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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Top 10 Baseball Stadiums for Craft Beer | The Daily Meal

mmmm, beer.

Jim Furtado Posted: April 30, 2013 at 09:50 AM | 156 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: ballparks, beer

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   1. DL from MN Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:04 AM (#4429343)
No article, just a slideshow. I have been impressed by how much Target Field likes to partner with local restaurants.
   2. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:16 AM (#4429357)
While I'm sure the thread will turn snooty soon enough - it's not my intent to start it with this comment, but do Goose Island or Sierra Nevada really count as craft beers?

Don't get me wrong - I'm a fan of Sierra Nevada... it's usually my go-to brew if I happen to grab a 12 pack at the 7-11 just because it's reliably available and I think it's a perfectly fine beer.

However, when I think 'craft' -- I don't know that I'd include them.
   3. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:34 AM (#4429377)
However, when I think 'craft' -- I don't know that I'd include them.

I also like Sierra Nevada but I wouldn't call it a craft beer, either. It and Brooklyn Lager are usually the best beers in the corner store on my block.

There are suddenly a lot of fancy beer places in my neighborhood, btw. A craft beer store opened along with a craft beer bar and a craft beer restaurant. Sadly, I've cut way back on my beer consumption to get rid of my fat belly. Where were you when I was a drunk? Alas alas alas...
   4. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:37 AM (#4429380)
Don't get me wrong - I'm a fan of Sierra Nevada... it's usually my go-to brew if I happen to grab a 12 pack at the 7-11 just because it's reliably available and I think it's a perfectly fine beer.

Sierra Nevada still gets included in these discussions because of their "street cred". Along with Sam Adam's, they kind of kicked off the whole craft brewing thing. And they still make small batch stuff like Estate and Harvest that are still kind of craftish.
   5. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:40 AM (#4429385)
I'm really thankful for the success of Sam Adams and Sierra Nevada as it means I'll always have an alternative to Bud/Coors/Heineken when I go to a bar or a restaurant.
   6. dr. scott Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:42 AM (#4429392)
Both Sierra and Goose island make what I would call craft beer, even if that is not mostly what you see from them. Goose island makes some fantastic sour beers, and Bigfoot by SN, though one of the first barley wines on the market is still highly regarded.
   7. Guapo Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:43 AM (#4429394)
There is a formal definition of "craft beer" from the Brewers Association here.

Sierra Nevada and Boston Beer Co. are still on the list.
   8. Crispix reaches boiling point with lackluster play Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:45 AM (#4429397)
I don't know what people mean when they refer to a beer called "Sierra Nevada". Sierra Nevada makes a lot of beers. People do this with "Sam Adams" as well.
   9. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:51 AM (#4429408)
I don't know what people mean when they refer to a beer called "Sierra Nevada".

I generally mean their pale ale which seems to be ubiquitous and not their seasonal stuff. And with Sam Adams I think most people refer to their Boston Lager which is also ubiquitous.
   10. The Good Face Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4429411)
While I'm sure the thread will turn snooty soon enough - it's not my intent to start it with this comment, but do Goose Island or Sierra Nevada really count as craft beers?


We should be wary of falling into the trap of believing that only craft beers are good beers, and craft beers can only be made in tiny quantities by some beardy, suspender-wearing guy who looks like he spends his free time trapping beavers and making his own candles.

I guess I don't like the whole notion of "craft" beer to begin with. There's good beer and there's shitty beer; it's perfectly possible for big breweries to make outstanding mass-produced beer.
   11. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:53 AM (#4429412)
I don't know what people mean when they refer to a beer called "Sierra Nevada". Sierra Nevada makes a lot of beers. People do this with "Sam Adams" as well.

SNPA is what people say when they generally refer to Sierra Nevada. Boston Lager is what is the general definition of Sam Adams.

Sierra Nevada makes some fantastic brews that aren't SNPA. Their porter is pretty good, Tumbler (autumn brown) is freaking awesome, and Celebration is still one of my favorite IPAs. And I said before, their Estate ale is really good too.

Of course, Sam Adams produces a ton of different beers.
   12. andrewberg Posted: April 30, 2013 at 11:55 AM (#4429415)
I haven't been to every stadium on the list, but I think Safeco is a great pick for #1. Seattle as a whole is a great beer town and Safeco does a good job sampling what is available.
   13. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:01 PM (#4429427)
All that aside, Petco should be #1. San Diego is the the capitol of craft beer on the West Coast (and probably the country). Don't know why the blurb about Petco included Widmer though. They are brewed by AB InBev and really don't count (even less than SN or Sam Adams).
   14. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:06 PM (#4429439)
I believe the Brewers Association has modified the amount you can brew while still being a "craft" brewery so that Sierra Nevada and Sam Adams can stay on the list. I don't have any real problem with this, both companies have done an astounding amount for the industry and still produce small batch products and have been good at supporting the craft beer industry rather than trying to limit entrants to the market so as to increase their own market share.

And yeah, when I'm talking about a Sam Adams I'm referring to their Boston Lager, and Sierra Nevada their Pale Ale. I buy each companies products pretty regularly, in the form of Sierra Nevada's Torpedo and Sam Adam's Latitude 48. I'm visiting the midwest this coming week, I'm exceptionally excited to go back to a region that has access to Bell's Two Hearted Ale.

Goose Island was a craft brewery until AB/InBev bought them out, but IIRC they've left Goose Island's brewing standards alone meaning that the beers remain pretty good. I don't know if that will continue in the future, as a new head took over in January of this year.
   15. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:12 PM (#4429448)
Seems like most ballparks I visit now have a really terrific selection of beers.

Who has the worst?
   16. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:15 PM (#4429453)
Seems like most ballparks I visit now have a really terrific selection of beers.

Who has the worst?


I had my boy with me on Opening Day (so beer prohibition) at Dodger Stadium, but their selection seemed pretty crappy. But LA seems to be a crappy craft beer city anyways.
   17. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:16 PM (#4429455)
Goose Island was a craft brewery until AB/InBev bought them out, but IIRC they've left Goose Island's brewing standards alone meaning that the beers remain pretty good. I don't know if that will continue in the future, as a new head took over in January of this year.


