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Thursday, June 05, 2008

Rush vocalist makes donation to Negro Leagues Museum

Close to 200 baseballs, all autographed by former Negro Leagues baseball players or backers, have been donated to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum by a somewhat surprising fan ... Rush singer/bassist Geddy Lee.

Really Repoz should write this intro, not me.

Mike Webber Posted: June 05, 2008 at 04:32 PM | 466 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: memorabilia, music, negro leagues

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   101. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:18 PM (#2810006)
Skinny McBarfington:
Give me Richard Thompson any day.
Ooh...I'd forgotten to mention him. I have a quasi-adolescent crush on Fairport Convention's albums from 1967-1970. (Plus their BBC Sessions...essential.) In their quiet, completely-unknown-in-America way, they may have been one of the greatest cover bands of all time, all while fielding brilliant songwriters as well. Nobody interpreted Dylan ("Percy's Song," "I'll Keep It With Mine," "Million Dollar Bash," "If You Gotta Go"), Cohen ("Suzanne," "Bird On A Wire"), or Mitchell ("Chelsea Morning," "I Don't Know Where I Stand," "Eastern Rain") better. Thompson's solo work is reeeally hit-and-miss: I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight and Shoot Out The Lights are right up there with the finest folk-rock albums ever made, but he can get too monochromatic lyrically. Awe-inspiring guitar work though, both electric and acoustic.

salfino:
Didn't he play guitar on Wah Wah? That's a pretty damn underrated riff, if you ask me (and you're not).
Pretty sure that's Harrison playing lead. Fantastic song, perhaps my favorite from an album that still stands as the best single thing a solo Beatle ever did. I mean, seriously: a double album with almost NO bad songs at all (I count maybe one)? By George Harrison of all people? Who saw that one coming in 1970?
   102. Answer Guy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:20 PM (#2810010)
I knew a kid who was a drummer growing up in New England in the 80's and idolized Bonham.


Oh, I adore Bonzo too. I enjoy many Zep tunes a lot, and some of their classic songs ("Misty Mountain Hop" for one) are pretty much all about Bonham.

Though if I lived the rest of my life without hearing another Led Zeppelin "blues" song, I think I'd honestly be OK with that.
   103. Honkie Kong Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:23 PM (#2810012)
1) Cricket but baseball is a close second
2) Old Rasputin, though I like La Chouffe too
3) Waver between brilliant and self indulging.

And talking of bassists..One of the best live guys I have seen is Johnny Myung from Dream Theater.
Butler was pretty good too
   104. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:26 PM (#2810014)
La Chouffe

La Chouffe! That's one of the beers I love. Good stuff.
   105. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:28 PM (#2810016)
1.) Baseball
2.) Unibroue La Fin du Monde or Trois Pistoles
3.) Not a fan at all, though I acknowledge they have put out some solid music.
   106. zonk Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:30 PM (#2810020)
1)Baseball - and if the NFL and NBA folded tomorrow, I'd wouldn't care - if I even noticed.
2)Rogue Dead Guy Ale
3)Rush is the perfect greatest hits band... The double disk hits collection is the only Rush most folks need.
   107. Answer Guy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:33 PM (#2810021)
Pretty sure that's Harrison playing lead. Fantastic song, perhaps my favorite from an album that still stands as the best single thing a solo Beatle ever did. I mean, seriously: a double album with almost NO bad songs at all (I count maybe one)?


I only count one seriously weak song across four sides. But it was actually a triple album - with a completely useless instrumental third record. (Seriously, if you've got a song that you're even thinking of calling "Thanks For the Pepperoni," the world doesn't need to hear it.) And to think that that record was essentially how Derek & the Dominoes came together.
   108. Jarrod HypnerotomachiaPoliphili(Teddy F. Ballgame) Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:38 PM (#2810028)
If I throw Steve Harris into the great bassists mix, will I be mocked?

Rush is a great blend of pretentiousness and charm, somehow dopey but with great potential that's often realized. Like a bright adolescent who's almost as smart as he thinks he is.

Speaking of things Canadian, there's a Quebec brewer called Unibroue that's putting out my favorite beers of late. Mostly Belgian-style and quite good. And thanks to Ichiro and U.S.S. Mariner, I'm fond of SP Lager, although I've never tasted it.
   109. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:41 PM (#2810032)
Speaking of things Canadian, there's a Quebec brewer called Unibroue that's putting out my favorite beers of late. Mostly Belgian-style and quite good. And thanks to Ichiro and U.S.S. Mariner, I'm fond of SP Lager, although I've never tasted it.
See my post #105, Teddy.
   110. Depressoteric Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:42 PM (#2810036)
Answer Guy:
But it was actually a triple album - with a completely useless instrumental third record.
The "Apple Jam" disc was originally a bonus disc throwaway, at no extra charge, so I don't really count it as part of the album proper. But I agree with you that it's pretty useless.
   111. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:48 PM (#2810045)
Ooh...I'd forgotten to mention him. I have a quasi-adolescent crush on Fairport Convention's albums from 1967-1970. (Plus their BBC Sessions...essential.) In their quiet, completely-unknown-in-America way, they may have been one of the greatest cover bands of all time, all while fielding brilliant songwriters as well. Nobody interpreted Dylan ("Percy's Song," "I'll Keep It With Mine," "Million Dollar Bash," "If You Gotta Go"), Cohen ("Suzanne," "Bird On A Wire"), or Mitchell ("Chelsea Morning," "I Don't Know Where I Stand," "Eastern Rain") better. Thompson's solo work is reeeally hit-and-miss: I Want To See The Bright Lights Tonight and Shoot Out The Lights are right up there with the finest folk-rock albums ever made, but he can get too monochromatic lyrically. Awe-inspiring guitar work though, both electric and acoustic.


Hmmn...I think Thompson's solo work is notable for its consistency. Sure, not every album is up there with those you mentioned, but even a lesser work such as Mirror Blue has moments such as "Beeswing" and "King of Bohemia". There's at least one classic song on virtually every album he's made. And he's still doing it - his latest album, Sweet Warrior, is excellent.

