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Monday, May 14, 2018

Taking Back the Ballparks - Chicago Cubs

We just passed the halfway mark in this endeavor. Yet like the baseball season itself, the second half won’t take quite as many days to complete.

Just as College Week gives Jeopardy host Alex Trebek a younger group of contestants to insult, and Fleet Week depletes the stock of antibiotics on our nation’s maritime vessels, By Acclimation Week is going to speed up the Taking Back the Ballparks project.

If my assumptions are correct, each day this week we’ll check off another team, a ballclub whose park has no need for a new name, and any suggestions otherwise will be greeted with responses ranging from huh to legitimate anger.

The first is the most obvious of all: Wrigley Field. While not the true corporate name we think of today, it’s probably not a coincidence that the park’s moniker is shared with the name of the chewing gum company one-time owner Phil Wrigley ran. In some ways, Wrigley was the original Busch. Or, perhaps, the original Trump, a comparison that likely pleases the Ricketts, if no one else in Chicago.

Obviously, Wrigley isn’t going anywhere. Hell, the neighborhood around it has assumed the name of the ballpark. And if there’s a greater justification for keeping a ballpark’s name for eternity than that, I can’t think of what it would be.

Feel free to use the space below to talk about what a good name for the ballpark would be if it wasn’t called Wrigley, your favorite moments there, or, if McCoy drops by to nakedly highjack the thread, the little-discussed intricacies of the Crimean War.

Tomorrow: Evil’s Residence

Ballpark History

Built: 1914

Capacity: 41,649

Name: Wrigley Field, 1926-present; Cubs Park 1920-26; Weeghman Park 1914-1920.

Other ballparks used by club in its current city: 23rd Street Grounds 1876-77; Lakefront Park I 1878-1882; Lakefront Park II 1883-84; West Side Park I 1885-1891; South Side Park 1891-1893; West Side Park II 1893-1915.

Distinctive Features: The ivy; the neighborhood; the rooftops onlookers; the overhanging second deck; the manual scoreboard; the continued dominance of day baseball; the marquee; the troughs, the chads and trixies. 


Ballpark Highlights:

With darkness falling, Gabby Hartnett deposited an 0-2 pitch from Mace Brown over the left-centerfield bleachers, giving the Cubs a 6-5 win over Pittsburgh, a victory that propelled them to an NL pennant. The Homer in the Gloamin’ was arguably baseball’s first famous walk-off dinger, and it remains the sport’s best named (sorry Bobby).

On July 1, 1943, night baseball came to Wrigley when the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League held its All-Star game under temporary lights.

In 1945, a dumbass brought a goat to a game and somehow thought that was OK.

Just a little over 25 years ago, in his fifth big league start, Kerry Wood turned in perhaps the single-most impressive pitching performances in big league history. Wood fanned 20, walked none and yielded just two baserunners – one when HBP magnet Craig Biggio took a curve off the shoulder and a questionable hit by Ricky Gutierrez that bounced off the glove of Kevin Orie. He managed this against the winningest team in Astros history, which was led by the NL’s best offense.

In 2003, the Cubs were within five outs of their first World Series visit in 58 years when all hell broke loose, almost none of it having to do with a foul ball into the stands.

On Oct. 22, 2016, Kyle Hendricks outdueled Clayton Kershaw to lead the Cubs to a 5-0 victory and a triumph in the National League Championship Series. Two weeks later, in Jacobs Field, the Cubs would claim their first World Series title in 108 years.

Selections to Date
San Francisco Giants - China Basin

Texas Rangers - The Ballpark in Arlington

San Diego Padres - Mission Field

Boston Red Sox - Fenway Park

Washington Nationals - Nationals Park

Tampa Bay Rays - Suncoast Dome

Philadelphia Phillies - Citizens Park

Seattle Mariners - Cascadia Field

Pittsburgh Pirates - Allegheny Park

Kansas City Royals -Kauffman Stadium

New York Mets - Willets Point

Los Angeles Angels - Autry Field

St. Louis Cardinals - Busch Stadium

Detroit Tigers - Tiger Field


Miami Marlins - Fish Tank


Cleveland Indians - Jacobs Field

 

