Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Texas Rangers’ ballpark now named Globe Life Park in Arlington

My name is Globe Life Park, and you are…

mk

The Texas Rangers have agreed to a 10-year deal with a McKinney-based insurance company to rename the team’s stadium Globe Life Park in Arlington.

Rangers officials declined to say how much the sponsorship is worth. Joe Januszewski, a team executive who led the sponsorship search, said it’s comparable to any top tier naming rights contract in baseball.

The team expects to have all signs in the park changed in time for the Rangers’ March 31 home opener against the Philadelphia Phillies.

The stadium has been called Rangers Ballpark in Arlington for the past seven years. The Rangers cancelled its only other naming rights deal with the financially trouble Ameriquest Mortgage in 2007. That was only about three years into a 30-year, $75 million deal.

At the time, Ameriquest, a major subprime lender, had fired thousands of employees and paid $325 million in settlements over claims of deceptive lending practices.

 

 

Repoz Posted: February 05, 2014 at 03:43 PM | 81 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: rangers

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 05, 2014 at 03:51 PM (#4652171)
Had I not read the article, I couldn't tell you what the place was called last year.
   2. Steve Sparks Flying Everywhere Posted: February 05, 2014 at 03:58 PM (#4652174)
A Prince Fielder joke is somewhere in here.
   3. Tripon Posted: February 05, 2014 at 04:05 PM (#4652178)
Naming rights are always a weird thing. Unless you get the rights right at the beginning of a stadium's life, few fans will associate your brand with the stadium. Even then, whenever somebody says "Progressive Field", I think the Indians stadium, and not "Progressive" the company.
   4. snowles Posted: February 05, 2014 at 04:13 PM (#4652182)
Absolutely @3. I don't know anyone who goes out of their way to call it the Rogers Centre and not Skydome. Should have just named it Rogers Skydome, but Uncle Teddy had to have his stamp on the place and then posthumously his statue at the gate.
   5. Adam G Posted: February 05, 2014 at 04:23 PM (#4652190)
I have no idea whether naming rights are worth it or not, but the thing I am always reminded of is how often that company's name will appear in print. So even if fans never refer to it correctly or if the media never uses the full name, you have to remember that the company name will appear on every ticket printed, on every mention of the event on Ticketmaster, on every flyer or poster or billboard advertising an event or game there.

I'm sure someone takes the time to quantify the amount of "mentions" that the name gets... and then someone figures a value for those mentions. I have no idea what those figures are, but I am certain that every mention of a name has *some* value. The nerd in me would love to see the data on this and how it's calculated.
   6. andrewberg Posted: February 05, 2014 at 04:53 PM (#4652214)
I hope Globe Life Park secretly opens up along its hemisphere and has a snifter of fine scotch hidden inside with a couple of tumblers.
   7. winnipegwhip Posted: February 05, 2014 at 04:57 PM (#4652217)
To bad Larry Flynt won't sponsor the ballpark from his old home area. Hustler Field in Cincinnati would be perfect.
   8. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:01 PM (#4652222)
I hope Globe Life Park secretly opens up along its hemisphere and has a snifter of fine scotch hidden inside with a couple of tumblers.

A snifter is also a type of glass. I think you mean a decanter.
   9. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:06 PM (#4652226)
A snifter is also a type of glass. I think you mean a decanter.

And people don't usually drink Scotch out of a snifter. Is a tumbler the same thing as a low-ball glass?
   10. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:10 PM (#4652230)
Here's a question: Why is this thing always called "The XXX in Arlington"? I don't know why that never struck me as strange until just now, but it does. It's words without information, to the vast majority of people who will ever see it. Arlington is just a place, a place I've never been and will probably never go, that I know nothing about. Is it nice there? Is it pretty or wealthy or is the food good? What, exactly, is the reason it's in the name of a baseball stadium?
   11. I am going to be Frank Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:17 PM (#4652236)
Arlington is a medium-size city in pretty much directly in between Ft. Worth and Dallas. It has the Rangers stadium, the new Cowboys stadium and a Six Flags theme park. That's the extent I know of it (I went to a Rangers game there years ago).
   12. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:22 PM (#4652242)
Why is this thing always called "The XXX in Arlington"?

"The Ballpark in Arlington of Anaheim" was just too many syllables.

And as for the new name, with any luck it'll have all the staying power and permanence of Ameriquest Field.

Rangers officials declined to say how much the sponsorship is worth.

Then it must not be much, otherwise it would be prominently highlighted in the press release. I've lived in the Dallas area for 25 years and never heard of this company until today, but they obviously don't need my money if they have so much to piss away on a stadium name.
   13. SoSH U at work Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:27 PM (#4652246)
What, exactly, is the reason it's in the name of a baseball stadium?


Because otherwise people would assume the ballpark is in Dallas, and if the folks of Arlington were going to pony up big dough for the thing, they at least want people to know where it was located. That would be my guess.
   14. Nasty Nate Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:32 PM (#4652252)

Because otherwise people would assume the ballpark is in Dallas, and if the folks of Arlington were going to pony up big dough for the thing, they at least want people to know where it was located. That would be my guess.


That's my guess, too. Just like Anaheim negotiated some guarantee to be in the Angels' name, Arlington probably did the same for the ballpark.
   15. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: February 05, 2014 at 05:35 PM (#4652255)

That's my guess, too. Just like Anaheim negotiated some guarantee to be in the Angels' name, Arlington probably did the same for the ballpark.


