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Monday, October 22, 2007

THT: Jaffe: Rob Neyer Interview

It was just your basic cotton, indeed! A nifty interview with Rob.

What’s the angriest feedback you ever got from a column?

The angriest feedback probably came after a column I wrote about Derek Jeter’s defense, I believe in 2001. You always get a lot of e-mail when you write anything negative about the Yankees, so I wasn’t surprised by that reaction. But apparently somebody in the media picked up on the column (which, by the way, was loaded with facts). I believe Suzyn Waldman mentioned it on the air somewhere, and John Sterling and Michael Kay had me on their radio show. What I didn’t know is that the goal apparently was to embarrass me, as the two of them spent most of the time yelling at me. This was my first time on New York radio, and not particularly pleasant. Sterling was particularly nasty. I don’t want to get Kay in trouble or anything, but it’s been more than six years, so I hope he doesn’t mind me saying this . . . Sterling was so rude that Kay e-mailed me the next day to apologize for his partner. I’ve always considered him a mensch for doing that. He certainly didn’t have to.

Repoz Posted: October 22, 2007 at 12:14 PM | 1273 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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   501. Los Angeles Waterloo of Black Hawk Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:25 PM (#2589667)
Shooty, I haven't seen Le Moustache, but I read the novella a few years back. I enjoyed it quite a bit, and am curious to see what tact the movie takes -- it can go absurd and it can go suspenseful, and if it were David Lynch it could do both, but it seemed like there could be a lot of pratfalls for any screen adaptation.
   502. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:26 PM (#2589668)
I greatly enjoyed Anchorman and didn't like Talladega Nights hardly at all. But they're pretty much the same movie, aren't they? But in one I laughed, and in the other I didn't. I don't know how else to explain it.

Marijuana?

I liked Old School, for example, but I was stoned out of my mind. Event Horizon had the same effect. I rarely partake of marijuana, but when I do, I make sure I'm watching a movie. I always like Jaws, but when I saw it once stoned I wanted to form a religion around it. Just say no kids!
   503. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:28 PM (#2589669)
Shooty, I haven't seen Le Moustache, but I read the novella a few years back. I enjoyed it quite a bit, and am curious to see what tact the movie takes -- it can go absurd and it can go suspenseful, and if it were David Lynch it could do both, but it seemed like there could be a lot of pratfalls for any screen adaptation.

I haven't read the novella, but the author made the movie himself which makes it all the more remarkable to me as it was his first film. I don't like to throw around the word genius...
   504. AndrewJ Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:29 PM (#2589671)
AndrewJ, is it me or did Spinal Tap get the number of Fergie Jenkins shutouts wrong? It's in the DVD outtakes.

From what I remember, the drummer (Mick Shrimpton) forgot to mention that Fergie pitched with the Phillies. This may well have resulted in an inaccurate career shutout total.

Albert Brooks is responsible for my single favorite movie scene of all time. It's the climax to Real Life, where he is running around dressed in a clown suit, setting fire to a house and screaming "trust me!"

When Harry Shearer, who cowrote REAL LIFE with Brooks and Monica Johnson, appeared in Philly last year, he said he and Brooks went into production for that movie intending to improvise an ending... what you saw in that scene, in other words, was thought up maybe 15 minutes before it was filmed. Another great film, by the way.
   505. Los Angeles Waterloo of Black Hawk Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:29 PM (#2589672)
Bernal, thanks for fixing the link in 508. Hot stuff.
   506. Van Lingle Mungo Jerry Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:32 PM (#2589676)
Anyone seen "Delicatessen" or "Shakes the Clown"? By far the funniest movies about cannibalism and alcoholic clowns, respectively, ever made.
   507. Los Angeles Waterloo of Black Hawk Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:32 PM (#2589677)
Marijuana?

No, I've never partaken. One movie just has good jokes and the other bad ones.
   508. J. Lowenstein Apathy Club Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:34 PM (#2589680)
perhaps the best of the lot was Slap Shot. It's the best portrait of deindustrialization I've ever seen, and it happens to be a comedy about hockey.

Few movies inhabit their period so well.

Slap Shot, incidentally, was written from a series of stories and anecdotes collected by Ned Dowd, who used to play for John Brophy in the Eastern League. There are probably enough John Brophy stories (most of which were probably told a couple of decades earlier about Eddie Shore) to fill about six screenplays (my favorite, of which I was recently reminded, was Jeff Brubaker smashing Broph's office coffee maker into about 10,000 pieces with his stick after an excruciating practice).

Brophy's from up my way - Nova Scotia - and it's hard to find a hockey guy in the entire province that doesn't have a Broph story.
   509. Steve Treder Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:35 PM (#2589682)
You know, just the other evening my wife and I were discussing the fact that you don't see as many funny movies about cannibalism these days, or about alcoholic clowns, either. Another way in which Hollywood is declining, I guess.
   510. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:38 PM (#2589687)
No, I've never partaken. One movie just has good jokes and the other bad ones.

Fair enough. I haven't seen either so I have no opinion. Mostly Will Farrell does nothing for me though I wish I could enjoy his movies more. I love 80's slob comedies and he seemed like the best hope for bringing them back. Ah well.
   511. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:39 PM (#2589688)
The Wes Anderson movies are interesting; there's a fine line between their genius and their irrelevance, and where each person draws the line is completely different, it seems. I love Rushmore, and I love Tenenbaums a bit more; in both cases I get, relate to, sympathize, and feel with the characters. Bottle Rocket is also very good, though not at the level of these two.

