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Monday, August 11, 2014

The Best Beer in Baseball

Several years ago, craft beer started taking off at Cincinnati’s Great American Ballpark. From 2011-2012, sales went up by 20 percent. From 2012-2013, they were up 47 percent.

So when it came time to create a new hangout in a highly trafficked spot on the third-base concourse, the ballpark went all-in on craft-style beers. The new Reds Brewery District – an 84-foot-long bar with more than 50 taps – included more than 20 craft offerings when it opened this spring. There were local beers from Cincinnati brewers like Christian Moerlein, MadTree, Blank Slate, Fifty West, Rhinegeist, Mt. Carmel, and Rivertown. There were national options from well-regarded breweries like Founders, Bell’s, West Sixth and Great Lakes.

And the market exploded. Counting single-day offerings, the Cincinnati Reds’ selection of distinct beers went from 42 to more than 130 – the most in Major League Baseball, according to a Washington Post analysis….

While teams like the Reds are just discovering the craft-beer market, the Seattle Mariners have long reveled in it. Located in the hops-mad Pacific Northwest – one of the bastions of craft brewing – the Mariners have a beer program that would make many specialty bars jealous.

About 70 percent of Safeco Field’s 700 beer handles are devoted to “good, quality craft beer,” according to Steve Dominguez, the general manager of Centerplate’s operations at Safeco Field.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: August 11, 2014 at 03:01 PM | 75 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: beer, mariners, reds, stadium fare

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   1. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: August 11, 2014 at 03:49 PM (#4768753)
all i know about miller park is that my wife can get her precious leinenkugel's.

for those not aware cincinnati has a strong german heritage and while i do not like beer personally all of my beer loving relatives tell that cincy breweries do a great job, particularly mt carmel and christian morlein.

   2. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: August 11, 2014 at 03:49 PM (#4768754)
by the way, good article. we need more of this activity and not repoz trolling with the peds garbage trying to re-start old fights
   3. Cargo Cultist Posted: August 11, 2014 at 03:50 PM (#4768757)
This is a great trend. Craft beers are better beers, because they are pure and made from only high quality ingredients, and unless it's a special type, the only ingredients used are water, malted barley, hops, and yeast (special types may add wheat, fruit, or rye). Craft beers taste better, and life is too short to drink watered-down, mass-produced beer.
   4. Ok, Griffey's Dunn (Nothing Iffey About Griffey) Posted: August 11, 2014 at 03:57 PM (#4768765)
This is a great trend. Craft beers are better beers,


The most expensive beer to buy at that 84-foot long bar is.....

Budweiser and Bud Light

edit: not to knock that area. There are tons of great beers on draft, and just around the corner, is a Moerlein bar that has bottles from breweries all across the country. It is just a little ridiculous to pay $9 for a Bud, when you can get a Kentucky Bourbon Barrel, or Lagunitas, or other breweries for $8.75. I think you get a little bit more Bud, but, c'mon
   5. DL from MN Posted: August 11, 2014 at 03:57 PM (#4768767)
Target Field has a good beer selection as well. If I'm paying $8 for a beer it had better be a beer I can't get at the local grocery store.
   6. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:10 PM (#4768782)
We've come along way from the Pabst fast fills ages ago (tap beer served by walking beer vendors) at County Stadium.
   7. Commissioner Bud Black Beltre Hillman Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:12 PM (#4768784)
Oakland Coliseum now has a small stall selling beers from Linden St. Brewing; it's $11 a pop but highly recommended. Last visit the stall was on the upper plaza near RF, where you come in off the BART ramp, serving Hop Candi (pale ale) and Oakland Glow (pilsner).
   8. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:19 PM (#4768793)
all i know about miller park is that my wife can get her precious leinenkugel's.

for those not aware cincinnati has a strong german heritage and while i do not like beer personally all of my beer loving relatives tell that cincy breweries do a great job, particularly mt carmel and christian morlein.


I'm not much of a beer drinker anymore either (much prefer bourbon and rye now), but I'll always make an exception for Leinenkugel's.

I's love to be able to find some Leine's Red near me. The Summer Shandy is excellent also.

In general, I'll take the good traditional small breweries over most of the "craft" stuff that is being produced. Too heavy, too over flavored.
   9. BDC Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:21 PM (#4768799)
cincinnati has a strong german heritage and while i do not like beer personally all of my beer loving relatives tell that cincy breweries do a great job

It's also a historic wine region, and has been reviving that industry of late, too. I wonder if local wines are an option in the Cincinnati park.

