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Friday, August 26, 2011

The Hurricane Irene Thread

There was the Swine Flu thread, so why not the Hurricane thread. Isn’t that right, New York Mets and the rest of the Northeast teams?

The New York Mets say they have postponed Saturday and Sunday’s games against the Atlanta Braves because of Hurricane Irene.

Both games will be rescheduled as a single-admission doubleheader on Sept. 8 beginning at 4:10 p.m.

Major League Baseball already had moved Sunday’s games at Philadelphia and Boston to Saturday to make them part of day-night doubleheaders. The Phillies play the Marlins and the Red Sox play the Athletics.


So to the primates on the Eastern coastal regions- stay safe.

Gamingboy Posted: August 26, 2011 at 08:49 PM | 912 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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   201. dave h Posted: August 28, 2011 at 12:54 PM (#3910708)
Hey Joe, didn't realize you are in Taunton. My brother in law is a firefighter there.

We already lost power here in New Haven. We also lost power on the fourth of the july. It may just be my street.

I'm pleased that the power is out and I can still post to btf.
   202. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 12:56 PM (#3910710)
Even if this storm fizzles out, it doesn't mean they shouldn't give as much attention to it. If the storm turns out to be as strong as predicted, it has the potential to kill a significant amount of people, especially if they don't take precautions, like Ray isn't.
   203. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 12:57 PM (#3910711)
I work in Taunton. I live in Lakeville.
   204. Gamingboy Posted: August 28, 2011 at 12:59 PM (#3910712)
Agreed with Joe that they can't be blamed for paying attention to it.

Just think about it: even with all of this attention, lots of people haven't been taking the precautions. Just imagine how few people would take precautions if there HADN'T been all the media attention.

(It's tropical storm now, BTW)
   205. James Newburg is in awe of Cespedes' CORE STRENGTH Posted: August 28, 2011 at 01:02 PM (#3910713)
Winds at 35 mph in Providence, gusting to 50. My girlfriend wants to walk to the neighborhood restaurant for coffee and a breakfast sandwich.
   206. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 01:23 PM (#3910718)
If the wind is at her back, she might arrive at the restaurant quicker than usual.
   207. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 01:31 PM (#3910722)
Getting a little gusty in Cambridge. I can see a few small branches down, and the rain is lighter than yesterday.
   208. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 01:39 PM (#3910724)
At first glance, there has not been much damage in Dupont Circle, although at some point last night a couple of cars collided on the rain-drenched streets and slammed into four or five parked cars, including a (previously) gorgeous Audi S4 convertible.
   209. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2011 at 01:54 PM (#3910732)
I know this makes me an idiot, but this is the first time since I've left NYC that I'm actually sorry I'm gone.
   210. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 01:56 PM (#3910733)
Having taken an extensive survey of my neighborhood by looking out my windows, there doesn't seem to be much damage. Looks like we got lucky.

Although I half-expected Ray's house to be the only one blown down, Hurricane Neddy style.
   211. Gamingboy Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:10 PM (#3910740)

Although I half-expected Ray's house to be the only one blown down, Hurricane Neddy style.



Homer: Oh Lisa, there's no record of a hurricane ever hitting Springfield.
Lisa: Yes, but the records only go back to 1978 when the Hall of Records was mysteriously blown away!
   212. dave h Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:12 PM (#3910742)
I got my rubik's cube out. Turn it topwise! Topwise!
   213. Lassus Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:20 PM (#3910748)
With his confirmation of lack of danger, I suggest Ray go find a tornado now.
   214. ray james Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:28 PM (#3910752)
Ray, I'll have you know my bathroom was flooded at 6:30 this morning. I had just flushed the toilet and the water pressure was so great, the plastic threaded cap connecting the water line to the tank snapped off as it refilled.

The force of the flow was so great, it was shooting out like a fire hose and aerosoling the air with water droplets, it was difficult for me to find where the water was coming from at first. What a mess.
   215. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:30 PM (#3910753)
187. RayDiPerna Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:38 AM (#3910691)
6:30am and it's been business as usual for me.


Yup, you are still an #######.
   216. Repoz Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:41 PM (#3910758)
Storm-drained TV reporter before...