I toured the Chicago GI brewery last summer -- while most of the more macros (Honkers, 312, etc) are still brewed elsewhere - they do a fair number of small, local batches and per the guys I talked to during the tour -- AB/IB stays out of their way (though, I suppose, what are they gonna say?).

I wholly agree with the idea that popularity and mass production doesn't necessarily make for a bad beer... I've had a number of SN's others -- but was referring to SNPA, as it's just the most widely available generally.

I guess I would just tend to put craft beers more into a bucket of 'local breweries' -- even if they do a bit more national shipping... Rogue, Half Acre, etc...
   18. A Real Acadian Hero Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:22 PM (#4429464)
Who has the worst?
Rogers Centre is brutal. Steamwhistle Pilsner, decent but unremarkable as it is, is the best of a very bad lot.
   19. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:25 PM (#4429468)
Seems like most ballparks I visit now have a really terrific selection of beers.

Who has the worst?


I think the Cubs are wholly disappointing - but haven't been to enough other parks to call them 'worst'... The (pseudo)'craft'/bottled stands are few and far between and it's a pretty mundane selection -- basically, the standard fare you would find at most convenience stores... i.e., the usual corona, dos equis, SN, a limited selection of goose island, etc.

You can't - or at least, couldn't so far as I recall last year - get a half acre or metro brewing beer at wrigley.

What's worse - I believe that Old Style is being swapped out for Coors this year... I truly hate Coors beer - it's probably my least favorite under the sun - so despite my Cub fandom, if someone wanted to nominate Wrigley as the worst, I wouldn't object and of the 10 or so parks I've caught a game at, I'd certainly put it at the bottom of the list.
   20. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:27 PM (#4429473)
it's perfectly possible for big breweries to make outstanding mass-produced beer.


Name them.

Another problem is that the craft beer market as defined is only 6% of the total beer market. That's grown like threefold in the last decade or so, but it still is negligible vs AB Inbev and Miller Coors stranglehold on the overall market (especially with AB Inbev trying to buy Groupo Modelo).
   21. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:33 PM (#4429481)

Name them.

Another problem is that the craft beer market as defined is only 6% of the total beer market. That's grown like threefold in the last decade or so, but it still is negligible vs AB Inbev and Miller Coors stranglehold on the overall market (especially with AB Inbev trying to buy Groupo Modelo).


Well, despite the classification changes -- I'd say that Goose Island and Sam Adams mass-produced flagships are still fine beers ('outstanding' might be going a bit far), and SN's cred/smaller batches aside, I think it's fair to say that SNPA ought to be counted as "mass produced", at least, it's certainly easy enough to find virtually anywhere and it's within shouting distance of outstanding, I think.
   22. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:33 PM (#4429482)
Fenway has stands that sell Harpoon and Sam Adams, as well as Wachusett, Cisco Brewing, Magic Hat, and Smuttynose. Certainly not top of the list, but I'd say at least solidly average. And they're only like a buck or two more than the mass market beers.

I should add that when I say "mass produced" I mean "mega-brewery owned"- Sierra Nevada, Sam Adams, Yuengling, and even Pabst doesn't fall into that category. I'd happily drink Pabst before I drank a single thing on offer from Miller Coors.
   23. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:35 PM (#4429487)
Well, despite the classification changes -- I'd say that Goose Island and Sam Adams mass-produced flagships are still fine beers ('outstanding' might be going a bit far), and SN's cred/smaller batches aside, I think it's fair to say that SNPA ought to be counted as "mass produced", at least, it's certainly easy enough to find virtually anywhere and it's within shouting distance of outstanding, I think.


Ok, then we're not actually disagreeing, I just read "mass produced" inaccurately. I was thinking more of Shock Top, Blue Moon, etc.

eta: Heck, I have Sam Adams in my fridge right now from a cookout on Sunday... where there was also Sierra Nevada Torpedo.
   24. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:41 PM (#4429491)
And that said, even though I don't like Budweiser, that AB can make that stuff taste the same with multiple breweries with multiple local water sources is freaking amazing. They know their stuff. I don't like it, but they do know their stuff. And Mitch Steele, one of the founders of Stone, was a master brewer at AB before he struck out on his own.
   25. ellsbury my heart at wounded knee Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:49 PM (#4429501)
Name them.


I had a Coors Batch 19 the other day that was actually pretty drinkable on a warm day. Not great, but still much better than a regular mass-produced domestic.

Safeco is indeed pretty great for beer. I've been to places that claimed to be craft beer bars that had less selection and were more expensive. If only the Mariners weren't awful.
   26. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:51 PM (#4429505)
Sam Adams especially deserves credit for helping the craft brewing industry, during hops shortages in 2008 and 2012 they've sold something like 25 tons of hops to over 100 craft breweries at cost (so, $5 lbs instead of $30+).

“I saw craft brewers who couldn’t make their beers, or couldn’t make the beers they wanted to. We felt like we needed to share,” says Koch, recalling his company’s beginnings as a microbrewery. The hops were raffled off in a lottery, with breweries allotted up to 528 pounds of hops apiece, in 88-pound batches. “We asked brewers not to request hops because they’d save money; buy them because you need them.” More than 350 microbreweries applied—nearly one-fourth of all microbreweries in the U.S. “I knew there would be demand, but I didn’t realize that level of need,” Koch says.


No way would you ever see one of the megabreweries doing that. So Sam Adams gets a ton of respect from me, and I'm happy for their wild success. They also make some really good beers.

eta:
that AB can make that stuff taste the same with multiple breweries with multiple local water sources is freaking amazing.


Oh, agreed. It's really impressive from a technical standpoint. But they still haven't made a good beer yet. And InBev is guilty of destroying the quality of it's European products like Becks by cheaping out on the ingredients and changing the brewing process. The only reason InBev didn't make the AB products worse is because they already sucked.
   27. Dave Spiwak Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:52 PM (#4429507)
Is a "craft beer" what we used to call a "micro brew" back in my younger days (like about 5 years ago)?
   28. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:52 PM (#4429508)
Rundown of beers available in 2012 at each MLB Park.

