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Thursday, June 05, 2008

Rush vocalist makes donation to Negro Leagues Museum

Close to 200 baseballs, all autographed by former Negro Leagues baseball players or backers, have been donated to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum by a somewhat surprising fan ... Rush singer/bassist Geddy Lee.

Really Repoz should write this intro, not me.

Mike Webber Posted: June 05, 2008 at 04:32 PM | 466 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: memorabilia, music, negro leagues

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   401. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 10, 2008 at 06:30 PM (#2813955)
The live performance of "Exiles" from the U.S.A. is quite possibly the finest moment of any incarnation of King Crimson. I have collected somewhere around 60 different performances of that song from 1972-1974, and they never did it better than right there, with the possible exception of the very different 11/23/73 performance found on The Night Watch. I also think that U.S.A. features near-peak versions of "Lament" and "Larks' Tongues In Aspic, Part Two." Just about the only thing it's missing is a good version of "Larks' Tongues Part One" and an unedited version of "Easy Money."


"Trio" from The Night Watch and Starless and Bible Black (it's the same performance) remains my favorite Crimson song from any of their incarnations, and one of my favorite quiet moments in rock history. It's just incredibly beautiful, and the way that Fripp's mellotron and Cross' violin flow into each other, and pick up the other's melodies is wonderful.
   402. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 10, 2008 at 06:31 PM (#2813956)
And earlier someone dissed "Sweet Virginia" off "Exile." I love that song.


Ditto. It's my favorite song from Exile.
   403. Answer Guy Posted: June 10, 2008 at 06:36 PM (#2813965)
I'm the one who always skips "Sweet Virginia." How much of that is wanting to go ahead and get to "Torn and Frayed" already I can't say.
   404. Answer Guy Posted: June 10, 2008 at 06:42 PM (#2813973)

In 1984 The Mats released Let It Be, Husker Du released Zen Arcade and Prince released Purple Rain. Not a bad year for MN music.


Despite hipper-than-average parents (mostly b/c they were young) in a hipper-than-average East Coast radio market, I never knowingly heard a single Mats or Husker Du song until 1992, when I was in college. It seems like a disproportionate share of the good stuff from the 80s didn't get wide exposure until well after the fact.

Sometimes it was if the mid-80s was one endless interchangeable Chicago ballad.
   405. Esoteric Posted: June 10, 2008 at 06:48 PM (#2813981)
vortex:
"Trio" from The Night Watch and Starless and Bible Black (it's the same performance) remains my favorite Crimson song from any of their incarnations, and one of my favorite quiet moments in rock history. It's just incredibly beautiful, and the way that Fripp's mellotron and Cross' violin flow into each other, and pick up the other's melodies is wonderful.
Completely agreed about "Trio," and the beauty of it is that it was a completely spontaneous improvisation. How amazingly lucky to have caught it on multitrack tape.

It also gave rise to one of my favorite instrumental credits in rock music: "Bill Bruford - admirable restraint."
   406. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 10, 2008 at 07:11 PM (#2814002)
Despite hipper-than-average parents (mostly b/c they were young) in a hipper-than-average East Coast radio market, I never knowingly heard a single Mats or Husker Du song until 1992, when I was in college.

Even in a hipper than average radio market, you weren't going to hear those two bands on the radio. Maybe on a college station.
   407. SoSH U at work Posted: June 10, 2008 at 07:16 PM (#2814006)
Even in a hipper than average radio market, you weren't going to hear those two bands on the radio. Maybe on a college station.


True. In their time, there were less than 10 commerical stations in the country that would have playlisted either of those bands (outside the Twin Cities).

Sadly, it's probably more than you'd find today (though, at least now we have options to the morning zoo keepers and Jack FM).
   408. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 10, 2008 at 07:42 PM (#2814033)
Sadly, it's probably more than you'd find today (though, at least now we have options to the morning zoo keepers and Jack FM).

There's also, of course, the internet.

In the 80s buying a record was a risk. You either had to hear the record from a friend (or acquire cassette recording of it), but for the out-there stuff you often had no friends with the record. So you had to drop your cash and pray. Actually, in the 80s MTV was a far superior venue for being exposed to good new music than the internet, which of course isn't saying much.
   409. SoSH U at work Posted: June 10, 2008 at 07:47 PM (#2814043)
There's also, of course, the internet.


Yeah, that was one of the options I was aluding to.