"There are different people dead from this hurricane!"
   217. bobm Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:43 PM (#3910759)
[196] There's a good amount of wind in Bristol, CT.

Actually, someone left the door open at ESPN and all the hot air is escaping.
   218. Karl from NY Posted: August 28, 2011 at 02:53 PM (#3910762)
Man, I slept through the best part. Now the skies are lightening, the rain is down to a mist, and the wind is down to maybe 30 mph gusts. Never lost power as far as I can tell. I just walked out to have a look around, and the Hudson isn't really any visibly higher than normal.

But before we start slamming the overhype, let's remember that it really could have been worse. It weakened so much by the time it hit NYC, because the center went over land for a large stretch in NJ starting from Atlantic City. (source: the wunderground.com map of the storm track's center.) A few miles east, well within the margin of error for any forecasts, and we would have gotten hurricane strength.
   219. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:12 PM (#3910773)
I've never seen so many disappointed reporters.

Hey, get over here for a story...a Schwinn just blew over in the tenement yard!


Yeah, that's why I noted the bird that they were following at one point. The whole thing took on a Capone's Vault kind of feel to it.
   220. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:15 PM (#3910777)
But before we start slamming the overhype, let's remember that it really could have been worse. It weakened so much by the time it hit NYC, because the center went over land for a large stretch in NJ starting from Atlantic City. (source: the wunderground.com map of the storm track's center.) A few miles east, well within the margin of error for any forecasts, and we would have gotten hurricane strength.


Well, there's a reason why the NYC area doesn't typically see major hurricanes.

This was nothing more than a heavy rain storm for us. I hate to say I told you so, but... no, I like saying that.
   221. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:15 PM (#3910778)
I think I see the sun about to peek out from behind the clouds.
   222. Karl from NY Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:19 PM (#3910780)
No, that's just your own overinflated head.
   223. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:22 PM (#3910781)
No, it was the sun. It's now out.
   224. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:23 PM (#3910782)
Not too bad on the Upper East Side. I saw one downed tree on top of an SUV. Another foot or 2 of surge and Roosevelt Island would have been under water. There was some minor flooding on the FDR. We definitely missed the worst of it.
   225. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:29 PM (#3910791)
Stay far away from that bird, Ray. It's probably got a nasty H5N1 flu.
   226. STEAGLES is all out of bubblegum Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:33 PM (#3910797)
But before we start slamming the overhype, let's remember that it really could have been worse. It weakened so much by the time it hit NYC, because the center went over land for a large stretch in NJ starting from Atlantic City. (source: the wunderground.com map of the storm track's center.) A few miles east, well within the margin of error for any forecasts, and we would have gotten hurricane strength.
i think the other big factor was that the storm picked up speed as it headed north. if the storm had moved as slow over new york as it did over virginia, you'd have been hammered just as hard. because it passed quicker, you got a weaker storm surge and less volume of rainfall resulting in flooding that was less than it could have been.


then again, when all the rain from upstate starts to flow down the rivers, you'll get hit with that, too, so it might be a bit early to start sucking each others dicks just yet.
   227. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:36 PM (#3910800)
then again, when all the rain from upstate starts to flow down the rivers, you'll get hit with that, too, so it might be a bit early to start sucking each others dicks just yet.

The Hudson valley is supposed to get hammered when the rain off starts hitting the river. Jersey, too.
   228. Joey B. is being stalked by a (Gonfa) loon Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:40 PM (#3910804)
I'm with Ray. Let's face it: New York bought all the ridiculous, over-the-top media type and dramatically overreacted to something that turned out to be nothing all that special.