Sounds like Miami and Toronto would be among the worst with KC not too far behind. Cincy seems really underrated.
   29. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:53 PM (#4429511)
Ok, then we're not actually disagreeing, I just read "mass produced" inaccurately. I was thinking more of Shock Top, Blue Moon, etc.


Blue Moon is OK -- I have a thing for Belgian wheats, though... that said, I guess I wouldn't call it outstanding either. It's sort of more a no complaints choice than it is something I'd ever go out of my way to order or buy.
   30. A Real Acadian Hero Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:54 PM (#4429513)
Molson in Canada, via a craft arm they bought years ago (Creemore) have put out a new beer (Hops and Bolts) that is very solid. It would fit on any shelve with the more mainstream craft offerings like SNPA or the SA Boston Lager.

AB-InBev have recently put out a couple of new beers under the Keith's banner (Cascade and Hellertauer) that are getting at least mediocre reviews. These wouldn't be world beaters, but may be able to sit on the same shelf, again, as say SNPA and not feel terribly shy.
   31. dr. scott Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:55 PM (#4429515)
Goose island it now taking taps from Lagunitas at AT&T park. I like the IPA as its a good beer, nothing really like the standard West Coast IPAs, so it was nice to see.

Wriggley has had the worst beer selection of any park I went to. I could not even find Goose Island there last summer. We had Old Style.

Half Acre was our favoritie Chitown brewery.

As for AT&T park, they have a lot of great beers, but most of those listed in the article are only in one place, and its not near any seats. The public house is awesome though, and is one of my locals as well (they have a street entrance and ballpark entrance). this is useful during game day, as the bartenders see me coming and know what to get even with it 2-3 deep at the bar.
   32. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 12:59 PM (#4429521)
Is a "craft beer" what we used to call a "micro brew"


Basically. Microbrew was a legal term iirc, so once breweries got beyond a certain size they couldn't legally call their products a microbrew anymore. Hence the "craft beer" term.

#30: I'd have to do a blind taste test with them to see how I feel. I mean, I don't hate Blue Moon the way I do Bud/Coors/Miller where I'd actually prefer not to drink anything than drink them, but they're below just about everything else and that's probably in part due to it's provenance.
   33. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:00 PM (#4429524)
Rundown of beers available in 2012 at each MLB Park.

Sounds like Miami and Toronto would be among the worst with KC not too far behind. Cincy seems really underrated.


I think I'd take Pittsburgh as my top choice... that's a really nice and diverse selection, you could easily go a whole game without repeats.

I think Wrigley has to rank down there with Miami.... never been, but I find nothing anywhere listed beyond the standard fare. Based on that list, I think I'm going to stick with the Cubs at the bottom spot, as much as it pains me to say so.
   34. The Good Face Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:09 PM (#4429528)
it's perfectly possible for big breweries to make outstanding mass-produced beer.


Name them.


Is this a serious question? Almost every one of the big and medium German brewers would qualify. Einbecker, Kulmbacher, G. Schneider & Sohn, Ayinger... all make outstanding beers. Hell, Spaten is now part of InBev and their Optimator Doppelbock is still a flagship for the style.

American macro brewers rarely make excellent beer because they don't need to; not because it can't be done.
   35. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:14 PM (#4429533)
I know next to nothing about beers and I have no idea whether it's considered a "craft beer" or not, what I DO know is that Spotted Cow (by the New Glaurus brewery) is a damn miracle out of the state of Wisconsin: a delicious beer that's sold at a price point nearly the same as mass-produced sludge like Budweiser, Coors, etc. It's not the most sophisticated beer on the planet, but at the price you pay it's ridiculously high quality. (It's a wheat beer akin to Blue Moon, but I strongly prefer it to Blue Moon.)

Sadly only available in the state of Wisconsin, but it's practically the state beer over there (at least in Madison and Milwaukee).
   36. ellsbury my heart at wounded knee Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:26 PM (#4429545)
It seems like there's almost no excuse for not having a decent beer selection at an MLB ballpark. Just about every MLB-sized city must have a handful of decent localish craft brews, and if the park just carries bottles it's not like it's a big production to deal with it like having stuff on tap. I suppose if there are exclusivity contracts with InBev or something that probably kills it, but I don't think that's the case.
   37. Flynn Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:41 PM (#4429563)
Sierra Nevada still gets included in these discussions because of their "street cred". Along with Sam Adam's, they kind of kicked off the whole craft brewing thing.


Fritz Maytag and his Anchor Brewing Co. say hello.
   38. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:46 PM (#4429569)
Almost every one of the big and medium German brewers would qualify.


You're right, I should have limited my aspersions to AB InBev, Molson-Coors, and SAB Miller. And InBev will ruin Spaten soon enough, ask fans of Becks and Bass Ale. It's why I'm terrified for Goose Island, which had some great beers and which is now under the thumb of those monsters.

eta: Yeah, without Anchor we might not have Sierra Nevada.
   39. Nasty Nate Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:51 PM (#4429577)
this thread and these pretzels are making me thirsty
   40. Flynn Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:51 PM (#4429578)
Fritz is the man. He's really the granddaddy of them all, and his brewery (though he sold it to the SKYY guys a few years ago) is one of San Francisco's greatest treasures.
   41. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 01:58 PM (#4429585)
Fritz Maytag and his Anchor Brewing Co. say hello.

Hey, so does New Albion.. so Anchor (way good stuff.. popularized "steam beer" aka beer fermented with lager yeast at ale temps), Sierra Nevada, Boston Beer Co., et al.

All those guys are pioneers.
   42. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:00 PM (#4429588)
Flynn, how is Ess Eff as a beer town now? Did Anchor inspire a lot of copy cats? Is there a good microbrew pub/sports bar in the city?
   43. The Good Face Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:04 PM (#4429595)
You're right, I should have limited my aspersions to AB InBev, Molson-Coors, and SAB Miller. And InBev will ruin Spaten soon enough, ask fans of Becks and Bass Ale. It's why I'm terrified for Goose Island, which had some great beers and which is now under the thumb of those monsters.