The Life Aquatic, by contrast, seems to have almost nothing to do with human beings. I don't know why -- it has the same trappings as the more successful entries in his ouvre, but somehow fails to gel. The Darjeeling Limited is a step back in the right direction, but only barely; though I thought it was pretty good while I was watching it, thirty minutes later I had forgotten it existed. I haven't thought of it since.


This captures my feelings perfectly (although I like Rushmore more than TRT). Rushmore is perfect IMO, but The Life Aquatic was just unwatchable. Horrible, horrible, soulless movie.
   512. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:42 PM (#2589691)
Anyone seen "Delicatessen" or "Shakes the Clown"? By far the funniest movies about cannibalism

Shaun of the Dead was a pretty funny movie about cannibalism, more of a zombie/cannibalism movie. Delicatessan was pretty funny. The one scene with the big climax was very funny.
   513. sardonic Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:44 PM (#2589693)
Ronin has some great car chases. You know what is a lost art? The footchase, you just never see it anymore


Bourne Ultimatum.
   514. J. Lowenstein Apathy Club Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:46 PM (#2589695)
I suppose I should actually tell the Brubaker story.

Brubaker was playing for Broph at the time with the Nova Scotia Voyageurs, and he and Guy Carbonneau were my idols when I was nine and going to Vees games. Bru was a big, somewhat clumsy forward who didn't skate all that great but had a knack for scoring goals and fighting - in today's league he'd have had a ten-year career in the NHL but in those days he probably couldn't pass the puck well enough.

So the Vees had blown a really brutal road game, and after driving back from God Knows Where the night before, Brophy un-cancelled the mid-morning practice skate. Once the players were on the ice, Broph came out and the trainer brought him a wooden chair. Broph sat down, and stared at the players, whereupon the trainer came back out with a cup of coffee for Broph. Broph orders the Vees to "SKATE!" and starts them doing windsprints up and down the ice. Now remember that Brophy is one of the legendary fighters in the history of the minor pros, and has been known to trade fists with his own players. He's also a very good coach. No one says no to Broph for long.

He continues this until he orders a break, and then the trainer comes out and refills Broph's coffee.

Whereupon Broph starts with "SKATE!" again, and they're doing windsprints again.

Well, I'm told that Broph had about six cups of coffee, sitting on his little chair, while every player slowly melted into the ice. Finally, Broph calls a halt to the practice, everybody collapses into the dressing room, and Brophy - still having said only about fifteen words all day - pulls on his coat, takes his car keys, and leaves.

Whereupon Brubaker takes his stick and proceeds to smash Broph's coffee maker to smithereens. Literally, the story goes, to smithereens - all that's left is little bits of glass and plastic strewn all over Broph's office.

And nothing *ever* gets said about the missing coffee maker.
   515. Tiboreau Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:49 PM (#2589697)
Lots of my favorites have already been mentioned, but I haven't seen a mention of the 3rd silent comedian, Harold Lloyd. The Harold Lloyd comedy set makes for a nice compendium of his stuff--I particularly enjoyed The Kid Brother as well as his classic, Safety Last!.

Also, some of my favorite Hitchcock films are his early ones like The 39 Steps, The Lady Vanishes, Rebecca, Foreign Correspondent.
   516. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:50 PM (#2589699)
The footchase, you just never see it anymore


What are the great footchase movies?

French Connection II
Casino Royale
Marathon Man- No it wasn't safe
Raiders of the Lost Ark
French Connection I (into the subway)

Several Chaplin movies, my favorite is Buster Keaton The Bachelor
   517. asinwreck Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:52 PM (#2589701)
When Harry Shearer, who cowrote REAL LIFE with Brooks and Monica Johnson, appeared in Philly last year, he said he and Brooks went into production for that movie intending to improvise an ending... what you saw in that scene, in other words, was thought up maybe 15 minutes before it was filmed. Another great film, by the way.

It's the perfect climax, and a great takedown of celebrity self-delusion. So many scenes in that film are wonderful ("would it be so wrong to have a Jimmy Caan?") but that's the one that resonates.

Slap Shot, incidentally, was written from a series of stories and anecdotes collected by Ned Dowd, who used to play for John Brophy in the Eastern League. There are probably enough John Brophy stories (most of which were probably told a couple of decades earlier about Eddie Shore) to fill about six screenplays (my favorite, of which I was recently reminded, was Jeff Brubaker smashing Broph's office coffee maker into about 10,000 pieces with his stick after an excruciating practice).

A nice detail is that his sister Nancy (who turned the stories into the screenplay) cast him as the mute terror Oglethorpe.

That script is wonderful. Everything in town is failing, from the mill to the team to Dunlop's marriage, and, it seems, Braden's marriage. Yet Dunlop soldiers on with a smile on his face, battling on the boards as he gets older, lying to his team about their prospects and lying to himself about his ex-wife. He never stops, not even at the parade where he's still holding out hope for Francine. It's a heartbreaking performance, and my favorite of Newman's work. (If I cared about Oscars, he would have won several, including for Slap Shot.)
   518. The Original SJ Posted: October 22, 2007 at 11:57 PM (#2589703)
There is a good footchase in the otherwise unremarkable The Firm
   519. Bernal Diaz has an angel on his shoulder Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:00 AM (#2589704)
How can one discuss footchases without mentioning Scooby Doo on Zombie Island?
   520. Cowboy Popup Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:01 AM (#2589706)
I rarely partake of marijuana, but when I do, I make sure I'm watching a movie.

