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Monday, April 08, 2013

Terry Francona gets lost on walk

Well maybe if Francona didn’t have a .300 career OBP…

Cleveland’s new manager said he got lost Monday making the two-block walk from his apartment to the ballpark for the Indians’ home opener against the New York Yankees.

Francona is living in downtown Cleveland during the season and he plans to ride a small scooter he used during spring training in Arizona for the short commute to the ballpark. However, he decided to hit the streets on foot early in the morning and ended up needing directions to find his new workplace.

“I got lost three times,” he said. “Even when I got to the garage two people who work here said, ‘Hey, do you know where you’re going?’ I was like, ‘Nope.’”

Fortunately for Francona, an Indians employee picked him up in a golf cart and got him to the stadium.

Boston’s manager for eight seasons, Francona was overwhelmed by the assistance he received while encountering a few fans on his maiden voyage.

“Cleveland is officially the nicest people I’ve ever met,” he said. “Everybody I did walk by said, ‘Hello.’ That’s a little different than I’m used to.”

Francona said he has always preferred to stay as close as possible to where he works.

“I like being close to the ballpark, always have,” he said. “If I had my druthers on the road, I would rather stay in a motel next to the ballpark than have to drive a half-hour.”

Repoz Posted: April 08, 2013 at 10:38 PM | 94 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: indians

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   1. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:07 PM (#4408108)
Must have been the pain pills.
   2. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:22 PM (#4408119)
Terry: I'm with the team. I'm with the team that's playing tonight.
Janitor: You go right straight through this door here, down the hall....
Terry: Yeah.
Janitor: ...turn right...
Terry: Yeah.
Janitor: ...and then there's a little jog there, about thirty feet.
Terry: A jog?
Janitor: ...jog to the left...
Terry: A jog? I don't have time for that.
Janitor: ...go straight ahead...
Terry: I trust you. I trust you.
Janitor: ...go straight ahead, go straight ahead, turn right the next two corners, and the first door the sign "Authorized Personnel Only"...
Terry: Yeah.
Janitor: Open that door, that's the clubhouse!
Terry: You think so?
Janitor: You're authorized. You're the manager, aren't you?
Terry: I've got a lineup card, yeah.
Janitor: It's on the...
Terry: Alright! Thank you. Thank you very much. Rock 'n roll! Rock and roll!!! HELLO, CLEVELAND!!! HELLO, CLEVELAND!!!
   3. Walt Davis Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:30 PM (#4408130)
Is he trying to clog the bases?
   4. Sonic Youk Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:42 PM (#4408136)
Isn't Progressive Field really easy to find? Isn't any ballpark really easy to find, if its opening day and you're in remotely the right neighborhood?
   5. Bruce Markusen Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:46 PM (#4408138)
Getting lost on a two-block walk? Wow.
   6. andrewberg Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:53 PM (#4408141)
HELLO, CLEVELAND!!!


Perfect.
   7. rb's team is hopeful for the new year! Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:58 PM (#4408143)
I think the most annoying part about this story is that he plans on using a motorized conveyance to travel 2 blocks every day.
   8. cmd600 Posted: April 08, 2013 at 11:58 PM (#4408144)
Isn't Progressive Field really easy to find? Isn't any ballpark really easy to find, if its opening day and you're in remotely the right neighborhood?


It is ridiculous, but considering how early he probably has to be at the park, I doubt he'd see any of the festivities, even with Clevelanders liking to start drinking early. And just to give him the benefit of the doubt, on the side of the park where most people live there are multiple garages and the Cavs arena which completely block the view of the ballpark.

But yeah, that is really dumb.
   9. boteman is not here 'til October Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:00 AM (#4408146)
The Cleveland Indians: easy to root for, but hard to find.
   10. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:07 AM (#4408149)
I think the most annoying part about this story is that he plans on using a motorized conveyance to travel 2 blocks every day.


This. I ride a motorbike to work nearly every day. By the time you put on the boots, proper jacket, gloves, helmet, throw your leg over it and start it, that's like 5-7 minutes. How big are Cleveland city blocks anyway? Isn't it like a 10 minute walk max.
Besides if it's drizzling or something you are much better off walking with an umbrella then being a pensioner on a scooter.
   11. Dale Sams Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:38 AM (#4408158)
I think the most annoying part about this story is that he plans on using a motorized conveyance to travel 2 blocks every day.


Uhhh...I thought Terry's leg/circulation problems were pretty well known. Somedays he'll be able to walk I'm sure. Somedays he'll have trouble walking to the mound.

“Everybody I did walk by said, ‘Hello.’ That’s a little different than I’m used to.”


Translated: "Everybody says 'Hello' and leaves it at that instead of saying 'Hello...here's what you need to do to fix the team..'
   12. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: April 09, 2013 at 01:08 AM (#4408167)
Uhhh...I thought Terry's leg/circulation problems were pretty well known. Somedays he'll be able to walk I'm sure. Somedays he'll have trouble walking to the mound.