In the 80s buying a record was a risk. You either had to hear the record from a friend (or acquire cassette recording of it), but for the out-there stuff you often had no friends with the record. So you had to drop your cash and pray. Actually, in the 80s MTV was a far superior venue for being exposed to good new music than the internet, which of course isn't saying much.


Well, I love my internet radio station (which was once one of those few commerical stations that would play the Mats and Husker Du). But yes, MTV (and 120 Minutes in particular) was once a great place to find new music.
   410. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 10, 2008 at 07:54 PM (#2814052)
If you like U.S.A, it's worth heading over to www.dgmlive.com and downloading the full version of the concert (with the unedited versions of "Easy Money" and "Asbury Park," both of which are nearly doubled in length) for a a few bucks.


sounded like such a good idea, i decided to head on over and do just that.

what show do you think they were featuring as their "random blast"???

why 6-28-1974 asbury park, of course!
   411. Answer Guy Posted: June 10, 2008 at 08:43 PM (#2814103)
This discussion of alternative rock in the 80s brings back memories of Answer Brothers' prodigious cassingle collection (which he left in Worcester) I was rifling thru last year. He picked up on every terrible trend in late 80s/early 90s music - from sub-Paula Abdul dance pap to the cheesiest hair metal to the wackest party rap, with a strange detour into middle-of-the-road numbers like "In The House Of Stone and Light" by Martin Page.

I had managed to purge the memory of Mad Cobra's "Flex" (crappy reggae) deep into the subconscious until I saw a copy of that single. "Flex-a...time to have sex-a..." Ugh.
   412. Swedish Chef Posted: June 10, 2008 at 08:56 PM (#2814110)
In the 80s buying a record was a risk. You either had to hear the record from a friend (or acquire cassette recording of it), but for the out-there stuff you often had no friends with the record. So you had to drop your cash and pray.

Didn't you have listening stations in American record shops? Here in Sweden in Ye Olden Days we could just request a record and put on the headphones.
   413. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 10, 2008 at 09:02 PM (#2814116)
Didn't you have listening stations in American record shops? Here in Sweden in Ye Olden Days we could just request a record and put on the headphones.


The same was true in Britain.
   414. Andere Richtingen Posted: June 10, 2008 at 09:43 PM (#2814140)
Well, I love my internet radio station (which was once one of those few commerical stations that would play the Mats and Husker Du).

They played them back in the 80s?

Didn't you have listening stations in American record shops?

It seems they were mostly gone in my generation. Tower Records on Sunset Blvd had it when it seemed no one else did.
   415. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 10, 2008 at 10:05 PM (#2814161)
They played them back in the 80s?


Sure. The station's been playing alternative/modern rock/indie since 1983 (when it was one of six commercial stations in the format). Since 2004, it's been online only.
   416. GGC don't think it can get longer than a novella Posted: June 10, 2008 at 10:13 PM (#2814174)
Huh. You guys are making me feel bad because I liked stuff like Van Halen and other stuff that would get played on rock radio back then. Van Halen isn't embarassing, but running out and buying Pyromania was. Before that Def Leppard rocked a little harder.
   417. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 10, 2008 at 10:28 PM (#2814199)
Huh. You guys are making me feel bad because I liked stuff like Van Halen and other stuff that would get played on rock radio back then.


Actually, I liked Roth-era Van Halen, too. At least tracks such as "Ain't Talkin 'Bout Love" and "D.O.A.". I just think the rythym section was dull and uninspiring.
   418. JMM Posted: June 10, 2008 at 10:36 PM (#2814212)
Huh. You guys are making me feel bad because I liked stuff like Van Halen and other stuff that would get played on rock radio back then. Van Halen isn't embarassing, but running out and buying Pyromania was. Before that Def Leppard rocked a little harder.