Shooty, Finding Nemo. When Crush the turtle speaks, you'll understand how Moses felt in the presence of the Burning Bush.
   521. bunyon Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:13 AM (#2589716)
I rarely partake of marijuana, but when I do, I make sure I'm watching a movie.

Anyone seen Liquid Sky? My wife told me it was a good movie - has a signature line in it she used to say every now and then. We were living apart (whatever the term is, she was working on the other side of the continent, we weren't broken up). One night I rented the movie. It was a Tuesday, I'd had a long day at work and was tired. Watched the movie and it was horrible. I mean, unbelievably bad. I told her this and she revealed that she'd only seen it twice and both times she was really stoned and in a large group of college friends. I'd seen it stone cold sober and alone. It's incredible the difference it makes.

Though, "My (unt kills" is still funny.
   522. SouthSideRyan Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:24 AM (#2589719)
Somebody mentioned the worst movies they've ever seen earlier.

Master of Disguise starring Dana Carvey. Only Jennifer Esposito's presence kept me watching it. That and the opinion that it just had to get funny at some point. It was truly awful.
   523. Meatwad Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:24 AM (#2589720)
i havnt seen finding nemo all the way through.

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly has to be the best spaghetti western ever. so much of what westerns use that you see in every movie came from that movie just a great one all around, even though its 3 hours it tells the story well.
   524. pv nasby Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:27 AM (#2589721)
#508: Bastard!
   525. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:27 AM (#2589722)
This thread looks great! Are all 600 posts about movies??

Is Roadwarrior, Mad Max??

EDIT - Has Requium for a Dream been mentioned?? I always turn it on when I need to get in a good mood.

Anyone here like, Zodiac? I heard he shot more footage and could easily watch a 4 hour hour version of that movie.
   526. I am going to be Frank Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:31 AM (#2589725)
The only two movies I have ever walked out on: Tomb Raider and Cabin Boy. I have also have never seen any of the Shrek movies.

Also, Spice World is hilarious on weed.
   527. Los Angeles Waterloo of Black Hawk Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:34 AM (#2589728)
Phil, Zodiac is terrific. It's virtually tied for the best movie I've seen this year (with Ratatouille).
   528. pv nasby Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:34 AM (#2589729)
Let's hear about Twins! Directed by Phil Coorey!
   529. SouthSideRyan Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:34 AM (#2589730)
Shrek the original is awesome. Stay away from the sequels though. Their very existence partially ruined the original for me. I refuse to watch them.
   530. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:44 AM (#2589734)
Phil, Zodiac is terrific. It's virtually tied for the best movie I've seen this year (with Ratatouille).

Lu loved it as well, but won't watch it again with me. I hired it the other day while she was in hospital with the girls, and watched again.

I rate it only behind Se7en and right next to Fight Club on his list of movies. The Game had it moments but the ending gives me the shits and is a little too cute.
   531. Los Angeles Waterloo of Black Hawk Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:45 AM (#2589737)
The Game is just fine until the ridiculous ending. Panic Room is pretty good.
   532. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:55 AM (#2589741)
Let's hear about Twins! Directed by Phil Coorey!

Thanks mate!

Both the girls are well and I should have some pictures soon! I wrote a description in the game 5 ALCS Sox Therapy thread, because all the drama unfolded during that game (her water broke either when Youks hit the HR or when Manny was thrown out at home)

It has been a crazy few days and I still can't believe the Sox somehow got into the World Series on top of it all.

Lu is well , but will spend another week in hospital it seems.
   533. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:01 AM (#2589742)
Jodie Foster has had a nice run recently: Panic Room, Flightplan, and Inside Man were all very good.

Match Point was really good.
   534. Dromedary pretzels, only half a dinar (CoB). Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:02 AM (#2589743)
'fraid Once Upon a Time in the West has GBU in a headlock beatdown ... Charles Bronson, Jason Robards & Henry Fonda (in his personal favorite role ... he shoots a child in cold blood within 30 seconds of his on-screen introduction for god's sake!) at the top of their game ... the pinnacle of Leone's western technique, with music by Morricone that stands alongside everything from the Man w/No Name trilogy ... by far my favorite western
   535. Los Angeles Waterloo of Black Hawk Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:04 AM (#2589746)
Flightplan? COME ON.
   536. Meatwad Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:08 AM (#2589748)
the man with no name trilogy is a great set of westerns. but the way that GBU ends is just amazing, everything in that moive truly builds to the scene in the graveyard.
   537. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:09 AM (#2589749)
with music by Morricone that stands alongside everything from the Man w/No Name trilogy

Thde soundtrack is beautiful. I never thought of it independent of the film and then one day, at a Starbuck's of all forsaken places, I heard this beautful music playing and realized it was the score from One Upon a Time in the West. FWIW, it's my favorite Jason Robards, Charles Bronson and Henry Fonda movie. But that seen when the crippled railroad tycoon is crawling through the muck is the best scene in a film loaded with best scenes. And generally, I'm not even a fan of westerns.