Fairport Convention circa 1969 is the probably the band I'd most like to see, given a TARDIS (except for perhaps The Beatles before the girls started screaming). I agree that the mix of original material and well chosen covers is amazing - what drives it into the realm of immortality is throwing the traditional British folk songs in there on Liege and Lief. Sandy Denny remains my all-time favorite singer (of either gender, in any genre), and Thompson is my favorite guitarist. To see them on stage together would be...well, I really can't imagine it.
   112. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: June 06, 2008 at 08:57 PM (#2810060)
I kinda like Rush. They are one of those bands that plenty of my friends and brother all listened to, so I heard them a great deal without ever buying an album or listening to on purpose. This thread has made me listen to a bunch of songs on youtube, nice flashback.
   113. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 07, 2008 at 01:20 AM (#2810390)
Hmmn...I think Thompson's solo work is notable for its consistency. Sure, not every album is up there with those you mentioned, but even a lesser work such as Mirror Blue has moments such as "Beeswing" and "King of Bohemia". There's at least one classic song on virtually every album he's made. And he's still doing it - his latest album, Sweet Warrior, is excellent.


I'm really glad we had that RT conversation about a month ago. Got me re-interested in him again. I just got Sweet Warrior from Amazon. It is excellent. Give Rumor and Sigh a run for the money.
   114. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: June 07, 2008 at 01:35 AM (#2810407)
Let's flip it around -- who was the worst bass player from an otherwise good band?

It seems most of your finest rock bands have really good rythym sections - Starr/McCartney, Moon/Entwhistle, Watts/Wyman (I'm aware no one's mentioned Wyman in this thread - he isn't in the conversation for the best bass player ever, but he was really good).

It's very hard to find a really well-known rock band built on a creeky foundation. (Well, there's punk, but that's almost doesn't belong in the category. They were aiming at a sound that was rough). Among bands that put any stock in technical competence whatsoever, it's hard to find many bad bassists or drummers.

Well, I guess the guy from the Doors was a lousy drummer. Not a huge fan of the entire band, but the drumming always sounded shoddy to me.

I know who has the worst lead guitarist -- the Beatles. Ever listened to the guitar solo in "Twist and Shout"? I swear to God, he forgot it was there - he just kept playing the verse part. A little louder, but it's just the verse part.

What would be the worst rock band you can come up with from the best bands of all-time?

Drummer - Doors Guy
Bassist - ?
Lead Guitar - George Harrison
Lead Singer - ?
Keyboardist - ?

Totaly different note -- but the keyboardist from the Animals was one of the best ever.
   115. Alex meets the threshold for granular review Posted: June 07, 2008 at 01:54 AM (#2810420)
Outside of Cream, Blind Faith, and Layla & Other Assorted Love Songs (in other words, outside of '66-'70) I have no use whatsoever for Eric Clapton.


Yeah, and if you take away Exile on Main St., Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Beggars Banquet the Stones aren't all that great either...sheesh.

Disraeli Gears, Fresh Cream and Wheels of Fire (not to mention other live Cream albums); Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton; Blind Faith; Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs. Six of the best blues-rock albums ever released, all driven by Clapton's guitar more than anything.
   116. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 07, 2008 at 02:01 AM (#2810428)
I know who has the worst lead guitarist -- the Beatles. Ever listened to the guitar solo in "Twist and Shout"? I swear to God, he forgot it was there - he just kept playing the verse part. A little louder, but it's just the verse part.


Eddie Van Halen once said of Jimmy Page "He plays guitar like he has a broken hand."

Based on the comments in this thread, most primates would vote for Geddy Lee in the singer part. Me, I'd vote for Steve Perry or Phil Collins.

Totaly different note -- but the keyboardist from the Animals was one of the best ever.


True. Rick Wakeman and Jon Lord too.
   117. jolietconvict Posted: June 07, 2008 at 03:52 AM (#2810671)
Ahh, Rick Wakeman always makes me think of his King Arthur on Ice. The 1970s were an unbelievable time for music but somethings just went too far. Apparently it bankrupted him.
   118. Phil Coorey is a T-Shirt Salesman Posted: June 07, 2008 at 05:25 AM (#2810813)
You can tell a lot about a guy based on the following things:

1) his favorite sport; baseball - it's all I think about, I think my family has had enough - test cricket is second but the standard has dropped and its not the same after a childish series between Australia and Inida this summer
2) his choice of beer; Nogne O Pale Ale - it's my flavour of the year so far - awesome.
3) how he feels about Rush - what about the voice of Geddy Lee? How did it get so high?
   119. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: June 07, 2008 at 06:07 AM (#2810822)
And talking of bassists..One of the best live guys I have seen is Johnny Myung from Dream Theater.

Dream Theater are also awesome. What can I say, I enjoy their masturbatory instrumental wankery.
   120. Phil Coorey is a T-Shirt Salesman Posted: June 07, 2008 at 06:16 AM (#2810824)
Down in a Tube Station at midnight has one of my favourite baselines ever
   121. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 07, 2008 at 06:25 AM (#2810828)
I'm really glad we had that RT conversation about a month ago. Got me re-interested in him again. I just got Sweet Warrior from Amazon. It is excellent. Give Rumor and Sigh a run for the money.


That makes me feel really good! Glad you liked Sweet Warrior.
   122. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 09, 2008 at 01:55 AM (#2812406)
3)Rush is the perfect greatest hits band... The double disk hits collection is the only Rush most folks need.


I just checked it out on Rhapsody, and I mostly agree. It's missing two essentials, YYZ and In the End.

I love how the beat in YYZ spells out the airport identifier in morse code: dah dit dah dah dah dit dah dah dah dah dit dit

Yeah, I'm a fan, and I like baseball and Guiness. So, I'm Clemenza.
   123. JC in DC Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:05 AM (#2812410)
I was thinking about that "worst" rock band question. Is it wrong to think lead guitarist would be "Miami" Steve Van Zandt? Or maybe even the Boss himself? I'd have Adam Clayton on bass and maybe Larry whatever his name as drummer. The Edge and Bono have carried that rhythm section quite a distance. In one man's opinion, of course.
   124. Random Transaction Generator Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:53 AM (#2812440)
I'm Canadian, and I have to be careful about who is around when I say this, but I have to:
I can't stand Rush.