Yeah, I'm no fan of InBev or the other giants, but even soulless corporate marketeers prefer not to trash a brand if they can help it. I've seen an increasing trend of giant corporation permitting new acquisitions to continue doing the things that made them worth acquiring in the first place. Not because they're good people who care about customers or continuity or any of that crap, but simply because it's better for business. I generally don't buy Spaten because I prefer other brewers for helles/pilsner styles, and the doppelbock style isn't my favorite, but I wouldn't write them off just yet.

Fritz Maytag and his Anchor Brewing Co. say hello.


An excellent beer that was way, WAY ahead of its time in America.
   44. Jeff Frances the Mute Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:21 PM (#4429629)
I toured the Chicago GI brewery last summer -- while most of the more macros (Honkers, 312, etc) are still brewed elsewhere - they do a fair number of small, local batches and per the guys I talked to during the tour -- AB/IB stays out of their way (though, I suppose, what are they gonna say?).


Goose Island is basically two separate organizations at this point. Their widely distributed stuff is pretty much all brewed at various AB/InBev breweries around the country. Most of this stuff is fine, but nothing special. AB/InBev has an established track record of lowering the ingredient quality over time on brands that they bring in house. I am confident saying that 3-5 years from now the quality on these brews will have slipped noticeably.

The other stuff is still brewed at the Goose Island brewery. Most of these brews are relatively niche items or beers (BCBS and anything else that requires barrel aging) that is difficult to scale. This operation is a rounding error for AB/InBev and no one really knows what will happen long term. They could leave it alone or let it die via neglect. Although, most of the rumors that I have heard indicate that they are supporting expansion of the barrel program so maybe it will thrive.

   45. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:23 PM (#4429631)
It's why I'm terrified for Goose Island, which had some great beers and which is now under the thumb of those monsters.

One of the AB Brewer's types had a chat on the AMA Reddit thing last week and he said that they really tried to get everything correct (water profiles, etc) with Goose Island..

http://www.reddit.com/r/beer/comments/1ck2no/beerit_ama_week_i_am_an_anheuserbusch_employee/
   46. Monty Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:25 PM (#4429637)
Of course, Sam Adams produces a ton of different beers.


So does Budweiser, but everyone knows what you mean when you say "Bud."

(You mean "Gross!")

(That was an unfair comment, as I'm not really a beer drinker, so I don't have anything particularly against Budweiser)

(Still, you probably do mean "Gross," right?)
   47. SuperGrover Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:27 PM (#4429641)
...with KC not too far behind.


Interestingly, Kauffman helped me mature my beer tastes by exposing me to Fat Tire on tap 15 some odd years ago. Back then, craft beers were few and far between (at least at the local grocer) and New Belgium were just beginning their expansion East (it hadn't yet made it to St. Louis, I believe). Fat Tire was a bit of a revelation for someone who had never drank anything other than mass-produced American piss (i.e., your favorite American Lager from Coors, A/B or Miller).

They removed Fat Tire on tap about a year before I left and it doesn't seem like they have improved much. I still do enjoy some New Belgium, but Leiny's are pretty terrible as a whole (except for Summer Shandy when it is 90+ degrees out). Shame.
   48. SuperGrover Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:29 PM (#4429642)
Oh and I should comment that any place with Oberon should win, hands down. I have yet to find a better Summer beer for temperatures from 70 to 100. It works in almost any occasion. I also have mine with a lemon rather than I orange as I don't feel it needs the additional sweetness.

P.S.-And screw you guys on the East coast who get Dogfish Head at your local park. So very jealous, especially for early Spring/late fall games.
   49. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:30 PM (#4429643)
(Still, you probably do mean "Gross," right?)

I am a Home Brewer and my favorite beers are way far from anything that AB InBev will ever produce. But my homebrew sensibilities allow me to respect the hell out the flagship, Budweiser. I don't love it, but I couldn't ever reproduce with the current equipment I have at home. It is freaking hard to make a lighter lager that tastes good 100% of the time.
   50. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:35 PM (#4429648)

#30: I'd have to do a blind taste test with them to see how I feel. I mean, I don't hate Blue Moon the way I do Bud/Coors/Miller where I'd actually prefer not to drink anything than drink them, but they're below just about everything else and that's probably in part due to it's provenance.


I just don't get this. Bud is not good and all, but it has its place. For example it's a great drink after working outside in the hot sun. Pound one or two and after cooling off then you can drink something with flavor.
   51. SuperGrover Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:36 PM (#4429652)
Goose island it now taking taps from Lagunitas at AT&T park. I like the IPA as its a good beer, nothing really like the standard West Coast IPAs, so it was nice to see.


That's a shame. I much prefer Lagunitas to Goose (although I do enjoy Sophie). Lagunitas IPA is solid and some of their other stuff is very good (Hop Stoopid, Sumpin, Sumpin, Lagunitas Sucks). Maybe not great for Summer, but should be very nice for a cool SF Summer evening.
   52. Guapo Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:44 PM (#4429658)
   53. SuperGrover Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:45 PM (#4429660)
I just don't get this. Bud is not good and all, but it has its place. For example it's a great drink after working outside in the hot sun. Pound one or two and after cooling off then you can drink something with flavor.


Why would you do that though when there are other low ABV beers that are much better? Lagunitas makes a DayTime IPA with flavor and just 4.65% ABV. Bell's makes a Midwestern Pale Ale that is delicious with just 5.2%. If you can handle chugging a Budweiser at 5.0% why not have something with flavor instead?
   54. Jeff Frances the Mute Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:46 PM (#4429663)
Some styles of beer lend themselves well to mass production. This is why you see a ton of lagers, wheat beer, and to a lesser extent pale ales. Stouts, sours, strong IPAs and other styles often require rarer ingredients (massive amounts of specialty hops or grain) or expensive infrastructure (barrels and space to age them).