Neither of those are particularly embarassing. It's not like you were listening to Poison or Warrant (unless you were, of course). But both Van Halen and Def Leppard were perfectly adequate as pop-metal goes.
   419. Esoteric Posted: June 10, 2008 at 11:41 PM (#2814383)
On a slightly different note, here is a highly incomplete list of the WORST albums, in my opinion, put out by otherwise great bands/artists. For groups with long decline phases I've limited myself to their "golden era" period (i.e. an inexplicable dip in the midst of a run of greatness):

- The Beatles: Beatles For Sale
- The Rolling Stones: Out Of Our Heads - I'm referring to their proper UK discography...this was an album of mostly crappy cover tunes and only one or two great songs
- The Who (1964-1982): A Quick One - "So Sad About Us," "Boris The Spider," and a bunch of horsesh*t. The title track would only become great in live performance
- Bob Dylan (1961-1968): The Times They Are A-Changin' - aside from the title track, "When The Ship Comes In," and "Boots Of Spanish Leather" you've got an overdose of preachy boring protest songs.
- Genesis (1970-1983): Wind And Wuthering - the last Hackett album is a pale retread of the landmark Trick Of The Tail with 25% of the songwriting genius.
- R.E.M. (1981-1998): Monster - the most returned album in popular music history, enough said.
- The Cure (1979-1992): The Top - Robert Smith really needed a band to bounce ideas off of...
- Yes (1969-1981): Tormato - the great "WTF??" moment in Yes history, coming on the heels of knockout Going For The One. Only one really memorable track here ("Onward")
- Elton John (1969-1975): Don't Shoot Me, I'm Only The Piano Player - "Daniel" doesn't redeem the rest of this schlocky tripe. A warning sign of things to come.
- The Beach Boys (1961-1972): Summer Days (And Summer Nights!) - an inexplicable hiccup in the steady artistic progression of Brian Wilson. "Help Me Rhonda" and "Let Him Run Wild" hold up the side, but not much else does.
- The Velvet Underground: White Light/White Heat - outre art-rock document my ass, this is a disgrace outside of WL/WH and "Here She Comes Now."
- David Bowie (1969-1980): Young Americans - rock's greatest chameleon tries out a new genre and fails. However, the lessons learned here would result in his greatest album ever in Station To Station.
   420. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: June 11, 2008 at 12:33 AM (#2814537)
On a slightly different note, here is a highly incomplete list of the WORST albums, in my opinion, put out by otherwise great bands/artists. For groups with long decline phases I've limited myself to their "golden era" period (i.e. an inexplicable dip in the midst of a run of greatness):


Rush: Caress of Steel
Zep: Presence
Deep Purple: Stormbringer
BOC: Mirrors

edit: I was going to list The Final Cut for Floyd, but since they never did anything worthwhile after that, it should be marked as their cliff dive.
   421. Dag Nabbit is part of the zombie horde Posted: June 11, 2008 at 12:48 AM (#2814576)
Bob Dylan (1961-1968): The Times They Are A-Changin' - aside from the title track, "When The Ship Comes In," and "Boots Of Spanish Leather" you've got an overdose of preachy boring protest songs.

The title track is also a preachy protest song.

The Clash - Combat Rock. Too Much Joy said it best: "Every great band should be shot / Before they make their Combat Rock"

Black Sabbath Volume 4 - Not bad, just nothing really memorable. I can't even remeber the last time I played it. Looking at the songs, I can't imagnie whtn that streak will end.

Oh, and on a completly random note - "Crossing the Red Sea w/ the Adverts" is one of the great treasures of the UK's 1977 punk explosion. Chock fulla great songs.
   422. salfino Posted: June 11, 2008 at 12:48 AM (#2814579)
- David Bowie (1969-1980): Young Americans - rock's greatest chameleon tries out a new genre and fails. However, the lessons learned here would result in his greatest album ever in Station To Station.

I like SOS as much as anyone, I thought. And I shared that view for a long time until I listed again to Hunky Dory and Ziggy.

When is someone going to give T-Rex some love here? The Slider is a great album, IMO.
   423. salfino Posted: June 11, 2008 at 12:58 AM (#2814591)
Bob Dylan (1961-1968): The Times They Are A-Changin' - aside from the title track, "When The Ship Comes In," and "Boots Of Spanish Leather" you've got an overdose of preachy boring protest songs.

You forgot one of the best love songs ever that really broke ground in not being so conventionally (happily) themed:

"When everything I'm a-sayin'/you can say it just as good/you're right from your side/I'm right from mine/we're both just one too many mornings/an' a thousand miles behind."
   424. salfino Posted: June 11, 2008 at 01:05 AM (#2814605)
Zep: Presence

Plant insists it's the group's best album. I think it's underrated. It rocks harder than any Zep album from beginning to end and it's probably Page's best album, too. It's interesting that two very overlooked albums from iconic bands, Black and Blue (Stones) and Presence were recorded in the same studio at basically the same time -- Zeppelin's in 17 days to the amazement of the Stones.
   425. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 11, 2008 at 01:20 AM (#2814645)
- Genesis (1970-1983): Wind And Wuthering - the last Hackett album is a pale retread of the landmark Trick Of The Tail with 25% of the songwriting genius.