I do, however, think it's pretty cool to see Geddy Lee sitting behind home plate at Blue Jays games. Whenever the Yankees, Red Sox or Twins are in town, he seems to be there.
   125. Obo Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:02 AM (#2812448)
1. Ice hockey, baseball is second.
2. Leffe or Unibroue's Blanche de Chambly.
3. Loved them as a kid. Moved on, but they're still fun.
   126. Posada Posse Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:05 AM (#2812451)
I'm not a big Rush fan, but Moving Pictures is flat out one of the best albums I've ever heard, great stuff.
   127. Guts Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:29 AM (#2812454)
Wow, this thread has the first Atom and his Package reference I've seen on BTF. Props to Robert S.
   128. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:34 AM (#2812457)
Down in a Tube Station at midnight has one of my favourite baselines ever


I prefer Fenway's.
   129. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:43 AM (#2812461)
Well, I guess the guy from the Doors was a lousy drummer. Not a huge fan of the entire band, but the drumming always sounded shoddy to me.

Whaaat? Densmore was a fantastic drummer. He and Robby Krieger were solid professionals and carried that band, IMO (and while I was a huge fan when I was 15, it's waned considerably).

How about Meg White? Or if the White Stripes aren't a Best Band, Mo Tucker?

Sure, but that kind of misses the point of why these people were in those bands.

It's hard for me to come up with many examples of bands that had poor drummers or bass players, because it's hard for me to enjoy a rock and roll band if the rhythm section isn't doing its job. Kinda defeats the purpose of the whole genre. By definition, such a band is one I am usually not going to have a lot of interest in (although I love the VU and White Stripes).

Van Halen has a surprisingly dull bassist. After about 1967, Bill Wyman seemed to lose interest in his job. Keith Richards played bass on about half of Exile on Main Street, I think.

I know who has the worst lead guitarist -- the Beatles. Ever listened to the guitar solo in "Twist and Shout"? I swear to God, he forgot it was there - he just kept playing the verse part. A little louder, but it's just the verse part.

Geez, it was 1962 and the song was a cover: he was basically filling in the bridge with the same horn riff from the original. And he was 19. Harrison developed into a fine guitarist in his early to mid 20s, and he wasn't exclusively a lead guitarist anyway. Starting in '65 or so he did some really nice work. Rarely do you listen to a Harrison Beatles guitar solo and think wow, that was a great guitar solo (not that there aren't exceptions: "Something", "Hey Bulldog"), but the Beatles weren't about guitar solos.
   130. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:44 AM (#2812463)
I'd have Adam Clayton on bass and maybe Larry whatever his name as drummer. The Edge and Bono have carried that rhythm section quite a distance. In one man's opinion, of course.

I wouldn't argue with that.
   131. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:45 AM (#2812464)
I know who has the worst lead guitarist -- the Beatles. Ever listened to the guitar solo in "Twist and Shout"? I swear to God, he forgot it was there - he just kept playing the verse part. A little louder, but it's just the verse part.

Geez, it was 1962 and the song was a cover: he was basically filling in the bridge with the same horn riff from the original. And he was 19. Harrison developed into a fine guitarist in his early to mid 20s, and he wasn't exclusively a lead guitarist anyway. Starting in '65 or so he did some really nice work. Rarely do you listen to a Harrison Beatles guitar solo and think wow, that was a great guitar solo (not that there aren't exceptions: "Something", "Hey Bulldog"), but the Beatles weren't about guitar solos.


So, it's Jimmy Page then?
   132. JC in DC Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:49 AM (#2812466)
I know very little about the Beatles, and I get the criticism of Harrison to some degree; OTOH, some of the guitar on Beatles records is among the purist guitar I've ever heard. Nothing flashy, clearly, but just extremely sound, extremely melodic guitar. Think, for instance, of Abbey Road.
   133. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:49 AM (#2812467)
3)Rush is the perfect greatest hits band... The double disk hits collection is the only Rush most folks need.



I just checked it out on Rhapsody, and I mostly agree. It's missing two essentials, YYZ and In the End.


And Circumstances.
   134. The importance of being Ernest Riles Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:52 AM (#2812469)
Misirlou in a Gleaming Alloy Air Car

Heh.
   135. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:54 AM (#2812470)
Comparisons of musicians is essentially flawed. It is not every guitarist's job to be Eric Clapton. It is not every bass player's job to be Mike Watt. It is not every drummer's job to be Keith Moon. In fact, it is rare for a musician to have these sorts of roles.
   136. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:56 AM (#2812472)
Comparisons of musicians is essentially flawed. It is not every guitarist's job to be Eric Clapton. It is not every bass player's job to be Mike Watt. It is not every drummer's job to be Keith Moon. In fact, it is rare for a musician to have these sorts of roles.


That said, we can all agree Steve Perry is terrible, no?
   137. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:59 AM (#2812473)
Misirlou in a Gleaming Alloy Air Car

Heh.


Thanks. I plan to keep the handle alive only as long as this thread is relevant. Plus ça change, Plus c'est la même chose
   138. JC in DC Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:00 AM (#2812474)
Comparisons of musicians is essentially flawed. It is not every guitarist's job to be Eric Clapton. It is not every bass player's job to be Mike Watt. It is not every drummer's job to be Keith Moon. In fact, it is rare for a musician to have these sorts of roles.


Next thing we know and this clown's gonna piss on the Hall of Fame.
   139. Kurt Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:04 AM (#2812476)
Rush is the perfect greatest hits band

I guess I like Rush more than most people, but the perfect greatest hits band would have to be worse than Rush, no? Someone like Goerge Thorogood or 311 or Godsmack. Or, speaking of Steve Perry...
   140. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:12 AM (#2812478)
So, it's Jimmy Page then?

Heh, good question. Despite the era, and despite my opinion that Page deserved all of the accolades he got as a guitarist, his solos rarely do a lot for me. Page's genius was his ability to work up innovative riffs with Bonham and get unbelievable sounds of out of his guitar. He was like a hybrid of Steve Cropper and Jimi Hendrix. Not that he didn't do some great solos (usually on the bluesy stuff), but to me they have little to do with what made him a great guitarist. IMO, Page's great accomplishments were songs like "Black Dog" and "The Rover."