AB/InBev and the like sell based on low price and marketing. It is not impossible for them to brew good beer, but it isn't part of their business plan. Their consistency is impressive as a technical achievement, but the beer ranges from terrible to below average so what is the point? I also don't see the ability to get identical terrible McDonald's hamburgers on 6 continents as a great accomplishment so I am may be an outlier.
   55. BDC Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:50 PM (#4429672)
As several have said, there's a long and complex hierarchy of good beer. In Texas, Shiner (from the independent Spoetzl brewery) is available everywhere, and makes some very good beers (though with them too, when you say "a Shiner," you typically mean Shiner Bock). But most wouldn't call it either "micro" or "craft"; Texas is a huge gigantic place, and Shiner makes an immense amount of beer.

Then below (above, next to?) that you have the statewide independents like St Arnold, Rahr's, and Real Ale, wide ranges of standard and seasonal products, which have become available most places in the past few years. Micro? Craft?

And then a lot of smaller independents like Franconia and Lakewood and No Label and Southern Star, of recent arrival, they do more or less standard ranges of beer, you can find them in some pubs, in some specialty stores. Micro yes, craft maybe.

And then some brewers who do freaky strange things in small batches in bottles where it looks like they glued their own labels on late one night in their mothers' basement (and are all the more respected for it): Jester King, Ranger Creek, Rogness (actually Rogness has beautiful labels), Adelbert's; and their only products are Tripel farmhouse ales and lagers made with whatever they used instead of hops in the Middle Ages, and white IPAs, and black witbiers, and God knows what, and you buy them from funky storefront individuals who happen to be selling beer along with organic goat cheese and macramé. Now this is both micro and craft, surely.

But you guys know all this. Anyway, the Ballpark in Arlington is making even St Arnold and Rahr's harder to find, and they're down to one tap of Franconia if you're lucky and the pub's open, but if you scour the second and third levels there and refuse to settle for less, you will do OK. I would not call it a beer paradise.

Along the lines of "big brewers can do something good if they want," Ziegenbock (Anheuser-Busch) is an acceptable alternative if you somehow can't get Shiner Bock.

   56. BDC Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:51 PM (#4429673)
Oh, and many thanks to Guapo for #52 in case I get to Nationals Park later this year. Any similar recommendations for New Yankee Stadium?
   57. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:52 PM (#4429676)
I just don't get this. Bud is not good and all, but it has its place. For example it's a great drink after working outside in the hot sun. Pound one or two and after cooling off then you can drink something with flavor.


I suppose I'd agree... my 'favorite' macro remains miller lite - but the only time I really drink it would be at tailgates and the occasional family bbq (where anything that looks darker than apple juice or doesn't come in 30 packs is frowned upon).

That's a shame. I much prefer Lagunitas to Goose (although I do enjoy Sophie). Lagunitas IPA is solid and some of their other stuff is very good (Hop Stoopid, Sumpin, Sumpin, Lagunitas Sucks). Maybe not great for Summer, but should be very nice for a cool SF Summer evening.


I think I'd take Goose over Lagunitas -- I particularly like Matilda (their take on a strong Belgian PA). It's not Delirium Tremens (or frankly, anything from Huyghe, probably my favorite brewery worldwide), but it's a very good knock off.

I don't generally have a lot of nice things to say about the west coast -- but I do tend to think that I had to drink only regional beers, I'd probably strongly consider moving west... In addition to Sierra Nevada, I have yet to drink anything coming out of Rogue I don't love... and Dead Guy is usually a staple in my fridge right up there with mustard.
   58. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:52 PM (#4429677)
Yeah, I'm no fan of InBev or the other giants, but even soulless corporate marketeers prefer not to trash a brand if they can help it. I've seen an increasing trend of giant corporation permitting new acquisitions to continue doing the things that made them worth acquiring in the first place. Not because they're good people who care about customers or continuity or any of that crap, but simply because it's better for business.


The big boys buy smaller labels to saturate a market with off-brand options that still contribute to their bottom line. Shocktop, Blue Moon, and probably Honkers are all vanity labels pushed into traditional markets specifically to provide an "alternative" to people who don't want to buy Bud Light. If you're stuck a sports bar with the idiots from college and all they have is Bud Light, Miller Lite and Coors, you'll order a Honkers (or a Yuengling) to at least pretend you're still drinking a good beer.
   59. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:56 PM (#4429683)
Why would you do that though when there are other low ABV beers that are much better? Lagunitas makes a DayTime IPA with flavor and just 4.65% ABV. Bell's makes a Midwestern Pale Ale that is delicious with just 5.2%. If you can handle chugging a Budweiser at 5.0% why not have something with flavor instead?


It has nothing to do with the ABV%, it's the heaviness of a flavorful beer, as well as the desire to savor one. $$ also comes into play - craft beers can really put the dent in your wallet if you start buying a lot of them. If I am looking for a quick refreshing 12 oz of liquid a Bud is high on the list.
   60. Howling John Shade Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:56 PM (#4429684)
Flynn, how is Ess Eff as a beer town now? Did Anchor inspire a lot of copy cats? Is there a good microbrew pub/sports bar in the city?

Not Flynn, but SF is a great beer town. Other than Anchor, the in-city breweries include 21st Amendment, Speakeasy, and a bunch of restuarants that do their own brewing (ThirstyBear, Beach Chalet, Magnolia, Social, etc). There's a bunch of great beer bars as well: Toronado, Alembic, Monk's Kettle, La Trappe, Biergarten.

If you expand outside the city, you can add Russian River, Lagunitas, Marin Brewing Company, and a bunch of others. Oakland has two great beer bars: The Trappist and Beer Revolution.

If you're looking for a place to watch a game, Public House is good, as is Kezar Pub, or Mad Dog in the Fog which is just across the street from Toronado.

Or just visit during SF Beer Week.
   61. if nature called, ladodger34 would listen Posted: April 30, 2013 at 02:58 PM (#4429687)
I have yet to drink anything coming out of Rogue I don't love... and Dead Guy is usually a staple in my fridge right up there with mustard.

Please, please don't drink the Maple Bacon Donut Beer they brewed. It is quite possibly the worst craft beer I have ever tasted, and it was $14 a 22 oz. bottle. It gave me a sad, because it seemed like it would be great. But everything else from Rogue has been awesome. They make damn good beer (aside from the Voodoo Donut collabs).
   62. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:00 PM (#4429690)
It has nothing to do with the ABV%, it's the heaviness of a flavorful beer, as well as the desire to savor one. $$ also comes into play - craft beers can really put the dent in your wallet if you start buying a lot of them. If I am looking for a quick refreshing 12 oz of liquid a Bud is high on the list.