Hmmn. I actually like Wind & Wuthering, but I admit that it's one of those albums that I really love while it's playing, but which fades from memory quickly. I agree with the songwriting - about the only real songs on it are "Eleventh Earl of Mar" (which has the classic Tony Banks intro), "Blood on the Rooftops", and "Afterglow". But even on the less developed songs, the bands sounds so good. I've never understood why "Inside and Out" was left off - it would be one of the best songs on the album had it been included...

Agree on Tormato, too, although I like "Arriving UFO". But the two albums that bookended it, Going for the One, and Drama, are two of their best. (Waiting for the backlash on that last-named one.)

You could probably put The Doors' The Soft Parade in there, too.
   426. Esoteric Posted: June 11, 2008 at 01:30 AM (#2814666)
Monty:
Monster is a great record. And if you feel it isn't, doesn't it fall under the "decline phase" category? I mean, why not just list Up?
Because both New Adventures In Hi-Fi and Up are fantastic albums. The latter is hideously underappreciated, the sound of R.E.M. rising to the challenge of having to make do without Bill Berry. They do a fine job, creating something singular and new (very mopey, but I like mopey!) that still features solid songwriting. They got lazy afterwards, though. It's been downhill since 1998.
   427. Esoteric Posted: June 11, 2008 at 01:36 AM (#2814683)
vortex:
But the two albums that bookended it, Going for the One, and Drama, are two of their best. (Waiting for the backlash on that last-named one.)
You'll get no backlash from me. Drama isn't necessarily one of their BEST (since we have to cut off the "best" at a reasonable number, which for me would include TYA, Fragile, CTTE, Relayer and GFTO) but it's a very solid album, and only bigotry against the idea of having THE BUGGLES FOR GOD'S SAKES in the band prevents some hardcore fans from acknowledging it. "Does It Really Happen?" and "Tempus Fugit" are two of Yes's finest works.

I didn't include The Doors on my original list because frankly I think they suck. Never been a fan. The one big classic rock band I vehemently disagree about. Some great songs ("People Are Strange," "Roadhouse Blues," "Peace Frog," "L.A. Woman") but no albums I'd ever want to listen to all the way through.
   428. scotto Posted: June 11, 2008 at 01:52 AM (#2814714)
I'll never be confused with a fan of the Doors, but I have to give Ray Manzarek credit for his early adoption, advocacy for and production of X's first albums. That is a band that I'd heard about but never heard and bought it because of all I'd read. It was one of the soundest decisions I've ever made.

And if you've heard the remixed version of "Riding with Mary" featuring Manzarek on keyboards that's on the reissue of "Under the Big Black Sun", you'll join me in giving him credit for not issuing THAT version. Hideous.
   429. Howie Menckel Posted: June 11, 2008 at 01:56 AM (#2814722)
"Bob Dylan (1961-1968): The Times They Are A-Changin' - aside from the title track, "When The Ship Comes In," and "Boots Of Spanish Leather" you've got an overdose of preachy boring protest songs."

Well, many of these songs were the first of the (modern) breed:

- "With God on Our Side" - this brought that mood beyond the coffee houses and into a lot of living rooms all over
- "One Too Many Mornings" - not preachy, just melancholy
- "Only A Pawn in Their Game" - ballsy for the era, and fresh; get beyond the obvious hatred for racists, and get to what makes them so pathetic
- "Restless Farewell" - written 3 weeks before the JFK assassination in 1963. a riff on an Irish folk song. If he released it decades later, it wouldn't have been surprising. But this guy was 22 years old, and chewing up life like a fruit fly. Already Dylan had gotten to this:

Oh a false clock tries to tick out my time
To disgrace, distract, and bother me.
And the dirt of gossip blows into my face,
And the dust of rumors covers me.
But if the arrow is straight
And the point is slick,
It can pierce through dust no matter how thick.
So I'll make my stand
And remain as I am
And bid farewell and not give a damn
   430. Esoteric Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:04 AM (#2814731)
"With God On Our Side" is one of the most childishly stupid lyrics Bob Dylan ever wrote, period. He should be ashamed of it. I remember my (very) Jewish friend John memorably saying, as we were listening to Dylan sing the "German" verse: "Oh come on, GET OFF YOUR HIGH HORSE BOB DYLAN." So true.
   431. Esoteric Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:04 AM (#2814733)
BTW, are there any Deadheads in the BBTF audience? I have over 300 shows from the 1966-1977 era of the Dead...so I guess you could say I'm a fan.
   432. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:09 AM (#2814742)
- Bob Dylan (1961-1968): The Times They Are A-Changin' - aside from the title track, "When The Ship Comes In," and "Boots Of Spanish Leather" you've got an overdose of preachy boring protest songs.


the times they are a changing is my least favorite song on the album and one of my least favorite dylan songs ever

i actually like that album quite a lot, it's not on the level of Freewheelin' and does suffer by being an extension of that album in some places, but the writing and performances are top notch in many places

hollis brown, north county blues and hattie carroll are the meat of the album for me (and i'm guessing the "preachy boring protest songs" that you reference), by turns stark, despairing, wearied, haunted, resigned and bitterly angry. emotionally, these cuts are on the level of the highest of dylan's early work and contain top notch singing and arrangement. as story telling goes, they're top notch, with dylan using a varieties of voices (both in the signing and the writing) with empathy and without distance. they're very naked performances, even though they're musical costumes.

only a pawn in their game, on the other hand, does nothing for me, falling squarely into the categorization you made above
   433. Biff, highly-regarded young guy Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:12 AM (#2814751)
I like Presence, especially "Achilles Last Stand". Then again, I like prog rock, so...there you go.

"Nobody's Fault But Mine" is also excellent.
   434. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:14 AM (#2814754)
BTW, are there any Deadheads in the BBTF audience? I have over 300 shows from the 1966-1977 era of the Dead...so I guess you could say I'm a fan.


I'm probably one of the few people on earth who actually prefer the Grateful Dead's studio output to their live output. I never saw the Dead live; I'm quite aware of the mythology surrounding their concerts, and the fact that they would improvise on stage to the point where two versions of the same song would sound completely different on given nights, but I always thought that both the Garcia/Hunter and Weir/Barlow songwriting partnerships were vastly underrated. The Dead have some great songs in their catalogue - "Sugar Magnolia", "U.S. Blues", "Uncle John's Band", "Row Jimmy", "Sugaree", and even something like "Terrapin Station", which was as about close as any US band ever got to progressive rock. I've always thought that the studio versions of those songs were the undiluted versions, before the live versions concentrated more on the improvisation, and less on the song itself. I know I'm in the minority on this, and I'm perfectly sure that most will disagree, but I think the Dead were a better studio band than a live one...
   435. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:19 AM (#2814764)
a riff on an Irish folk song.
it's adapted from the lyrics, music and construction of "the parting glass" which dylan undoubtledly heard The Clancy Brothers (an early influence) perform, among others. there's a great version of it that they perform on their Live at Carnegie Hall album. The Pogues covered it as well on the Honkytonk Woman ep. It's a wonderful, wistful, melancholy song of parting and Dylan captured much of the feel and mood in his adaptation.
   436. Esoteric Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:23 AM (#2814773)
vortex:

Yeah, no question that I disagree with you there. I started with their studio albums and liked them quite a bit (bought the big Golden Road complete official releases boxed set as my first ever exposure to the Dead), but once I spent more time focusing on the live material I had less and less time for the studio version.

The one exception is Europe '72. Nominally it's a live album, but given the amount of vocal and instrumental overdubbing (and given the amount that the songs debuting on that set would change over the years), it's really a studio album in all but name. And yet I would take those original, concise versions of "Jack Straw," "Brown-Eyed Woman," "Cumberland Blues," "Sugar Magnolia," "He's Gone," and the China/Rider suite over all the thousands of performances they would subsequently get. "He's Gone" never sounded better than it does on Europe '72: tight and sweet.
   437. Howie Menckel Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:26 AM (#2814777)
"it's adapted from the lyrics, music and construction of "the parting glass" which dylan undoubtledly heard The Clancy Brothers (an early influence) perform, among others."

I was at that 30th anniversary Dylan show at Madison Square Garden - the Clancy Brothers were there, I believe they did "When The Ship Comes In" with him.