I was impressed by the craft beer at Progressive Field in Cleveland lately, and also at the Cell in Chicago, though there it's mostly in bottles. Philly has excellent beer kiosks (Victory, from Downingtown, is very much worth getting). Arlington has improved a lot lately, even way up in the cheap seats where we get Rahr's and other local brews.

New Yankee Stadium is much more generic and bland, though probably beyond the moat there they have $99 pints brewed from the purified sweat of peacocks or something.
   10. BDC Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:22 PM (#4768802)
Oh, and one counter-trend in Cleveland gave me a chuckle: a stand called Your Dad's Beer or something like that. You could get Stroh's and Genny Cream Ale and Old Style and the like. Didn't look very popular, though.
   11. Moeball Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:29 PM (#4768808)
So when it came time to create a new hangout in a highly trafficked spot on the third-base concourse, the ballpark went all-in on craft-style beers. The new Reds Brewery District – an 84-foot-long bar with more than 50 taps – included more than 20 craft offerings when it opened this spring.


The Craft Beer section at Petco Park in San Diego is on the first-base side but also features a lot of local brewers such as Karl Strauss, Lost Abbey, Green Flash and, of course, Stone.
   12. The Polish Sausage Racer Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:30 PM (#4768809)
I've been much happier since I used the At the Ballpark app to find the craft beer carts scattered around Miller Park. There's some good stuff available there to save you from Miller Lite.
   13. Into the Void Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:30 PM (#4768810)
This is the thread where the people in the "hipster thread" who were vilifying hipsters for their obscure music and fashion tastes get to wax poetic about their favorite 50 obscure microbrews.
   14. GregD Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:31 PM (#4768811)
This is truly a sign of humanity's progress. I want to go to Cincinnati right now.

The Dodgers disappointed me a bit on this front. Most of the places selling have lousy beer. There's a couple of places in the corners that have maybe a half dozen taps and some decent bottle selection. But nothing like what it could be.

Is San Diego stocked with Stone specialty beers?

Barclays Center, to switch sports, may have the worst beer selection in the country despite being near some fine breweries. F-in Anheuser Busch near-exclusive contracts.
   15. Manny Coon Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:31 PM (#4768813)
Surprised they Padres didn't get mentioned in the article, Petco has a strong collection of beers.

Here is an article I found talking about everything they have: http://beergraphs.com/bg/162-petco-ballpark-beer-review/

Biggest problem with Petco is that you have to watch the Padres.
   16. Flynn Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:33 PM (#4768815)
Oh, and one counter-trend in Cleveland gave me a chuckle: a stand called Your Dad's Beer or something like that. You could get Stroh's and Genny Cream Ale and Old Style and the like. Didn't look very popular, though.


That sounds fun, I'd drink that as long as the prices were good (given the popularity of PBR as a retro beer, I'm guessing they're not offering much of a discount over far better beers).

Regina's Pizza in Boston still stocks Ballantine and Narragansett, and although it's nothing to write home about, it's fun to drink beers your grandpa drank while watching the Red Sox game on a black and white TV.

In general, I'll take the good traditional small breweries over most of the "craft" stuff that is being produced. Too heavy, too over flavored.


If we're including the older craft breweries in this - for me, Anchor (1966), Sierra Nevada (early 70s), and Unibroue (1993) - I would sign off on that.
   17. BDC Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:41 PM (#4768826)
vilifying hipsters for their obscure music and fashion tastes get to wax poetic about their favorite 50 obscure microbrews

I won't have that! I would never vilify a hipster. Now let me tell you about Revolver Blood & Honey from Granbury, Texas.

I'll take the good traditional small breweries

In Texas, that would be Shiner. Often derided by actual hipsters as bland and weak – mostly lagers up and down the darkness scale, with seasonal grapefruit and prickly-pear beers – but when it's 101 degrees at the ballpark one often does not want a Trippel Raspberry Syrup.
   18. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: August 11, 2014 at 04:51 PM (#4768834)
I wish Boston had better selections. They have a couple kiosks with Cisco and Wachusett and Harpoon, but there isn't much by way of non-macrobrew at most places.
   19. Shredder Posted: August 11, 2014 at 05:03 PM (#4768842)
It's a freaking baseball game. You're practically supposed to drink crappy beer. Craft beer is available everywhere these days, and I would venture to guess that 99% of the bars in Chicago have at least a few decent craft options (50 taps are nice, but not always necessary). I drink enough good beer that I'm perfectly happy drinking an Old Style or Miller Light or whatever at a baseball game.
   20. Red Menace Posted: August 11, 2014 at 05:11 PM (#4768847)
The article is well worth a click-through as it features some nifty charts and comparative visualizations.
   21. dr. scott Posted: August 11, 2014 at 05:14 PM (#4768852)
SF is a bit hit or miss. There is a fantastic beer bar (Public House) as part of the park with in and out privileges that is open even on non game days. But the beer inside AT&T is just Ok. A few Lagunitas, Goose islands, and speakeasy. The public house also has the best prices. for only $7 you can get a Russian River Blind Pig (close to the going price if you can ever find it) as opposed to $11 for anything in the park. You can even get a selection of trappists for $9-$11. Its a long way from most seats to the beer bar, so I just get my two before the game starts.
   22. zonk Posted: August 11, 2014 at 05:18 PM (#4768856)
I generally just get the Old Style at the park, too - unless I happen to walk past the craft stand on my way to the bathroom or get food.