Oh gee, no. Didn't know about that at all. Thanks for the info.
   13. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 01:44 AM (#4408170)
I recall Bruce Bochy getting pissed at SD blowing a late inning lead @ Milwaukee and choosing to walk back to the Pfister Hotel downtown because he could 'see the skyline and it didn't seem that far.' It's not a walk I would take, but anyways Bochy did it and said he was offered crack and some other interesting props. during his walk (he never got lost).
   14. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: April 09, 2013 at 02:16 AM (#4408175)
Why would Terry Francona's leg circulatory problems be well known?

News to me.
   15. vortex of dissipation Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:02 AM (#4408181)
He now has two artificial knees and a road map of scars. He has to pause when asked about the number of surgeries he's had, then says he's had 22 on his knees alone, six to treat a staph infection in 2002 that put his life in danger and nearly cost him his right leg. Complications from staph led to blood clots and internal bleeding and a pulmonary embolism on each side of his lungs.


"It aged me," he says. "It's not gonna kill me, but what it does is kind of piss me off. It's aggravating."

Because he has to manage his activity carefully, Francona wears extra clothes to help his circulation, including tights on his legs. Blood thinners make him cold all the time, which is why he wears a cover-up over his baseball jersey. He has issues with his hip, and his leg sometimes swells. He swims every day to help his circulation. When he doesn't, he notices.


http://clevelandmagazine.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=E73ABD6180B44874871A91F6BA5C249C&nm=Article+Archives&type=Publishing&mod=Publications::Article&mid=1578600D80804596A222593669321019&tier=4&id=659018EB0C6E48CDBEF79D9A67E89A94
   16. Walt Davis Posted: April 09, 2013 at 04:26 AM (#4408188)
Then he should get a flat on the lake and swim to work!
   17. Repoz Posted: April 09, 2013 at 05:49 AM (#4408191)
I think Furtado and I both got lost in Cleveland trying to locate the SABR sub-hotel...which was next to a dive bar that was situated next to an even divier bar.

Cool jernt.
   18. RollingWave Posted: April 09, 2013 at 06:27 AM (#4408198)
so I guess what he was doing in that Harlem Shake thing was actually early symptoms of Alzheimer
   19. depletion Posted: April 09, 2013 at 07:31 AM (#4408209)
I was in Chicago on business and had a thought to hit Wrigley Field for a Cubs night game. I was taking the metro from downtown to my airport hotel. Someone told me it was a mile walk from the metro to the park. I decided to blow it off as walking around an unfamiliar city for a mile in a suit might not be the best choice. Kind of sad I missed the opportunity to see that historic park. Is it a long walk from the metro to Wrigley? OK neighborhood?
   20. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:40 AM (#4408232)
Why would Terry Francona's leg circulatory problems be well known?

News to me.


It's also why he was taking pain pills. Remember the media making that an issue after 2011?

http://espn.go.com/boston/mlb/story/_/id/7091109/report-terry-francona-pain-meds-use-alarmed-boston-red-sox
   21. zonk Posted: April 09, 2013 at 08:51 AM (#4408237)
I was in Chicago on business and had a thought to hit Wrigley Field for a Cubs night game. I was taking the metro from downtown to my airport hotel. Someone told me it was a mile walk from the metro to the park. I decided to blow it off as walking around an unfamiliar city for a mile in a suit might not be the best choice. Kind of sad I missed the opportunity to see that historic park. Is it a long walk from the metro to Wrigley? OK neighborhood?


By Metro do you mean the El or the Metra?

If the Metra, the downtown stops -- there are about a dozen -- are a good bit more than a mile (closer to 4 or 5). The Ravenswood stop much further north is probably about a mile give or take, but you'd have been much better off taking the El north rather than sticking with Metra (connecting with a Metra stop outside of the loop via the El is a pain, but no undoable).

The neighborhoods from the downtown areas north to Wrigley are perfectly fine -- you'd basically be passing through the Loop, Gold Coast, and Lincoln Park. Along that route - the only thing you'll be harassed by would be Trixies and Yuppies. The walk from the Ravenswood stop to the ballpark isn't terrible by any means - there are a few blocks to be a bit wary of (nascent gang turf lines), but you'd have been perfectly fine sticking with main streets.... On rare instances when my car's been in the shop -- I've walked this basic route (I'm about six blocks from Wrigley and the Ravenswood stop is the closest Metra stop to me) on plenty of occasions. I'm very close to a Brown line El stop -- so I usually hop a train to near the Metra station -- but on a nice summer evening, it's a nice walk to get in a bit of exercise.