Precisely.

I'm not stranger to shotgunning, funneling, or any of the other methods favored by the college set for quick intake of beer (in fact, about 10 years ago, a friend of mine had a "tournament" around march madness and we actually got 64 entrants funneling beers.... I made the final four... but lost to a girl... rumors of throwing the match haunt me to this day).

I will maintain forever and always that if you want a beer you can just down like water -- there is no better match than Busch Light. It's cheap and only mildly more heavy and tasty than soda water.... but if someone corners you in a dark alley and demands you shotgun a beer to escape, that's the one I want in my pocket.
   63. Jeff Frances the Mute Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:00 PM (#4429691)
I just don't get this. Bud is not good and all, but it has its place. For example it's a great drink after working outside in the hot sun. Pound one or two and after cooling off then you can drink something with flavor.


Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but it would make more sense to enjoy a lighter beer that is refreshing and flavorful. Styles such as berliner weisse, kellerweis, California common, "session" ales are meant to be refreshing and flavorful.

There is a perception to craft beer is only about massive ABVs and IBUs, but it is pretty uncommon at this point for a craft brewery to not have at least one light, refreshing option. Partially this is dogfooding; brewers like to drink beer as they brew and you can'y drink strong beers all day.
   64. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:02 PM (#4429696)
I'd go back to Texas just to drink Shiner again. That, and Austin, were the only things I liked when visiting an ex in Texas. I should date another girl from Texas, then I can say "some of my exes live in Texas."

But BDC gets at a good point about the definitions. I don't mind "craft" as an overarching term applying to the market, but there's a vast difference between Sam Adams and a brand new brewery that produces a few hundred barrels of beer.
   65. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:03 PM (#4429697)
21st Century is currently my second favorite brewery (behind a local upstart, Monday Night Brewing.)
   66. SuperGrover Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:04 PM (#4429698)
I think I'd take Goose over Lagunitas -- I particularly like Matilda (their take on a strong Belgian PA). It's not Delirium Tremens (or frankly, anything from Huyghe, probably my favorite brewery worldwide), but it's a very good knock off


Matilda is solid (no DT by any means but still good) and as mentioned I am a huge fan of Sophie, but the rest of their selection falls way short. Alternatively, there are 5-6 Lagunitas varieties I purchase from time-to-time. I just prefer their work.

Interestingly, I live almost next door to the epitome of the craft brewery (http://www.pipeworksbrewing.net/). The 5-6 "employees" run their company out of a hollowed-out former awnings store. They also very rarely shave or wear shirts. Interesting look into the creative porcess I guess.
   67. BDC Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:05 PM (#4429699)
I like to drink beer as I cook, and lately it's been St Arnold Summer Pils for choice. Victory (from PA) does a beer called Prima Pils that I think is wonderful. They aren't quite as cheap as Bud Light, I'll grant that …
   68. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:06 PM (#4429702)
I just don't get this. Bud is not good and all, but it has its place. For example it's a great drink after working outside in the hot sun. Pound one or two and after cooling off then you can drink something with flavor.


For this, I drink a local brew called "water."

Finch's Beer Company's Golden Wing blonde ale is a fantastic, low ABV, smooth drinking, "light" beer. It's my go-to beach beer.
   69. Jeff Frances the Mute Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:06 PM (#4429705)
I will maintain forever and always that if you want a beer you can just down like water -- there is no better match than Busch Light.


Easier and cheaper to just have a shot of tequila and a glass of water-- which is why the macros are losing market share to craft brewers. People looking for a cheap buzz are switching to liquor and people interested in quality are switching to craft beer.
   70. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:07 PM (#4429706)



Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but it would make more sense to enjoy a lighter beer that is refreshing and flavorful. Styles such as berliner weisse, kellerweis, California common, "session" ales are meant to be refreshing and flavorful.

There is a perception to craft beer is only about massive ABVs and IBUs, but it is pretty uncommon at this point for a craft brewery to not have at least one light, refreshing option. Partially this is dogfooding; brewers like to drink beer as they brew and you can'y drink strong beers all day.


I DO enjoy Bud, that's my point. And until I can get a 6-pack of 16 oz bottles from a craft brewer for $5 I am going to stick with it as my before-during-after chores beer.
   71. BDC Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:09 PM (#4429707)
As with wine (where my tastes and budget are far more limited), if you enjoy it, you should drink it. Beer is like baseball, at its least distinguished it's still a lot better than most other things in life.
   72. SuperGrover Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:10 PM (#4429708)
It has nothing to do with the ABV%, it's the heaviness of a flavorful beer, as well as the desire to savor one. $$ also comes into play - craft beers can really put the dent in your wallet if you start buying a lot of them. If I am looking for a quick refreshing 12 oz of liquid a Bud is high on the list.


What makes heaviness though? Budwesier has more ABV and more calories than Day Time IPA. Is it just the taste that makes it seem heavy?

You want to chug a Michelob Ultra or something fine as that has 60% of the calories and alcohol of the lightest "good" beer. But Budweiser? Once you get that high you have all kinds of options that should be "lighter."
   73. The Good Face Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:11 PM (#4429711)
Some styles of beer lend themselves well to mass production. This is why you see a ton of lagers, wheat beer, and to a lesser extent pale ales. Stouts, sours, strong IPAs and other styles often require rarer ingredients (massive amounts of specialty hops or grain) or expensive infrastructure (barrels and space to age them).


True to an extent. Sours have contamination issues and usually need a separate facility, as well as aging requirements. Strong IPAs and Russian Imperial Stouts need massive amounts of hops and malts respectively. But those are all pretty much niche products, and I say that as a drinker who loves sour ales. One of the biggest tragedies caused by the American macro brewers is that they've poisoned the minds of many American drinkers against lager/pilsner style beers, making them believe that those styles can't be "great" beer. A perfectly-executed helles, pilsner, or kolsch is every bit the great beer that people think the latest alcohol-laden hop bomb IPA to be.