I believe that is also how the Florida Marlins became the Miami Marlins.
   16. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 05, 2014 at 06:08 PM (#4652275)
I'd be willing to bet that the most recognizable ballpark names are still Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park, Dodger Stadium, and Wrigley Field. That's two team names, one neighborhood, and one club owner whose name is also a universally known product. I doubt if 1 fan in 100 could name the other 26 correctly on the first try, and most people would be lucky to get half of them right.
   17. Nasty Nate Posted: February 05, 2014 at 06:16 PM (#4652283)
The Rangers cancelled its only other naming rights deal with the financially trouble Ameriquest Mortgage in 2007.


It's probably confirmation bias on my part, but it seems like a lot of the companies that pay for naming rights end up belly-up.

Also, why did the Rangers cancel the other deal?
   18. Random Transaction Generator Posted: February 05, 2014 at 06:16 PM (#4652284)
I doubt if 1 fan in 100 could name the other 26 correctly on the first try, and most people would be lucky to get half of them right.


How strict is the definition of "right"?
If I were to say "Camden Yards", am I right or wrong?
What about "Angel Stadium"?

I think I could name, at best, 15 of them if I got points for those ones.
However, if you gave me a list of ballpark names (and some fake ones), I could probably link the right name to the right team for more than 25 of them.

Oakland's stadium? Um...
"O.co Coliseum"? I've heard that before. Must be Oakland.
   19. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: February 05, 2014 at 06:30 PM (#4652299)
Also, why did the Rangers cancel the other deal?

The club had most likely been trying to weasel out of it since, per Wiki:
In February 2005, reporters Michael Hudson and Scott Reckard broke a story in the Los Angeles Times about “boiler room” sales tactics at Ameriquest. Their investigation found evidence that the lender had in various questionable practices, including “deceiving borrowers about the terms of their loans, forging documents, falsifying appraisals and fabricating borrowers' income to qualify them for loans they couldn't afford.”

On 1 August 2005, Ameriquest announced that it would set aside $325 million to settle attorney-general investigations in 30 states to settle allegations that it had preyed on borrowers with hidden fees and balloon payments. In at least five of those states—California, Connecticut, Georgia, Massachusetts, and Florida—Ameriquest had already settled multimillion-dollar suits. Brian Montgomery, the Federal Housing Administration commissioner said that the Ameriquest settlement reinforced his concern that the industry was exploiting borrowers, and that he "was shocked to find those customers had been lured away by the “fool’s gold” of subprime loans".

In May 2006, Ameriquest Mortgage announced it was closing all of its retail offices and in the future would make its loans through mortgage brokers, a channel that is not covered by the predatory-lending settlement with the Attorneys General.


And just three months later:

On June 13, 2007, lawyers for borrowers, who were seeking to combine 20 suits into one class-action suit, asserted in a filing in Illinois Northern District Court that "Assets of the Ameriquest entities were transferred to (the owner of Ameriquest) Arnall with the actual intent to hinder, delay, or defraud the plaintiffs in this action."
   20. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 05, 2014 at 06:32 PM (#4652302)
I doubt if 1 fan in 100 could name the other 26 correctly on the first try, and most people would be lucky to get half of them right.

How strict is the definition of "right"?


Whatever name is used by the club on its official website.

If I were to say "Camden Yards", am I right or wrong?

I'll give you that one.

Oakland's stadium? Um...

If it's not still called "Oakland Coliseum", then I have no idea myself what it's supposed to be called.

If only the goddam media had had the sense of self-respect not to play along with these dumbassed corporate names right from the jump, and just use a traditional or generic name instead. "New Comiskey" and "Candlestick", for instance. Or just call a corporate bandbox "Homer Field" and cut straight to the chase.

But there are some exceptions I'll allow: To me, the Astros will forever play in Enron Field, since it's hard to imagine a more perfect fit of corporation and ball club than that.
   21. BDC Posted: February 05, 2014 at 06:40 PM (#4652305)
Indeed, another name I'll hear a lot but never use; and soon it'll change again anyway.
   22. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 05, 2014 at 07:34 PM (#4652335)
Ameriquest was also the sponsor of the 2005 Super Bowl halftime show. They spent a ton of money on advertising. But as #19 notes, they were pretty much on their deathbed in 2006-2007 due to regulatory issues and the impending subprime mortgage crisis.

Not to turn this into a political thread, but Roland Arnall, the founder and owner of Ameriquest, was made ambassador to the Netherlands by President Bush while the regulatory investigations into the company were still going on. I have always been surprised that this was not a bigger political issue for Republicans during the financial crisis, but Ameriquest was absorbed by Citigroup and Arnall died from cancer in early 2008, before the financial crisis peaked, and the media focused their attention elsewhere.
   23. SoSH U at work Posted: February 05, 2014 at 07:36 PM (#4652337)
If only the goddam media had had the sense of self-respect not to play along with these dumbassed corporate names right from the jump, and just use a traditional or generic name instead. "New Comiskey" and "Candlestick", for instance. Or just call a corporate bandbox "Homer Field" and cut straight to the chase.


I imagine the ad side of these operations would hear holy hell from their clients if the major media outlets tried it.

Of course, there's no reason the rest of us need to follow the national M&A activity just to keep up with the name of the ballpark where Barry dunked balls into the bay. As I've said before, to no avail, I'd love to see BTF run something where we come up with alternate names for every stadium, names that reflect the franchise's history or its location, rather than blindly following what some rich dudes paid some other rich dudes for the privilege of plastering on the outside of the stadium until the SEC cracks down on them.
   24. Brian C Posted: February 05, 2014 at 08:17 PM (#4652364)
I still call SF's park "Pac Bell". And I still default to "Enron Field" like #20. Just out of habit.