Another western I really love, though, is Hang 'Em High. And with that, pardners, good night.
   538. Dromedary pretzels, only half a dinar (CoB). Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:15 AM (#2589756)
GBU ends well, but the section about the battle for the bridge is horribly written, laughably over-acted and an pointless waste of time ...
   539. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:16 AM (#2589757)
I loved Inside Man, but stopped watching Flightplan. Did she find the kid?
   540. Meatwad Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:20 AM (#2589760)
the battle for the bridge was almost funny in its own way, though it wasnt necessarly a waste of time, it sets up a couple key things for the ending such as tucos gun being unloaded, and that tuco tries to cheat blondie out of the gold by going ahead to get it first for himself
   541. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:40 AM (#2589769)
Children of Men is definitely a contender for me as well. I'll have to see it at least once more, though.

That is the best movie from 2006. I talked about it for weeks afterwards
   542. Vrhovnik Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:11 AM (#2589785)
Charles Bronson, Jason Robards & Henry Fonda...at the top of their game
And let's not forget Claudia Cardinale!
   543. Klutts! Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:18 AM (#2589792)
The cinematographer of Children of Men, Manny Lubezki, is a friend of mine (our daughters have been in same class here in LA for 3 yrs now). He's a great guy in addition to his obvious talent behind the camera.
   544. BDC Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:27 AM (#2589803)
The worst films I have ever seen include Exposed with Rudolf Nureyev, the remake of DOA with Dennis Quaid, Meet the Fockers, and several baseball movies: Talent for the Game, For Love of the Game, and Ed. The last of those, Ed, is really something special. I wonder how it would seem stoned, but I wouldn't advise it, it might bring on psychosis. It is the kind of film that seems made by people who never even watched a movie before.

Edit: I'm talking films that had a studio release, a star or two, and some big buildup, of course. Obviously there are a lot of films that should never have gotten made, but never got seen much either ...
   545. Kiko Sakata Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:32 AM (#2589811)
Also, in the last 5 years or so, the one movie I've seen that really haunts me is La Moustache. It's about a man who shaves off his moustache but nobody notices and nobody acknowledges he ever had a moustache. My girl and I rarely agree about movies, but we were both haunted by the film and are still haunted by it over a year later for reasons we can't explain. Has anybody else seen it?


I read the novella in college and it still haunts me - I haven't been willing to shave my mustache since, for fear I'd go insane. I might have to convince my wife to add that to our Netflix queue.

Anyone seen "Delicatessen"


Delicatessen is a brilliant movie, probably in my top 10.
   546. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:37 AM (#2589821)
Duck Soup is the best Marx brother. I'm slayed every time I see Groucho with the loving cup on his head and and the boys paint it to look like Groucho.

No love for the Purple Rose of Cairo or Broadway Danny Rose? I thought they were both very, very sweet movies.

I haven't seen the Best Years of Their Lives mentioned. A bit dated but an honest look at real people post-WWII. If I were a kid in the 40s I think I would have had a crush on Theresa Wright -- she's so pretty and wholesome.

The Blues Brothers was a major disappointment for me. IMO, Landis got way too much money and used 1000 cop cars where 3 would have done, 1000 cops around City Hall where 10 would have done. There's a lot to like about the movie, the music, all the cameos, Kathleen Freeman, the bar scene where they pretend to be the good old boys, but it is all too much.
   547. Vrhovnik Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:44 AM (#2589831)
If I were a kid in the 40s I think I would have had a crush on Theresa Wright -- she's so pretty and wholesome.
Theresa Wright was good in Hitchcock's "Shadow of a Doubt" and ok in "Pride of the Yankees."
   548. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:46 AM (#2589834)
The cinematographer of Children of Men, Manny Lubezki, is a friend of mine (our daughters have been in same class here in LA for 3 yrs now). He's a great guy in addition to his obvious talent behind the camera.

That's awesome, some of the extra features have him I think, and they talk about how they put it all together. It is riveting & compulsory viewing.

Seriously, has there been a better filmed film, in the last 5-10 years??
   549. Vrhovnik Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:49 AM (#2589839)
Phil, congrats on the new additions!
   550. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:05 AM (#2589852)
Phil, congrats on the new additions!

Thanks!

I have come down with a pretty bad chest infection and am not allowed to visit the girls for at least a day.

Not happy
   551. Mark Edward Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:06 AM (#2589855)
I don't really see movies that often (especially at theaters), but I did see Lars and the Real Girl this weekend. The plot will turn most people away (a guy dates a blow-up doll? Come on!), but it's a very good comedy in a quirky/sweet way. Ryan Gosling is quickly becoming one of the better actors of the 2000s.

For Coen Brother fans, No Country for Old Men will be coming out in about a month. It's going to be interesting because the book was great, but the Coens usually make solid-to-great films (mostly great).

While seeing Lars, I saw a preview for Juno, and that's the first I've heard of it (again, not a big movie guy). But it looks hilarious- it's got some folks from Arrested Development in it (Jason Bateman, Michael Cera) as well as some other favorites (J.K. Simmons, Rainn Wilson).

Chris Farley was the first celebrity death that I cried over; I was 12 at the time.
   552. AJMcCringleberry Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:14 AM (#2589860)
After reading the quote in the intro and seeing 500+ posts this is not what I expected from this thread.

Anyway, my boyhood crushes were Samantha Micelli and Kelly Kapowski.

And here's my top movies list (not really in any order)

Se7en
Fight Club
The Usual Suspects
Primal Fear
Pulp Fiction
Reservior Dogs
Jackie Brown
Grindhouse
The Shawshank Redemption
12 Angry Men
Double Indemnity
Donnie Darko
Blood Diamond
The Departed
Glengarry Glen Ross
Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels
Shaun of the Dead
Heat
Rounders
Swingers
The Silence of the Lambs
Office Space
Witness for the Prosecution
The Big Lebowski
   553. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:28 AM (#2589866)
For Coen Brother fans, No Country for Old Men will be coming out in about a month. It's going to be interesting because the book was great, but the Coens usually make solid-to-great films (mostly great).

