkable faux Led Zep. Their straightforward attempts to be a more rocking version of an art/prog band mostly haven't aged especially well despite the technical skill on display and the presence of some terrific instrumental passages. (The instrumental "La Villa Strangiato" is pretty awesome start to finish.)

I still stand by Permanent Waves and Moving Pictures, when their songwriting got much better, as high-quality throughout and their other '80s albums as containing some great songs.

And they can flat out play, live or in the studio.
   91. salfino Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:28 PM (#2809936)
My thought echoes Esoteric - Clapton has been coasting since about 1972. Give me Richard Thompson any day.

Agreed. Post Patti Boyd, he has absolutely nothing to say. He's a great technician on the guitar. Makes a nice sound. But the songs? Very few and very, very far between.

Didn't he play guitar on Wah Wah? That's a pretty damn underrated riff, if you ask me (and you're not).
   92. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:29 PM (#2809937)
I'll play, though Winnie nailed it!

1. Baseball
2. A couple of Belgian beers I can never remember the name but I drink them rarely. Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada Pale Ale are my regulars.
3. I have no feelings about Rush at all. Don't love 'em, don't hate 'em. In fact, this whole debate about Rush is bizarre to me. If it weren't for Pavement, I wouldn't even know who Geddy Lee was. Sounds like a cool guy, though.

Is there a win shares for bassists and other rock musicians? Maybe there oughta be.
   93. The importance of being Ernest Riles Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:37 PM (#2809949)
An oldie but a goodie:

Congress Debates Coolness of Rush

WASHINGTON, DC–Continuing its long-running debate on the subject Monday, members of Congress argued the merits of Canadian power trio Rush. "'The philosopher and the plowman, each must play his part'?" asked House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-TX). "C'mon. Neil Peart must be the most pretentious lyricist in arena-rock history. Gentlemen, forget these bloated, overrated '70s dinosaurs." Countered longtime Rush loyalist Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-OR): "Keep talking, man, the tunes say it all: 'Passage To Bangkok'? 'By-Tor And The Snow Dog'? That part in 'Red Barchetta' where [Rush bassist/vocalist] Geddy [Lee] sings about the gleaming alloy aircar shooting toward him two lanes wide? Look me in the eye and tell me that doesn't rock, ############!" The deliberations are expected to continue throughout the week.


I like that part about Red Barchetta, since the part about the gleaming alloy aircar shooting toward him two lanes wide does rock, #############.
   94. Answer Guy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:38 PM (#2809952)
No. Rush was never "Prog." But Prog people tend to like them, which is where the confusion comes in.


They're perhaps the most frequent "gateway band" for prog rock fans. Bands like Crimson and Camel get zero airplay and exposure, at least in the US. And Rush has a bigger following than Yes or Tull.
   95. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:39 PM (#2809955)
And they can flat out play, live or in the studio.


That's the truth. I don't know if I've ever seen a band whose live sound was so similar to what was on record - for better or worse.
   96. Mike Green Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:46 PM (#2809962)
1) Baseball only
2) I'll take premium (local craft or continental European)
3) Don't care for their music, found the Ayn Rand phase tiresome, but would now
like to sit down and watch a ballgame with Geddy Lee.
   97. villageidiom Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:49 PM (#2809964)
I played drums and grew up in New England in the 80s; that combination pretty much meant you were a Rush/Peart fan.

I knew a kid who was a drummer growing up in New England in the 80's and idolized Bonham. At any mention of Peart, he would insist that Peart had no skill whatsoever. It was his way of getting out of having to listen to Rush, yet everyone was compelled to play some Rush for him because he was so obviously wrong.

Reminds me of some threads around here.
   98. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: June 06, 2008 at 07:51 PM (#2809970)
I don't know if I've ever seen a band whose live sound was so similar to what was on record

The most boring concert I ever saw was Dave Mason, circa '74, post-Traffic. His set sounded exactly like the album his tour was pimping, seemingly note for note.
   99. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:00 PM (#2809984)
Would that the BBTF crowd was half as passionate about beer as obscure musicians.


Obscure musicians don't taste like horse urine. That I know of, anyway.
   100. Dr Stankus and the Semicolons Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:01 PM (#2809985)
found the Ayn Rand phase tiresome


Fun fact: Ayn Rand thought that tap dancing was the highest performance art form.
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