Naming rights are weird - it's easy to pick up the name when the stadium is new, but it's tough to adjust after it changes. I think that a big part of my brain thinks, just on general principle, that a stadium is named when it's new and that's that. But then, I don't go around talking about Weeghman Park, so...
   25. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 05, 2014 at 09:14 PM (#4652389)
The club had most likely been trying to weasel out of it since, per Wiki . . .

Seems like AmerIquest wouldn't have been able to continue making payments, and would have been interested in lowering its public profile, not raising it.
   26. snowles Posted: February 05, 2014 at 09:44 PM (#4652403)
@24, it's not just limited to large-scale things either. I live in a remote town in northern Ontario and when something is named, dang it, it sticks forever. For instance, we have one grocery store, and the name has changed 3 times since 1960. But dang if people still aren't calling it by the original name, despite the owner being dead and the chain it was completely defunct. There are people who refer to a clothing store as the hardware store it was in 1952. There are people in Thunder Bay, Ontario, who refuse to acknowledge the city amalgamated in 1970.

It's gotten to the point where, as a business advisor, I just say, do you really want to go through the hassle of renaming it if no one will use the new name? Now most places aren't changing names, even when it's a family-named business bought by a complete stranger. Weird stuff.

It would just be so much easier if they named each place after the team and added Arena, Collesium, Place, Stadium, Park or some variation. Except for the Jays, are any other parks used for anything but baseball?
   27. Home Run Teal & Black Black Black Gone! Posted: February 05, 2014 at 10:07 PM (#4652416)
I'll call the Marlins ballpark The Orange Bowl foreva'.
   28. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 05, 2014 at 10:38 PM (#4652429)
I still refer to the stadium where the Jets and Giants play as "Giants Stadium" half the time, even though they now play in Metlife Stadium, a completely new park. I haven't had the same mental block around Shea and Citi Field, probably because Citi is so much nicer and because I have been to both of them so many times.
   29. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 05, 2014 at 10:42 PM (#4652432)
Of course, there's no reason the rest of us need to follow the national M&A activity just to keep up with the name of the ballpark where Barry dunked balls into the bay. As I've said before, to no avail, I'd love to see BTF run something where we come up with alternate names for every stadium, names that reflect the franchise's history or its location, rather than blindly following what some rich dudes paid some other rich dudes for the privilege of plastering on the outside of the stadium until the SEC cracks down on them.

Grandfathered in (or resurrected): Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park, The Skydome, Dodger Stadium, Wrigley Field, Oriole Park OR (not "at") Camden Yards, Busch Stadium, New Comiskey, Oakland Coliseum, The Jake, Kaufmann Stadium, Enron Field, Palace of the Fans**, Mile High Stadium, Miller Park. That's 15 of 30, which gives us a proper nod towards continuity and historical precedent.

For the rest:

Sign Em Young Park: Tampa Bay
Jungaleers Den: Detroit
10,000 Lakes Field: Minnesota
Six Gun Stadium: Texas (Alt: Bidness Ballpark)
Seraphs Park: The Angels
Fisherman's Field: Seattle

The Tomahawk: Atlanta
Barney Field: Washington***
Miracle Park: The Mets
The Holding Pen: Philadelphia
Humidity Field: Miami
Smoky Field: Pittsburgh
Desert Park: Arizona
Gwynn Park: San Diego
Fault Line Field: San Francisco

I guarantee that it wouldn't take long for those names to catch on, and they'd be a hell of a lot easier to remember than the names of 15 banks or computer companies.

**Cincinnati

***"Barney" was Walter Johnson's much more commonly used nickname than "The Big Train"




   30. JJ1986 Posted: February 05, 2014 at 11:03 PM (#4652436)
I don't think you want to call the Rockies park "Mile High." That's what the Broncos stadium should be called.
   31. Jim Wisinski Posted: February 05, 2014 at 11:31 PM (#4652442)
Tested myself on Andy's challenge. I had to look at the top of the page to see remind myself of the new Rangers park name but I don't think that should count against me.

I got two wrong. I thought the Angel's stadium was just called Anaheim Stadium and thought that the Marlins were in Sun Life Stadium (I think that was the final of the 37 different names their previous home went by).
   32. BDC Posted: February 05, 2014 at 11:32 PM (#4652443)
I think the best name ever for a ballpark is Fifth Third Field, especially since there's both a first and a second Fifth Third Field.
   33. SoSH U at work Posted: February 05, 2014 at 11:50 PM (#4652453)
I think the best name ever for a ballpark is Fifth Third Field, especially since there's both a first and a second Fifth Third Field.


There's at least a third Fifth Third field (Toledo, Dayton, Grand Rapids).

OK, so Andy's given us 30 nominations (no grandfathering, you can nominate the existing name, but the process is the same). Any others?