I never saw Led Zeppelin live, but I have never quite figured out why that had such a great reputation as a live band, and not more as a band that too full advantage of what the studio offered and thus couldn't really pull it off live. All I have to judge by is The Song Remains the Same and the various things in the Led Zeppelin DVD, but I see a band that was far too prone to lengthy, often poorly executed, masturbatory noodling, most of it from Page. The studio version of "Stairway to Heaven" (which featured a very nice Page solo) was long enough. Why did they feel the need to make it twice as long live?
   141. Posada Posse Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:14 AM (#2812479)
Did you hear that they kicked Michael Anthony out of the band to make room for Eddie's son Wolfgang? I don't know if Wolfgang is any good, but it's at least kind of interesting that 3/4 of the band are named "Van Halen" now.


They recently finished a tour with Wolfgang (aka Wolfie) on bass and David Lee Roth on vocals; by most accounts Wolfie (who's 16 years old) was competent but hardly spectacular. I tend to agree that Michael Anthony was sort of dull on bass, but IMO he played well on a couple of their albums, particularly Fair Warning.
   142. Gold Star - just Gold Star Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:45 AM (#2812488)
Worst bassist: Van Halen's Michael Anthony. A bass-playing friend of mine called Anthony "King of the Open E."
   143. PerroX Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:59 AM (#2812494)
Way back up, it was the Moving Pictures tour in Charlotte, in '81 I believe. My best friend got in a wreck on the way (the second and last car wreck I was in, the first with him also), but we still made the show in time.

It's baseball and Guinness for me.

As for music, I left the "prog rock" universe long ago, and musical snobbery about the same time.

I can appreciate a good bassist as much as anyone -- Mingus, Bootsy, Entwistle, Claypool, Wooten, etc., but some of my favorite rock bands have had barely competent bassists -- Clash, Replacements.

Nobody mentions Sting because he's a prima donna, but The Police are driven by his bass.

I don't underestimate the importance of a good rhythm section in rock, but it's guitar music.

Oh yeah, Kim Gordon.

A rock bassist can make a good living on the E.
   144. PreBeaneAsFan Posted: June 09, 2008 at 05:38 AM (#2812499)
You have to be deaf or have not heard the vast majority of their work to think that George Harrison is a bad lead guitarist. If anything, George Harrison is an overlooked great guitarist because he plays clean melodic solos and doesn't try to go too far outside the structure of the song. His early stuff sounds like most early rock solos and his later stuff is quite creative.

I'd say Robbie Robertson is the worst lead guitarist for a major band (purely as a lead guitarist, I'm actually a big fan of his overall). I also find Dave Davies rather unsatisfying as a lead though of course that's not what the band is really about. Everyone who played lead other than Joe Walsh in the Eagles was also fairly weak. And I think Carl Wilson from the Beach Boys is a poor lead though of course that's not a really a guitar driven band.
   145. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 09, 2008 at 06:27 AM (#2812510)
Rarely do you listen to a Harrison Beatles guitar solo and think wow, that was a great guitar solo (not that there aren't exceptions: "Something", "Hey Bulldog"), but the Beatles weren't about guitar solos.


John Lennon actually played lead guitar on "Hey Bulldog".
   146. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 09, 2008 at 06:40 AM (#2812512)
I think you'd have to throw Mike Rutherford of the post-Hackett Genesis in there, too. He wasn't a bad guitarist per se, just very, very bland. Excellent bassist, though.

Interesting that Michael Anthony got so many nominations. I've always thought that Van Halen's rythym section plodded, but I always thought it was Alex Van Halen's fault. Whosever's fault it is, they basically have all the fizz of a day-old opened Dr. Pepper.
   147. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 09, 2008 at 06:43 AM (#2812513)
Geez, it was 1962 and the song was a cover: he was basically filling in the bridge with the same horn riff from the original. And he was 19. Harrison developed into a fine guitarist in his early to mid 20s, and he wasn't exclusively a lead guitarist anyway. Starting in '65 or so he did some really nice work. Rarely do you listen to a Harrison Beatles guitar solo and think wow, that was a great guitar solo (not that there aren't exceptions: "Something", "Hey Bulldog"), but the Beatles weren't about guitar solos.


Very well said. I think Harrison improved tremendously as a guitarist over the course of The Beatles' career. His adoption of slide guitar just before the breakup made his sound...
   148. Ryan Lind Posted: June 09, 2008 at 06:57 AM (#2812514)
I just think yall are discriminatory. This thread would have a totally different tone if it were "Negro vocalist makes donation to Rush Museum."
   149. RobertMachemer Posted: June 09, 2008 at 08:07 AM (#2812522)
They recently finished a tour with Wolfgang (aka Wolfie) on bass and David Lee Roth on vocals; by most accounts Wolfie (who's 16 years old) was competent but hardly spectacular. I tend to agree that Michael Anthony was sort of dull on bass, but IMO he played well on a couple of their albums, particularly Fair Warning.
I've heard kinder accounts of Wolfie's bass-playing, but that's just me; on the other hand, he'd only picked up a bass for the first time less than a year (or something like that) before going on tour. My understanding is that he's a better lead guitarist and drummer, but I'm no musician so take what I say with a Lot of salt. It was a fun concert regardless.
   150. Kurt Posted: June 09, 2008 at 12:02 PM (#2812556)
Definitely Mike Rutherford - I thought of him last night, and came here to mention him. And who could front the band from hell, other than Sammy Hagar?
   151. Matt Clement of Alexandria Posted: June 09, 2008 at 12:33 PM (#2812567)
I guess I like Rush more than most people, but the perfect greatest hits band would have to be worse than Rush, no?
The perfect greatest hits band remains and will forever be Creedence, a band objectively far greater than Rush.

I like Rush well enough, but their singles don't reach a level of greatness required of a perfect greatest hits band. I'd say they're up there with, say, Aerosmith in terms of bands where the stuff you hear on the radio is good, and you don't really need the rest of it.
   152. They paved Misirlou, put up a parking lot Posted: June 09, 2008 at 12:49 PM (#2812580)
The perfect greatest hits band remains and will forever be Creedence,


Good one. How about Three Dog Night?
   153. andrewberg Posted: June 09, 2008 at 12:53 PM (#2812583)
I remember Mike Anthony winning awards for "best backup vocalist" from some rock magazines in the late 80s and early 90s. Hardly makes up for the single note bass line on Jump.