Is that the one about the scary as hell contract killer??
   554. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:32 AM (#2589869)
After reading the quote in the intro and seeing 500+ posts this is not what I expected from this thread.


I was shocked as well. I thought it had to be steroids or the Yankees or anything but 600 posts about movies!!

I once had a Top 100 list on a spreadsheet somewhere. It had all the garden variety greats on it that have been listed here already.

From the last 5 years I would add

Zodiac, Children of Men and Memento on it for sure.

There are a few I have missed for sure.
   555. Mark Edward Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:33 AM (#2589871)
Is that the one about the scary as hell contract killer??

Yes.

Cormac McCarthy is a hell of a writer, I just can't stand the fact that he doesn't use quotation marks. I don't even understand why he does this either.
   556. Infinite Yost (Voxter) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:46 AM (#2589877)
It cast possibly the best young male lead actor of his generation


This was hundreds of posts ago, about Titanic, but I had to say this: I'd be crying if I weren't laughing so hard. Leonardo DiCaprio is roughly two good performances and about fifteen thousand middling-to-poor ones deep in his career. He is one of many reasons to loathe that truly loathesome movie. He's one of the reasons to dislike a lot of movies: Blood Diamond, The Departed, Gangs of New York . . . hell, pretty much any Scorcese movie he's in is worse for it.

Here's a movie that's better than the book: The English Patient. A very good book by one of my favorite writers, but the movie made all the right choices in streamlining the storyline, and in removing the political element made it stronger. Good book, great movie.
   557. Miko Supports Shane's Spam Habit Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:53 AM (#2589878)
No one mentioned Shane? It's one of the great westerns, even though now it is seen as the cliche.

Others you've forgotten:

Pee Wee's Big Adventure
Babe

and this one I dedicate to all of the Lounge:

A Thousand Clowns (with Jason Robards)

(seriously! not a joke. though I don't think it's on dvd.)
   558. Miko Supports Shane's Spam Habit Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:57 AM (#2589879)
Comments on others' comments:

SamM: c'mon, name a real boyhood crush. We all have crushes on Newman and Redford, that's how cool they are.

East of Eden is the greatest film ever made. I'm the only person who thinks this, but that's OK.

Not the greatest for me, but very good. Made me realize what the deal was about James Dean.

Terminator 2 (seriously)

It's a tear-jerker!

"I know now why you cry, but it eez somezing I can nevah do."
   559. Corn On Ty Cobb Posted: October 23, 2007 at 03:58 AM (#2589880)
Cormac McCarthy is a hell of a writer, I just can't stand the fact that he doesn't use quotation marks. I don't even understand why he does this either.


His sporadic use of apostrophes is even more annoying and pointless. He never uses an apostrophe for the word “don’t”, while other words might be apostrophized or they might not. There is no rhyme or reason behind it. He not only does this with the dialog (which could be defended), but in the narrative portions and everywhere else also.
   560. Corn On Ty Cobb Posted: October 23, 2007 at 04:06 AM (#2589882)
He is one of many reasons to loathe that truly loathesome movie. He's one of the reasons to dislike a lot of movies: Blood Diamond, The Departed, Gangs of New York . . . hell, pretty much any Scorcese movie he's in is worse for it.


I thought he gave a solid performance in Blood Diamond. He wasn't awful in Gangs. . . Daniel Day-Lewis just made everyone look like amateurs on-screen in that movie, which is nothing to be ashamed of. The accent was over the top in The Departed, but he was fine otherwise.

Ryan Gosling is every bit the young actor DiCaprio is. . . and he makes better choices.
   561. Infinite Yost (Voxter) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 04:21 AM (#2589890)
I thought DiCaprio was revolting in Blood Diamond, but that was mostly his ludicrous accent. That whole movie was very, very bad. You could have cast a cross between Bogart and Brando in DiCaprio's part, and that movie still would have been awful. I cried at the end of it . . . because I'd just thrown away three hours of my life that were never coming back.

As far as his Scorcese work, he just doesn't have the presence. He's consistently overwhelmed by the gravity of the themes and the power of the other actors, and in Gangs, he once again did another hysterically bad accent.

When DiCaprio did Gilbert Grape, I was very optimistic about the career of what seemed to be a promising young actor. It's been downhill -- and rapidly -- ever since.
   562. Infinite Yost (Voxter) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 04:22 AM (#2589893)
Oh yeah, and second the thoughts on Cormac McCarthy. An excellent writer almost derailed by his own pretensions vis a vis punctuation.
   563. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 04:46 AM (#2589901)
Good movies that should be mentioned in this discussion:

Ferris Bueller's Day Off
Evil Dead/Evil Dead II/Army of Darkness
Master and Commander
Excalibur
Mystery Men
   564. TFTIO is building his own mealworm farm Posted: October 23, 2007 at 05:17 AM (#2589911)
Cormac McCarthy's a little to Iowa Writer's Workshop for my tastes, but I'm excited for the new Coen brothers movie. I think "Children Of Men" was the best movie I've seen in five years. The best movie I've ever seen is "The Conversation", with Altman's "The Long Goodbye" a close second. I loved "The Departed", which was Marky-Mark's movie above all; and the best movie I've seen this year was either "The Bourne Ultimatum" or "Eastern Promises". "Zodiac" was good, but I thought Gyllenhaal was a little light for the central role. Why's he so obsessed? Who cares! More Mark Ruffalo, please. The most hateful movie I've seen all year was "The Invasion", which was utter garbage, poorly made and morally cowardly.

