Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Friday, June 16, 2017

The Era of Position Players Pitching

Some interesting numbers in this article:

Yesterday, toward the end of an absolute thrashing at the hands of the Twins, the Mariners sent Carlos Ruiz to the mound… The day before, the tables were turned, and as the Mariners were maiming the Twins, the Twins sent out Chris Gimenez to pitch. A few days before, the Padres used Erick Aybar. The day before that, the Phillies used Andres Blanco. The day before that, the Twins used…Chris Gimenez…

Baseball right now finds itself within a number of eras, but among them, this is the era of position players pitching.

 

 

PreservedFish Posted: June 16, 2017 at 08:12 AM | 40 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: fangraphs

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. Jose is El Absurd Bronson Y Pollo Posted: June 16, 2017 at 09:00 AM (#5477293)
It makes sense. In the era of 7-8 man pitching staffs and no movement between AAA and MLB you can't expect to have a fresh pitcher available to eat an inning or two in a blowout all the time.
   2. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: June 16, 2017 at 09:47 AM (#5477332)
This is one of the things that drives me nuts about contemporary baseball. In this era of 8-man bullpens, we increasingly "need" position players to pitch in blowouts to "save the bullpen" because no one's hypercompartmentalized role is "long relief." Position players are even pitching more often in long extra inning games since, once the game goes off-script, managers have burned all 8 of their tactical relievers in innings 7-12 and you don't dare ask tomorrow's starter or the guy on his throw day to do anything outside of their specialized routine.
   3. Davoice of Dapeople Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:04 AM (#5477350)
This Chris Gimemez thing is nuts. He's the Twins backup catcher and he's pitched in FIVE games this year!
   4. JohnQ Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:07 AM (#5477356)
What baseball should really do is evolve away from the notion of a "Starter" and rather think of them all as "Pitchers". You should be able to rotate all your 12-13 pitchers when needed during every game. Wouldn't it be better to have Clayton Kershaw available in a high leverage situation in a 1-1 game in the 7th rather than have him pitch to the bottom of the order in a 5-0 game in the 5th inning?

All Pitchers should be limited to 1 or 2 innings and used flexibly like middle relievers. The best pitchers should appear in 60-70 games a year not 30. Pitchers should be used like they're used in the all star game.
   5. Adam Starblind Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:13 AM (#5477365)
Eh, I'm not smart enough to know if that's a good idea analytically, but as a fan I think it sucks. Plenty of fans come to the park to "see Clayton Kershaw pitch." And they want to see him for 8 innings, not 2 innings as a setup man.

Slightly tangentially, after the 2015 NLDS game in which Kershaw allowed the Mets 3 hits over 7, a radio reporter interviewed me and asked me what was wrong with the Mets' office today. My answer was something along the lines of "are you stupid or something?"
   6. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:15 AM (#5477369)
What baseball should really do is evolve away from the notion of a "Starter" and rather think of them all as "Pitchers". You should be able to rotate all your 12-13 pitchers when needed during every game. Wouldn't it be better to have Clayton Kershaw available in a high leverage situation in a 1-1 game in the 7th rather than have him pitch to the bottom of the order in a 5-0 game in the 5th inning?

All Pitchers should be limited to 1 or 2 innings and used flexibly like middle relievers. The best pitchers should appear in 60-70 games a year not 30. Pitchers should be used like they're used in the all star game.


It won't work.

There's no way to get 200 IP out of your ace in 1-2 innings stints. Pitchers simply can't throw on that many consecutive days. A 60-70 G, 140 IP workload will destroy their arms in short order.

The answer to this is simple. Everyone except your closer and elite set-up guy should be expected, and trained, to throw 2-3 IP per outing.

That's how relievers used to work. If your 3rd-7th RP can all give you 40 G and 80 IP over the season, you've got plenty of arms in a 7 man pen.
   7. Ithaca2323 Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:20 AM (#5477375)
All Pitchers should be limited to 1 or 2 innings and used flexibly like middle relievers. The best pitchers should appear in 60-70 games a year not 30.


Except in your scenario, Kershaw throws just 75-120 innings. Even though they're high leverage innings, I suspect you're getting less value out of him.