The beer list at Wrigley is rather disappointing, actually.

I understand that it might be a bit of a sizeable order for some of the local brews, but they couldn't rotate in and out? I mean, it's taken forever just to get Goose Island (and that was long after the Busch-then-Imbev acquisition).

Maybe I'm getting provincial in my old age, but I tend to stick local more than I do east or west coast. Once upon a time, I think I'd say most of my favorites came out of Oregon/northern California. Now? I'll reach for Half Acre or Revolution, especially on tap. If I can extend my provincialism, you've also got New Glarus in Wisconsin and Founders (plus what... 3-4 others?) in Michigan.

I imagine most folks would say the same in other regions... A golden age for beer drinkers.
   23. Ziggy Posted: August 11, 2014 at 05:29 PM (#4768864)
You guys actually buy beer at baseball games? Given that I usually sit in the cheap seats, drinking at the park can easily triple or quadruple the cost of a game. On top of the expense, buying beer, and spilling beer, and peeing, all take time that could be better spent watching baseball. I'll have one at home during a game,* but when I'm at the park I'll pass.

* Public Works IPA recently. I've also been mixing my own shandies (using Hoegarten heffeweisen), since the pre-bottled ones are usually just beer with added lemon flavoring.
   24. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: August 11, 2014 at 05:39 PM (#4768869)
zonk

ah yes, the wife likes teh spotted cow beer very much
   25. Bourbon Samurai Posted: August 11, 2014 at 06:02 PM (#4768890)
Went to a game at te Tokyo dome last month. They had lovely young ladies walking aroubd with kegs of asahi and Sapporo for four bucks a pour, and they kept on pouring till two outs in the bottom of the 9th
   26. DL from MN Posted: August 11, 2014 at 06:17 PM (#4768899)
You guys actually buy beer at baseball games?


Rarely. Usually I get a Summit before I go. However, if I do get a beer at the ballgame I'm sure not getting a light beer.
   27. GregD Posted: August 11, 2014 at 06:17 PM (#4768900)
You guys actually buy beer at baseball games? Given that I usually sit in the cheap seats, drinking at the park can easily triple or quadruple the cost of a game.
All true. But it's beer! At a baseball game!
On top of the expense, buying beer, and spilling beer, and peeing, all take time that could be better spent watching baseball.
Don't break the seal!
   28. A triple short of the cycle Posted: August 11, 2014 at 06:40 PM (#4768918)
One of the great things about the Oakland Coliseum is you can get your pre-game drink on in downtown Oakland, at a bar next to the 12th Street BART station (Radio Bar). You can go from barstool to train platform in about 2 minutes, and the train ride itself is only 10 minutes from 12th Street to Coliseum stations. If you lay down a good base in this manner, you only need to buy one or two overpriced beers to nurse at the ballgame. At the Coliseum, I've always frequented the Sierra Nevada stand, behind home plate and next to the Saag's sausage stand. The Sierra Nevada beer lady, Fran, is like 75 years old. The one time I caught a foul ball, I had Fran the beer lady and also John the Saag's sausage guy autograph it for me.

EDIT: I guess this is the public transit version of tailgating.
   29. frannyzoo Posted: August 11, 2014 at 07:57 PM (#4768964)
Triple: I loved Oakland on my single visit there and your post makes me want to investigate moving there. "Public transit tailgaiting" prime among the reasons. I fail to understand the Coliseum hatred, the site and town mesh well. Now if only those home prices would go down to, let's say, Fort Worth, Texas price levels.