What's so funny is that this is the city that likes to think of itself as the meanest, toughest, baddest city in the world. Of course practically the entire country at some point along the way turned into a bunch of pussified, hysterical drama queens, and New York is no different.
   229. dave h Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:44 PM (#3910808)
The thing with this storm is there was a huge disconnect between the coverage and the data/projections. Here in ct, the weather service never projected more than a 10% chance of a hurricane, but the weather channel maps made it look like a decent hurricane was the most likely result. Better safe than sorry (and that's why I did some basic prep) but overdoing the story might make some people tune it out the next time.
   230. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:51 PM (#3910815)
Let's face it: New York bought all the ridiculous, over-the-top media type and dramatically overreacted to something that turned out to be nothing all that special.
Of course, a lot of what seems like silly overreaction ended up serving the city very well. Shutting down the trains seems absurd, of course, but two major train yards (Coney Island and Upper Manhattan) flooded.
   231. Gamingboy Posted: August 28, 2011 at 03:54 PM (#3910818)
It's better to overreact than to underreact. It's true everywhere.
   232. The Id of SugarBear Blanks Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:02 PM (#3910822)
The wall-to-wall coverage on every major over-the-air channel yesterday -- starting before noon -- bordered on abuse of the public airwaves.
   233. The Ghost fouled out, but stays in the game Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:04 PM (#3910824)
On CNN, they said it's hard to cover a flash flood, because by the time you drive to it, it's gone.

It's gone, or you are, pal.
   234. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:10 PM (#3910826)
In my lifetime of consuming weather predictions, I don't remember them underselling an event, not once. They present worst-case scenarios as most-likely, and I can't say that I really disagree with that policy.

If this sort of thing convinces a small confederacy of dunces to ignore all weather warnings, then it'll eventually thin their numbers a bit.

And it's not true everywhere, Gamingboy. I can think of at least ten industries where overreaction is a far greater danger than underreaction, particularly for management.
   235. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:14 PM (#3910829)
OK, then. It's better to over-prepare than to under-prepare.

Nobody was holding a gun to my head, forcing me to buy eggs or watch CNN.
   236. dave h Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:15 PM (#3910830)
This is similar to lying about the side effects of pot because you didn't trust your kids to avoid it if you tell the truth. At some point you lose credibility. If someone exaggerates over and over again, you're not a dunce if you stop listening to them.
   237. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:20 PM (#3910833)
The media covered this hurricane the way they cover everything now--breathless hysterics. #228 is their primary audience despite their professed hatred of the hysterics, said hatred often described in hysterics. My girl was flipping between channels for coverage and NY1 did the the best job. Cool and collected, generally. The "major networks" kept trying to over dramatize everything. I've come up with my "baseball cap test" for these things now. If the reporter's baseball cap stays on their head then they are full of #### about how bad the storm is. I'm fine with the city's over-preparation. Hopefully I can get to work tomorrow but it's no tragedy if I can't. Anyway, the whole thing has been anti-climactic and half of me is grateful for that and the devilish part of me is disappointed.
   238. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:23 PM (#3910836)
If someone exaggerates over and over again, you're not a dunce if you stop listening to them.


Yes you are. Just because they can't tell you with 100% accuracy what's going to happen to you doesn't mean that nothing whatsoever is coming.
   239. Gamingboy Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:23 PM (#3910837)
And it's not true everywhere, Gamingboy. I can think of at least ten industries where overreaction is a far greater danger than underreaction, particularly for management.


I sort of meant my "true everywhere" thing in the location sense.

As in, "It's unlikely that a major hurricane would hit New York City, but it's a good idea to be prepared."
Or, "It's unlikely that there will be a Earthquake in the Midwest, but more should be done to prepare."
Or, "It's unlikely that a tornado would hit downtown Chicago, but it's possible, preparations should be made."


Stuff like that. There are at least two documentary series that are based entirely on the premise that people have no idea how bad some worst case scenarios could be if people or governments didn't listen to warnings. There was a big National Geographic issue about how screwed up New Orleans would be if a major hurricane hit it, and after Katrina they basically ran a article where they quoted heavily from the first article and say what they got right and wrong.
   240. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:26 PM (#3910839)
Shooty, here in SEMASS a reporters hat blew off her head into the raging sea, in Marion, MA.

And a male reporters hat blew off in Westport, MA. Now what?
   241. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:26 PM (#3910840)
The decision to shut down the subway was sound, of course, but some wondered at the time why it was scheduled for yesterday at noon and not a mere four or five hours later.
   242. The District Attorney Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:29 PM (#3910843)
What about asteroid preparation? It's not too likely to happen, but if it does, we're all dead!