EDIT; Coke to Snapper.
   8. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:30 AM (#5477392)
Except in your scenario, Kershaw throws just 75-120 innings. Even though they're high leverage innings, I suspect you're getting less value out of him.

Not only that, but you don't have enough pitchers. Teams need ~1450 IP. If you're former SPs are now only giving you 100 IP each, you need almost 1000 IP from your bullpen.
   9. AROM Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:48 AM (#5477411)
In 1982 there were 43 pitchers who did not start a game and pitched at least 70 innings.

This group averaged 60 games, 98 innings, and 64 strikeouts. They were led by Bob Stanley, who pitched 48 games and 168 innings (nearly winning the ERA title).

The lower strikeout rate from that era is due to some combination of:

1. Pitchers didn't throw as hard
2. Even relievers had to pace themselves a bit, instead of throwing max effort for one inning
3. Hitters back then put a greater emphasis on putting balls in play
4. Teams selected hitters more for contact than power. Swap Joey Gallo for Ken Oberkfell and multiply a few times across the league

Could relief pitchers succeed today if they didn't throw max effort, didn't strike out everyone, and paced themselves? Thing is, the pitchers that are talented enough to do that and survive aren't in the bullpen. They are starters.

Even if relief pitchers could change their approach and not get hammered today, they would still strike out more batters than their ancestors did, because they are pitching to Gallo, and not Oberkfell. So a 60 game, 100 inning workload in 2017 would still require more pitches than it did in 1982.

It's good that we're asking questions, and we should not assume that the current one inning reliever is optimal. But there may be reasons why going back to workloads of the past won't work anymore.
   10. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: June 16, 2017 at 10:52 AM (#5477413)
Could relief pitchers succeed today if they didn't throw max effort, didn't strike out everyone, and paced themselves? Thing is, the pitchers that are talented enough to do that and survive aren't in the bullpen. They are starters.

I think there's a big difference between a 2+ IP relievers and a starter. The reliever may have to pace himself a bit to face 8-12 batters rather than 4, but he still doesn't have to face the same batter 3 times. That means he can still get by with the lack of pitch variety that characterizes modern RPs.
   11. AROM Posted: June 16, 2017 at 11:06 AM (#5477431)
Hitters pitching in 2017: (unless I missed a few)

15.1 IP, 7 HR, 13 BB, 3 SO. Terrible at all the FIP components. And the BABIP? .236
   12. AROM Posted: June 16, 2017 at 11:09 AM (#5477439)
My list:

Gimenez
Bethancourt
Plawecki
Aybar
M Martinez
Montero
Ruiz
Sardinas
Blanco
   13. Mike Emeigh Posted: June 16, 2017 at 12:10 PM (#5477526)
Mike Freeman, also. BBRef has a nice little option where you can go to the Game Pitching page in Play Index and select Typically a Position Player; it's based on career games played.

Adding in Freeman: 16 1/3 IP, 23 H, 20 R, 17 ER, 13 BB, 3 K, 7 HR, .329/.429/.714 BA/OBP/SLG, .267 BABIP. Usually the BABIP for non-pitchers pitching is much higher than for regular pitchers, around .350 or so.

EDIT: Forgot the one sac fly - the BABIP is actually .262, not .267.

-- MWE

   14. GGC for Sale Posted: June 16, 2017 at 12:18 PM (#5477534)
Who was the last pitcher to pace himself like the old timers did? Was it Livan Hernandez?
   15. Joyful Calculus Instructor Posted: June 16, 2017 at 12:23 PM (#5477540)
[11] That seems to vindicate Voros' Law.
   16. AROM Posted: June 16, 2017 at 01:14 PM (#5477580)
Usually the BABIP for non-pitchers pitching is much higher than for regular pitchers, around .350 or so.


I've looked at that before, but don't remember seeing anything like that.