SoSH U at work Posted: May 14, 2018 at 09:42 AM | 49 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: cubs, stadium names

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   1. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: May 14, 2018 at 10:07 AM (#5671726)
Is there any story behind the Chicago Whales' name? 30 seconds of googling didn't answer the question. "Whales" doesn't really work in the Midwest. I've been trying to alliterate my way to it from the name "Weeghman", but that doesn't work. Were there some really fat players on the team? Really skinny ones who got ironically called whales? There are beluga whales in the Shedd Aquarium, but it didn't open until 1930. The biggest thing in Illinois waters is the lake sturgeon, no one's idea of a whale.

I like it as a name and like the logo, but it strikes me as a random sort of name with no local connection.

Weeghman Park wouldn't be a terrible name, if we all lost our collective minds.
   2. McCoy Posted: May 14, 2018 at 10:08 AM (#5671727)
There is no real reason to have it be called Wrigley Field. Cubs park works just fine
   3. Jose is an Absurd Force of Nature Posted: May 14, 2018 at 10:16 AM (#5671733)
This is one where maybe there are better names for it but I don't think a change is worth it.

I went to one game there. Cub fans should be glad that's all I saw. Ryne Sandberg broke his legs, some slightly frightening guy sat next to me and the Cubs lost something like 13-1 and Doug Dascenzo pitched the ninth. Quick tracer, this is the game I went too. It was a great experience though. Amazing place to see a ballgame.
   4. BDC Posted: May 14, 2018 at 10:17 AM (#5671734)
As McCoy notes, people of my father's generation tended to say Cubs Park and Sox Park, though of course "Wrigley" was in use too. I think that the 1926 renaming of the stadium didn't fully "take" for many decades. My dad was born in 1930, though, so that generation is obviously dwindling.

Wrigley Field was the first place I saw a game, and remains, of the extant parks, the one I've been to second-most often. In fact, after the Rangers move across the street in 2020, Wrigley Field will for awhile become the active ML park I'll have seen the most games in.
   5. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: May 14, 2018 at 10:32 AM (#5671747)
Wrigley Field. Duh.
   6. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:04 AM (#5671770)
the continued dominance of day baseball
Eh, not so much anymore.
   7. McCoy Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:06 AM (#5671773)
Whales was the winning name in a newspaper nickname contest.
   8. villageidiom Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:17 AM (#5671781)
Keep it Wrigley Field, if only to keep the reference in The Blues Brothers relevant.
   9. Greg Pope Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:25 AM (#5671791)
As McCoy notes, people of my father's generation tended to say Cubs Park and Sox Park, though of course "Wrigley" was in use too. I think that the 1926 renaming of the stadium didn't fully "take" for many decades. My dad was born in 1930, though, so that generation is obviously dwindling.

I don't live in the city proper, just the northern suburbs. I never hear anyone say Cubs Park or Sox Park up here. I assume it's a city thing. I do know several people who have named their dog Wrigley. It's clearly an integral part of the team's identity.
   10. McCoy Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:30 AM (#5671795)
I've heard Sox Park before but it has always been Wrigley for me and I have a feeling that has mostly to do with WGN.
   11. Perry Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:30 AM (#5671796)
I don't live in the city proper, just the northern suburbs. I never hear anyone say Cubs Park or Sox Park up here. I assume it's a city thing. I do know several people who have named their dog Wrigley. It's clearly an integral part of the team's identity.


I had a girlfriend in college, born ca. 1955, from Rogers Park (i.e. the city), who always called it Cubs Park.
   12. Zonk prescribes Rezine for TDS Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:35 AM (#5671804)
The last generation of Wrigleys to own the Cubs weren't exactly beloved - they were pre-media explosion Lorias before there was a Loria, selling off Madlock, Sutter, etc before bowing out to that quaint 'newspaper'.

It's always surprised me a bit that the namesake has endeared because of that. I guess it was just the gum guys' good fortune to sell the park about a decade or so before naming rights became all the rage. While I was a bit young when the sale went down, my recollection from the older fans in the 80s is that the Wrigleys weren't exactly beloved... it's not like there was a lot of warm and fuzzies over the Wrigley's 65 years owning the team.