Anywhere north of the Loop and it's awfully hard to find yourself in trouble pretty much anywhere east of Western avenue... not that crossing Western puts you in peril, but there are a few multiblock areas best to avoid.

You'd probably have been fine.
   22. rb's team is hopeful for the new year! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 09:00 AM (#4408240)
Well then, with this new knowledge, i retract my statement.

But what's up with boston sports figures and staph? Maybe they should clean up whatever hospital they all use.
   23. GregD Posted: April 09, 2013 at 09:17 AM (#4408247)
I remember somebody 7 or 8 years ago coming in to town to play the Phillies, looking at the map, and then walking from their hotel down Broad Street to the ballpark. "It was like being in Iraq or something," is my recollection of the quote in the next day's DN.
   24. zonk Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:01 AM (#4408284)
My best getting lost story -- police believe alcohol was involved -- was at a buddy's bachelor party near the IL/WI border. We started BBQing at his place in Kenosha, traveled out to Lake Geneva for a round of golf, and then hit some adult establishments... somewhere... I got separated from the group by the highly volatile mix of cocktails and women whose profession depends on friendliness.

I then lost a few hours.... and reemerged from the haze walking down some random rural Wisconsin highway, covered in mud from chest down, with nary a single light from any settlements to be seen. This predating Alexander Graham Bell - much less cell phones - I was pretty screwed. Finally, I saw headlights coming over a hill -- and moved to flag down the car for assistance. When its rollers and floodlight came on, I briefly entertained making a run for it... and then remembered that in my current state, running into an officer of the law who probably couldn't just leave me in the middle of nowhere might actually count as good fortune. Having witnessed my tentative moves towards the woods, the officer emerged from the car smartly and demanded I place my hands on the hood of the cruiser. I complied... and he started laughing - "what the hell happened to you?" I told him quite honestly that I hadn't a clue - but if we were going to discuss any crimes committed in the vicinity, I wanted an attorney present for questioning. Somewhat surprisingly, I still had my wallet and an appropriate amount of cash in my pocket. Officer Friendly was kind enough to drive me to a gas station, where I finally found a cab that would pick me up and drive me the 30 miles back to my buddy's home, where my car was parked for the night. On the drive to the gas station, we attempted to piece together my route and the best estimate was that I was a good 10 miles from the nearest reasonable point of bachelor party-esque debarking. The fact that I still had my wallet and a seemingly proper amount of cash ruled out robbery, and against advice of imaginary counsel -- a check of nearby taverns and adult establishments revealed no issues with anyone that had been ejected or otherwise problematic.

There was mild surprise the next day at the wedding when I showed up alive and unmarried to a wayward stripper.

   25. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:07 AM (#4408293)
One of the more fun things to do in New York is to go to Central Park and watch the people who are hopelessly lost and are about to lose their minds in frustration. Think it's impossible to get lost in a rectangular park surrounded by tall landmarks? Fools! That's just what they want you to think!
   26. GregD Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:34 AM (#4408315)
One of the more fun things to do in New York is to go to Central Park and watch the people who are hopelessly lost and are about to lose their minds in frustration. Think it's impossible to get lost in a rectangular park surrounded by tall landmarks? Fools! That's just what they want you to think!
Yes! Sometimes you can get lucky and catch actual city residents lost, too. They're the ones who get angry instead of amused when you tell them they are on the west side instead of the east side.
   27. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:39 AM (#4408320)
Sometimes you can get lucky and catch actual city residents lost, too.

I got lost a couple of times my first years in the city. I once jogged about 3 extra miles because I didn't realize I was making a big loop back to the west side of the park. I know the park really well now but it's easy to get disoriented on the looping paths if it's still new to you.
   28. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:43 AM (#4408326)
I remember somebody 7 or 8 years ago coming in to town to play the Phillies, looking at the map, and then walking from their hotel down Broad Street to the ballpark. "It was like being in Iraq or something," is my recollection of the quote in the next day's DN.

That's a weird description but I can imagine where he was coming from. The hotels on Broad Street is a pretty big long walk to the stadium, and there's a few blocks between where the urban part of the city ends and the parking lots for the stadiums begin that's a little desolate.
   29. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:48 AM (#4408333)
I am baffled at anyone who can get lost above 14th street in NYC. I walk in the wrong direction once in awhile but it only takes me a block to realize this.
   30. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:49 AM (#4408336)
So, anyone want to rank the best walking around stadiums?

Fenway and Wrigley are both great, of course. AT&T is up there. Yankee Stadium is underrated but there are lots of cool Domincan bars, etc. if you're willing to walk around. Citifield is kind of isolated. Oakland Coli. is terrible. I don't recall there being anything around the Ballpark in Arlington but that amusement park? That's all I got. Seattle doesn't look like it's too far a walk to the waterfront, but I've only seen it from afar.
   31. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:50 AM (#4408339)
I am baffled at anyone who can get lost above 14th street in NYC. I walk in the wrong direction once in awhile but it only takes me a block to realize this.