Are we excusing Ringo Starr from the worst musician debate out of mercy?

I love Zeppelin, and I agree that Paige's greatest strengths are crafting riffs and song structure, though I don't think his solos are a weakness.

If I was making a band on pure musicianship (out of well known artists), I would have Peart on drums, Hendrix on guitar, Pastorious on bass, and possibly Chris Cornell on vocals, but that's negotiable. I don't know enough rhythm guitarists to nominate one.

And for the record, I love baseball and basketball, prefer to drink Smithwicks (or Newcastle or any dark ale), and enjoy Rush.
   154. Van Lingle Mungo Jerry Posted: June 09, 2008 at 12:54 PM (#2812584)
The perfect greatest hits band remains and will forever be Creedence, a band objectively far greater than Rush.


The correct answer is Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.
   155. zonk Posted: June 09, 2008 at 01:28 PM (#2812620)
Did you hear that they kicked Michael Anthony out of the band to make room for Eddie's son Wolfgang? I don't know if Wolfgang is any good, but it's at least kind of interesting that 3/4 of the band are named "Van Halen" now.


I'm fairly sure that the Van Halens are well on their way towards pissing off every non-related musician on the planet, so they'll likely be stuck with some random cousin singing soon.

You have to be deaf or have not heard the vast majority of their work to think that George Harrison is a bad lead guitarist. If anything, George Harrison is an overlooked great guitarist because he plays clean melodic solos and doesn't try to go too far outside the structure of the song. His early stuff sounds like most early rock solos and his later stuff is quite creative.


Agree completely - and it's near criminal that the idea of 'worst' X comes up, and from the Beatles, we select GEORGE FRACKIN' HARRISON but no one brings up Ringo Starr?

Half the drum tracks that Ringo gets credited with were actually laid down by McCartney covering up Ringo's utter averagishness (at his best).

Strangely enough, I've seen Ringo's annual summer "all-Starr Band" tour three times, but on each occasion -- solely to see folks he was touring with (Joe Walsh, John Entwistle, etc).


I guess I like Rush more than most people, but the perfect greatest hits band would have to be worse than Rush, no? Someone like Goerge Thorogood or 311 or Godsmack. Or, speaking of Steve Perry...


To me, that's a "steal it off the net" band. I mean, I paid $10 for a Destroyers greatest hits tap in high school; I think that entitles me to poaching the random Thorogood song in a new format when I feel the need to do so.

I think Rush is fair enough that I'd probably purchase their hits package again in whatever format evolves past our current.
   156. zonk Posted: June 09, 2008 at 01:32 PM (#2812624)
The correct answer is Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers.


Completely disagree.

Not on par with the Beach Boys to enter the discussion of greatest American bands, but they're damn close.

Beyond the early 80s, when they got sorta tired, they've got a long catalog of excellent work.
   157. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:08 PM (#2812659)
At the risk of bringing in politics to the thread, a friend of mine was crowing about how most musicians with conservative political leanings suck. I think we were looking through a database of rock star political donations and saw Sammy Hagar in there giving money to Bush. Then I remembered that Gene Simmons was also a right-winger, as is Ted Nugent. And then I thought to myself, with Hagar on rhythm/vocals, Nugent on lead guitar, and Simmons on bass....wow, that's a drummer short of one of the worst possible rock supergroups of all time.

Neil Peart has sorta moved away from Objectivism, but the bigger problem with putting him in this band is that he's really good. They'd need to find one of the more nondescript drummers for one of those bands that have the concerts attended mostly by people wearing black T-shirts.

I suppose the Nuge is something of a talented guitarist. Unfortunately, he's an awful signer, a lousy songwriter and composer, and so difficult to get along with and work with that he hasn't had people who can help him with his shortcomings.

Come to think of it, this sounds like Frank Zappa too if you ignore the "composer" and "something" parts since he's possibly the most inventive and prolific composer and guitar player the rock world has ever seen. Of course he didn't really write songs per se and was difficult enough to work with that he could attract any either. He once had Lowell George (Little Feat), who turned out to be a fine songwriter, in his band but kicked him out.
   158. Dan Szymborski Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:15 PM (#2812669)
Johnny Ramone was a ocnservative.
   159. Posada Posse Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:20 PM (#2812674)
At the risk of bringing in politics to the thread, a friend of mine was crowing about how most musicians with conservative political leanings suck. I think we were looking through a database of rock star political donations and saw Sammy Hagar in there giving money to Bush. Then I remembered that Gene Simmons was also a right-winger, as is Ted Nugent. And then I thought to myself, with Hagar on rhythm/vocals, Nugent on lead guitar, and Simmons on bass....wow, that's a drummer short of one of the worst possible rock supergroups of all time.


The Gene Simmons mention reminds me of a pretty crappy drummer: his ex-bandmate Peter Criss. I don't know if he's a right-winger though.
   160. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:20 PM (#2812676)
Answer Guy: You don't know how close you are.
   161. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:26 PM (#2812685)
Answer Guy: You don't know how close you are.


Hilarious. I suppose Satriani is technically gifted but it seems like there are a lot of guys out there like that at any given time, and that the real shortage appears to be in rockers who can write good songs.

Appropos of nothing, one time I went to see Rush and they had a guy named Vinnie Moore, who was basically a poor man's Joe Satriani or Steve Vai, as the opening act. He would introduce every song with it's title but they were all pretty much the same song.
   162. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:29 PM (#2812686)

The Gene Simmons mention reminds me of a pretty crappy drummer: his ex-bandmate Peter Criss. I don't know if he's a right-winger though.


Well, I could have just saved everyone time and said that Kiss would be the worst supergroup of all time, but they don't fit the traditional definition of "supergroup."