I could talk about movies all day long.

And congrats to Phil! Good on ya, mate.
   565. Benji Posted: October 23, 2007 at 05:17 AM (#2589912)
Could it be possible? 576 comments and I'm the first to bring up Marcia Brady as my TV crush?

My personal top ten movies:

1. Godfather
2. Blues Brothers
3. Slapshot
4. Stalag 17
5. White Heat
6. Blazing Saddles
7. 48 Hours
8. Goodfellas
9. Ferris Bueller's Day Off
10. Dog Day Afternoon
   566. Benji Posted: October 23, 2007 at 05:23 AM (#2589914)
And, almost forgot. My next major crush after Marcia was Glynnis O'Connor. There was a hometown girl who was a near clone of her, and I putzed around, never got around to asking her out and she moved away. A Kazmir-sized regret.
   567. CWS Keith plans to [omitted] at [omitted] Posted: October 23, 2007 at 06:00 AM (#2589925)
I greatly enjoyed Anchorman and didn't like Talladega Nights hardly at all. But they're pretty much the same movie, aren't they? But in one I laughed, and in the other I didn't. I don't know how else to explain it.

I was the same. I think part of my reasoning for not liking it is because I have some wierd complex in me that, if the 'general public' (or a majority of people in my vicinity -- in my case, at college here) starts to like something that I like, I try to find a reason to dislike it. My best example of this would be this season of The Office. It seems like everybody I know watches it now and I haven't laughed a whole lot this season. I don't know if it's because I'm trying not to laugh or because it really hasn't been that funny. I tend to think the latter -- there's too much relationship stuff going on (Pam and Jim, Daryl and Kelly, Kelly and Ryan, Dwight and Angela, Angela and Andy) and there's too much non-office stuff going on (the whole thing at Dwight's house).
   568. jakarta Posted: October 23, 2007 at 06:40 AM (#2589933)
Most of my friends and family know me as someone who doesn't like movies. My wife and I have a netflix account, and I rarely can sit through a whole movie with her. But it's not really that I don't like movies, just that so many stories don't lend themselves well to the narrative arc and timespan of a feature film.

Also, I am particularly quick to get angry at the scoring if I feel it is trying to manipulate me or covering for poor dialogue.

However I do get through more movies if I watch at triple speed.

that said, some favorites are:

Casablanca
Night at the Opera
Blues Brothers
Lebowski
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Stalingrad
Shawshank
The Castle
Ran
Stalag 17
Lock Stock and Two Smoking Barrels
Henry V

hmm, not a lot of relevant women in these movies...
   569. Alex_Lewis Posted: October 23, 2007 at 07:37 AM (#2589939)
The fact that Unforgiven has not been mentioned is a travesty!

I gots but one line for ya: "We've all got it coming, kid."
   570. Walt Davis Posted: October 23, 2007 at 07:37 AM (#2589940)
I'm too lazy and hungry to make it all the way through here, but some not mentioned when I gave up (somewhere around 425) ...

Lone Star
To Sleep with Anger (just f'ing brilliant and nobody's seen it)
My Favorite Year (I think that's the title -- Peter O'Toole as an Errol Flynn type on a Sid Caesar like show)

really, damn near anything with Peter O'Toole

Waking Ned Devine

WC Fields not getting enough love though I'm not sure he ever made a great movie. But the body of work is quite nice.

Hadn't noticed Harold & Maude mentioned yet.

I have a weak spot for some Bill Forsyth films -- Gregory's Girl, Local Hero, Comfort & Joy, and I think That Sinking Feeling. did anyone mention Hope & Glory.

Clockwork Orange still creeps me out.
   571. Phil Coorey. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 08:04 AM (#2589942)
The Castle

The Aussie movie?

If so, you rule

Tell him, he's dreaming!!
   572. PreservedFish Posted: October 23, 2007 at 08:05 AM (#2589943)
God knows why. Top 10:

Lawrence of Arabia
The Godfather
Manhattan
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Yojimbo
Lost in Translation
Mean Streets
Together (Lukas Moodyson)
Fargo
Waiting for Guffmann

I'm not sure if that's really accurate or not. The top 6 are the only no-brainers on the list.
   573. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:31 PM (#2589973)
My favorite movie: Back to the Future

Silly premise, sure, but it's got equal parts comedy, suspense, action.

My favorite pure comedy: The Naked Gun

#576, is Mystery Men good? I just added it to my Blockbuster queue.
   574. Paul D(uda) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:36 PM (#2589977)
   575. Slinger Francisco Barrios (Dr. Memory) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:39 PM (#2589981)
Perhaps you just answered your own question.

8-D
   576. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: October 23, 2007 at 12:53 PM (#2589987)
A few more seriously underrated movies: You Can Count on Me, Unstrung Heroes, Dominic and Eugene, The Edge.
   577. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:15 PM (#2590006)
"That French animated movie about the cyclist and his grandmother and her dog--the name escapes me"

The Triplets of Belleville.
   578. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:17 PM (#2590011)
My best example of this would be this season of The Office.