AB/InBev and the like sell based on low price and marketing. It is not impossible for them to brew good beer, but it isn't part of their business plan. Their consistency is impressive as a technical achievement, but the beer ranges from terrible to below average so what is the point? I also don't see the ability to get identical terrible McDonald's hamburgers on 6 continents as a great accomplishment so I am may be an outlier.


InBev's track record isn't great, but as I pointed out before, there are many German brewers producing an absolute shitload of beer, much of which is of outstanding quality.
   74. SuperGrover Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:12 PM (#4429713)
I DO enjoy Bud, that's my point. And until I can get a 6-pack of 16 oz bottles from a craft brewer for $5 I am going to stick with it as my before-during-after chores beer.


And that's fine. I guess the rationale of it having a place because it is easy to drink doesn't resound for those who think it's swill. If the only redeeming quality is that it is easy to drink you should probably find another way to intake your alcohol.

For you though there seems to be other reasons and that is 100% okay. Hugs for everyone!
   75. Flynn Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:15 PM (#4429716)
Flynn, how is Ess Eff as a beer town now? Did Anchor inspire a lot of copy cats? Is there a good microbrew pub/sports bar in the city?


Err... I don't know, I don't really live there anymore!

But yeah, Anchor definitely inspired a lot of copycats. Pretty much every microbrewery in Northern California owes some debt to Anchor. Pretty much every microbrewery in the country owes some debt to Anchor.

I think the one insight I could provide is that Anchor, Sierra Nevada and Lagunitas are ubiquitous beers. I drank SNPA at keggers in high school, for God's sake. In England really crappy bars sometimes just offer the usual assortment of crappy lagers. That couldn't happen in SF. You wouldn't be able to open a bar, not have Anchor, Lagunitas and Sierra Nevada on tap, and be able to stay open. Workin'men drink it (in fact, they drink it more than the yuppies, who have probably moved on to some obscure lambic).
   76. Flynn Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:19 PM (#4429719)
InBev's track record isn't great, but as I pointed out before, there are many German brewers producing an absolute shitload of beer, much of which is of outstanding quality.


1. It's Germany.

2. The biggest mass-produced German beers aren't as good. If I'm at a place that's serving Krombacher I'm going to try and find something else if I can help it.
   77. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:20 PM (#4429720)

And that's fine. I guess the rationale of it having a place because it is easy to drink doesn't resound for those who think it's swill. If the only redeeming quality is that it is easy to drink you should probably find another way to intake your alcohol.

For you though there seems to be other reasons and that is 100% okay. Hugs for everyone!


True, true, I feel the same way about something like Mountain Dew. And hey as long as I get a hug I am all good.
   78. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:24 PM (#4429724)
Yeah, I generally don't feel refreshed when I drink any of the beers I mentioned. In the situation described I'd rather have a glass of ice water. And if I'm elsewhere, and there's enough proliferation of pretty good beer that at worst I'm drinking a Sam Adams. Which is a perfectly cromulent brew.

Re 44: That's more or less what I'm talking about. And they do it because Wall Street loves the gigantic, immediate savings that can be seen, even if that choice is followed by a decline in market share.
   79. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:34 PM (#4429733)
True, true, I feel the same way about something like Mountain Dew.


Yeah, I'm not going to get (more) snobby and say "Thou Shalt Not Drink Bud!" I'm just saying that I'd rather drink water than those beers because I do not find them refreshing. And if I'm drinking beer for flavor and taste, there's other choices I'd go with above those. Pretty much the only time I'll have one is when I've got no other option and I want to get drunk. And then I have to drink a lot more of them than I'm used to because I'm a fan of the higher alcohol hoppy American IPA/Double IPA styles.
   80. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:39 PM (#4429738)
Interestingly, Kauffman helped me mature my beer tastes by exposing me to Fat Tire on tap 15 some odd years ago. Back then, craft beers were few and far between (at least at the local grocer) and New Belgium were just beginning their expansion East (it hadn't yet made it to St. Louis, I believe). Fat Tire was a bit of a revelation for someone who had never drank anything other than mass-produced American piss (i.e., your favorite American Lager from Coors, A/B or Miller).

They removed Fat Tire on tap about a year before I left and it doesn't seem like they have improved much. I still do enjoy some New Belgium, but Leiny's are pretty terrible as a whole (except for Summer Shandy when it is 90+ degrees out). Shame.


I would guess part of it is Boulevard is just so dominant as a craft beer in this market, its seen as "Kansas City's beer" and while I love Boulevard, it has come at the price of crowding out any other would-be craft beers in the area. I would like it if they provided Schlafly's and some of the St. Louis beers, and I would LOVE it if they provided Free State Brewery from Lawrence, KS but I imagine most fans are drinking either Boulevard or one of the Big Three mass-produced beers.
   81. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:52 PM (#4429746)
I would guess part of it is Boulevard is just so dominant as a craft beer in this market, its seen as "Kansas City's beer" and while I love Boulevard, it has come at the price of crowding out any other would-be craft beers in the area.


I think you get that in every market. Atlanta's "craft brew" that is available more or less everywhere is Sweetwater, usually either 420 or IPA. And it's a perfectly adequate beer. But Red Brick, Monday Night, Terrapin (Athens), Red Hare, Burnt Hickory and Jekyll Island all make better beer (and that doesn't get into the quality Crawford makes at 5 Seasons Brewpub or the stuff like Highland and such, from North Carolina.)
   82. Spectral Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:53 PM (#4429748)
Matilda is solid (no DT by any means but still good) and as mentioned I am a huge fan of Sophie, but the rest of their selection falls way short.


Their CBS series, particularly the Coffee and Cherry Rye versions are some of the best bourbon barrel-aged stuff on the market.
   83. The Polish Sausage Racer Posted: April 30, 2013 at 03:58 PM (#4429755)
TFA won't open for me, but I expect Miller Park is nowhere on the list. Miller Lite, Coors Light and a smattering of Leinie's is about all I've ever found there. It's a travesty. I assume the naming rights came with some sort of monopoly that prohibits good beer from entering the building (though that doesn't explain the presence of Leinenkugel's).
   84. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:03 PM (#4429766)
I assume the naming rights came with some sort of monopoly that prohibits good beer from entering the building (though that doesn't explain the presence of Leinenkugel's).