Oh, we're talking about beer. Those visiting Denver will want to visit this place prior to their Rockies sojourn. It's right down the street. Might I suggest a bike share from hotel to pub to game to where ever?
   30. PreservedFish Posted: August 11, 2014 at 08:42 PM (#4768988)
One of the great things about the Oakland Coliseum is you can get your pre-game drink on in downtown Oakland, at a bar next to the 12th Street BART station (Radio Bar).


Or, more relevant to this thread, The Trappist.
   31. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 11, 2014 at 08:59 PM (#4768998)
This is the thread where the people in the "hipster thread" who were vilifying hipsters for their obscure music and fashion tastes get to wax poetic about their favorite 50 obscure microbrews.


No, that's an all-too-common conflation of two types. Actual hipsters, the ones everyone hates, are of the "I'm going to try to be so uncool that I'm really actually cooler than you" variety, as expressed through "ironically" embracing what is justifiably mocked in mainstream culture, for example terrible mustaches, jorts and mullets. The burly guys with the beards and the tattoos who are into local farming, butchering and making craft beers aren't hipsters at all - they're kind of "alternative" folks who are trying to do a good job at their craft. No ironic superiority there; them's good people, for the most part. Granted, it's sometimes hard to tell a bushy ironic beard from a bushy butcher beard, but if it's found on a guy who is wearing Weird Al Yankovic glasses and going to "dance party night" in Brooklyn, it's the former.
   32. TFTIO is familiar with the works of Pablo Neruda Posted: August 11, 2014 at 09:11 PM (#4769007)
Or, more relevant to this thread, The Trappist.

Oh my yes.
   33. boteman Posted: August 11, 2014 at 09:11 PM (#4769008)
On top of the expense, buying beer, and spilling beer, and peeing, all take time that could be better spent watching baseball.

You've just emptied your plastic beer cup, so why leave your seat just to pee??? Be creative!
   34. TFTIO is familiar with the works of Pablo Neruda Posted: August 11, 2014 at 09:14 PM (#4769010)
Toronto has terrible, lazy food and beer. It's sad, because it's not like you can't get good local beer and food. I suppose it's of a piece with the overall laziness of Rodgers' ownership, but it's a crying shame.
   35. zonk Posted: August 11, 2014 at 09:17 PM (#4769012)


No, that's an all-too-common conflation of two types. Actual hipsters, the ones everyone hates, are of the "I'm going to try to be so uncool that I'm really actually cooler than you" variety, as expressed through "ironically" embracing what is justifiably mocked in mainstream culture, for example terrible mustaches, jorts and mullets. The burly guys with the beards and the tattoos who are into local farming, butchering and making craft beers aren't hipsters at all - they're kind of "alternative" folks who are trying to do a good job at their craft. No ironic superiority there; them's good people, for the most part. Granted, it's sometimes hard to tell a bushy ironic beard from a bushy butcher beard, but if it's found on a guy who is wearing Weird Al Yankovic glasses and going to "dance party night" in Brooklyn, it's the former.


Yeah, hate to break it to folks - but the hipsters are drinking PBR not a Daisy Cutter....
   36. Bhaakon Posted: August 11, 2014 at 09:40 PM (#4769029)
This is the thread where the people in the "hipster thread" who were vilifying hipsters for their obscure music and fashion tastes get to wax poetic about their favorite 50 obscure microbrews.


Eh the problem with hipsters isn't hipster culture per say, it's that all middle-to-upper class counter-cultures tend to attract a certain brand of elitist gadfly that everyone hates because they're pretentious jackoffs with no substance of character guiding their behavior beyond a desire to be on the bleeding edge of the latest non-mainstream fad. It just happens that the hipster movement is the one that such people seem to be glomming on to at the moment. In a few years they'll move on to something else and leave the people who are hipsters because they believe in the lifestyle and not because it's the trend du jour.

There are plenty of annoying beer snobs as well, but the thing about good beer is that jackoffs can't make it less delicious.
   37. SteveM. Posted: August 11, 2014 at 10:11 PM (#4769057)
I would hope Cincinnati carries Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale. Best damn beer I have ever had.
   38. madvillain Posted: August 11, 2014 at 10:54 PM (#4769094)
Safeco really can spoil ya. They sell bombers of Dead Guy in the 300 level for 9.75. That's awesome. I do remember going to Camden however in 2009 and buying a 24oz can of some piss lager for $5. That was awesome in its own way.


Eh the problem with hipsters isn't hipster culture per say, it's that all middle-to-upper class counter-cultures tend to attract a certain brand of elitist gadfly that everyone hates because they're pretentious jackoffs with no substance of character guiding their behavior beyond a desire to be on the bleeding edge of the latest non-mainstream fad. It just happens that the hipster movement is the one that such people seem to be glomming on to at the moment. In a few years they'll move on to something else and leave the people who are hipsters because they believe in the lifestyle and not because it's the trend du jour.


