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Thursday, September 14, 2017

Traina: Evan Longoria reveals his top food pet peeve

When pennant dreams fade, sports bar owner Evan dreams of sushi.

“I love sushi,” Longoria said. “Sushi is one of my favorite things to eat. I hate when people slather their sushi with Sriracha. I used to do it just after college and I didn’t know how to eat sushi, so it was like, “I’m gonna eat this fish, but I’m just gonna put Sriracha all over it and it’ll taste like Sriracha.”

He continued, “But now you go to these nice places, there’s a place [in New York] that started in Boston called O Ya, and it’s one of my favorite sushi places. They sauce it for you, the fish is unbelievable, It doesn’t need anything else. So that’s my biggest pet peeve. I love Sriracha don’t get me wrong. I think it fits well with what it fits with.”

New York’s food scene earns even more praise.

I’m like an accoutrements guy. I like all the stuff that goes with the meal. At Peter Lugers, you’re gonna great a great steak, you’re gonna get potato, veggies. I’m for the oysters, the specialty cheese-and-meat plate and a seafood tower. I want all those things before I eat my steak. My favorite steak place to go to is Berns in Tampa. It’s actually my favorite restaurant in all the land. The variety is unbelievable the quality is unbelievable, the experience is great.”

Greg Franklin Posted: September 14, 2017 at 01:39 AM | 179 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: food, rays

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   1. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 09:45 AM (#5531405)
Born and raised in Southwest Louisiana. Worked on a commercial shrimp boat in high school. Love seafood. Won't eat sushi. If I'm going to pay that much for food, I at least want it to be dead.

Although I did once work with a guy who would eat live shrimp right off the sorting table. He'd pick one up, pop the head off, peel it, and eat it right there. Blech!
   2. Greg K Posted: September 14, 2017 at 09:49 AM (#5531407)
I thought it was wasabi that one smothers sushi in.
   3. puck Posted: September 14, 2017 at 09:58 AM (#5531411)

I thought it was wasabi that one smothers sushi in.

I was just going to say, are people putting *a lot* of sriracha on their sushi, or is there just some of it (a "hint"? I guess for most people it's more than a hint, but still not slathered), as is supposed to be the case with wasabi?
   4. Greg K Posted: September 14, 2017 at 10:04 AM (#5531416)
I recall once at an all-you-can-eat sushi place, they plopped down a lump of wasabi about the size of a golf ball. My one friend says to the other: "if you eat all of that wasabi right now, I'll pay for you". Before he could finish the sentence friend #2 pops it in his mouth.

The following half hour provided some of the best entertainment I've ever had.
   5. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 10:11 AM (#5531423)
Some sushi is so damn good it needs nothing. Some isn't. Sriracha tastes good on that stuff. Sriracha mayo, even better.
   6. BrianBrianson Posted: September 14, 2017 at 10:45 AM (#5531450)
I've never in my life seen a person eat sushi with Sriracha. Sriracha is indeed well overused - it's pretty flat as hot sauces go. Usually, it's best to find an old woman from the Leeward Islands and get her to make you a Scotch Bonnet sauce that's just Scotch Bonnets, Vinegar, and Salt. In a pinch, you can ask a Jamaican.

Although I will use Frank's Red Hot to make wings. I'm not a snob.
   7. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: September 14, 2017 at 11:06 AM (#5531474)
Fish and shellfish have souls, unlike steer, lambs and hogs. Just look into their eyes in the supermarket, and you can see straight through to God. I don't see how anyone with a trace of empathy could ever eat them.
   8. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 11:24 AM (#5531491)
I've never in my life seen a person eat sushi with Sriracha.

Seconded.

Although now that I think of it, I've never actually had Sriracha either (to my knowledge). I'm sure it's great, and I've had hot sauce and hot food, but it's never seemed to come up as yet.
   9. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 11:35 AM (#5531503)
It's usually Sriracha mayo. Which is phenomenal.
   10. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 11:39 AM (#5531508)
It's usually Sriracha mayo. Which is phenomenal.

You shut your filthy disgusting mouth. Posting this blasphemy once was bad enough, but doubling down?
   11. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 11:42 AM (#5531512)
It's usually Sriracha mayo. Which is phenomenal.

I do like mayo, so I can see giving this a shot. I may be a purist, though, so we'll have to see.


Do I have a food pet peeve? Not even sure how to define that.

Maybe AMERICAN-Italian food in general. Being in the land of Ragu, I rather think it's all truly awful at this point, as well as omnipresent. I relish visiting NY and having actual Italian food.
   12. Hot Wheeling American Posted: September 14, 2017 at 11:52 AM (#5531519)
   13. BDC Posted: September 14, 2017 at 12:17 PM (#5531539)
Naturally I read the headline as "pet food peeve."

I don't get peevish around food. I guess there are a few things I can't understand, like putting both salt and sugar on popcorn at the same time.
   14. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 12:42 PM (#5531565)
Some sushi is so damn good it needs nothing. Some isn't. Sriracha tastes good on that stuff. Sriracha mayo, even better.


Of course, the stuff that isn't - you shouldn't bother eating... granted, it's not always feasible/amendable with dinner companions, but given my druthers - if it's an untried (or unvouched) place, I'm a big fan of starting slow and small. Potentially throws dinner into chaos if you strike out, but I'd rather bow out quickly with one light round followed up by pub food from whatever is nearby than I would trudge through a complete meal of wasabi-soy protein balls. Of course, some restaurants frown on this, too -- but chances are decent enough that if happen on a new place concerned about turning tables quickly, it probably doesn't suck.