Although Kiss also serves as an example of how you don't need to be talented musicians-qua-musicians to be rock stars, albeit a different type of example from say, The Clash.
   163. salfino Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:31 PM (#2812688)
In defense of Ringo, from Wiki

In his extensive survey of The Beatles' recording sessions, Mark Lewisohn confirmed that Starr was both proficient and remarkably reliable and consistent. According to Lewisohn, there were fewer than a dozen occasions in The Beatles' eight-year recording career where session 'breakdowns' were caused by Starr making a mistake, while the vast majority of takes were stopped due to mistakes by the other three members.[25]

Starr is also considered to have advanced various modern drumming techniques, such as the matched grip, placing the drums on high risers for visibility as part of the band, tuning the drums lower, and using muffling devices on tonal rings, along with his general contributions to The Beatles as a whole.[23] Specific drum parts executed by Starr in notably signature fashion include the fill that brings the drums and bass guitar into "Hey Jude", the steady rock beats in "Please Please Me" and other early Beatles recordings, the drum kit pattern through the bridge of "Hello, Goodbye", and the driving bass drum notes found in "Lady Madonna", underlying the more intricate, double-tracked snare drum. His use of a 'sizzle' cymbal (a cymbal incorporated with rivets that vibrate) would bring a much fuller sound than standard 'ride' cymbals. Starr comments his best drumming is on the 1966 single B-side "Rain".


For the record, McCartney played drum only on Dear Prudence and Back in the USSR, during the brief time Ringo left the band.
   164. Kurt Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:47 PM (#2812708)
The perfect greatest hits band remains and will forever be Creedence, a band objectively far greater than Rush.

I don't know enough about them beyond their hits to agree or disagree, which may prove your point.

I like Rush well enough, but their singles don't reach a level of greatness required of a perfect greatest hits band. I'd say they're up there with, say, Aerosmith in terms of bands where the stuff you hear on the radio is good, and you don't really need the rest of it.

*You* don't, but their fans do. Obviously a lot of this is personal preference, but if you ask 100 actual Rush fans what their favorite song is you might get 50 different answers. They are not for everyone (to put it mildly), but they're talented enough that their more obscure songs are at least interesting, and pleasing to some. IMO the perfect greatest hits band is one where all the songs sound about the same, so the obsure ones are basically about like the hits only worse. Nobody goes to a George Thorogood or Huey Lewis or ZZ Top concert to hear obscure B sides.

On the other hand, if you go by commercial success (greatest hits compilations sold versus actual albums sold), the winner would probably be Bob Marley.
   165. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:52 PM (#2812713)
as to Craig's questions:

1. baseball; (college hoops 2nd)
2. probably Presidente;; mostly drink Sweetwater 420
3. I like Rush okay, but I'm not a rabid fan. They might crack my top 30 bands or so.

"Tom Sawyer" is in 7/4 I think. It's pretty tough on "Rock Band"
   166. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 02:53 PM (#2812714)
Completely disagree.

Not on par with the Beach Boys to enter the discussion of greatest American bands, but they're damn close.

Beyond the early 80s, when they got sorta tired, they've got a long catalog of excellent work.


Ditto. Petty and the Heartbreakers are a greatly underappreciated band.
   167. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:03 PM (#2812723)
John Lennon actually played lead guitar on "Hey Bulldog".

Source? Every source I've seen credits Harrison, but I agree that stylistically it could be Lennon.
   168. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:05 PM (#2812725)
For the record, McCartney played drum only on Dear Prudence and Back in the USSR, during the brief time Ringo left the band.

Also "The Ballad of John and Yoko." Which has pretty amateurish sounding drums.
   169. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:05 PM (#2812726)
On the other hand, if you go by commercial success (greatest hits compilations sold versus actual albums sold), the winner would probably be Bob Marley.


I think they hand out Bob Marley Legend at freshman orientation.
   170. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:11 PM (#2812732)
*You* don't, but their fans do. Obviously a lot of this is personal preference, but if you ask 100 actual Rush fans what their favorite song is you might get 50 different answers.


I just had a flashback to alt.music.rush.

Every regular or semi-regular on there had his (I use the masculine for a reason, they have few female fans) own pet obscure or semi-obscure song they tout as an all-time great.
   171. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:15 PM (#2812738)
Anyone who thinks Ringo Starr was a bad drummer knows nothing - absolutely nothing - about the subtleties of drumming, and thinks that it should always be either Keith Moon/Bonzo or jazz. Starr was, quite simply, the finest pop drummer ever. You can listen to his lines endlessly and pick up all sorts of great little touches that complement the music without demanding attention. That's what he was about: he wanted to build the foundation of a song and hated the spotlight. He never made mistakes, and he was never less than thoroughly professional and clever with regard to his approach. It makes my gorge rise to see people who are ignorant about The Beatles (or music in general) use him as a punchline...stupid fools.

As for my favorite performances of his, check out "Rain," "Strawberry Fields Forever," "Good Morning Good Morning" (the Anthology take removes the horns and you can focus on how insane a combination of minimalism and complexity the drum track is - he's pushing the kick like a defibrillator), "Baby You're A Rich Man," or (in a very different way) "Something."
   172. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:18 PM (#2812742)
#115 - Le Samourai:

As for this:
Yeah, and if you take away Exile on Main St., Let it Bleed, Sticky Fingers and Beggars Banquet the Stones aren't all that great either...sheesh.
This is farcical. You take those away and you still have The Rolling Stones No. 2, Aftermath, Between The Buttons, Their Satanic Majesties Request, Goats Head Soup, Some Girls, and a slew of classic singles ("Little Red Rooster," "The Last Time," "Satisfaction," "Get Off Of My Cloud," "19th Nervous Breakdown," "Paint It Black," "Have You Seen Your Mother, Baby, Standing In The Shadow?," "Let's Spend The Night Together," "We Love You," "Jumpin' Jack Flash," "Honky Tonk Woman," etc.)

Clapton wasn't even the most interesting part of any band he was in, with the exception of maybe Derek & The Dominoes (and there Duane Allman fights for your primary attention). In Cream Jack Bruce wrote most of the songs, sang most of the lyrics, and took centerstage with his bass. In Blind Faith Steve Winwood was the most interesting contributor.
   173. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:27 PM (#2812753)
I agree with The Piano here, as I have mentioned before (although I would put "You Won't See Me," "Ticket To Ride" and "The Night Before" at the top of the list).

However, I do think that in '67/'68 or so his contributions started to suffer. I don't know if it was the band as a whole deciding to downplay the drums, or Ringo getting lazy, but he's barely there on the White Album and in many of the singles from '67 and '68.