Tauntons are more important for a snowstorm than a hurricane.
This was good.
   243. DKDC Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:29 PM (#3910845)
The media coverage was and always is shameful. Watching this morning, they almost seemed disappointed the storm was weaker than expected.

However, there was real science behind this one that projected a significant chance of a seriously dangerous storm. Refusing to prepare or heed the official warnings out of some silly sense of macho non-chalance is as stupid as overhyped entertainment news.
   244. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:35 PM (#3910854)
Yes, DKDC. You prepare for a bad storm, and watch the news with the sound off until something unusual appears on the screen.
   245. Gamingboy Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:37 PM (#3910856)
What about asteroid preparation? It's not too likely to happen, but if it does, we're all dead!


There are ideas. Some of which would actually be possible now if enough capital was thrown at them.
   246. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:38 PM (#3910857)
The reckless placing of a Fox5-DC reporter on the Ocean City boardwalk in the middle of the storm inspired perhaps the most stupid Twitter hashtag in recent days: #seafoam
   247. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:40 PM (#3910859)
The decision to shut down the subway was sound, of course, but some wondered at the time why it was scheduled for yesterday at noon and not a mere four or five hours later.

Yes. No reason not to shut it down at 10 PM instead.
   248. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:46 PM (#3910868)
No reason not to shut it down at 10 PM instead.
Except for the only reason to shut it at noon, namely that shutting down the subway isn't like flipping a switch, it takes ~8 hours. So if you started at 10 PM, it would still be in progress as the storm arrives. So with reasonable caution, the latest they could've done a shutdown was 2-3 yesterday afternoon.
   249. Karl from NY Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:47 PM (#3910870)
The decision to shut down the subway was sound, of course, but some wondered at the time why it was scheduled for yesterday at noon and not a mere four or five hours later.


1) The last runs began at noon. Some of the longer subway lines take nearly 2 hours for a full trip, and LIRR and Metro-North take well over 3 hours to their outermost reaches.

2) Then the equipment has to be moved to yards or other safe places.

3) Then the workers have to get home or to some storm shelter somehow, with the transit not running by definition.

4) There was a lot of rain even ahead of the center of the hurricane, with that front coming in from the northwest. The hurricane peaked in NYC at 9 am today but the bulk of the rain came well before that.

All in all, the noon shutdown was about right. There's a lot more to an operation of that magnitude than you might think. (Coke to RB, though I explained in more detail.)
   250. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:52 PM (#3910874)
Wrong thread
   251. Yonder Alonso in misguided trousers (cardinal) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:52 PM (#3910875)
The real question now for the MTA is how long it'll take to get the trains (and buses) running again. Everything I've heard says that it won't be back until probably tomorrow afternoon-- certainly not by the morning commute.

On the Upper East Side, things look okay (of course, I'm just looking out my window). On the other hand, I have no hot water, but that happens in my building after most big storms.
   252. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:57 PM (#3910879)
As far as I can tell, the MBTA has been shut down for...no reason whatsoever.

North of Boston, it's not even windy. And it's not raining. And there's nothing in the radar that suggests we're going to have more rain.

FYI the storm hit NYC as a tropical storm.
   253. Howie Menckel Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:58 PM (#3910880)
I realize that this may surprise some, but the New York City-area television stations also are seen in places like, oh, New Jersey, where this is the first hurricane to hit land in the state since 1903 (and before that, 1821).

Hoboken was so indundated with rain last night that they had to evacuate their own shelter to ship those folks to the Izod Center in the Meadowlands. The city is closed to incoming traffic, and no one can drive on the local streets, either. Record flooding of many rivers are expected in the next 48 hours, with awful results to come. Sections of many highways remain impassable.

Not exactly a yawner over here.
   254. jack the seal clubber (on the sidelines of life) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:59 PM (#3910882)
I've never seen so many disappointed reporters.

Hey, get over here for a story...a Schwinn just blew over in the tenement yard!


Yeah, that's why I noted the bird that they were following at one point. The whole thing took on a Capone's Vault kind of feel to it.