In effect, the Wrigleys purchased an NL powerhouse... and saw it fall back in the NL pack within a decade or so (especially after PK took over when Bill passed). They still had some nice teams in the 20s/30s, but the NL balance of power in the midwest clearly shifted south to St Louis. You had the 4A World Series appearance in '45... and then some beloved players in the 50s/60s, but the last decade of Wrigley ownership was not one of fanbase/owner love.

Had naming rights become a "thing" a decade or so earlier, it wouldn't have surprised me if 'Wrigley' had gone the way of 'Weeghman' and few tears would have been shed over it.
   13. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:54 AM (#5671819)
The last generation of Wrigleys to own the Cubs weren't exactly beloved - they were pre-media explosion Lorias before there was a Loria, selling off Madlock, Sutter, etc before bowing out to that quaint 'newspaper'.


Sutter post Cub WAR - 6.1

Leon Durham Cub WAR - 14.9

Lee Smith Cub WAR after replacing Sutter- 18.7
   14. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:59 AM (#5671825)
Now, Madlock hurt. Not only was he far better post trade than Murcer and Ontiveros, the Cubs had no ready replacement like they did for Sutter. Ontiveros was supposed to be that replacement, and he was OK for 1 year, but then terrible for 2. Followed by Lenny Randle, Ken Reitz, and rookie Ryne Sandberg, before getting Ron Cey.
   15. Zonk prescribes Rezine for TDS Posted: May 14, 2018 at 12:10 PM (#5671836)
I'm not denying the Sutter trade ultimately worked out, I'm just saying that my recollection was (Bill III by that point?) that the Wrigleys were seen as cheap.
   16. Moses Taylor, aka Hambone Fakenameington Posted: May 14, 2018 at 12:17 PM (#5671850)
Just a little over 25 years ago, in his fifth big league start, Kerry Wood turned in perhaps the single-most impressive pitching performances in big league history. Wood fanned 20, walked none and yielded just two baserunners – one when HBP magnet Craig Biggio took a curve off the shoulder and a questionable hit by Ricky Gutierrez that bounced off the glove of Kevin Orie. He managed this against the winningest team in Astros history, which was led by the NL’s best offense.

May 6, 1998. So, 20 years. Cubs made an awesome documentary about it.
   17. Spahn Insane Posted: May 14, 2018 at 12:20 PM (#5671856)
the Cubs had no ready replacement like they did for Sutter

It worked out fine, as you note, but was Smith's replacing Sutter really what the Cubs were contemplating? (Sincere question--these events were either before my Cub fandom or just at the start of it, so my knowledge of the details is lacking.) Sutter was traded in the 1980-81 offseason. Smith didn't become the closer until mid-1982 (though I was thinking he'd started a lot more games than he did--only 5 in 1982. Perhaps my newly-minted Cub fandom inflated his rotation presence beyond reality, particularly since he was pretty bad as a starter.). Was he only in the rotation as a stopgap, or did he simply crap out?
   18. SoSH U at work Posted: May 14, 2018 at 12:30 PM (#5671867)
16. Aw crap. Thanks.
   19. Rusty Priske Posted: May 14, 2018 at 12:55 PM (#5671903)
To me there are only three parks that absolutely should NEVER have their name changed (though there are others that are close to that): Yankee Stadium, Fenway, and Wrigley.
   20. QLE Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:05 PM (#5671916)
For those who are more reticent about the name:

What would you change the name of the Wrigleyville neighborhood to?
   21. McCoy Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:11 PM (#5671926)
I think Zonk's recount is a bit off. Jim Hart takes the team over in 1902 gets sick and sells the team to Charles Murphy and the team that would eventually be called the Cubs have the greatest run in baseball history. At that point no matter what happens they are of course going to fall back to the pack. Nothing but that can happen. But how did they get there? Well, the Cubs were very fortunate in that they basically lost nobody to the AL during the League Wars. That was the reason they, Pittsburgh, and NY were the powerhouses in the NL for the first 15 odd years in the NL. The Cubs hit some hard times and Wrigley is able to buy out his partners. Brings in Veeck to run the team and the Cubs churn out a pretty darn good 1920's and 1930's. From 1926 to 1938 they are either first or second in attendance and they go to the WS 4 times. PK took over in 1932 and by the close of the decade the neglect of the team is final taking its toll on the major league club. PK and the Cubs don't really go in for a controlled minor leagues and they prefer an open minor leagues so they are hurt by that. PK also wasn't crazy about integration so the Cubs miss out on of top Negro talent for years. So they hit their lean times and it also didn't help that throughout it the Cubs and Wrigley basically refused to do much with their stadium other than to keep it beautifully looking. It wasn't until the 1990's that the started taking steps to enlarging the stadium. Mid to late 60's and early 1970's saw the Cubs do well and interest in the Cubs picked up. The rest of the 1970's for the Cubs were similar in vein as it was for the rest of the majors in that it was a struggling time. By the end of it all the city was most definitely ready for a new owner to take over but up until the 1950's or so the Cubs were considered a good and popular team so there would little reason to dislike the owners at that point.
   22. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:33 PM (#5671944)
Cubs made an awesome documentary about it.


Your link appears to be the trailer.

Here is the documentary itself.
   23. Bote Man Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:33 PM (#5671945)
What would you change the name of the Wrigleyville neighborhood to?

Hooverville.
   24. Zonk prescribes Rezine for TDS Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:36 PM (#5671953)
What would you change the name of the Wrigleyville neighborhood to?


Nowadays? Lincoln Park North.

The rest of the 1970's for the Cubs were similar in vein as it was for the rest of the majors in that it was a struggling time. By the end of it all the city was most definitely ready for a new owner to take over but up until the 1950's or so the Cubs were considered a good and popular team so there would little reason to dislike the owners at that point.


But the lean times you're describing account for half of the Wrigley's ownership of the team... and indeed, in the last few decades before he died - PK wasn't at all a very public face (hence the Pete LaCock quip in the 70s about going to the Wrigley Building to request a meeting with PK to "see if you really existed!").

Even beyond that, while the Wrigley family had a fair amount philanthropic endeavors - the most famous aren't even in Chicago (probably the Catalina Islands conservatory in California).

All I'm saying by the last few decades of Wrigley ownership - the Wrigleys were hardly a beloved ownership group... and what's more, the family doesn't seem nearly as enmeshed in the fabric of Chicago as other commercial/architectural/philanthropic luminaries... i.e., the McCormicks, the Adlers, the Fields, etc - you see no shortage of landmarks and endeavors that still occupy somewhat hallowed places in the city's history... but despite their innovation and breadth, the Wrigleys just don't seem to occupy that same strata.

Add that all up, and I'm just saying that it surprises me the namesake application to the ballpark occupies the hallowed ground it does.

EDIT: Just for the record, I am NOT a vote in favor of changing the name... quite the opposite. I'm only saying the degree to which the name is held so dear doesn't make as much sense to me
   25. McCoy Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:43 PM (#5671964)
I agree with most of that but to nitpick you Wrigley has, ahem, Wrigley Field and Wrigley Building
   26. Ziggy's screen name Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:46 PM (#5671970)
Not a Cubs fan, so breaking the curse didn't matter to me. So my favorite thing about the Cubs WS win (other than the fact that that game 7 was awesome) was Bryant's huge sloppy grin when he scooped up that grounder and knew that he'd just won the world series.
   27. Zonk prescribes Rezine for TDS Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:49 PM (#5671976)
I agree with most of that but to nitpick you Wrigley has, ahem, Wrigley Field and Wrigley Building


Well... at least until the new owners change the name to the Groupon Building and they go the way of Sears!
   28. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: May 14, 2018 at 01:53 PM (#5671980)
The rest of the 1970's for the Cubs were similar in vein as it was for the rest of the majors in that it was a struggling time. By the end of it all the city was most definitely ready for a new owner to take over but up until the 1950's or so the Cubs were considered a good and popular team so there would little reason to dislike the owners at that point.