Say Hey Park in San Francisco.
The existing nickname for the Southside park, The Cell
Chavez Ravine for LA
Camden Yards, without question
Iron Yards, Pittsburgh (Gary's already got the Steel Yard)

   34. puck Posted: February 06, 2014 at 12:24 AM (#4652466)
I've never heard anyone here call Coors Field anything other than Coors Field and never heard anyone who thought there was something wrong with the name. (Though I'm sure they exist.) It's been the name from the start and Coors is a pretty huge local brand so it feels fairly natural. It's not nearly intrusive as "Invesco Field at Mile High" or "Sports Authority Field at Mile High."
   35. greenback calls it soccer Posted: February 06, 2014 at 01:44 AM (#4652479)
Smoky Field: Pittsburgh

Call it either Clemente Field or Three Rivers Stadium. Riverfront is also a good name for the Reds' current stadium. Yes, the old stadia themselves sucked, but each name captured a significant geographical feature.

I agree with puck on Coors. Some brands really are associated that closely with the city or region (see Busch Stadium and Miller Park).

The Mets playing in Citi Field seems appropriate honestly.
   36. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 06, 2014 at 02:27 AM (#4652487)
Three Rivers Stadium.


I thought of that, but I figured Three Rivers was better suited for the football stadium nearby. And Clemente's already got that fantastic bridge.

And if a branded name is the proper choice (and I agree Coors is a good fit in Colorado), that's fine. I just think it would be an interesting experiment to come up with alternatives, particularly for those parks that have changed names since opening.
   37. boteman Posted: February 06, 2014 at 03:13 AM (#4652493)
Camden Yards, without question

Big question here. "Oriole Park" evokes the pastoral image of baseball with green grass and bright, brilliant sunshiny days. As a railfan I'm thrilled that the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad's switching yard is immortalized in the name "Camden Yards", as they were the first commercial rail carrier in this country. But putting team name next to the word "Park" is about as baseball as it gets.

The Mets playing in Citi Field seems appropriate honestly.

I'm pulling for Madoff Coliseum, as that's where the Mets went to get their heads chomped off by voracious carnivores.
   38. just plain joe Posted: February 06, 2014 at 09:38 AM (#4652517)
Your Name Here stadium/field/colisseum/park/arena; that works for nearly all of them.
   39. Bitter Mouse Posted: February 06, 2014 at 09:48 AM (#4652521)
10,000 Lakes Field: Minnesota


Hey it is kind of handy (but confusing I will admit) to just refer to everything in downtown Minneapolis as Target _____; Field, Center, whatever.
   40. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 06, 2014 at 10:05 AM (#4652524)
I don't think you want to call the Rockies park "Mile High." That's what the Broncos stadium should be called.

Fair enough.

--------------------------------

Madoff Coliseum

Another worthy nomination.

--------------------------------

Chavez Ravine for LA

Only if you first listen to Lenny Bruce's "Religions, Incorporated", which uses that as its punch line.

But then if you've ever read Harold Parrott's The Lords of Baseball, you might think that "The Oom" would be the most appropriate name for Dodger Stadium.
   41. BDC Posted: February 06, 2014 at 10:25 AM (#4652535)
As to Arlington itself, it's always been just "The Ballpark," the name when it was first built. Can't imagine any local will ever refer to it differently, unless perhaps it were renamed for Nolan Ryan, which doesn't seem very likely at the present time.

It seemed naff to call the thing "The Ballpark" initially, but you gotta admit it's a no-nonsense sort of name. Likewise to locals the big thing across the street is "Cowboys Stadium."
   42. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: February 06, 2014 at 10:31 AM (#4652537)
Hey it is kind of handy (but confusing I will admit) to just refer to everything in downtown Minneapolis as Target _____; Field, Center, whatever.


There is some story of a ballplayer getting traded and having to play in Anaheim that night. He tells the driver to take him to Edison International Field or whatever it was called back then, and the cab driver takes him to Edison Park, a local park complete with softball fields.

It gets really confusing in cities where a corporate sponsor is a bit too ubiquitous. I've heard of people getting "Sprint Center" (a sports/concert arena in KC) confused with "The Sprint Campus" (the operational HQ of the company).

Jungaleers Den: Detroit


Is there a push at all to name the stadium after Illitch?
   43. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 06, 2014 at 10:47 AM (#4652544)
But putting team name next to the word "Park" is about as baseball as it gets.


I got nothing against Oriole Park, I just love the "Yards" part of the name. Distinct but appropriate for a baseball stadium.

   44. Rusty Priske Posted: February 06, 2014 at 11:20 AM (#4652564)
Renaming is just generally lame.

You want to put your name on a ballpark? Build a new one.
   45. Hal Chase School of Professionalism Posted: February 06, 2014 at 12:11 PM (#4652605)
You want to put your name on a ballpark? Build a new one.


Bingo. There is value in naming rights for the first one. Once it changes, it'll take forever for that new name to catch on.
   46. Bitter Mouse Posted: February 06, 2014 at 12:22 PM (#4652613)
It gets really confusing in cities where a corporate sponsor is a bit too ubiquitous.


Minneapolis has Target Center, Target Field, a downtown Target store, Target Plaza North and South (where Target HQ is located), and several other buildings with Target employees in them and with Target names on them (like the building with Target Commercial Interiors). It is pretty darn funny actually, well if you know where you are going.
   47. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 06, 2014 at 01:17 PM (#4652651)
Minneapolis has Target Center, Target Field, a downtown Target store, Target Plaza North and South (where Target HQ is located), and several other buildings with Target employees in them and with Target names on them (like the building with Target Commercial Interiors). It is pretty darn funny actually, well if you know where you are going.

Jesus, is there a single credit card in the entire Twin Cities area that hasn't been hacked?
   48. Bourbon Samurai Posted: February 06, 2014 at 02:26 PM (#4652693)
Everybody I know (live in the area) calls it Camden Yards.