I made my feelings well known on hipsters in the other thread but beer really has nothing to do with hipsterism. Most guy that are super into beer and even brew their own beer are nerds from what I've seen. People in the sciences moreso than on average in the population. It used to be eccentric, which of course is why hipsters latched onto it initially but while 90% of hipsters may enjoy craft beer I think only maybe 50% (at absolute most) of craft beer people are hipsters.

they're kind of "alternative" folks who are trying to do a good job at their craft. No ironic superiority there; them's good people, for the most part. Granted, it's sometimes hard to tell a bushy ironic beard from a bushy butcher beard, but if it's found on a guy who is wearing Weird Al Yankovic glasses and going to "dance party night" in Brooklyn, it's the former.


Holy ####, I love you. Great explanation. As an urban person this should be required reading.
   39. TFTIO is familiar with the works of Pablo Neruda Posted: August 11, 2014 at 10:59 PM (#4769101)
I try not to second-guess people's aesthetics, but I hate those ####### faux-metal hipsters, dammit.
   40. PreservedFish Posted: August 11, 2014 at 11:06 PM (#4769107)
I missed whatever the recent hipsters thread was, but I've been in other ones on this site, and #31 was the first accurate thing I've read about hipsters here. I've tried to articulate the same thing in the past but I didn't do it nearly as well.

A friend of mine delineated that difference thusly: on the one hand you have "hipsters," on the other hand you have "funky urban people."
   41. Cargo Cultist Posted: August 11, 2014 at 11:22 PM (#4769120)
Hipsters don't drink craft beer. They drink Pabst Blue Ribbon.

I am amazed that people don't know that..
   42. PreservedFish Posted: August 11, 2014 at 11:36 PM (#4769127)
Me on hipsters in 2010:

This is another subject, but "hipster" is one of my least favorite terms, as used by most people, because as best as I can tell most people define it as "people less than 35 that have a sort of alternative style that I do not like." This floating definition makes it totally useless.

I think "hipster" is a fine term for a very specific kind of style: skinny jeans, ironic moustache, corny second-hand sweaters, terrible greasy haircut, PBR drinking(or is it Tecate now?). These people certainly exist. ...

"Hipster" is a small subset of "funky urban people." If you look at the food truck line at one of these Twitter-updating places you will see hipsters but you will also see the quirky girl that's all of a sudden in love with knitting ... the dad that's trying to stay cool ... a large variety of different people all wearing Chuck Taylors, and of course lots of normal non-funky people too.

But my friends that are definitely not hipsters, whenever they use the word hipster it means "funky urban person that's currently pissing me off." That's the definition that I want to disappear.


BTF thread on food trucks
   43. Spahn Insane Posted: August 12, 2014 at 12:47 AM (#4769147)
I would hope Cincinnati carries Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale. Best damn beer I have ever had.

It's damn tasty, that's for sure, but a little of that sweet strong ale (think it's around 8.5 ABV) goes a long way. Not sure I'd want to drink much of it on a hot summer day. Now, Little Kings, those might just do the trick (if we're limiting ourselves to Cincinnati-area offerings). Small, tasty enough, drinkable. Better than your average ballyard swill.
   44. Spahn Insane Posted: August 12, 2014 at 12:50 AM (#4769148)
BTF thread on food trucks

I like RMc's post no. 13. Has it been that long since Ernie Harwell passed away (and Ray's reaction thereto plunged him into BBTF immortality, even before "It's over. It's always been over.")?
   45. NattyBoh Posted: August 12, 2014 at 06:48 AM (#4769171)
Somewhere Chuck Thompson is smiling.

Would love to see the minor league equivalent. I read one about Jersey ballparks and beer earlier in the month. Will have to post that.
   46. Ok, Griffey's Dunn (Nothing Iffey About Griffey) Posted: August 12, 2014 at 09:03 AM (#4769188)
I would hope Cincinnati carries Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale. Best damn beer I have ever had.