What a show...
   438. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:26 AM (#2814778)
BTW, are there any Deadheads in the BBTF audience? I have over 300 shows from the 1966-1977 era of the Dead...so I guess you could say I'm a fan.


the dead never did much for me (though lord i tried back when i was DAT trading, since having Dead shows was usually the only way to get the non-Dead shows i really wanted from Dead DAT traders), though i do enjoy the Jerry Garcia Band and Jerry's work with Dave Grisman enough to have picked up some shows.

hvae you seen the Grateful Dawg documentary?
   439. PerroX Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:27 AM (#2814780)
It's still sinking in that Geddy gave all those baseballs to the museum.


He's a great humanitarian, he's a great philanthropist,
He knows just where to touch you, honey, and how you like to be kissed.
   440. PerroX Posted: June 11, 2008 at 02:38 AM (#2814793)
Don't have time to reminisce now, but I'd like to hear about the great shows people have been to.

Never a big Dead fan, but I still remember a Halloween show in Columbia, SC back in the mid-80's.

Some freaky freaks out that night, not counting the three black transvestites in the IHOP after the show.

Rush was the first, but the best show I ever attended was probably Jason and the Scorchers in New Orleans in the late '80's. Transcendent. Warner Hodges kicked ass for hours.

And this was after seeing Chuck Berry do a literally blazing rendition of Johnny B. Goode with his amp going up in flames. Not to mention JazzFest.

My list is long, from Sonic Youth and Sun Ra in Central Park to the Replacements at Cat's Cradle.
   441. The Wilpons Must Go (Tom D) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:00 AM (#2814845)
Don't have time to reminisce now, but I'd like to hear about the great shows people have been to.

Its a long list because I am older than I used to be, but a few come to mind.

I saw Eric Clapton many years ago and it was one of the worst shows I have been to. I saw Cream in 2005 and it was one of the best shows I've been to.

The Who, although I only saw them with Jones and Starkey.

I saw Neil Young several times each on his 1983 Trans tour and his 1989 Freedom tour and those were up there. Also, Neil with Booker T. and the MG's whenever that was.

Lou Reed Magic and Loss tour 1992.

I've seem Paul McCartney a number of times. He has a lot of good songs to choose from. One thing I noticed seeing both Paul and Ringo is that among other things, the Beatles were the biggest hams out there.

I always loved seeing King Crimson and the various offshoots.
   442. Esoteric Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:04 AM (#2814852)
I've seen Radiohead 10 or so times starting in October of 1995, and even though I enjoyed the 2003 $2 Bill show a lot (the one MTV taped where they debuted Hail To The Thief in the U.S.; I was in the 3rd row), that first concert will always be the highlight of my life.
   443. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:05 AM (#2814855)
Don't have time to reminisce now, but I'd like to hear about the great shows people have been to.


Blue Oyster Cult ~ 1984. The did a mesmerizing 10 minute jam of Dominance and Submission.
   444. salfino Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:06 AM (#2814858)
I've seem Paul McCartney a number of times. He has a lot of good songs to choose from. One thing I noticed seeing both Paul and Ringo is that among other things, the Beatles were the biggest hams out there.

Fab Faux does all the Beatles stuff way better than McCartney. Sad but true. No slight to Sir Paul. Fab Faux are that good.
   445. Answer Guy Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:09 AM (#2814866)
I'm probably one of the few people on earth who actually prefer the Grateful Dead's studio output to their live output.


I understand where you're coming from. The first issue is that their studio recordings before Workingman's Dead were subpar, badly produced efforts. There are some good songs in there, but almost any widely available live version of "St. Stephen" or "China Cat Sunflower" beats the studio version hands down. It's a cliche to refer to Live Dead, but that's a more fully realized "St. Stephen."

It seems like most "jam" bands' early studio albums aren't as good as they should be, as they have trouble translating their craft to the studio setting. Phish's first couple of studio releases aren't very good either.
   446. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:14 AM (#2814884)
It seems like most "jam" bands' early studio albums aren't as good as they should be, as they have trouble translating their craft to the studio setting. Phish's first couple of studio releases aren't very good either.