I've never been lost on the streets above 14th, only in the park. I have circled around Greenwich Village, though. I can never keep my bearings there. Should have let Moses tear it down!
   32. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:54 AM (#4408342)
I've never been lost in Central Park, if only because I always look for the Ghostbusters apartments on the West side. The West Village never ceases to trip me up.
   33. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:56 AM (#4408346)
Coors (I went in 2003) had a terrific area around it. PNC (2002) was also very good if you came across the bridge with some pretty nifty little places. I thought St. Louis (2007) and Cincinatti (2004) were pretty good in terms of having stuff around them. The biggest disappointment to me was Seattle (2006) which had a whole bunch of nothing around it. Basically you had to get past the football field to get to anything good. Philadelphia (2005) was also pretty isolated. Minnesota (2012) was a bit of a walk but you quickly got to an area with some really great places. Atlanta (2008) is also a bit isolated but I've always enjoyed the city. I think Atlanta and Seattle are probably pretty similar but I have a good friend in Atlanta who can show me where to go after the game, in Seattle I had no such tourguide.
   34. Dale Sams Posted: April 09, 2013 at 10:59 AM (#4408348)
There's nothing around Kansas City's or the Texas stadium (Except the amusement park, which is a fair hike). There's *some* stuff near the Trop, but that's also a fair hike.
   35. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:01 AM (#4408351)
Citifield is kind of isolated

you can take a wonderful tour of chopshops and attack dogs
   36. rb's team is hopeful for the new year! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:01 AM (#4408352)
Atlanta and seattle are in no way similar.

Atlanta is a deadzone around the stadium. Seattle at least has a few bars, and is within easy walking of downtown.
   37. Drexl Spivey Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:06 AM (#4408357)
So, anyone want to rank the best walking around stadiums?


Don't ever try to walk from Miller Park to Lake Michigan.

I normally like taking long walks with someone but that stretch is just bleak and scary.

Wrigley is the best I've been to in terms of walking.

   38. GregD Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:07 AM (#4408360)
That's a weird description but I can imagine where he was coming from. The hotels on Broad Street is a pretty big long walk to the stadium, and there's a few blocks between where the urban part of the city ends and the parking lots for the stadiums begin that's a little desolate.
I've made that walk and think that's weird, too. (There are some parts of Philly that do, though, suggest what it would be like to live in a bombed-out place--though not the old MOVE block which was rebuilt.) But it's a deeply unlovely walk. Philly has to be the biggest disappointment since 1) it's a hugely walkable city and 2) unlike other very walkable cities, there was space to fit a ballpark, so it's a purely self-inflicted wound. You could have had a huge happening neighborhood around the park and instead you've just got parking lots.
   39. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:07 AM (#4408361)
The area around Broad Street and the Philly stadium complex is in no way "like Iraq". It's just a flat, featureless, suburban-looking dead zone. Let's not stereotype.
   40. Fernigal McGunnigle has become a merry hat Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:11 AM (#4408367)
In Tito's defense, I think I see the problem he had. Looking at the map, you can see that there is a grid to the northwest with the numbered streets running roughly northwest-southeast, and the named avenues running roughly northeast-southwest. But Euclid and Prospect are offset from the grid; they're actually a spur of a different grid to the east (towards Cleveland State University). Also several of the numbered streets dogleg off of the grid when they approach Euclid and Prospect. So you can imagine a guy in an unfamiliar city turning left onto Euclid or Prospect and thinking he's on the northwest grid and is walking due southwest when he is actually on a spur of the eastern (Cleveland State) grid and is walking west-southwest. Pretty soon you'd be completely disoriented.

In a city like Chicago with a consistent grid you can pretty easily avoid getting lost so long as you know your destination's address. In a city like Boston with a more tangled layout you're going to expect to get lost and so put more effort into knowing your route and the street plans and so on. This part of Cleveland looks to be halfway in between, a semi-rationalized street layout, which seems like a potential trap for the unwary.
   41. Steve Parris, Je t'aime Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:18 AM (#4408377)
I remember somebody 7 or 8 years ago coming in to town to play the Phillies, looking at the map, and then walking from their hotel down Broad Street to the ballpark. "It was like being in Iraq or something," is my recollection of the quote in the next day's DN.

That's a weird description but I can imagine where he was coming from. The hotels on Broad Street is a pretty big long walk to the stadium, and there's a few blocks between where the urban part of the city ends and the parking lots for the stadiums begin that's a little desolate.