It's damn tasty, that's for sure, but a little of that sweet strong ale (think it's around 8.5 ABV)


Yes, Cincinnati does have this at the ballpark. $8.75 for a 12 ounce cup. Budweiser is $9 for 16 ounce at the same stand!
   47. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 12, 2014 at 09:49 AM (#4769210)
Yeah, the minor league parks I've been to the past couple of seasons have been well represented by craft, which makes sense given the largely family business type vibe at so many of them, with local businesses sponsoring so much of it.
   48. Nasty Nate Posted: August 12, 2014 at 09:58 AM (#4769219)
Actual hipsters, the ones everyone hates, are of the "I'm going to try to be so uncool that I'm really actually cooler than you" variety, as expressed through "ironically" embracing what is justifiably mocked in mainstream culture

I'm not sure this type actually exists.
I think "hipster" is a fine term for a very specific kind of style: skinny jeans, ironic moustache, corny second-hand sweaters, terrible greasy haircut, PBR drinking(or is it Tecate now?). These people certainly exist. ...
"Hipster" is a small subset of "funky urban people."

I don't think this is quite right. "Hipster," as an externally-applied label, is used by non-urban people and non-funky urban people to describe all of the funky urban people. The funky urban people themselves think hipster refers to the mythical archetype in the parts I have quoted ("Oh, it's those other funky urban people, not me.").
   49. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:11 AM (#4769236)
Me on hipsters in 2010:


So you started hating the term "hipster" before it was cool?
   50. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:12 AM (#4769238)
Actual hipsters, the ones everyone hates, are of the "I'm going to try to be so uncool that I'm really actually cooler than you" variety, as expressed through "ironically" embracing what is justifiably mocked in mainstream culture


I'm not sure this type actually exists.


You've never been to Brooklyn, Coachella or Logan Square in Chicago, have you?
   51. bigglou115 Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:15 AM (#4769243)
Hmmm. I like to make my own beer, but nobody is calling me a hipster. I mostly just like to cook, and I think the beer is an off-shoot of that. Also, I don't think buying and making craft beer should be too conflated. Homebrew is cheaper than purchasing anything but Keystone, by far, and it tastes good because it doesn't have preservatives. That said, I take some pride in making beer the same way I do when I put together a 3 or 4 course meal on the grill.

Edit: saw a coachella reference later in the thread. Anybody here done that? I'm legitimately curious how it could be fun. Seems like you'd barely be able to hear, pressed up against sweaty people, and most of the acts are being replaced with DJs. I'm crowd averse, but that still doesn't sound like fun. Is it all about the atmosphere?
   52. Nasty Nate Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:27 AM (#4769266)
You've never been to Brooklyn, Coachella or Logan Square in Chicago, have you?

I'm sure all those people think of themselves as the "good" funky or alternative urban people. I think it would be almost impossible to find someone to admit that they are trying to be so uncool that they're really actually cooler.

People think that "hipster" does not refer to them, but to someone that fits some detailed negative parts of a stereotype. But I don't think that's true, it's just the nature of stereotypes.
   53. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:39 AM (#4769290)
I'm sure all those people think of themselves as the "good" funky or alternative urban people. I think it would be almost impossible to find someone to admit that they are trying to be so uncool that they're really actually cooler.

People think that "hipster" does not refer to them, but to someone that fits some detailed negative parts of a stereotype.


Oh, of course they wouldn't admit it. Doesn't change the fact that they're loathsome hipsters.

Edit: saw a coachella reference later in the thread. Anybody here done that?


Yes, back in around 2005 or so. My cousin is well-connected in the music industry, so we had passes that weren't all-access but improved-access, so we were able to get away from the crowds when we wanted to. There were moments when it was fun - seeing Wilco as the sun went down was spectacular. But then my cousin made us go see Chemical Brothers instead of Coldplay because of course all his friends were way too cool for Coldplay (too cool in a music-biz way, not a hipster way). That was just horrible, and your point about all the acts being replaced by DJs is spot on, so I'm sure it's only gotten worse. I guess I'm glad I did it once, but let's put it this way, I live in Chicago, play in multiple bands, and never even think about going to Lollapalooza.
   54. Nasty Nate Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:44 AM (#4769292)
Doesn't change the fact that they're loathsome hipsters.

I'm sure people were thinking the same thing about you at Coachella, unless they were thinking you are a loathsome bro-dude.

Edit:
I live in Chicago, play in multiple bands, and never even think about going to Lollapalooza.

C'mon, that's 90% there to what you called loathsome.
   55. PreservedFish Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:51 AM (#4769299)
"Hipster," as an externally-applied label, is used by non-urban people and non-funky urban people to describe all of the funky urban people. The funky urban people themselves think hipster refers to the mythical archetype in the parts I have quoted ("Oh, it's those other funky urban people, not me.").


First sentence is exactly right. Second sentence is mostly right, except that the archetype is not mythical. This is an event.
   56. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:53 AM (#4769301)
I'm sure people were thinking the same thing about you at Coachella, unless they were thinking you are a loathsome bro-dude.