The media covered this hurricane the way they cover everything now--breathless hysterics


Plus Chris Christie scolding the yankees up in NJ, and the reporter in Va Beach becoming indignant about the people running around there..
This was a major disappointment for the weather channel and networks; when they play something up, damn it, they expect results, and not just a few flooded houses and unfortunate people getting hit by trees. They want Armageddon and broadcasting awards.
I have no issue with warning the public as to danger; I do have an issue with them refusing to admit that the degree of hysteria (Shooty is right in categorizing it as this) they present is overblown, and then admonishing the viewer repeatedly that "don't think that because it's just a Category 1 it's not dangerous! Listen to us! You stupid #####!".
   255. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2011 at 04:59 PM (#3910883)
My family in North Jersey was evacuated last night. I'm assuming they're fine, but I don't know about the property damage to my parents' home yet.
   256. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:01 PM (#3910884)
RB/Karl, even a mid-afternoon subway shutdown would have helped out the many business owners who are now probably SOL until Tuesday morning.
   257. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:01 PM (#3910885)
It looks like the rain has ended in SEMASS, leaving only wind. It's pretty windy. Pretty, pretty windy.
   258. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:04 PM (#3910887)
Sustained winds at 30+ mph. Not too bad, but trees and branches have come down.
   259. dave h Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:06 PM (#3910890)
Tve, if someone lies to you repeatedly, I would say the dunce is the person who does listen. The weather chanell could have presented the projections honestly. Instead, they presented worst case scenarios as median projections. I could only figure this out by comparing with the nws website. Using that data they could have said "10% chance of hurricane landfall, stay inside when it gets close and make sure to have a couple days of food and water. Some areas could be at risk of flooding." Instead, they sent a reporter out to try to induce panic and had him embarrassed by people running around in their swim suits.
   260. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:07 PM (#3910891)
It looks like the rain has ended in SEMASS


So I should expect wind, north of the city?
   261. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:09 PM (#3910892)
Instead, they presented worst case scenarios as median projections


They didn't want to get sued.
   262. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:09 PM (#3910893)
The rain stopped here in northern Westchester right around noon. No sun yet, wind hasn't been anything like as bad as I expected (though I have no idea how to judge wind speed). Lot of standing water out on the lawn, due to the pre-soaked condition of the ground before the rain started yesterday. I'm going to bake some cookies, then head out to check that the car is okay, and to buy some bananas. Phew! Busy day!
   263. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:09 PM (#3910894)
Someone really could write a pretty good book about this, though. Once upon a time it rained. The end.
   264. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:10 PM (#3910895)
They didn't want to get sued.


Sued?
   265. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:12 PM (#3910896)
Tve, if someone lies to you repeatedly, I would say the dunce is the person who does listen.


I think this is true. But you originally said "eggagerates", which is a completely different phenomenon.
   266. aleskel Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:15 PM (#3910897)
Looks like we avoided major damage here in Astoria, aside from a few scattered power outages (this being Queens, that's not a surprise). I didn't see any downed trees in my short walk around the neighborhood.

I have no problem with the MTA shutting down the trains so early, I doubt there were that many people who weren't planning on sticking to their homes/immediate neighborhoods after noon yesterday. Plus, considering the MTA's abysmal finances, they have every reason to play it conservatively and not risk any more expensive damage.
   267. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:15 PM (#3910898)
Sued?


Maybe this is wrong, but I keep thinking that they're hedging against the storm actually being worse than expected. If they tell it like it is, and then the storm is worse than expected, wouldn't they run the risk of people suing them claiming they weren't warned?
   268. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:20 PM (#3910900)
It's not windy on the North Shore, Drew?
   269. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:22 PM (#3910902)
Shooty, here in SEMASS a reporters hat blew off her head into the raging sea, in Marion, MA.

Oh noes! Run. You run for your damned life!
   270. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:22 PM (#3910903)
I'm waiting for a group of BTF denizens to re-appear in the coming days, saying \"#### you guys, we couldn't contribute to your ####### thread because we got ######."
   271. tfbg9 Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:22 PM (#3910904)
Some of the shots of "damage" in the loop on NY1 are mockable.
   272. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:22 PM (#3910905)
@266: FWIW, Cuomo, not Walder, made the decision to shut down the trains and buses.
   273. Ray (RDP) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:23 PM (#3910906)
Maybe this is wrong, but I keep thinking that they're hedging against the storm actually being worse than expected. If they tell it like it is, and then the storm is worse than expected, wouldn't they run the risk of people suing them claiming they weren't warned?