Of course, he was was back to his best form on Let It Be, and Abbey Road features some of his best work.
   174. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:29 PM (#2812759)
Andere -

"Ticket To Ride" is a great early/midddle Beatles drum track. Thanks for pointing me to "The Night Before," too...hadn't really paid much attention to that one before but you're right, the percussion track is pretty clever and layered, especially the maraca break in the middle eight.

Also, he plays a pretty decent set of brushes, cf "I've Just Seen A Face" (the finest song from Help! in my opinion).
   175. Kirby Kyle Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:32 PM (#2812765)
I'm a little surprised to scan this thread and not see Bruce Thomas of The Attractions mentioned as among the great rock bassists.
   176. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:32 PM (#2812766)
Are we excusing Ringo Starr from the worst musician debate out of mercy?

I believe I am the only member of the Ringo Starr Singing Fan Club. I know he has no range but I love the sheer pleasantness of his voice.

I know nothing of music, but I always thought Ringo's drumming sounded like it was being played backwards.

Also "The Ballad of John and Yoko." Which has pretty amateurish sounding drums.

I don't care. I love that song.
   177. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:36 PM (#2812768)
I know nothing of music, but I always thought Ringo's drumming sounded like it was being played backwards.
Perhaps it sounds this way to you because he was a left-hander playing a right-handed drumkit. As a result his fills are often "backwards," proceeding in an unorthodox reverse progression across the kit. Part of what made his style so delightful: he plays it low-key, but when you listen you realize that there's some really weird sh*t going on in there.
   178. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:39 PM (#2812769)
Also "The Ballad of John and Yoko." Which has pretty amateurish sounding drums.

I don't care. I love that song.


Oh, I do too, and I don't mind the fact that McCartney played the drums here and there. The idea that he was anything close to Ringo is nuts though.
   179. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:46 PM (#2812779)
I almost forgot:

You want to hear great British Invasion-era drumming? Listen to Ringo Starr beat the holy living hell out of his kit on "Twist And Shout." That wasn't just Lennon's triumph, there. The drums lock in with the guitar perfectly (listen to the opening, it's a like a crank winding up a generator), and the little coda at the end is a slice of overcompressed mono godliness.
   180. HCO Posted: June 09, 2008 at 03:58 PM (#2812793)
A 180 post Rush thread and no Retardo or Ayn Rand? What has Primer come to?
   181. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:08 PM (#2812807)
Here are my "greatest/favorite instrument" guys, although I'd shudder to see them all in a band together. Talk about a bad combo...

- Male Vocals: Peter Gabriel (more subjective than any other choice...I've just always been fascinated by his voice, both the early screeching and the later hoarseness)
- Female Vocals: Sandy Denny (none better. ever.)
- Lead guitar: Robert Fripp
- Rhythm Guitar: Pete Townshend (honorable mention: Peter Buck)
- Bass: John Entwistle
- Drums: Phil Collins (anyone who laughs at this has never heard him drum, period)
- Keyboards: Elton John (honorable mention: Nicky Hopkins)
- Production/Sound effects weirdness: Brian Eno

<u>Guest instrumentalists</u>:
- Harmonica: Stevie Wonder
- Backing vocals: either The Beach Boys (Wilson/Wilson/Wilson/Jardine/Love/Johnston) or the Beatles (Lennon/McCartney/Harrison)
- Slide Guitar: Duane Allman
- Mellotron: Mike Pinder (playing this instrument properly is a real skill, like trying to wrestle a rhinoceros)
   182. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:15 PM (#2812815)
The Beatles had the best rythym section of any band in history. Also the least flashy, which is why they never got the credit they deserve. That's one reason I was so hard on Harrison earlier. Was it too harsh? Perhaps. It was early work, and by those standards Dave Davies scores really lowly. At least the Beatles never had to hire a session to play the solo for them.

The Beatles are one of two bands where the lead guitarist might be the most obscure member of the band. The other is Motley Cure.

Then again "most obscure Beatle" is a rather strange sounding phrase. The noun defeats the purpose of the adjective.

Although Kiss also serves as an example of how you don't need to be talented musicians-qua-musicians to be rock stars, albeit a different type of example from say, The Clash.

Topper Headron was a great drummer.

Johnny Ramone was a ocnservative.

Still is.
   183. Posada Posse Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:27 PM (#2812823)
The Beatles are one of two bands where the lead guitarist might be the most obscure member of the band. The other is Motley Cure.


Speaking of bad bassists, Nikki Sixx of Motley Crue is considered one of the worst bassists in hard rock. He's a good songwriter for the kind of stuff the Crue does, and recently released an album with a side band called Sixx AM that's surprisingly solid. As a bassist, however, he's always been considered a weak point for Motley.
   184. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:29 PM (#2812824)
At least the Beatles never had to hire a session to play the solo for them.


That solo on "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is Eric Clapton. Of course George wrote and sang the song so it's not like he *had* to hire Clapton. It might well have been a case of some of the other Beatles not being around, which happened quite a bit during sessions for the White Album.

The Beatles are one of two bands where the lead guitarist might be the most obscure member of the band. The other is Motley Cure.


I think Rush probably should be mentioned here. Not that that's a knock on Alex Lifeson's guitar chops, but the other two guys are more famous.
   185. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:30 PM (#2812829)
Then again "most obscure Beatle" is a rather strange sounding phrase. The noun defeats the purpose of the adjective.
Yeah, it's hard to be obscure as a Beatle. But I get where you're going with that: Harrison was such a private person that he actively dodged the spotlight. That said, it's hard to call the guy who brought "Taxman," "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," "Something," and "Here Comes The Sun" to the Beatles "obscure."

Though my favorite Harrisong is probably "Long, Long, Long." Brutally underrated, that one.

And The Beatles DID actually have to bring in a musician to play a solo for them, in a way. Harrison couldn't get Lennon and McCartney to take "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" seriously during the White Album sessions, so he invited Clapton in to play the solo in order to force the others to shape up. It worked.
   186. Kirby Kyle Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:32 PM (#2812831)
The Beatles are one of two bands where the lead guitarist might be the most obscure member of the band. The other is Motley Cure.

Talking Heads.
   187. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:34 PM (#2812834)
A 180 post Rush thread and no Retardo or Ayn Rand?