Am I the only one who thought the Indians park was still called Jacobs Field?
   49. Karl from NY Posted: February 06, 2014 at 02:56 PM (#4652713)
The MTA and LIRR call the Mets' transit stop "Willets Point", so we could use that. Willets Point Field. Or hell, I still just call it Shea half the time anyway.

The Long Island Ducks play in Bethpage Park, which is not named after nor in Bethpage the town which is twenty miles away. (It's a bank.)
   50. Pat Rapper's Delight Posted: February 06, 2014 at 03:01 PM (#4652721)
Am I the only one who thought the Indians park was still called Jacobs Field?

No.
   51. A Fatty Cow That Need Two Seats Posted: February 06, 2014 at 03:06 PM (#4652724)
I'm in my early-30s and may never get over the recent renaming of the Triborough Bridge. Enough with the Kennedys!
   52. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 06, 2014 at 06:06 PM (#4652857)
Am I the only one who thought the Indians park was still called still calls the Indians park Jacobs Field?


No.

----------------------------------------------------

I'm in my early-30s and may never get over the recent renaming of the Triborough Bridge. Enough with the Kennedys!

I hear you, sister. I still think of New York's international airport as Idlewild. (Hey, that's what JFK himself called it.) And don't get me started on "Reagan National" Airport, which at least the local cab drivers still refer to as "National".
   53. Greg K Posted: February 06, 2014 at 07:52 PM (#4652923)
Naming rights are always a weird thing. Unless you get the rights right at the beginning of a stadium's life, few fans will associate your brand with the stadium. Even then, whenever somebody says "Progressive Field", I think the Indians stadium, and not "Progressive" the company.

I was actually pretty surprised last year when I learned that there was a pet food store chain called PETCO.
   54. Karl from NY Posted: February 06, 2014 at 08:15 PM (#4652939)
The most amusing are the corporate names you can't even tell are corporate names, so they can't be providing brand equity. Great American Ballpark. Great Western Forum.

Also, Yankee Stadium should be included on the list of the corporate names. That's no noble pushback against corporatism, that's the Yankees deciding their own corporate brand is worth more than they could squeeze out of a name sponsor.
   55. God Posted: February 06, 2014 at 08:46 PM (#4652955)
54 - The United Center had been open in Chicago for about 10 years before I realized it was named after a corporate sponsor. Same with the Great Western Forum, Key Arena in Seattle, and America West Arena in Phoenix.

Maybe it's an NBA thing?
   56. God Posted: February 06, 2014 at 08:50 PM (#4652956)
Oriole Park is a fine name for a ballpark. Camden Yards is a better one. Also more unique -- there have already been a few Oriole Parks. The official name that combines the two is lame, but let's at least give them credit for including the "Camden Yards" part at all. I don't think most teams would have.

Anyway, as far as usage is concerned, it's Camden Yards and that's it. It doesn't really matter what the official books say, the public has decided what the name is and that ain't ever gonna change.
   57. Jim Wisinski Posted: February 06, 2014 at 08:52 PM (#4652959)
I like that it has the full name though because OPACY is a pretty nice acronym.
   58. Walt Davis Posted: February 06, 2014 at 11:23 PM (#4653004)
Brian Montgomery, the Federal Housing Administration commissioner said that the Ameriquest settlement reinforced his concern that the industry was exploiting borrowers, and that he "was shocked to find those customers had been lured away by the “fool’s gold” of subprime loans".

Hilarious.

On June 13, 2007, lawyers for borrowers, who were seeking to combine 20 suits into one class-action suit, asserted in a filing in Illinois Northern District Court that "Assets of the Ameriquest entities were transferred to (the owner of Ameriquest) Arnall with the actual intent to hinder, delay, or defraud the plaintiffs in this action."

Class Action Lawsuit Ballpark in Arlington would have been an awesome name.

And c'mon folks, the White Sox play in "The Cell", not "New Comiskey."


   59. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 07, 2014 at 12:41 AM (#4653024)
4 - The United Center had been open in Chicago for about 10 years before I realized it was named after a corporate sponsor. Same with the Great Western Forum, Key Arena in Seattle, and America West Arena in Phoenix.

Maybe it's an NBA thing?


I think it's an NBA/airline thing. I believe the Delta Center in SLC was the first, followed by the Phoenix and Chicago arenas. I had no idea any of them were named after airlines for quite some time. When another more obvious brand named arena opened, I can't remember which one, it dawned on me that those arenas had also given corporate names.


   60. The Yankee Clapper Posted: February 07, 2014 at 01:10 AM (#4653029)
The official name that combines the two is lame, but let's at least give them credit for including the "Camden Yards" part at all. I don't think most teams would have.

The team shouldn't get the credit, that goes to the state of Maryland. Or former Governor Donald Schaefer, more specifically. Maryland paid for the stadium and had the final call. The Orioles wanted to call it Orioles Park, Schaefer wanted Camden Yards. The compromise was to use both, and when the Orioles tried to make Orioles Park more prominent, Schaefer squelched it. The public vastly prefers Camden Yards by any measure.
   61. boteman Posted: February 07, 2014 at 03:09 AM (#4653038)
A related story appeared yesterday in The Consumerist.
   62. Snowboy Posted: February 07, 2014 at 05:55 AM (#4653048)
Naming rights are always a weird thing. Unless you get the rights right at the beginning of a stadium's life, few fans will associate your brand with the stadium. Even then, whenever somebody says "Progressive Field", I think the Indians stadium, and not "Progressive" the company.