Busch Stadium doesn't seem to have that problem.
   85. BDC Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:03 PM (#4429767)
Miller Park is there at #9, and TFA claims that you can get "Lakefront Brewery, Milwaukee Brewing Company, Sprecher Brewery, and Horny Goat Brewing Company. But probably the most popular local brewery found at Miller Park is New Glarus."
   86. ThisElevatorIsDrivingMeUpTheWall Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:15 PM (#4429781)
It's natural to have mostly summer styles in the ballpark, but one of the best combinations I can remember was Blue Ridge Porter coupled with peanuts at Camden Yards in the late 90's. I don't know who got in cahoots with Peroni lately, it must be a distribution thing, and sadly, Nats Park has replaced what used to be a decent all-around ballpark food beer in amber Dos Equis with the blue-bottle lager that's not much better than MGD. I would really love for the park to get Anchor Steam, I think that's probably the most versatile beer around. It seems to go with everything, and if it gets warm during a 100 degree ballgame, you can still stand it.
   87. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:18 PM (#4429786)
Not Flynn, but SF is a great beer town. Other than Anchor

I may have mentioned this in a previous beer thread, but one of the softball fields where I play is right near the Anchor brewery, and when the wind is right, the whole place smells like hops.
   88. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:22 PM (#4429792)
Miller Park is there at #9, and TFA claims that you can get "Lakefront Brewery, Milwaukee Brewing Company, Sprecher Brewery, and Horny Goat Brewing Company. But probably the most popular local brewery found at Miller Park is New Glarus."

the lakefront brewery is all hype.

sprecher is a long-time Wisconsin brewery with a devoted following. they do not distribute beyond Milwaukee or if they do it's a rare place. you can order their sodas on-line. the root beer and ginger ale are tremendous.

new glarus makes many fine beers according to the aficionados but the belle cow (ha, ha) is spotted cow

I do not drink beer. but I follow such things being in Wisconsin. that and the mrs drinks beer so I have to stay up to speed on such things

   89. The Polish Sausage Racer Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:30 PM (#4429808)
Huh. I wonder where they hide it. Maybe in the Club section, where the plebes are unwelcome.
   90. God Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:32 PM (#4429813)
The thing about which stadiums serve which beers is -- where do they serve them? if there's only one stand and it's a 20-minute trek from my seat, I'm not going to be going over there very often. On a recent trip to Comiskey the most exotic thing available near my section was Blue Moon. Bummer.

I guess Shiner isn't an official microbrewery but they do some nice craft stuff that's generally only available in their variety 12-packs. The recent Prickly Pear Lager was great. Shiner's summer (Ruby Redbird) and winter (Holiday Cheer) seasonals are also top-notch.
   91. Spectral Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:33 PM (#4429815)
the lakefront brewery is all hype.

I've only tried a few of their things, but their IPA, Hefeweizen, and Stein beer were all solid, if unspectacular. What makes you say they're all hype?

Miller Park could use some Central Waters and Hinterland though.
   92. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:35 PM (#4429819)
spectral

because they continued to be part of the leftovers at all wallbanger sponsored functions. good beer does not go undrank. undrunk. you know what I mean.

   93. The Polish Sausage Racer Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:37 PM (#4429822)
Answering my own question, thanks to the At the Ballpark app: This looks like a decent bet---"Beers of Wisconsin" in section 111, 124, 212, 225 and 427 of Miller Park. I'll have to hunt these spots down. My tix are in 215 so I'm surprised I've missed the one at 212 all this time. Other than the ubiquitous Miller Lite and a few varieties of Leinie's, it just says "specialty beers" but I guess that would include craft beers.
   94. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:39 PM (#4429823)
polish

need to get that beer detector looked at big fella
   95. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:41 PM (#4429825)

sprecher is a long-time Wisconsin brewery with a devoted following. they do not distribute beyond Milwaukee or if they do it's a rare place. you can order their sodas on-line. the root beer and ginger ale are tremendous.

new glarus makes many fine beers according to the aficionados but the belle cow (ha, ha) is spotted cow

I do not drink beer. but I follow such things being in Wisconsin. that and the mrs drinks beer so I have to stay up to speed on such things


I have many a transplanted cheesehead friend in Chicago that still swears by Sprecher - and I will agree that the Spotted Cow is a superb beer.
   96. The Polish Sausage Racer Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:42 PM (#4429827)
Indeed, Harveys. If they have New Glarus on tap and I've been drinking The Champagne of Bottled Piss all these years, I will be an unhappy Polish Sausage.
   97. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:45 PM (#4429837)
for the beer lovers if you are going to Milwaukee what you need to do, and I mean you 'need' to do this, is the sprecher beer tasting at the brewery.

the brewery tour is kind of mundane. but if you pay 15 bucks you get a cheese/beer tasting. and by all accounts it is very impressive

so, now you know
   98. zonk Posted: April 30, 2013 at 04:49 PM (#4429844)
I have never been disappointed in any brewery tour... Heck, I even did the AB tour when I was down in St Louis and found it enjoyable way to spend an afternoon.
   99. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 05:08 PM (#4429879)
I'm going to grab beer on my way home today. Any recommendations for someone in the northeast with a modest beer selection at his local package store? They've got breweries like Victory, Troegs, and Smuttynose, but they don't have anything by way of small batch stuff.

eta:
if you are going to Milwaukee what you need to do, and I mean you 'need' to do this, is the sprecher beer tasting at the brewery.


I will make sure that I do this when I'm in Milwaukee next week.
   100. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: April 30, 2013 at 05:13 PM (#4429883)
(though that doesn't explain the presence of Leinenkugel's


Lenies is owned by SABMiller.

I'm very irritated that I'm going to be in Detroit and Milwaukee this coming week and neither the Tigers or the Brewers will be home while I'm there.
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