For 2010-2017, its .264. That's 137 pitcher-games, 134 innings, 5.70 ERA, 65 BB, 44 SO, 32 HR

If I take out Jason Lane, who actually converted to a pitcher, it changes to:

.269 BABIP, 124 IP, 65 bb, 38 so, 31 hr, 6.10 ERA
   17. Ziggy: The Platonic Form of Russell Branyan Posted: June 16, 2017 at 01:18 PM (#5477583)
Position players pitching is fun but should never happen. Just swap in your 5th starter. Call up some guy from AAA and demote #5 starter after the game to give him some rest. And if he's pitching on zero days rest and dies after the game, so what, he's a 5th starter. Even with no rest he's probably a better pitcher than your backup catcher (or Adam Dunn).
   18. Mike Emeigh Posted: June 16, 2017 at 02:04 PM (#5477631)
I've looked at that before, but don't remember seeing anything like that.

For 2010-2017, its .264. That's 137 pitcher-games, 134 innings, 5.70 ERA, 65 BB, 44 SO, 32 HR


I looked at it back in the 2000s, when position players pitching was less common, so it may just be small sample size variance. The HR rate is pretty high now.

One thing at which I should look again is whether pitchers with high BABIPs in the minors are still washing out more frequently. Clay Dsvenport did a study about 10 years ago which suggested that they were.

-- MWE
   19. AROM Posted: June 16, 2017 at 03:27 PM (#5477717)
I only get .260 for the 2002-2009 period. I picked those years 1) not to overlap with what I looked at in 2010-2017 and 2) after most of Rick Ankiel's pitching career was over.

Definitely fewer occurrences. Once I removed Ankiel and Brooks Keishnick (who is more than half of the total games) I'm left with:

36.3 innings 21 bb 12 so 6 hr .260 babip

I debated David McCarty and ended up leaving him in. If I remove him babip chances to .263

My theory is the babip is suppressed in this group by having too many of the hardest hit balls flying out of the yard and removing themselves from the calculation.
   20. BDC Posted: June 16, 2017 at 04:36 PM (#5477789)
It's all kinda weird. We've had a few threads recently about two-way players, but I wouldn't have thought the leading edge of the trend would be Chris Gimenez on the mound.

For one thing, there's an injury risk. We hear a lot about the fragility of pitchers and how they can never be exposed to batting, baserunning, fielding, or lifting objects heavier than a gallon of milk; but what about Gimenez' arm? I remember Jose Canseco derailing his by-then-goofy career after a pitching stint.

I would have thought that there would be more of a trend in the other direction: using pitchers in the outfield, maybe 3B or even SS, to fill in as utility men in odd situations. (Short benches, need for PH or PR, consequent loss of the utility man, etc.) Much less chance of a pitcher getting injured playing a couple innings in RF than of a fourth outfielder pitching an inning.

But maybe this is why I am an idiot on the Internet and not a baseball front-office guy :)
   21. Baldrick Posted: June 16, 2017 at 05:19 PM (#5477835)
For one thing, there's an injury risk. We hear a lot about the fragility of pitchers and how they can never be exposed to batting, baserunning, fielding, or lifting objects heavier than a gallon of milk; but what about Gimenez' arm? I remember Jose Canseco derailing his by-then-goofy career after a pitching stint.

Gimenez is quite literally a replacement level player. I don't think they're super worried about the very minor danger to his arm that might result from him occasionally eating some innings in a blowout.
Position players pitching is fun but should never happen. Just swap in your 5th starter. Call up some guy from AAA and demote #5 starter after the game to give him some rest. And if he's pitching on zero days rest and dies after the game, so what, he's a 5th starter. Even with no rest he's probably a better pitcher than your backup catcher (or Adam Dunn).

Um, what?
   22. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: June 16, 2017 at 05:37 PM (#5477862)
Much less chance of a pitcher getting injured playing a couple innings in RF than of a fourth outfielder pitching an inning.

Ryan Goins missed a month of last season with "forearm tightness" after being pressed into service in a 19-inning game against Cleveland. His inning ended on a double-play ball hit by...... Chris Gimenez.

And now you know the rest of the story.
   23. PASTE does not get put on waivers in August Posted: June 16, 2017 at 06:06 PM (#5477889)
I've been advocating the routine use of position players as pitchers to finish out blowouts for years. I'm surprised there's such resistance to the idea now that some managers are going that route. Or is it really resistance to modern 1-2 batter relievers?
   24. Walt Davis Posted: June 16, 2017 at 07:03 PM (#5477905)
In response to the general question of "where's the long reliever?" He probably came on in the 3rd. When you lose 15-2 (or whatever), it's not usually a case where the game was 2-2 in the 7th. The starter went 2, the long guy went 3, the AAA kid went 2 now will be optioned, you hoped your #6 reliever would give you 2 but he got whacked for 5 runs in the 8th and now you don't want to use a real pitcher.