Desolate I can see, but you wouldn't be in any danger. Now if Connie Mack or the Baker Bowl were still around ....
   42. McCoy Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:18 AM (#4408378)
Well, about 10 years ago there was a ton of closed up and boarded housing projects around the stadium area. That might be what they were looking at when they called it Iraq.
   43. Fernigal McGunnigle has become a merry hat Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:24 AM (#4408382)
In 20 years the neighborhood to the west of US Cellular will be interesting. There are interesting thing popping up in Bridgeport, and you can sort of see a slow crawl of civilization down Halsted Ave starting to happen. Though the Cell will presumably still have the huge parking lots and a railyard between the stadium and the fun stuff.

Right now it's just the railyard, the parking lots, a warehouse, the Chicago PD's narcotics division, and a couple of bars on 33rd.

   44. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:32 AM (#4408390)
I am baffled at anyone who can get lost above 14th street in NYC


I agree with this, but on the flip side, lower Manhattan, south of WTC particularly Wall St. and east of Broadway can be very confusing at night.
   45. GregD Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:41 AM (#4408403)
The area around Broad Street and the Philly stadium complex is in no way "like Iraq". It's just a flat, featureless, suburban-looking dead zone. Let's not stereotype.
Sure I assume they meant the areas south of Christian where despite the gentrification it wasn't unusual to see abandoned buildings or seemingly uninhabitable rowhouses that were still inhabited in the side streets.
   46. Blastin Posted: April 09, 2013 at 11:52 AM (#4408412)
I don't get getting lost above 14th street either, unless you can't count, but yes, the West Village makes little sense, considering 4th street and 12th street intersect and such, and all the number avenues just become names (except for 4th avenue, which appears and then disappears 14 blocks later) because #### you that's why. Although since I've become a distance runner I've enjoyed running from my area (East Harlem) down to the bottom of the island and back, learning more directly how the streets connect with one another.

Don't get me started on Queens and its roads/streets/drives/avenues.
   47. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:09 PM (#4408438)
How do you find East Harlem, Blastin? I live in West Harlem near Morningside Park myself. I've been here for two years and I love it. Such a change of place from Williamsburg.
   48. Bourbon Samurai in Asia Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:13 PM (#4408442)
I got lost once in Central Park in NY- I used to work on the Upper East and had a show on the Upper West and would regularly just cross the park instead of taking the subway down and then up, but one time I took a very very slight detour to look at something, got back on the path, and wouldn't you know it wound up making a huge loop and ending up back where I started and being super late.
   49. McCoy Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:20 PM (#4408452)
The only time I got utterly lost was in 1988 or so in Clinton, IN.
   50. Blastin Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:24 PM (#4408457)
Dock: I like it a lot. West Harlem is nicer but every place I need to get is more accessible than it was when I lived in West Harlem (where I was before).

East Harlem is quieter, but I'm by the river and Ward's/Randall's Island so it's really great for the running I need to do, and I'm far enough south (100th) that I can walk to all the area bars/restaurants, which are either farther south (by 96th) or west (by Lex).
   51. SoSH U at work Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:24 PM (#4408458)
The only time I got utterly lost was in 1988 or so in Clinton, IN.


I belive getting utterly lost is the primary reason people wind up in Clinton.

   52. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:40 PM (#4408476)
Blastin: Interesting, as most of East Harlem I've been to isn't all that great, but that's in the 3rd Ave/121 St area.

West Harlem is definitely very nice. There are no bars where I can jump in for a quick beer like there are in Williamsburg, but there are tons of great restaurants, and more opening all the time. I am shocked at how quiet Harlem in general is. I had no idea Brooklyn was so noisy until I moved out.

Also, West Harlem is oddly clean except for the dog ####. No one picks it up. Brooklyn isn't clean at all, but everyone picks up their dog ####.
   53. Blastin Posted: April 09, 2013 at 12:44 PM (#4408480)
Well, yes, farther up it's not all that great (although farther east of there, by 1st and by Pleasant, it gets nice again). They're trying to build my slice of it up, too.
   54. BDC Posted: April 09, 2013 at 01:58 PM (#4408560)
I find Central Park disorienting. And I used to find the financial district disorienting till I started to spend a lot of time there (family member got a job on lower Broadway), and sort of internalized the specific pattern of the streets.

Where I get lost is Arlington, Texas. It is a set of featureless parallel section roads with randomly repeating chain retail and restaurant venues where they cross. People find it hilarious that I can walk in places like Hamburg and Budapest without getting lost, but if I drive four blocks from my house in a city where I've worked for 25 years, I lose track of what's in what direction, and start turning south to get to somewhere actually north of me, that sort of thing.