Well, this place is nothing if not for differing opinions. I think Junta is their best effort.
   447. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:26 AM (#2814914)
it was early era studio phish that led me to the mistaken belief that phish wasn't a band worth my time, rather amusing if considered in light of how much time and money i'd later spend collecting, listening and following them on tour.

still don't bother with the studio stuff though
   448. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: June 11, 2008 at 03:39 AM (#2814938)
it was early era studio phish that led me to the mistaken belief that phish wasn't a band worth my time, rather amusing if considered in light of how much time and money i'd later spend collecting, listening and following them on tour.

still don't bother with the studio stuff though


I've never seen them live, but I would have loved to see them perform Esther.
   449. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 04:03 AM (#2814981)
I've never seen them live, but I would have loved to see them perform Esther.


you might get a chance, i'd put money on another comeback within the next year, probably within 6 months, trey in particular seems fired up about playing together again.

then again, be careful what you wish for. i saw them play esther at the 2nd vegas show in 2000. trey bricked the entire last verse, forgetting the lyrics, then finished with "she died. dead."
   450. Misirlou's been working for the drug squad Posted: June 11, 2008 at 04:10 AM (#2814998)
be careful what you wish for. i saw them play esther at the 2nd vegas show in 2000. trey bricked the entire last verse, forgetting the lyrics, then finished with "she died. dead."


LOL!
   451. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 04:21 AM (#2815009)
yeah, the boys got a little sloppy at the end of their run. at Conventry (their farewell shows), the last song they played, The Curtain (With) had to be restarted half-way through after they realized they were playing it in the wrong key. not exactly going out on top.
   452. The Wilpons Must Go (Tom D) Posted: June 11, 2008 at 04:50 AM (#2815039)
I'm probably one of the few people on earth who actually prefer the Grateful Dead's studio output to their live output.

I am with you on that.
   453. Joey Numbaz (Scruff) Posted: July 16, 2008 at 04:34 PM (#2861354)
Anyone interested in going to the 7/24 Rush show at the Verizon Center in Indianapolis? It's rescheduled from earlier and is now the last show of the tour. Let me know ASAP if you have any interest.
   454. Joey Numbaz (Scruff) Posted: July 16, 2008 at 04:44 PM (#2861368)
Just finally getting around to reading this thread. This post was great:

"You can tell a lot about a guy based on the following things:

1) his favorite sport;
2) his choice of beer; and
3) how he feels about Rush.

Not sayin' there are any right or wrong answers. Just sayin' that, if you know that stuff about someone, you can pretty much figure out most other things worth knowing."


1) Baseball, duh
2) Guiness, Yuengling (not Lager, the old school stuff from America's oldest brewery, like Lord Chesterfield Ale) or any wheat beer.
3) Love Rush and see them 2x every tour, maybe 3 on this one. Have every song in my iPod, most rated 4 or 5.

So what does that mean? What other things does this say about me?
   455. A.T.F.W. Posted: July 16, 2008 at 05:15 PM (#2861411)
That Lord Chesterfield Ale is some good stuff, I really wish Yuengling sold their product in Ohio.
   456. Joey Numbaz (Scruff) Posted: July 16, 2008 at 05:24 PM (#2861421)
Lord Chesterfield Ale is by far my favorite yellow beer. I pick up a case or two every time I drive to PA.

I even name my fake baseball stadiums in leagues Lord Chester Field and most of my teams are the Pottsville Yuenglings. They used to have the best commercials like 15 years ago, old black and whites that talked about America's Oldest Brewery being America's best.

I'm very disappointed that they chose to go national with the Lager, easily the worst of their flavors. If I had to rank them I'd go:

Lord Chesterfield Ale
Porter
Black and Tan
Premium
Light
Lager
Lager Light

We used to (early 1990s) be able to get the premium in cases of 16 oz. returnables for $11.99, which were $10.79 after you got the deposits back. Then they kind of rebranded themselves as a micro-brew with the Lager and now that's like $18-19 a case I think.
   457. A.T.F.W. Posted: July 16, 2008 at 05:43 PM (#2861458)
Interesting list, I haven't tried some of those. My gf's father goes to PA a couple times a year and stocks up on Yuengling, but he always brings back a bunch of cases of the Lager. One year he brought me a case of Lord Chesterfield, but I may have to put in a request for the porter.

Incidentally, Great Lakes Brewery has a pretty good Porter if you're partial to those.
   458. Joey Numbaz (Scruff) Posted: July 16, 2008 at 07:37 PM (#2861609)
I think I had one of those at the SABR convention; pretty sure it was my first beer the first day, on recommendation from the bartender after I asked for a good local dark beer . . . it is good.
   459. Esoteric Posted: July 17, 2008 at 06:17 AM (#2861971)
I know most people won't agree, but this is probably my favorite "off-topic" thread in the history of BTF. Just a lot of great music chatter.
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