No snark intended: You can't sue a news organization for this. There's no cause of action anyone could sue under. Suing a news org for defamation, yes. Suing a news org for failing to accurately predict the weather, no. A negligence-type cause of action doesn't work, for a variety of reasons.
   274. Gamingboy Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:23 PM (#3910907)
Someone really could write a pretty good book about this, though. Once upon a time it rained. The end.


Worst Cliff Notes Ever!
-Noah
   275. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:23 PM (#3910909)
It's not windy on the North Shore, Drew?


I'm not really north shore, Joe (I'm in Malden), but the winds here are like 20 MPH, tops.
   276. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:24 PM (#3910910)
A negligence-type cause of action doesn't work.


Good to know, thanks Ray. So many of these people are simply fomenting panic.
   277. aleskel Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:27 PM (#3910912)
and FWIW, for all the criticism of the overhyped government warnings, at least in NYC they was mostly focused on potential flooding and downed lines/power outages. Considering both have occurred in some parts of the city, I would say they treated the storm appropriately.
   278. Greg K Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:28 PM (#3910913)
But you originally said "eggagerates", which is a completely different phenomenon.

I'm on your side of this little discussion so don't take this the wrong way, but I just have to say...I don't really know what an "eggagerate" would be, but I do agree it sounds like quite the phenomenon.
   279. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:28 PM (#3910914)
I don't mean to sound callous to anybody who is currently experiencing flooding or power outages (though flooding is assuredly worse). It's just that Boston seems to have (once again) made a mountain out of a molehill.
   280. Joey B. is being stalked by a (Gonfa) loon Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:30 PM (#3910915)
Hoboken was so indundated with rain last night that they had to evacuate their own shelter to ship those folks to the Izod Center in the Meadowlands. The city is closed to incoming traffic, and no one can drive on the local streets, either. Record flooding of many rivers are expected in the next 48 hours, with awful results to come. Sections of many highways remain impassable.

Not exactly unusual for Hoboken, which is very low-lying, with parts of the city below sea level. The whole region has been getting ridiculously high amounts of rainfall for weeks, so this was just the icing on the cake.
   281. dave h Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:32 PM (#3910918)
if you exaggerate enough, you're just lying. If nws says 10% chance of hurricane winds in ct, and you use that to make a figure with a line across ct that says "category one" and you have no explanation that that is not a median projection, then you're lying.

Not everyone did this. The alerts from the city of new haven were remarkably reasonable - they laid out the chance of flooding and power outages, said to use common sense, and gave a number to call with questions.
   282. Greg K Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:34 PM (#3910919)
It sounds like there are two issues here

1) Official Government warnings, which sound like they were well-advised and helped prevent some damage to the city, as well as giving people a heads up.

2) Network coverage, which (shockingly) sensationalized the story

It's like when there's an official bear warning for the area near my family's cottage. I don't take that as the government telling me I'm probably going to die unless I lock myself in a steel box immediately. I take it more as a "dude, take some precautions because if you get killed by a bear after being warned you're going to feel like an idiot".
   283. The District Attorney Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:35 PM (#3910920)
I don't really know what an "eggagerate" would be, but I do agree it sounds like quite the phenomenon.
This?
   284. tshipman Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:36 PM (#3910921)
Good to know, thanks Ray. So many of these people are simply fomenting panic.


I think you misspelled ratings there.



And Katrina was actually worse than what people were projecting.
   285. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:39 PM (#3910922)
I think you misspelled ratings there.


My mistake, I'll do better next time.

And Katrina was actually worse than what people were projecting.


Everywhere?
   286. Joe Bivens, Minor Genius Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:43 PM (#3910924)
Oh, Malden. Malden could use some wind.
   287. Karl from NY Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:47 PM (#3910925)
and FWIW, for all the criticism of the overhyped government warnings, at least in NYC they was mostly focused on potential flooding and downed lines/power outages. Considering both have occurred in some parts of the city, I would say they treated the storm appropriately.