That said, I do walk from downtown Arlington to the Ballpark quite often, especially for day games. Dale (#34) is correct that there's no there there, but it's been a tidier and brighter no-there since Cowboys Stadium was built.
   55. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: April 09, 2013 at 02:16 PM (#4408579)
East Harlem is quieter, but I'm by the river and Ward's/Randall's Island so it's really great for the running I need to do, and I'm far enough south (100th) that I can walk to all the area bars/restaurants, which are either farther south (by 96th) or west (by Lex).

maybe it's semantics, but I wouldn't call 100th st. "East Harlem". When I lived in Manhattan, Harlem started at 110th going north. You live on the Upper Upper East Side
   56. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 02:24 PM (#4408586)
When I lived in Manhattan, Harlem started at 110th going north.

So, less:

Across 110th Street,
Pimps trying to catch a woman that's weak
Across 110th Street,
Pushers won't let the junkie go free.
Across 110th Street,
Woman trying to catch a trick on the street.
Across 110th Street,
You can find it all in the street.

And more:

Across 81st street
Bagels with salmon and cream cheese,
Across 81st street
Boutiques won't take Discover for free
Across 81st street
13 dogs being walked on one leash
Across 81st street
You can find it all in the street

Welcome to the neighborhood Blastin!
   57. GregD Posted: April 09, 2013 at 02:37 PM (#4408593)
Hmm. My experience has been that people call East Harlem at 96th--so Spanish Harlem or East Harlem start by the giant projects--while they're much looser on West Harlem. The Upper West Side dissolves into Morningside Heights, so Harlem starts at 110th down the hill from Columbia and at 125 west of Amsterdam. Maybe. Generally. I've known people who bought in buildings along 5th Ave in the low 100s and they get mocked all the time for saying they live on the Upper East Side, though friends who line on CPW in the low 100s never get mocked for saying they live on the Upper West Side.
   58. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 02:56 PM (#4408612)
The mocking is ridiculous. I lived in Williamsburg for the longest time, and whenever I told someone exactly where, I was accused of living in Bushwick and pretending to live in Williamsburg.
   59. Blastin Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:06 PM (#4408618)
You live on the Upper Upper East Side


Trust me, the realtor would have pimped it that way if he could, but the UES ends at 96th. Now, you could say I don't live in East Harlem - which could be said to begin at 106th - but in that case I just live in an unnamed neighborhood that I have christened "Hellgate" after the train bridge on Ward's Island.

But, in terms of temperament and price, I live in E. Harlem.

And the West Side is a lot different, yes. The West Side has a lot of little neighborhoods - after the UWS (where I grew up), there's Morningside Heights and Manhattanville and Hamilton Heights and Wash Heights and Inwood..... with Harlem lurking off to the right.

If you put my zipcode into any weather/map/search program, it does not say UES. The UES ends at 10028.

Edit: Twitter, being moronic, always says I'm posting from "near Astoria." Ha.
   60. Dale Sams Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:08 PM (#4408622)
So, anyone want to rank the best walking around stadiums?


Haven't been to the Marlins stadium, but didn't we decide that not only is there little to do..but that the hike from parking your car in a non rip-off zone takes you through some dangerous areas?

Aka: Reason #35 Marlins baseball is a blight.
   61. Blastin Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:12 PM (#4408626)
Welcome to the neighborhood Blastin!


Don't call it a welcome. I've been here for years!
   62. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:41 PM (#4408669)
btw, Shooty, that was terrific.
   63. Moeball Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:46 PM (#4408672)
Cleveland’s new manager said he got lost Monday making the two-block walk from his apartment to the ballpark for the Indians’ home opener against the New York Yankees.


OK, I haven't been to Cleveland (yet) - is the setup of the downtown so different that one could do this? The reason I ask is because I've been to NY (Yankee Stadium and Shea), Boston (Fenway), Chicago (old and new Comiskey as well as Wrigley), SF (Candlestick), Detroit (Tiger Stadium), Cincinnati (Riverfront), Pittsburgh (3 Rivers Stadium), Oakland, LA and San Diego - every ball park I've ever been to was large enough that I could see the actual stadium from 2 blocks away. Can you literally not see the stadium in Cleveland when you're only 2 blocks away?

   64. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:48 PM (#4408675)
btw, Shooty, that was terrific.

Thanks. And thanks to Bobby Womack, of course. I got out of Williamsburg just as it was beginning to piss everyone off, thankfully. The UES has no pretensions to anything so that's nice, although it is so, so dull. I miss the energy of Williamsburg when it was just getting started though I have no desire to go back there now.
   65. Dock Ellis on Acid Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:52 PM (#4408681)
Agreed. I loved Williamsburg and defended it from the haters, but I don't miss it one bit. Harlem is also unpretentious, and I was a bit taken aback by how friendly everyone is. I figured as a white guy, I'd be encroaching their territory and resented for contributing to the gentrification. Then I figured out why everyone was being so friendly when one evening I was walking home and was approached by a kid who said, "Excuse me officer, do you have the time?"
   66. Blastin Posted: April 09, 2013 at 03:56 PM (#4408683)
Ha.
   67. SoSH U at work Posted: April 09, 2013 at 04:01 PM (#4408688)
OK, I haven't been to Cleveland (yet) - is the setup of the downtown so different that one could do this? The reason I ask is because I've been to NY (Yankee Stadium and Shea), Boston (Fenway), Chicago (old and new Comiskey as well as Wrigley), SF (Candlestick), Detroit (Tiger Stadium), Cincinnati (Riverfront), Pittsburgh (3 Rivers Stadium), Oakland, LA and San Diego - every ball park I've ever been to was large enough that I could see the actual stadium from 2 blocks away. Can you literally not see the stadium in Cleveland when you're only 2 blocks away?