The average deficit in Gimenez's 5 games this year is 10 runs (man the Twins get blown out a lot). His last appearance:

starter: 3.2, 9 R
R1: 1.1, 1 R (on 3 H, 2 BB, 43 pitches)
R2: 2, 0 R (23 pitches)
R3: 1, 2 R (19 pitches) -- Craig Breslow, a name I recognize
CG: 1, 2 R (20 pitches)

The game before was a 13-8 slugfest that they lost in an NL park (so PHs for Ps). They used 5 relievers in that game including (surprisingly) all 3 of the guys they used in the next day's blowout. Over those 2 games, Breslow gave them 2 IP and 7 R. R1 threw 11 pitches to get 1 out in game 1 (2 BB).

This is partly what happens when relievers 6-8 don't pitch well. R1 is already back in AAA. R2 pitched well and Breslow was a disaster.

2017 is on pace for about 540-550 relief innings on average. That's up 50 innings from the previous 10 seasons or so. Essentially we've gone from 7 relief slots throwing 70 innings each to 8 throwing just under 70. And that's the average, teams with extra crappy, less durable, injured starters will probably end up having to cover 600. Last year's leaders were the Dodgers at 591 followed by Pit at 585 and Cincy at 583.

That load is not usually spread around evenly. Closers usually aren't much above 60 innings these days. If your set-up guys are healthy, they aren't likely to top 70 innings either. The Dodgers did spread their load pretty evenly with Jensen taking 69, Blanton 80 and Baez 74 but that still left 370 innings for the other 5 slots (74 per). They used 21 different pitchers in relief to cover those innings, 13 of them exclusively relievers. But this included two LOOGYs -- Howell with 64 GR and 51 IP and Liberatore with 58 GR and 43 IP. That's nearly 2 whole slots to cover less than 100 innings.

So now you've got 276 relief IP covered by a little over 3 slots and now we're up to 92 per slot. That's over-stated some because Sept roster expansion is used to eat up garbage time but it's still a heavy load for those guys on the AAA shuttle.

There are still relief _slots_ covering 80-100 innings a year, they're just chopped up among 3-5 individual pitchers over the course of a season. It used to be you'd see a group of AAAA guys with lines like 10 appearance, 15-20 IP. But it seems to me that lately it's been a group of AAAA guys with lines like 20/20. The Dodgers used 6 no-name guys to put together 73 appearances and 77 IP.
   25. smileyy Posted: June 16, 2017 at 08:48 PM (#5477931)
I can't believe how much optimization for 12+ inning games and blowouts is happening in this thread. The modern pitching staff optimizes for the normal case: 9 innings, not a blowout.
   26. PreservedFish Posted: June 16, 2017 at 11:07 PM (#5477982)
I've been advocating the routine use of position players as pitchers to finish out blowouts for years. I'm surprised there's such resistance to the idea now that some managers are going that route.


Yeah, the shortened bullpen is what's driving this, but in reality that this aspect is just as significant. If pitcher innings are truly limited then it is almost certainly good strategy to strategically tank games. Just to take an example from last night - the Angels went into the top of the 9th with a 5 run deficit to the Royals. At that point, according to BR's win expectancy, they had a 99% chance of losing the game. What's the point in using an actual pitcher in that situation? If you're lucky you'll win one such game in a year, but with aggressive tanking you can transfer many innings (50? 100? even more?) away from your relief corps. Used to be that managers would only use a position player with like a 15 run deficit. That number's coming down. Maybe it should be a lot lower.