Right. Let's also remember that this thread is subject to a severe selection bias. If you were flooded or lost power, you're not posting here.
   288. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:47 PM (#3910926)
Malden could use some wind.


To blow away...what? The locals?
   289. Drew (Primakov, Gungho Iguanas) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:48 PM (#3910928)
Right. Let's also remember that this thread is subject to a severe selection bias.


Yep.
   290. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2011 at 05:52 PM (#3910930)
The #&(@() ATM is out of money. I just had to credit card a candy bar.
   291. CrosbyBird Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:07 PM (#3910933)
I'm with Ray. Let's face it: New York bought all the ridiculous, over-the-top media type and dramatically overreacted to something that turned out to be nothing all that special.

What's so funny is that this is the city that likes to think of itself as the meanest, toughest, baddest city in the world. Of course practically the entire country at some point along the way turned into a bunch of pussified, hysterical drama queens, and New York is no different.


I bought a case of bottled water and some snacks, checked the batteries in my flashlight, and moved the stuff on my terrace close to the building wall so it wouldn't blow off. That's a ridiculous overreaction? I'm a drama queen?
   292. DKDC Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:12 PM (#3910934)
I bought a case of bottled water and some snacks, checked the batteries in my flashlight, and moved the stuff on my terrace close to the building wall so it wouldn't blow off. That's a ridiculous overreaction? I'm a drama queen?


Frankly, I'm sick of hearing your story already. Go blog about it, you self-obsessed diva.
   293. Howie Menckel Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:16 PM (#3910938)
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/29/nyregion/new-york-expects-lengthy-recovery-of-transit-system.html?_r=1&smid=tw-nytimes&seid=auto

"....an initial survey revealed flooded subway tracks, powerless commuter rail networks and fallen trees and branches that had rendered some rail routes impassable.

The New Haven line of the Metro-North Railroad had no power because of downed wires along its route. Parts of the Metro-North track along the surging Hudson River were flooded. Subway lines in parts of Brooklyn were also inundated."

Is this a common occurrence?
   294. JE (Jason Epstein) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:16 PM (#3910939)
   295. aleskel Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:23 PM (#3910941)
Is this a common occurrence?

As far as the subway, no. The last time there was a major flooding was two (maybe three) years ago when a pump failed during a major rainstorm. If memory serves, they had it fixed within 36 hours.

A big portion of of the tunnels is underneath the water table, so it depends on a lot of constantly operating pumps to keep it clear. I wouldn't be surprised if the problems now have to do with a pump failure, maybe stemming from a power outage.
   296. Hysterical & Useless Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:26 PM (#3910943)
Not a "common" occurrence for subway lines to be inundated, but does happen when there are really heavy rains, ie, every 4 or 5 years maybe. New Haven line runs fairly close to Long Island Sound, and has overhead power lines, so those are always at risk from high winds or (in winter) severe icing. And the Hudson Line in many places is barely above the normal level of the river, so no surprise that might see some water over it. Though those stretches aren't electrified, so once the water subsides a bit they should be good to go.

On the bright side New York, the Mets are now on a 5 day non-losing streak!
   297. smileyy Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:37 PM (#3910947)
It's better to overreact than to underreact.


To individual incidents of unknown severity, yes. To every day happenings, no.
   298. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:40 PM (#3910948)
The most significant damage in my neighborhood appears to be from the people who used the hurricane as cover to jimmy open an ATM, leaving only money bands behind.
   299. Yonder Alonso in misguided trousers (cardinal) Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:41 PM (#3910949)
I don't really know what an "eggagerate" would be, but I do agree it sounds like quite the phenomenon.


An exaggeration of an aggregate, probably.


Anyway, I'm about to go outside and walk a bit around the neighborhood, but I don't expect to see much damage. I am curious though about the construction site across from my building, where-- as of yesterday afternoon at least-- much of the debris hadn't been covered or secured.
   300. TVerik, the gum-snappin' hairdresser Posted: August 28, 2011 at 06:44 PM (#3910951)
The sky is blue! There's sun!
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