And beyond mere baseball, Wrigley helped make the world safe for democracy. How soon we forget.
   29. Bote Man Posted: May 14, 2018 at 02:56 PM (#5672046)
SoSH, it appears that these 4 naming threads are also stickied to the top of the Newsstand page, as today's OMNICHATTER and the softball thread have been pushed down below everything.
   30. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: May 14, 2018 at 06:18 PM (#5672239)
the Cubs had no ready replacement like they did for Sutter

It worked out fine, as you note, but was Smith's replacing Sutter really what the Cubs were contemplating?

The killer was losing Lee Smith. Anyone else recall the Rich Gossage experience at Wrigley?
   31. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: May 14, 2018 at 06:20 PM (#5672241)
Not a Cubs fan, so breaking the curse didn't matter to me. So my favorite thing about the Cubs WS win (other than the fact that that game 7 was awesome) was Bryant's huge sloppy grin when he scooped up that grounder and knew that he'd just won the world series.

Fun fact about that throw: Bryant's foot slid on the wet grass as he made the throw. Slid a few feet apparently. As a result, he nearly threw the ball into right field. Rizzo had to catch it over his head. Jed Hoyer has said that he still has trouble watching that replay, even knowing how it ended, because of what nearly happened on that play.
   32. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: May 14, 2018 at 06:22 PM (#5672244)
As for the actual topic: Wrigley Field works. It's a classic name that has lasted for longer than all but the oldest can recall. And the neighbhorhood is called Wrigleyville nowadays.

If you want other options:
Weegham Park. Let's really go Old School.

The Friendly Confines. That's it's nickname.

Cubs Park. Generic, but it works

North Side Stadium. Because it's on the North Side.

But it should be Wrigley Field.
   33. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 14, 2018 at 06:23 PM (#5672246)
The killer was losing Lee Smith. Anyone else recall the Rich Gossage experience at Wrigley?
You're totally underselling the Al Nipper and Calvin Schiraldi experiences at Wrigley.
   34. Walt Davis Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:08 PM (#5672415)
Just keep it Wrigley but if you're gonna change, it's Ernie Banks Field. With double-headers every day!
   35. Tom T Posted: May 14, 2018 at 11:48 PM (#5672463)
but was Smith's replacing Sutter really what the Cubs were contemplating?


My then-11-year-old mind definitely was under that impression. I do recall it wasn't the immediate plan---they still had Willie Hernandez---but being a "closer" stuck in my brain as Smith's expected long-term role. I DO vividly remember the announcers (might have been in '81, though) talking about how this kid had a strong arm and a solid fastball, but lacked control, citing as evidence that he had launched one over the backstop in some (spring training? minor league?) appearance.

Lee filled in as a starter in June of '82, but I don't recall the circumstances as he hadn't primarily been a starter since '78.
   36. ajnrules Posted: May 15, 2018 at 08:30 PM (#5673079)
Ivy Field
   37. Zonk prescribes Rezine for TDS Posted: May 16, 2018 at 09:10 AM (#5673302)
The killer was losing Lee Smith. Anyone else recall the Rich Gossage experience at Wrigley?


Very much so -

In fact, this is one of those games that is very much burned in my memory...

Speaking of Calvin Shiraldi.... He throws 9, beautiful scoreless innings. The Cubs scratch across a run in the top of the 10th.... and Gossage blows it for Calvin.
   38. mitchiapet Posted: May 16, 2018 at 12:57 PM (#5673478)
Weeghman Park. An old ballpark with an old school, non-corporate name. Let's be honest, Wrigley (like Busch) was known for his company before owning the Cubs, and putting the family name on the ballpark was about advertising gum as well as the other usual reasons for an owner to put the family name on a business.
   39. Walt Davis Posted: May 16, 2018 at 05:33 PM (#5673781)
Plus if we change it to Banks Field then the Angels can take Wrigley Field.

Looking up the other Wrigley I discover on Wiki that the guy who designed Wrigley also designed Comiskey ... which kinda boggles my mind. "Hey, great job on the Cubs park, we want to hire you to design our park. One condition though -- make sure it has none of the positive features of the Cubs park but feel free to stick seats behind girders again."