That's exactly what they were thinking (to the extent that this type of hipster existed in 2005 - it's a relatively new phenomenon). Of course, by bro-dude standards, I'm a major nerd. I just don't go out of my way to look like it.

Edit:

C'mon, that's 90% there to what you called loathsome.


Au contraire. I'm mostly a covers guy, which hipsters absolutely hate, and my original band plays straight-up rock without any ironic facial hair or skinny jeans. We like Springsteen and U2 - how much less hipster can you get than that? We'd never be able to play at the Hideout. Trust me, I'm the least cool musician on the planet.

Second edit to drive home my point: I once played in a Dave Matthews tribute band. Years ago, but that settles it.
   57. Nasty Nate Posted: August 12, 2014 at 10:56 AM (#4769305)
First sentence is exactly right. Second sentence is mostly right, except that the archetype is not mythical. This is an event.

Fair point.
   58. Nasty Nate Posted: August 12, 2014 at 11:04 AM (#4769318)
Second edit to drive home my point: I once played in a Dave Matthews tribute band. Years ago, but that settles it.


Ok, all charges are dropped.
   59. GregQ Posted: August 12, 2014 at 11:52 AM (#4769352)
I live in Portland, Or. now one of the huge epicenters of hipsterism, and they do exist just like described in #31, But as it is Portland there is also a huge subcult of beer snobs independent of them. At Burnside Brewery one night and the guy next to me started arguing with the waiter about the type of hops in the beer. The server went in the back and asked the brewer and when told the patron claimed that there was probably a mix up in the brewing process. As to nerds in brewing, I know a ton just in my immediate neighborhood and one of them is buying a new system that you just add water, hops etc.., hook it to the internet and download your favorite beer recipe and it automatically brews the beer.

How many hipsters does it take to screw in a light bulb?

I would tell you but it’s an obscure number that you have never heard of.
   60. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 12:39 PM (#4769394)
As to nerds in brewing, I know a ton just in my immediate neighborhood and one of them is buying a new system that you just add water, hops etc.., hook it to the internet and download your favorite beer recipe and it automatically brews the beer.


That's awesome. "Computer, make me a beer!"
   61. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: August 12, 2014 at 01:31 PM (#4769465)
As to nerds in brewing, I know a ton just in my immediate neighborhood and one of them is buying a new system that you just add water, hops etc.., hook it to the internet and download your favorite beer recipe and it automatically brews the beer.

   62. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: August 12, 2014 at 01:32 PM (#4769468)
   63. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 12, 2014 at 01:55 PM (#4769509)
hook it to the internet and download your favorite beer recipe and it automatically brews the beer.

Why did they program me to feel drunk...
   64. Shredder Posted: August 12, 2014 at 03:25 PM (#4769618)
Homebrew is cheaper than purchasing anything but Keystone, by far, and it tastes good because it doesn't have preservatives.
So you're brewing beer without alcohol?
I live in Chicago, play in multiple bands, and never even think about going to Lollapalooza.
I've not been to Lolla, but it looks like kind of a nightmare. Generally I don't go because there's only a handful of bands I really want to see, and at least some of them are probably playing aftershows, and that way I see them in a better setting without paying for the Lolla headliners. Pitchfork, on the other hand, is actually a lot of fun. Decent lineup usually, you don't have to walk all over creation to get from stage to stage, smaller crowd (though obviously in a much smaller park). It's a lot cheaper than Lolla, and even when there's not a lot interesting going on musically, it's great people watching.
   65. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 03:35 PM (#4769632)
Pitchfork, on the other hand, is actually a lot of fun. Decent lineup usually, you don't have to walk all over creation to get from stage to stage, smaller crowd (though obviously in a much smaller park). It's a lot cheaper than Lolla, and even when there's not a lot interesting going on musically, it's great people watching.


Pitchfork is the source of the original (actual) hipster infestation in Chicago.
   66. Shredder Posted: August 12, 2014 at 03:37 PM (#4769633)
Pitchfork is the source of the original (actual) hipster infestation in Chicago.
Right, because Bucktown didn't exist until 2005. Pretty sure there plenty of hipsters in Chicago before the Intonation/Pitchfork Festival got underway.
   67. zonk Posted: August 12, 2014 at 03:45 PM (#4769640)
I've not been to Lolla, but it looks like kind of a nightmare. Generally I don't go because there's only a handful of bands I really want to see, and at least some of them are probably playing aftershows, and that way I see them in a better setting without paying for the Lolla headliners. Pitchfork, on the other hand, is actually a lot of fun. Decent lineup usually, you don't have to walk all over creation to get from stage to stage, smaller crowd (though obviously in a much smaller park). It's a lot cheaper than Lolla, and even when there's not a lot interesting going on musically, it's great people watching.