Agree about this season. Last week's episode was TERRIBLE. The only time I laughed was when Kevin said, "Scrantonicity II. Don't ever mention Scrantonicity to me again"
   579. Paul D(uda) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:20 PM (#2590015)
Can someone take me through why Borat was such a huge deal last year? I rented it recently and while I thought the scene-setting was very good (credit sequences, subtitles, interstitials) and there were a couple of genuinely funny scenes, it mostly left me cold.

Borat, like Snakes on A Plane or the Jackass movies, is a movie that you NEED to see in the theatre. This will sound dumb, but you don't watch it, you experience it. Borat and the Jackass movies are the most fun I've ever had at the movies, yet they are not the funniest movies I've ever seen, if that makes sense. If you missed seeing them at the theatre, your best bet is to smoke some weed and watch them, although even that will fall short.
   580. CrosbyBird Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:27 PM (#2590020)
I'm hard-pressed to explain why I enjoy him, as comedy is by far the most subjective thing we have going. With dramas, you can have a reasonable discussion as to what you like and disliked, even with people with whom you disagree. In comedy, it boils down to "I laughed" or "I didn't laugh".

My favorite scene in Borat is one people rarely mention. He's driving the ice cream truck and the music comes on, all the children are coming up to the truck, and the bear sticks its head out the window and roars, scaring them all away. It's just a fantastic thirty-second bit.

The movie has hysterical moments but I do not think Borat can carry an entire movie, and the German character (upcoming) even less so.

I greatly enjoyed Anchorman and didn't like Talladega Nights hardly at all. But they're pretty much the same movie, aren't they? But in one I laughed, and in the other I didn't. I don't know how else to explain it.

Well, you're missing Christina Applegate (very underrated comic actress) and Steve Carrell for starters. That makes a huge difference.
   581. Mister High Standards Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:34 PM (#2590026)
and the best movie I've seen this year was either


The King of Kong without a doubt. Though Jesse James is amazing as well.
   582. Kirby Kyle Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:38 PM (#2590034)
My top 30:

Annie Hall
Citizen Kane
Goodfellas
The Right Stuff
Dr. Strangelove
The Third Man
Chinatown
Sherlock, Jr.
Notorious
Three Colors: Red
The Conversation
The Godfather
Duck Soup
One False Move
Raising Arizona
Out of Sight
Out of the Past
Groundhog Day
Touch of Evil
Adaptation.
The Wrong Trousers
This is Spinal Tap
The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
Brazil
The Exterminating Angel
The Gold Rush
Sunset Blvd.
Monty Python and the Holy Grail
Stranger Than Paradise
Mean Streets
   583. CrosbyBird Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:43 PM (#2590046)
Master of Disguise starring Dana Carvey. Only Jennifer Esposito's presence kept me watching it. That and the opinion that it just had to get funny at some point. It was truly awful.

That may have been the very worst movie I've ever seen.

I mean, I entered that movie with the lowest expectations possible and was still disappointed.

I'm surprised there's no mention of Dodgeball. Ben Stiller is hysterical in that movie.
   584. SoSH U at work Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:45 PM (#2590048)
I'm stunned that there's been no mention of Jan Smithers among early crushes. She seems right in this crowd's wheelhouse (she was in mine).
   585. Sam M. Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:51 PM (#2590053)
No love for the Purple Rose of Cairo or Broadway Danny Rose? I thought they were both very, very sweet movies.

Purple Rose is by far and away my favorite Woody Allen movie. Indeed, I think it is much more than just a very sweet movie; I think it is quite sad and profound. It's a statement about how we have to live in this world, much as we want to escape into the lives in our dreams and fantasies that are so much more pleasant . . . and this world can be a lot harsher. No happy endings for poor Cecilia -- at all. It also has just about my favorite movie line of all time:

I met a wonderful new man. He's fictional but you can't have everything.

Awesome.

OTOH, I have always absolutely loathed Hannah and Her Sisters, an opinion that I'm sure will get me some hostile fire (I saw it was praised upthread while I was away yesterday). There is not a single character in that entire movie I cared about, or wanted to spend a single extra minute around beyond the time I spent watching them on the screen. I hated them all and wanted them gone the moment the movie ended. Compare that to Purple Rose, where you couldn't help but care about Cecilia, and even wanted good things to happen for the fictional Tom Baxter, and could (to some extent) sympathize with Cecilia's husband, Monk, who was cruel to her but the source of his anger and frustration was all there.

Anyway . . . as to this:

SamM: c'mon, name a real boyhood crush. We all have crushes on Newman and Redford, that's how cool they are.

What, Lee Majors and Tom Seaver weren't good enough for you??? If you think I'm going to confess to surreptiously borrowing my sister's Teen Beat and . . . . um, using it while looking at pictures of Donny Osmond, you've got another think coming.

Oops.
   586. Fat Al Posted: October 23, 2007 at 01:52 PM (#2590054)
Magnolia
   587. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:01 PM (#2590063)
From the last 5 years I would add

Zodiac, Children of Men and Memento on it for sure.


Given my considerable esteem for Children of Men (as mentioned previously) & Zodiac,I should probably watch Memento as well.

Random notes --

I'm glad other people love Rushmore. Its appeal is completely lost on me. Perhaps I'm just immune to Bill Murray's charms (I found Lost in Translation bizarrely overrated, though it does get points for that final scene with "Just Like Honey" playing).