Funny, I agree with your first points, but think the example of Progressive Field doesn't prove it at all? In fact it's the counter example, because to me it will always be Jacobs Field or The Jake. And The SkyDome will always be The SkyDome. I still call it PacBell, but sometimes I will call it AT&T because I guess repetition is a learning method afterall, and it has been AT&T since 2006.

Then it must not be much [the value of the sponsorship], otherwise it would be prominently highlighted in the press release. I've lived in the Dallas area for 25 years and never heard of this company until today, but they obviously don't need my money if they have so much to piss away on a stadium name.

Naming rights don't actually cost that much, in my opinion. You can get your corporate name and/or logo plastered on a baseball stadium (and, as mentioned, every ticket, billboard, webpage masthead, piece of stationary, and employee golf shirt or cap) for $3-4M a year, or even less if you bargain well. Progressive pays the Indians $4M/yr. I thought the White Sox badly undersold themselves when they renamed Comiskey Park as U.S. Cellular Field in 2003 for about $3M a year. The DBacks (JP Morgan Chase), the Tigers (Comerica), the Reds (Great American Insurance), the Pirates (PNC Bank), the Mariners (Safeco), etc are all getting about $2M/yr for their stadium names. Meanwhile the Astros are somehow soaking Coca-Cola for more than $6M to sport Minute Maid, and Citigroup is paying $20M per annum to the Mets. I don't think the corps miss the $2-4M that much, and I don't think the teams get enough to make a difference on their bottom line (or at least not enough to make a difference in their product, which theoretically could improve their bottom line)

I'd be willing to bet that the most recognizable ballpark names are still Yankee Stadium, Fenway Park, Dodger Stadium, and Wrigley Field. That's two team names, one neighborhood, and one club owner whose name is also a universally known product.

I'm not taking that bet. But I'll further it by adding that more fans today could identify the location of The Polo Grounds or Ebbets Field or Comiskey Park before they could name the location of Globe Life Park, Rogers Centre, or Citizens Bank Ballpark.

Also Fenway Park may not be as lily white as we want to commemorate it: maybe Fenway was named for the neighbourhood in which it was built, but also maybe it was named such by the Red Sox owner in 1912 who also owned Fenway Realty Company, and wanted to use it as promo.
   63. boteman Posted: February 07, 2014 at 02:53 PM (#4653315)
And The SkyDome will always be The SkyDome.

I remember when it opened the Torontonians who VEHEMENTLY INSISTED that is was not The Skydome, it was simply Skydome and don't you forget it!!
   64. Good cripple hitter Posted: February 07, 2014 at 03:04 PM (#4653322)
I remember when it opened the Torontonians who VEHEMENTLY INSISTED that is was not The Skydome, it was simply Skydome and don't you forget it!!


That lasted a lot longer than you think. I remember when ESPN did the stadium ratings back before it was renamed, and it had this passage:

"And then there was that name. SkyDome. Not the Skydome. Just SkyDome. Like it was a state of being more than a place.

"How are you doing these days?"

"Great. I was dealing with a lot of heavy stuff for awhile, but I'm feeling good about my life right now. I'm at SkyDome.""
   65. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 07, 2014 at 03:19 PM (#4653332)
I remember when it opened the Torontonians who VEHEMENTLY INSISTED that is was not The Skydome, it was simply Skydome and don't you forget it!!



That lasted a lot longer than you think. I remember when ESPN did the stadium ratings back before it was renamed, and it had this passage:

"And then there was that name. SkyDome. Not the Skydome. Just SkyDome. Like it was a state of being more than a place.

"How are you doing these days?"

"Great. I was dealing with a lot of heavy stuff for awhile, but I'm feeling good about my life right now. I'm at SkyDome.""


That's not really any different than how we refer to all stadia. We wouldn't say "I'm at the Fenway," or "I'm going to a game at the PNC Park." It's only with domes where the The has infected the language.

   66. ASmitty Posted: February 07, 2014 at 04:21 PM (#4653372)
I was living in Chicago when the Sears Tower was renamed the Willis Tower. It mostly just made everybody irate and everyone still calls it the Sears Tower. Not sure what Willis was thinking about when they made that particular corporate expenditure.
   67. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: February 07, 2014 at 05:01 PM (#4653389)
I just quick quizzed myself, and I came up with 20.5 correct park names. I'm giving myself half-credit for Tropicana Field, which I assigned to the wrong team (mixing it up with Minute Maid Park).
   68. Hysterical & Useless Posted: February 09, 2014 at 10:50 AM (#4653803)
I still call the ugly monstrosity looming over Grand Central the Pan Am building.
   69. Jim Wisinski Posted: February 09, 2014 at 11:08 AM (#4653808)
Naming rights don't actually cost that much, in my opinion. You can get your corporate name and/or logo plastered on a baseball stadium (and, as mentioned, every ticket, billboard, webpage masthead, piece of stationary, and employee golf shirt or cap) for $3-4M a year, or even less if you bargain well. Progressive pays the Indians $4M/yr. I thought the White Sox badly undersold themselves when they renamed Comiskey Park as U.S. Cellular Field in 2003 for about $3M a year. The DBacks (JP Morgan Chase), the Tigers (Comerica), the Reds (Great American Insurance), the Pirates (PNC Bank), the Mariners (Safeco), etc are all getting about $2M/yr for their stadium names. Meanwhile the Astros are somehow soaking Coca-Cola for more than $6M to sport Minute Maid, and Citigroup is paying $20M per annum to the Mets. I don't think the corps miss the $2-4M that much, and I don't think the teams get enough to make a difference on their bottom line (or at least not enough to make a difference in their product, which theoretically could improve their bottom line)