As mentioned, if the basketball arena is in between you and the stadium, then yes.

   68. Walt Davis Posted: April 09, 2013 at 04:57 PM (#4408745)
Zonk ... those were the worst directions to Wrigley I've ever seen. :-)

If you were downtown, all you needed to do was get on the Howard (north) line ... OK, Chicago went to colors to name all their lines years after I left ... the red line I think that one is. The Addison st stop is half a block from Wrigley.

Getting from Wrigley back to your airport hotel would have been a bit of a pain but take the Addison bus west until you run into the O'Hare line, get on the train.

And we don't call it the metro dammit! People probably gave you crap directions just for that.
   69. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 02:04 AM (#4409478)
Then I figured out why everyone was being so friendly when one evening I was walking home and was approached by a kid who said, "Excuse me officer, do you have the time?"


Well yeah, they had you figured as the one cop who wasn't constantly busting their balls with pointless stop & frisks.
   70. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 09:29 AM (#4409573)
The mocking is ridiculous. I lived in Williamsburg for the longest time, and whenever I told someone exactly where, I was accused of living in Bushwick and pretending to live in Williamsburg.


While there's nothing wrong with verifying zip code cred. that's a little over the top. My faves are people that tell me they live in Chicago, only to find out they live in Crystal Lake, Sandwich or Gurnee. It's not I like I live in Germany and need a more general idea.
   71. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 09:39 AM (#4409581)
Googling maps of NYC neighborhoods, I can't tell if I live on the UES or in Yorkville. There seems to be some confusion there.
   72. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 09:45 AM (#4409583)
Googling maps of NYC neighborhoods, I can't tell if I live on the UES or in Yorkville. There seems to be some confusion there.

It could be both.

As far as I've always known, the UES is everything from 59th to 96th, from the Park to the East River. Once you cross 96th, it's Spanish Harlem (not sure what the Western boundary between Spanish Harlem and Harlem is). Yorkville is the northern sub-section of the UES that used to be heavily German and Hungarian.

   73. Greg K Posted: April 10, 2013 at 09:52 AM (#4409591)
While there's nothing wrong with verifying zip code cred. that's a little over the top. My faves are people that tell me they live in Chicago, only to find out they live in Crystal Lake, Sandwich or Gurnee. It's not I like I live in Germany and need a more general idea.

I'm always caught in limbo on this. Especially when I'm in Canada, but outside of Ontario. If I say I'm from Scarborough, I'm being a pompous Toronto ass
because I expect people to know the various communities within the Greater Toronto Area. If I say I'm from Toronto, then it later comes out that I actually
grew up in Scarborough, I'm a pompous ass for trying to pass myself off as a Torontonian.

Luckily I now live in the UK where "Canada" is sufficient.
   74. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:09 AM (#4409688)
I'm always caught in limbo on this. Especially when I'm in Canada, but outside of Ontario. If I say I'm from Scarborough, I'm being a pompous Toronto ass
because I expect people to know the various communities within the Greater Toronto Area. If I say I'm from Toronto, then it later comes out that I actually
grew up in Scarborough, I'm a pompous ass for trying to pass myself off as a Torontonian.

Luckily I now live in the UK where "Canada" is sufficient.


I love that New Yorkers will respond to "Where you from?" with "The City", even if they're in Paris.
   75. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:12 AM (#4409693)
I love that New Yorkers will respond to "Where you from?" with "The City", even if they're in Paris.

Even though I've lived in NYC for 13 years, as a good NorCal boy, The City is still San Francisco to me.
   76. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:21 AM (#4409704)
Even though I've lived in NYC for 13 years, as a good NorCal boy, The City is still San Francisco to me.

San Fran's nice, but way too small to be "The City".
   77. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:28 AM (#4409707)
Once you cross 96th, it's Spanish Harlem (not sure what the Western boundary between Spanish Harlem and Harlem is).


I think it's 5th avenue.
   78. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:30 AM (#4409709)
San Fran's nice, but way too small to be "The City".

Bah. Compared to Tokyo, so's New York!
   79. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:35 AM (#4409717)
Bah. Compared to Tokyo, so's New York!