Someone expressed surprised that no one had mentioned Arsenic & Old Lace. I very nearly did, because it came to mind when I was trying to conjure up the title of Kind Hearts & Coronets ... Arsenic is definitely worth consideration on its own.

As are the various Thin Man movies, where comedies are concerned. Ditto Clifton Webb's Mr Belvedere movies. (Speaking of Webb, has anyone mentioned Laura?)

Can't believe I neglected to include Velvet Goldmine among my favorites. That omission is hereby remedied. Possibly the best rock'n'roll movie ever.
   588. Hot Wheeling American Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:04 PM (#2590068)
I'm surprised there's no mention of Dodgeball. Ben Stiller is hysterical in that movie.

I thought Dodgeball was brutal and continue to be surprised when people reference it as one of the top comedies of the past few years.

Stiller is such a weird case. Zoolander and There's Something About Mary are classics for me, but his resume is littered with bombs (Envy, Duplex, Dodgeball, Along Came Polly).
   589. The Original SJ Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:05 PM (#2590069)
Magnolia was one of the worst movies I have ever seen.
   590. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:06 PM (#2590074)
Sam, good points about the depth of Purple Rose. That Allen could create a 2D character in Tom Baxter and give him depth, but always keeping him "celluloid" as it were, was a real achievement.
   591. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:06 PM (#2590075)
I'll second Aresenic and Old Lace and the Thin Man movies. Good stuff.

Nobody's bringing up any silent films, so I'll throw Metropolis out there.
   592. Fat Al Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:11 PM (#2590081)
Magnolia was one of the worst movies I have ever seen.


There seem to be two reactions to that movie. Yours, and thinking it was just great (mine). Extra bonus for me was the best performance by Tom Cruise since Cocktail.
   593. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:14 PM (#2590086)
Good call on Lone Star. For me, it falls a notch below 8 Men Out (best baseball movie ever?), but John Sayles is easily my favorite director of the last couple of decades. (Anybody else remember his short-lived TV series from '90 or so, Shannon's Deal? Good stuff.)

Also omitted by me until now -- Bob Roberts, one of the very few movies I've ever paid twice to see in the theatre. (Others would be Dazed & Confused, the Dawn of the Dead remake, Basket Case, possibly Hedwig & the Angry Inch, Rocky Horror Picture Show ... maybe Lone Star as well.)
   594. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:17 PM (#2590090)
My fave Woody Allens (in order):

1. Annie Hall
2. Manhattan
3. Hannah and Her Sisters
4. Crimes and Misdemeanors
5. Purple Rose of Cairo
6. Love and Death
7. Match Point
8. Everyone Says I love You
9. Radio Days
10. Zelig
11. Broadway Danny Rose
12. Sleeper
13. Bananas
14. Bullets over Broadway
15. Mighty Aphrodite
   595. Swoboda is freedom Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:24 PM (#2590099)
My fave Woody Allens (in order):


Any list of Woody has to include Take the Money and Run. The story was disjointed but absolutely hilarious. I don't think he has done a good movie since Bulletts and that doesn't compare to the 70s/80s stuff.
   596. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:26 PM (#2590103)
Two more I haven't seen mentioned:
The swashbuckliest, manliest adventure movie of all time, even if the history is a little off: The Adventures of Robin Hood.
On a much gentler note, one that never fails to bring a tear to my eye, To Kill a Mockingbird. I think the movie is better than the book, but I only read the book once long ago and I've watched the movie dozens of times.

I really liked Lost in Translation but I wonder if I feel the same after a second viewing.

One more, not top 50 but a taut noir movie: Kubrick's The Killing with Sterling Hayden, Elisha Cook, Jr.
   597. CrosbyBird Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:27 PM (#2590106)
Stiller is such a weird case. Zoolander and There's Something About Mary are classics for me, but his resume is littered with bombs (Envy, Duplex, Dodgeball, Along Came Polly).

I'm with you on Something About Mary. Envy and Duplex are awful. Along Came Polly is a terrible movie but PSH is pretty funny in the basketball scenes and Hank Azaria has a really great bit part.

I thought Zoolander was decent (more for the over-the-top plot than Stiller's work there, although it sort of hammers on the "male model = stupid" joke over and over). I think his best work was Dodgeball because of how outrageous the performance was and the ridiculousness of the individual lines like "That's me taking the bull by the horns. It's a metaphor." and "Nobody makes me bleed my own blood" and "Blaze. Laser.... Blazer."
   598. Wayne Newton's pet monkey (gef, talking mongoose) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:28 PM (#2590108)
Ack! I forgot Frances as well!

And Malcolm X!
   599. Fat Al Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:34 PM (#2590111)
Best? As in worst?

Every time I watch Cocktail, the protagonist gets ever increasingly loathsome and unsympathetic.

Although, you could say that about any Cruise movie, whose stock-in-trade is playing characters of questionable depth, integrity and fortitude, but who seem to possess the power to induce loyalty in those around them anyway.


Yes, I actually did mean best as in worst. Cocktail is one of my favorite awful movies of all time.

Cruise's performance in Magnolia, however, was exceptional. The only time I really could ever say that for him (he played the obnoxious cocky guy decently in Color of Money I guess). Speaking of which, has the Hustler been mentioned? Incredible performance by Gleason in that one.
   600. Hal Chase Headley Lamarr Hoyt Wilhelm (ACE1242) Posted: October 23, 2007 at 02:34 PM (#2590112)
612 posts and not one mention of Road Warrior or Where Eagles Dare??
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