I assume that it's not just the name that the naming rights buy but also some prominent ad space inside the park, plus they probably buy even more space inside which further links the company and what it's selling with the name on the building. It's just one piece of a larger ad campaign; Tropicana (owned by Pepsi) isn't just the name of the Rays stadium, there's also a giant ad sign with the company name and an organge with a straw in it down the right field line as well as other ads in the stadium and plenty of TV/radio ad spots as well. If you follow the Rays at all locally then you know damn well that Tropicana is orange juice.
   70. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: February 09, 2014 at 11:49 AM (#4653820)
I still call the ugly monstrosity looming over Grand Central the Pan Am building.

Who would call it anything else? The same people who call Sixth Avenue "The Avenue of the Americas"? The folks who say "Reagan National Airport"?
   71. BDC Posted: February 09, 2014 at 12:43 PM (#4653833)
Placenames for things that aren't there anymore are an interesting category. Crystal Palace in London is a notable example. The Marais in Paris hasn't been a swamp in a long time, and of course not far away is the Place de la Bastille. Polo Grounds and Ebbets Fields are now names for apartment complexes on those sites. In Manhattan there are several examples: Collect Pond (though I believe there is an attempt to restore a pond on the site) and the various "slips" along the old waterfront, filled-in streets for centuries now. I still think in terms of the IRT, BMT, and IND subways, and there are still a fair number of signs that use that nomenclature, but that's been technically obsolete since before I can remember, and not in common parlance for decades. I will be one of the last living people to call the bus station Port of Authority :)
   72. bobm Posted: February 09, 2014 at 02:45 PM (#4653884)
[6] I hope Globe Life Park secretly opens up along its hemisphere and has a snifter of fine scotch hidden inside with a couple of tumblers.

If the Rangers' recent postseason disappointments are any indication, Globe Life Park is more likely to be a tantalus.
   73. bobm Posted: February 09, 2014 at 02:51 PM (#4653887)
The MTA and LIRR call the Mets' transit stop "Willets Point", so we could use that.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/03/12/nyregion/12shea.html?_r=0

Officials at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority had once hoped that a bit of Citigroup’s $400 million endorsement pact with the Mets might trickle down their way, through a naming rights deal of their own for the station.

But those hopes evaporated with the bank’s near-collapse and the Mets’ refusal to share the wealth.

So on Tuesday, transit officials informed the Mets that when the subway station (currently named after the team’s former home, the now-demolished Shea Stadium) was rechristened, it would not actually use the name of the new ballpark.

Instead, the station, on the No. 7 line, will be called simply Mets/Willets Point. New signs will go up soon replacing the old signs, which say Willets Point/Shea Stadium. The nearby Long Island Rail Road station will be renamed in the same way.

“We’re willing, as we have said, to entertain corporate names on stations, but only for a fee,” said Jeremy Soffin, a spokesman for the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.
   74. bobm Posted: February 09, 2014 at 02:55 PM (#4653888)
In Manhattan there are several examples: Collect Pond (though I believe there is an attempt to restore a pond on the site)

Yes, and the re-opening has been delayed for years.

http://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/M242/history

Collect Pond Park

Located on Leonard Street between Centre and Lafayette Streets, this park occupies the eighteenth century site of Collect Pond. The pond was a large, sixty-foot deep pool fed by an underground spring. The waters derived their name from seventeenth century Dutch settlers, who called it “kolch” meaning “small body of water”. Following the English capture of New Amsterdam (1664), the name was corrupted to “collect.” Throughout the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, Collect Pond was a favorite spot for picnics and ice-skating. In 1796, John Fitch (1743-1798) launched one of the first experimental steamboats on the waters. During this time, the pond was still clean enough to use for the area’s drinking water. By the early nineteenth century, however, New York City had transformed the sparkling waters into a communal open sewer. Disgusted, local authorities initiated a project to fill the sewer with earth from an adjacent hill. In 1805, in order to drain the garbage-infested waters, designers opened a forty-foot wide canal that today is known as Canal Street.

By 1811, the City had completed the filling of Collect Pond. A neighborhood known as Paradise Square soon arose over the pond’s previous site. Unfortunately, due to the area’s extremely high water table, Paradise Square began to sink in the 1820’s. The neighborhood also began to emit a foul odor, prompting the most affluent residents to leave the community. By the 1830s, Paradise Square had become the notorious “Five Points,” an extremely poor and dangerous neighborhood renowned for its crime and filth. [...]

This park will be closed to transform it into a lush green space with a reflecting pool and other elements that will evoke the large pond here that served as a source of fresh water for the early residents of lower Manhattan. An interactive spray shower will provide recreational opportunities in a community where they are greatly needed. A plaza with benches and tables will attract workers and jurors during lunchtime as well as others attending the surrounding courthouses and community residents. The new park also will include a pedestrian bridge over the pool, decorative pavements, plantings, lighting, bicycle racks, drinking fountains, trash receptacles, fencing and gates. The former parking lot will be incorporated into the park.
   75. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 09, 2014 at 03:09 PM (#4653898)

I think the Citi folks hoped that they would call the subway stop "Citi Field" without having to pay for it. I'm guessing if there had been no financial crisis and government bailout of Citigroup, such a thing might have happened, but after the bailout there was absolutely no chance.
   76. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: February 09, 2014 at 03:22 PM (#4653903)
Who would call it anything else? The same people who call Sixth Avenue "The Avenue of the Americas"? The folks who say "Reagan National Airport"?