This is true. As an NYC native, I've only once been simply astonished by the size of a city, and it was when I visited Tokyo.

It helps that their (hideous) fake Eiffel Tower is smack dab in the middle of things, whereas all the nicest views from Manhattan skyscrapers have only a sliver of the city on one side before the river. In Tokyo, from that orange monstrosity, it's city in every direction until Fuji off in the distance.

And boy, I don't think I can go back to Tokyo until I'm rich enough to not mind hemorrhaging money every hour.
   80. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:36 AM (#4409721)
Bah. Compared to Tokyo, so's New York!

Mexico City, and Sao Paulo are bigger too. But none of them are as close to the "Capital of the World" as NYC.
   81. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:38 AM (#4409723)
Also true. Though Mexico City is kind of gross to fly into and get around in. I haven't been to Sao Paulo.
   82. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:39 AM (#4409725)
Mexico City, and Sao Paulo are bigger too. But none of them are as close to the "Capital of the World" as NYC.

Naw. When you're from Hayward, San Fran is the Capital of the World. This is fact!

This is true. As an NYC native, I've only once been simply astonished by the size of a city, and it was when I visited Tokyo.

Is it worth visiting? I really want to go to Japan but as a New Yorker, would it be better off skipping Tokyo (ie. a bigger version of NYC) and just heading straight for a place like Kyoto? The yen's implosion is making a trip to Japan more and more realistic!
   83. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:47 AM (#4409737)
I was living in SK at the time so going to Tokyo was like flying to Chicago from NY (about 2 hours). To answer your question, I think flying there and spending, like, a weekend there is worth doing because it really is a fascinating place, but the rest of the country is where you'll probably get a more enjoyable experience overall.

But it's cool to see Tokyo in all its absurdity.
   84. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:51 AM (#4409745)
But it's cool to see Tokyo in all its absurdity.

Thanks. As long as I can stock up on my Hello Kitty gear, I'll be good. Seriously, if the Yen stays reasonably weak--and boy does the BOJ hope it does--then I really may go next year.
   85. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4409750)
BTW, proof that San Francisco is The City

Would Steph Curry lie? No, sir, Steph Curry would not.
   86. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:56 AM (#4409754)
I'm not about to link my facebook on here, but my Tokyo albums are just about the most hilarious albums I've ever posted. I mean, there are eight-foot monchichi toys just chilling in the street.

They are terrifying when 8 feet tall.
   87. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 11:59 AM (#4409760)
I mean, there are eight-foot monchichi toys just chilling in the street.

You know, I think I could have fun in Tokyo...
   88. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:03 PM (#4409766)
You know, I think I could have fun in Tokyo...

Japan is one of a very few places I have no desire to go.

I'm a pretty timid traveler (i.e. my standard of living must go up on all vacations, and I minimize any risk of intestinal distress), but there are things I want to see in a lot of places I won't go (China, India, Africa, etc.).

Japan, there's just nothing there I care about. Hawaii's in the same boat.
   89. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:12 PM (#4409776)
Aw, I loved Africa. But then, I was with my parents so we could afford nicer things. I'm still at an age where I enjoy hostels, though.

I'll probably agree in a few decades, so I'm off to another jungle (Costa Rica) this summer.
   90. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:13 PM (#4409780)
(i.e. my standard of living must go up on all vacations, and I minimize any risk of intestinal distress)

Interestingly enough, Japanese food is what I eat when my stomach has that not so fresh feeling. Their cuisine always "feels" very clean to me. I've always heard the food there is amazing, too, even the Western-style places. I really want to see the temples in Kyoto and the salamanders as big as a dog, myself.
   91. villageidiom Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:14 PM (#4409786)
San Fran's nice, but way too small to be "The City".
So, Oklahoma City, then? Houston? Phoenix? LA? Dallas?
   92. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:15 PM (#4409789)
Oh the food is awesome.
   93. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:16 PM (#4409791)
Aw, I loved Africa.

I've only been to South Africa, but I really enjoyed it. Shockingly to me, the gf did, too, and wants to go back. Supposedly I'm supposed to travel to Zimbabwe and/or Malawi for work at some point but it hasn't happened yet.

I'll probably agree in a few decades, so I'm off to another jungle (Costa Rica) this summer.

Costa Rica is great. You shouldn't have any trouble with the food there and the coffee is the best I've ever had. Make sure to have plenty of the gallo pinto.
   94. Blastin Posted: April 10, 2013 at 12:29 PM (#4409808)
I'm really excited. And you can fly there on Jet Blue from NYC! Yay!

In Africa, I went to Zambia and Zimbabwe (Vic Falls, not the city or anything).

Whitewater rafting in the Zambezi (complete with way-too-close hippos and crocs) is one of those "I've lived a fortunate life" moments.

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