Maybe Comiskey looked better when it was new but even as a kid I thought that place was a dump. Wrigley was also a dump in many ways but for the green grass and the brick and the ivy and the sunshine and the gazing out over the wall.
   40. stevegamer Posted: May 18, 2018 at 04:50 AM (#5674805)
Catching up, but I agree this is the best name. While it may have been called something different at one time, that was too long ago.
   41. McCoy Posted: May 18, 2018 at 07:12 AM (#5674812)
The issue with Comiskey was that it was poorly lit.
   42. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: May 18, 2018 at 08:40 AM (#5674846)
Looking up the other Wrigley I discover on Wiki that the guy who designed Wrigley also designed Comiskey ... which kinda boggles my mind. "Hey, great job on the Cubs park, we want to hire you to design our park.


Comiskey is older than Wrigley, not the other way around.
   43. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: May 18, 2018 at 10:23 AM (#5674911)
Bartman Bowl
   44. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: May 18, 2018 at 12:49 PM (#5675111)
Let's be honest, Wrigley (like Busch) was known for his company before owning the Cubs, and putting the family name on the ballpark was about advertising gum as well as the other usual reasons for an owner to put the family name on a business.


When Auggie Busch bought the Cardinals, he wanted to rename Sportsman's Park "Budweiser stadium". That name was vetoed by Commissioner Ford Frick. So he named the stadium after himself, and shortly thereafter, introduced "Busch Bavarian Beer."
   45. Spahn Insane Posted: May 18, 2018 at 01:27 PM (#5675139)
The killer was losing Lee Smith. Anyone else recall the Rich Gossage experience at Wrigley?

I do, yes. And I remember 16-year-old me being fairly pissed about the Smith for Nipper + Schiraldi (wtf?) trade. Turns out hiring Jim Frey as your GM had consequences.
   46. Spahn Insane Posted: May 18, 2018 at 01:32 PM (#5675145)
Fun fact about that throw: Bryant's foot slid on the wet grass as he made the throw. Slid a few feet apparently. As a result, he nearly threw the ball into right field. Rizzo had to catch it over his head. Jed Hoyer has said that he still has trouble watching that replay, even knowing how it ended, because of what nearly happened on that play.

Well. Rizzo caught the throw around face height; Bryant's throw was perfectly on target, though as noted he slipped before making it, so obviously the play could've turned out very, very badly. I love Fowler's comment from the WS documentary, describing him seeing Bryant slip and the resulting trajectory of the throw: "[laughing] No, he DIDN'T just throw that ball away..."

That documentary's great for all sorts of reasons, but I especially liked hearing the players talking about what was going through their minds toward the end (Zobrist said he'd be lying if the "curse" didn't cross his mind when the Indians tied it in the 8th). Also, Zobrist's concern for the fans, thinking "man, they must be miserable." Indeed.
   47. Spahn Insane Posted: May 18, 2018 at 01:34 PM (#5675147)
Speaking of Calvin Shiraldi.... He throws 9, beautiful scoreless innings.

In a row? I call bullshite.
   48. Zonk prescribes Rezine for TDS Posted: May 18, 2018 at 02:07 PM (#5675183)
I do, yes. And I remember 16-year-old me being fairly pissed about the Smith for Nipper + Schiraldi (wtf?) trade. Turns out hiring Jim Frey as your GM had consequences.


Weird. That was a very polarizing trade - I remember being (wrongly and stupidly, in hindsight) thrilled to see Smith shipped out of town.

Speaking of Calvin Shiraldi.... He throws 9, beautiful scoreless innings.

In a row? I call bullshite.


Hey - the boxscore is there!

Strange how certain games stick with you - but that is one I very much do remember. I was half in tears/half in a rage when Gossage choked it away. Indeed - got in a tussle with my dad, who grew up with Goose and took exception to my lengthy tirade slurring his good name. I think I got the best line in, though -

Dad: He's maybe the best reliever in history. He used to be really good!

Me: Yeah, and Calvin Shiraldi used to be in line for a win after throwing 9 great innings!
   49. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 18, 2018 at 02:27 PM (#5675207)
Me: Yeah, and Calvin Shiraldi used to be in line for a win after throwing 9 great innings!
I hope your dad grounded you for implying that pitcher wins are at all important.

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