Clearly, teams don't want to carry a mopup guy anymore. Two nights ago the Rangers hit 0% win expectancy in the 6th inning. They brought in Dillon Gee, let him finish the game, and then booted him to AAA after the game. The Nationals were in the same situation, and went a different direction - they gave an inning each to three disappointing relievers (Treinen, Turner, Blanton). Neither of these solutions seem optimal when compared with the admittedly embarrassing expedient of allowing your backup catcher to get flayed alive as a pitcher.
   27. Ziggy: The Platonic Form of Russell Branyan Posted: June 16, 2017 at 11:34 PM (#5477987)
The place where position players pitching is a bad idea isn't the blowouts, it's the very long games. If it's the 19th inning and you bring in your backup catcher you're basically conceding the game (and saying "sorry about wasting the last seven hours folks"). Those are the games where it's important to have a long reliever, even if your long reliever is just a starter whom you can option to AAA (and replace with another AAA starter) after the game.
   28. Brian White Posted: June 16, 2017 at 11:46 PM (#5477990)
If it's the 19th inning and you bring in your backup catcher you're basically conceding the game (and saying "sorry about wasting the last seven hours folks").


Brent Mayne has no idea what you're talking about.
   29. DavidFoss Posted: June 17, 2017 at 01:01 AM (#5477999)
If it's the 19th inning and you bring in your backup catcher you're basically conceding the game (and saying "sorry about wasting the last seven hours folks").

You could argue that that is not a bug, it is a feature. At some point it has to get easier to score. Running out of pitchers or relievers getting tired is part of what gets an extra inning game to finally end. Especially if teams have depleted lineups because they pinch-ran for their slugger in the 11th.
   30. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: June 17, 2017 at 09:55 AM (#5478025)

I'd love to see what would happen if more pitchers held back a bit and didn't exert max effort as often as they do now. Hitters seem better today than they used to be (relative to pitchers), so my first instinct is to think that most pitchers couldn't survive that way in today's game. On the other hand, you'd have fewer pitcher injuries, and the healthy guys would be able to go more innings, so you'd have fewer innings pitched by bad pitchers (and position players).

Much less chance of a pitcher getting injured playing a couple innings in RF than of a fourth outfielder pitching an inning.

This is true, although I recall that Mariano Rivera missed a season after tearing his ACL shagging fly balls before a game.
   31. RMc and the Respective Punishments Posted: June 17, 2017 at 11:15 AM (#5478032)
It's hilarious that teams have a bullpen full of relief pitchers, and they still have to bring in a position player to pitch!
   32. Misirlou doesn't live in the restaurant Posted: June 17, 2017 at 11:18 AM (#5478033)
Swap Joey Gallo for Ken Oberkfell and multiply a few times across the league


Heh. Gallo has 165 K in 392 PA and a 96 career OPS+. Oberkfell had 356 K in 5528 PA and a career 97 OPS+.
   33. PASTE does not get put on waivers in August Posted: June 17, 2017 at 11:24 AM (#5478035)
On the other hand, you'd have fewer pitcher injuries,


There is no evidence that pitchers are getting hurt any more now than they were in 1950 or 1975. Nor any less, for that matter.
   34. base ball chick Posted: June 17, 2017 at 12:24 PM (#5478051)
it makes very good sense to bring in some backup position player in a blowout ESPECIALLY if the bullpen is all tired out.

your starter in his throwing day - assuming he hasn't already thrown, usually is good for 1, maybe 2 innings

what i think is the MOST interesting is that these players are pretty much pitching to contact - like BITGOD - and in spite of having no 96 MPH stuff or killer curve/splitter/slider, and throwing in the 70s/80s, they are STILL getting freaking ML hitters out. and they even pick up a few strikeouts

you would think they would be pitching essentially BP - so how on earth does a MAJOR LEAGUE hitter not hit this weakass stuff?

a few of my favorite memories are bradley ausmus playing 2B/SS a few times and actually being pretty darn good. not gold glove good, but incredibly better than you would think. and, of course, roy oswalt playing LF in an extra inning tie

i am always hoping to see a pitcher who is put in to pinch hit in one of those incredibly long tie games hit a walkoff
   35. Nero Wolfe, Indeed Posted: June 17, 2017 at 01:00 PM (#5478060)
I have always enjoyed seeing position players coming in to pitch. There is something Mitty-esque about it. It's the closest we get to the fantasy we've all had about being called from the stands in the 19th to pitch an inning and be the hero.
   36. PASTE does not get put on waivers in August Posted: June 17, 2017 at 01:07 PM (#5478061)
Doesn't a starter on this throw day generally do his throwing before the game?
   37. base ball chick Posted: June 17, 2017 at 01:35 PM (#5478072)
PASTE does not get put on waivers in August Posted: June 17, 2017 at 01:07 PM (#5478061)

Doesn't a starter on this throw day generally do his throwing before the game?