Apparently you didn't read the thread.
   188. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:35 PM (#2812838)
#186 - Answer Guy:

Ha, beat me to it. Though see my post for an explanation of what actually happened there. Harrison demoed the song for the band (the "acoustic" version found on Anthology 3), but they weren't really interested in focusing on it, so out of frustration he brought a (reluctant) Clapton in to basically send a message to Lennon and McCartney: "look, I'll just do it myself with Ringo and my friends if you don't want to help out."

Lennon and McCartney were always guilty of spending endless amounts of time producing their songs and then rushing through Harrison's. Only "Something" really got the studio attention it deserved from the rest. Lennon didn't even show up for the recording sessions of a lot of Harrison's songs.
   189. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:36 PM (#2812841)
#188 - Kirby Kyle:
Talking Heads.
But Harrison was also the keyboardist. And keyboardists are almost always obscure!

By the way, I'm listening to Talking Heads nonstop these days. The first four albums plus The Name Of This Band Is... are essential purchases. A compilation is all you need after that, though. What a sudden collapse. I count exactly four good songs during their last 8 years ("And She Was," "Road To Nowhere," "Wild Wild Life," "(Nothing But) Flowers").
   190. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:40 PM (#2812843)
Harrison couldn't get Lennon and McCartney to take "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" seriously during the White Album sessions, so he invited Clapton in to play the solo in order to force the others to shape up. It worked.


Ah, so *that's* what it was.

Supposedly Harrison had several All Things Must Pass already written for Abbey Road. But no, instead we got "Maxwell's Silver Hammer" (Paul's fault) and all 8 freakin' minutes of "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" (John's fault). Probably a good thing for the fans in the long run since we got to hear George's tunes anyway, but I'd be pissed if I had written, say, "What Is Life" and my bandmate had said, "Nah, let's do another take of Maxwell." (Supposedly they did dozens of takes of that number.)
   191. Dan Szymborski Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:41 PM (#2812847)
Hey! I like Maxwell's Silver Hammer!
   192. Kirby Kyle Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:46 PM (#2812851)
By the way, I'm listening to Talking Heads nonstop these days. The first four albums plus The Name Of This Band Is... are essential purchases. A compilation is all you need after that, though. What a sudden collapse. I count exactly four good songs during their last 8 years ("And She Was," "Road To Nowhere," "Wild Wild Life," "(Nothing But) Flowers").

I strongly disagree. Naked is a terribly underrated album, and one I'll still listen to front to back 20 years after first buying it. I wasn't a fan of True Stories, but regard the other post-Name of This Band albums as just a notch below Remain in Light.
   193. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:46 PM (#2812853)
Supposedly Harrison had several All Things Must Pass already written for Abbey Road.
It's worse than that. Harrison offered "Isn't It A Pity?" and "Art Of Dying" to the group BACK IN 1966, during the Revolver sessions, and they said "no thanks" (though it's fair to note that he still got three songs onto that single LP - his highest-ever quotient - and they're all excellent). "Wah-Wah" was written during the Get Back/Let It Be sessions in early 1969 when he briefly quit the group. "What Is Life?" and "Let It Down" both date from the Get Back sessions too - Harrison can be heard demoing them for Lennon and McCartney to general indifference. "I'd Have You Anytime" was a co-write with Dylan from late 1968, though I suppose that the Dylan credit meant it was always destined to remain outside The Beatles' sphere. "All Things Must Pass" was demoed in early 1969 as well (and is included on Anthology 3).
   194. Depressoteric Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:52 PM (#2812860)
all 8 freakin' minutes of "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" (John's fault)
For what it's worth, every member of the band really enjoyed "I Want You." They put a ton of effort into it, with full contributions from all four, and each has spoken highly of it in later years. Me, I agree with you and Robbie Robertson, who famously dismissed it in a 1969 review as "noisy sh*t."
   195. RobertMachemer Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:54 PM (#2812862)
Maxwell's Silver Hammer is easily one of my favorite Beatles songs. Sure, I failed Rock Snob 101 long ago, but Maxwell's Silver Hammer tells a darkly comic story with a catchy tune. It's not pretentiously overblown, it's just cute (in an Edward Gorey sort of way). I'd rather listen to it than a lot of other Beatles songs (or Rush songs for that matter).
   196. villageidiom Posted: June 09, 2008 at 04:57 PM (#2812872)
Funny - wasn't the whole genesis of the Lennon/McCartney songwriting credit about minimizing the number of fights over who had how many songs on the album? Glad that worked so well.

EDIT: And Billy Preston says hi.
   197. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 05:14 PM (#2812898)
Me, I agree with you and Robbie Robertson, who famously dismissed it in a 1969 review as "noisy sh*t."


It has it's uses; I like the sound of the guitar on that little jazzy solo in the middle. Everything good about it would still be good if its runtime were 4:50 or so.

(Did Preston ever play guitar on any Beatles track? I thought his contributions were limited to keyboards.)
   198. villageidiom Posted: June 09, 2008 at 05:21 PM (#2812905)
(Did Preston ever play guitar on any Beatles track? I thought his contributions were limited to keyboards.)
Are you only accepting greetings from session musicians who played guitar solos for the Beatles?
   199. Baldrick Posted: June 09, 2008 at 05:24 PM (#2812908)
Lots of Beatles fans here, it seems like. Or at least folks with some interest in a lot of the picky details about less-known songs.

So it seems like as good a place as any to link to my blog where I ranked every Beatles song from 1-206. I put a lot of work into the order, but ultimately it's really just a list of my favorites not of any "objective" worth. One of the great things about The Beatles is the way that virtually every song could easily be someone's favorite and it would be hard to really call them wrong.

Would love to hear comments or thoughts from the Primer crowd on their favorites.
   200. Answer Guy Posted: June 09, 2008 at 05:27 PM (#2812913)
Are you only accepting greetings from session musicians who played guitar solos for the Beatles?


Well, I think the topic came up in the context of a band's lead guitarist (citing, in addition to Harrison, The Kinks' Dave Davies specifically) needing a ringer at some point.

Bringing in keyboardists was a common practice. The Who would bring in Nicky Hopkins to play piano frequently, to the point where he's almost the de facto 5th member of the band on some studio albums. The Stones used him too, and they had other people to fill in on other instruments, especially after Brian Jones died.
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