I've only done Lolla once and I hated it... It had all the annoyances of a big stadium show without the creature comfort and apparently, I've become too old to find a lot of the crap amusing that comes it.

I thought Pitchfork's lineup this year was rather subpar - a buddy had a spare for Saturday and I just couldn't work up the interest...

Now... Riot Fest... I guess it's a whole lot of bands a bit past their prime, but there are more than a few that are still relevant.

One problem with fests is that if there's only one or two bands you want to see - you're getting a pretty short set. I don't tend to do well with seeing bands I don't know well live as an introduction... Maybe that's the sign of a non-hipster - the need for studio magic/craftmanship to better appreciate the rawer live sound of the artists....
   68. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 03:57 PM (#4769649)
Right, because Bucktown didn't exist until 2005. Pretty sure there plenty of hipsters in Chicago before the Intonation/Pitchfork Festival got underway.


I've lived in Chicago since 1998, and yes, there were alterna-kids in Bucktown back then. But the specific demographic of today's ironically ridiculous hipsters is a little more recent than that. Maybe they represent the next generation of the alterna-kids, sure, but they're a different thing.
   69. Shredder Posted: August 12, 2014 at 04:31 PM (#4769677)
One problem with fests is that if there's only one or two bands you want to see - you're getting a pretty short set. I don't tend to do well with seeing bands I don't know well live as an introduction... Maybe that's the sign of a non-hipster - the need for studio magic/craftmanship to better appreciate the rawer live sound of the artists....
They tend to be a good excuse to listen to new stuff before the festival, and with everything streaming these days, that's a lot easier to do. I started listening to Parquet Courts, for example, because they were playing Pitchfork. I listened to a bunch of bands before the festival that I didn't know much about, and they've since become one of my favorite bands.

We're doing Riot Fest and the AV Fest/Hideout Block Party in September.
But the specific demographic of today's ironically ridiculous hipsters is a little more recent than that. Maybe they represent the next generation of the alterna-kids, sure, but they're a different thing.
I think you'll find that's the case everywhere. I don't think the Pitchfork Festival really has anything to do with that. As for the whole Pitchfork Empire, I think you have the causality reversed.
   70. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: August 12, 2014 at 06:31 PM (#4769780)
Yeah, you're right, I didn't really mean to imply causality there - I probably should have used "epicenter" rather than "source" in my original statement.
   71. Spahn Insane Posted: August 12, 2014 at 07:22 PM (#4769800)
Now... Riot Fest... I guess it's a whole lot of bands a bit past their prime, but there are more than a few that are still relevant.

This year's Riot Fest lineup blows Lolla's out of the water. I'm definitely looking forward to it (though they jacked up the prices this year, such that I didn't spring for the VIP tickets. $375 for a 3-day VIP pass? F that.)

The wife likes Lolla, and went for 2 days of it this year. I haven't been since 1992, when it was a whole different creature of course, but it doesn't sound much like my scene.
   72. TFTIO is familiar with the works of Pablo Neruda Posted: August 13, 2014 at 02:52 AM (#4769952)
I haven't been to a festival since (hipster alert!) the Touch & Go 25th anniversary. I'm too old and cranky any longer, and these bands today. Sheesh.
   73. Lassus Posted: August 13, 2014 at 09:50 AM (#4770026)
The wife likes Lolla, and went for 2 days of it this year. I haven't been since 1992

1991 Irvine Meadows. Incredibly fun.
   74. BDC Posted: August 13, 2014 at 09:57 AM (#4770035)
I actually went to Austin City Limits two years ago. Long story, and I didn't hear any of the name acts, but it was a fun and goofy experience on the fringes. And I must come in dead last in any BBTF Hipness Sweepstakes.

   75. BDC Posted: August 13, 2014 at 10:02 AM (#4770046)
You guys actually buy beer at baseball games?

It's an association for me: hot weather, the ballpark atmosphere, freedom, wasting time before the game. I love my beer.

I do not drink at the Cowboys stadium: I hate the beer there; it's indoors; the weather is cooler; and I never developed the assocation football + alcohol = fun. I never even smuggled a flask into games when I was an undergraduate at Michigan State. It seemed to me a shortcut to hypothermia.

I don't drink after a baseball game starts. That way 3½ hours later I am well and truly sober to drive home.

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