- i think so
however, if the bulpen has been beat to heck i think the manager might could ask the starter to throw later on in case they might could need him for an inning or 2

i remember phil garner doing this with both roy oswalt and andy pettitte back in 04/05
   38. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: June 17, 2017 at 03:03 PM (#5478095)
I can't believe how much optimization for 12+ inning games and blowouts is happening in this thread. The modern pitching staff optimizes for the normal case: 9 innings, not a blowout.

I've read about Earl Weaver that he would obsess over who the 25th guy on the roster would be as Weaver would imagine all sorts of what-if scenarios that could happen in a game and he wanted to have the optimal roster for whatever might happen. Blowouts and long games are not an entirely unheard of situation and the problem with optimizing for the standard script of a game is it leads to calls for nonsense like ghost runners on 2nd to start the 12th inning or whatever.
   39. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 17, 2017 at 03:22 PM (#5478100)
i am always hoping to see a pitcher who is put in to pinch hit in one of those incredibly long tie games hit a walkoff


Earl Wilson pinch hit a walk-off home run in the 13th inning for the Tigers in 1966.
   40. Adam Starblind Posted: June 17, 2017 at 04:58 PM (#5478131)
what i think is the MOST interesting is that these players are pretty much pitching to contact - like BITGOD - and in spite of having no 96 MPH stuff or killer curve/splitter/slider, and throwing in the 70s/80s, they are STILL getting freaking ML hitters out. and they even pick up a few strikeouts


Todd Zeile was a knuckleballer. It didn't work, but still.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Phil Birnbaum
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogOTP 26 June 2017: Confederations Cup shows how sports media in Russia differs from politics
(696 - 8:30am, Jun 29)
Last: ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick

NewsblogCENTRAL PARK - JULY 1, 2017 10 AM - BBTF ANNUAL SOFTBALL EXTRAVAGANZA
(309 - 8:26am, Jun 29)
Last: Hysterical & Useless

NewsblogLet's Do the Math on Miguel Montero and Jake Arrieta
(13 - 8:21am, Jun 29)
Last: homerwannabee

NewsblogSABR 47 - NYC
(21 - 8:18am, Jun 29)
Last: djordan

NewsblogMiguel Montero after Cubs cut him: ‘People can’t handle the truth’ – Chicago Sun-Times
(25 - 8:03am, Jun 29)
Last: Renegade (((JE)))

NewsblogOT-NBA off season thread
(163 - 7:55am, Jun 29)
Last: Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant

NewsblogAs the Tigers falter, Justin Verlander emerges as an intriguing trade possibility
(25 - 7:39am, Jun 29)
Last: Never Give an Inge (Dave)

Gonfalon CubsMeh
(62 - 4:50am, Jun 29)
Last: Moses Taylor, Unwavering Optimist

NewsblogOMNICHATTER needs no reason, just space, for June 28, 217
(94 - 1:28am, Jun 29)
Last: Shredder

NewsblogOT: Summer Soccer Thread 2017
(102 - 10:20pm, Jun 28)
Last: Textbook Editor

NewsblogRon Darling rips Mets’ muscle-head trainers as a ‘joke’ | New York Post
(25 - 10:11pm, Jun 28)
Last: Howie Menckel

NewsblogThe education of New York Yankees prospect Clint Frazier
(6 - 8:57pm, Jun 28)
Last: You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR)

NewsblogDodgers rookie Cody Bellinger has never heard of 'Seinfeld,' teammates hilariously respond
(190 - 8:10pm, Jun 28)
Last: Dog on the sidewalk

NewsblogSprint Speed shows fastest at each position | MLB.com
(40 - 6:57pm, Jun 28)
Last: cardsfanboy

NewsblogMiguel Montero shifts blame to pitchers after Nationals steal seven bases - Chicago Tribune
(75 - 6:40pm, Jun 28)
Last: Cargo Cultist

Page rendered in 0.3167 seconds
47 querie(s) executed