I don't call it anything today. It has Metlife signage on it now, but it's a pretty unremarkable building, other than the fact that you can see it from pretty far away looking up Park Avenue.

Nobody says Avenue of the Americas out loud, but I have a lot of clients on 6th Avenue and their business cards all say "Avenue of the Americas". I'm guessing plane tickets through DCA say "Reagan" on them somewhere. Cab drivers still call it the "Triboro" but on the radio the traffic reporters call it the "RFK" or the "RFK Triboro".

"Park Avenue South" was "Fourth Avenue" until 1959; now most people don't even know that Fourth Avenue ever existed (and still exists below 14th St). I know what the IRT is because my dad still called it that when I was growing up, but I don't know anyone from my generation who uses that name, and the next generation will probably have no idea what it means with the exception of a few NYC/transit history buffs. Eventually the new names take hold, but it takes a while (Avenue of the Americas is probably an exception because of how unwieldy it is).
   77. BDC Posted: February 09, 2014 at 03:26 PM (#4653904)
The el stop at "US Cellular" is still called Sox-35th, right? I don't remember it ever being called Comiskey, though it might have been at one point. The corresponding stop on the North Side has never mentioned either Wrigley or the Cubs (that I recall); it's just "Addison."
   78. BDC Posted: February 09, 2014 at 03:28 PM (#4653906)
Cab drivers still call it the "Triboro" but on the radio the traffic reporters call it the "RFK"

OTOH I've never heard people use "Idlewild" for the airport (kind of a shame, because it's a nice name). Probably has to do with the proximity of the renaming to JFK's death.
   79. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: February 09, 2014 at 03:30 PM (#4653908)
OTOH I've never heard people use "Idlewild" for the airport (kind of a shame, because it's a nice name).


It's a hell of a lot more worthy of pathetically clinging to than Sixth Avenue. (-:
   80. Hysterical & Useless Posted: February 09, 2014 at 04:12 PM (#4653918)
Andy, my guess is that anybody who's NYC experience began in the last 15 years or so would only know it as the MetLife Building.

Ave of the Ams is just such a long and unwieldy name that it really never had a chance against 6th Ave.

One name change I try to go along with is the renaming of the Interboro Parkway as the Jackie Robinson. Although it ticks me off that they chose such a crappy road to name after him. Hate driving on it. Only use it a few times a year, and then only around 5 AM when there's not a lot of traffic, but jeez it's an awful road.

There's a scout troop lost at Child's,
Khruschev's due at Idlewild
   81. boteman Posted: February 10, 2014 at 01:08 AM (#4654041)
OTOH I've never heard people use "Idlewild" for the airport (kind of a shame, because it's a nice name). Probably has to do with the proximity of the renaming to JFK's death.

Idlewild is preserved for posterity in the Twilight Zone episode The Odyssey of Flight 33 which is worth a viewing in its own right. I never knew until I heard the plane calling Idlewild and went to look it up.

No self-respecting D.C. native calls it "Reagan". Of course, there aren't many self-respecting people in D.C. these days, so what are ya gonna do?

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Phil Birnbaum
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogWhat's Buster Posey's best trait as a catcher? Here's what his pitchers had to say - Giants Extra
(5 - 5:47am, Oct 24)
Last: Morty Causa

NewsblogAJC: Hart says ‘yes’ to Braves, will head baseball operations
(15 - 5:31am, Oct 24)
Last: Morty Causa

NewsblogGleeman: Royals may bench Norichika Aoki for Game 3
(21 - 3:00am, Oct 24)
Last: PreservedFish

Newsblog9 reasons Hunter Pence is the most interesting man in the World (Series) | For The Win
(8 - 2:52am, Oct 24)
Last: mex4173

NewsblogOT: Monthly NBA Thread - October 2014
(368 - 2:12am, Oct 24)
Last: RollingWave

NewsblogOT: Politics, October 2014: Sunshine, Baseball, and Etch A Sketch: How Politicians Use Analogies
(3402 - 1:51am, Oct 24)
Last: Swoboda is freedom

NewsblogKey question GMs have to weigh with top World Series free agents | New York Post
(28 - 12:50am, Oct 24)
Last: Dale Sams

NewsblogOT: NBC.news: Valve isn’t making one gaming console, but multiple ‘Steam machines’
(867 - 12:47am, Oct 24)
Last: Poster Nutbag

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 10-23-2014
(13 - 11:36pm, Oct 23)
Last: EddieA

NewsblogDealing or dueling – what’s a manager to do? | MGL on Baseball
(44 - 11:31pm, Oct 23)
Last: villageidiom

NewsblogRoyals are not the future of baseball | FOX Sports
(39 - 11:25pm, Oct 23)
Last: villageidiom

NewsblogOT: NFL/NHL thread
(8370 - 11:22pm, Oct 23)
Last: Russlan is fond of Dillon Gee

NewsblogI hope this doesn't get me fired. | FOX Sports
(23 - 11:17pm, Oct 23)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogGold Glove Awards finalists revealed | MLB.com
(53 - 11:07pm, Oct 23)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogOT: The Soccer Thread, September 2014
(904 - 10:56pm, Oct 23)
Last: frannyzoo

Page rendered in 0.4699 seconds
52 querie(s) executed