I feel the same with any sort of similar small plates/shared meals (tapas, etc)... that's supposed to be a big part of the whole point in my mind -- you're not chained to a mistake dinner.
   15. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 12:51 PM (#5531575)
I'd rate sushi in three broad categories. There's superb sushi, good sushi, and poor sushi. Superb is rare and usually expensive. Probably 90% of sushi restaurants are serving the good sushi, and most of this stuff seems like it came from some central kitchen in the center of the earth because one restaurant's sushi is virtually indistinguishable from every other's. Poor sushi is usually found in airports and grocery stores and such. That stuff isn't really worth eating, but sometimes we still do, because we have a craving. The rice is cold, the fish is cut wrong, there are too many cucumbers or whatever.
   16. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 01:52 PM (#5531615)
Eating raw flesh (actual raw, not cured or smoked) of any kind is revolting. We invented fire for a reason.
   17. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:01 PM (#5531624)

He continued, “But now you go to these nice places, there’s a place [in New York] that started in Boston called O Ya, and it’s one of my favorite sushi places.

O Ya is indeed excellent. Have never been to the one in NY, but I took my wife to the one in Boston the night I proposed.
   18. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:07 PM (#5531632)
I love raw flesh.
   19. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:30 PM (#5531658)
We invented fire for a reason.

Well, we didn't really "invent" fire per se, but I had this exact attitude until I was about 30. I grew up in the middle of Illinois in the '80s/'90s - not exactly a great way to be exposed to sushi. My one attempt was at a crappy place in college on a date. And then about 10 years ago, I actually tried good sushi. Wow. I've since tried to make up for all that lost time.

So, have you ever actually tried good sushi?

You know what's especially delicious? Raw snapper.
   20. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:33 PM (#5531661)
I'm with PF -- though, I'll bow to him on sushi because I'll admit that as much as I like it, I've never craved it enough to resort to airport/grocery store iterations.... it's something I'd only do at a restaurant.

Anyway.... we did invent fire for a reason: Because pig requires it (Chicken too, but who cares about chicken).

While I do not object to - and very much like - many dishes that involve beef or fish and require fire, both beef and some fish (again, I'll defer to PF's expertise, but I don't know that I've ever heard of your standard north american, freshwater game fish making for good sushi) could still very much be enjoyed without fire.
   21. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:38 PM (#5531664)

So, have you ever actually tried good sushi?


I find it repulsive, especially the texture. I've had very rare Tuna; ugh. Just liked I've had very rare beef; ugh.

I really don't get the concept of trying to acquire a taste for food that repulses me. There's so much good food I already like that I'd be fat as a house if I ate to my heart's content.
   22. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:40 PM (#5531665)
Anyway.... we did invent fire for a reason: Because pig requires it (Chicken too, but who cares about chicken).

It also makes digesting any meat far, far easier. If you ate a 12 oz. sirloin raw, you'd likely be sick as a dog.
   23. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:40 PM (#5531667)
Not a sushi expert by any means, just a guy that likes to eat it. I like cooked fish too. And, naturally, salted/smoked/pickled fish.
   24. GordonShumway Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:42 PM (#5531668)
So, have you ever actually tried good sushi?

I find it repulsive, especially the texture. I've had very rare Tuna; ugh. Just liked I've had very rare beef; ugh.

I really don't get the concept of trying to acquire a taste for food that repulses me. There's so much good food I already like that I'd be fat as a house if I ate to my heart's content.


What about raw oysters or clams?
   25. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:44 PM (#5531671)
If you ate a 12 oz. sirloin raw


One of my favorite restaurant memories is going to this legit bistro in France and watching a table of 6 businessmen order 4-5 entree beef tartares. I've only ever known it as an appetizer. This stuff was mixed tableside and each diner got literally a softball sized portion, 12 ounces at the least. ElRoy couldn't handle the raw egg in it, I suppose. I ordered the gorgeous squab dish that's in most of the photos. Fantastic meal. The website I linked refers to the tartare as a "tremendous portion."
   26. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:45 PM (#5531672)
What about raw oysters or clams?

I've eaten them, but don't see the appeal at all. The just taste like salt water and whatever sauce you add. I can tolerate the texture b/c you just swallow them.

To only way I like any bivalve is baked clams.
   27. I am going to be Frank Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:48 PM (#5531677)
Good beef tartare is tasty. I think the 90% number is about right. Sushi in the US probably does all come from the same place - there are only so many seafood distributors around and they'll be servicing the grocery stores and most restaurants. I don't know how stuff is graded, but the fact that every supermarket sells sushi now and so few people get sick means that the fish is at the very least edible and sanitary. That's better than the Chiptotle's of the world.

The specialty distributors and $500 sushi restaurants are the ones who get their sushi flown in directly from Japan.

I'm going to Japan in a couple weeks and plan on going to the fish market and eating a lot of raw fish. Also plan on getting some Kobe beef - probably cooked, but I'd be more than willing to eat it raw.
   28. Chicago Joe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:51 PM (#5531683)
here I was hoping this was a pet food peeve.
   29. BDC Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:53 PM (#5531687)
Not all sushi involves raw fish, by any means. Some is always cooked, at least in the US, including shrimp and eel. Eel sushi is just about my favorite food. Quite a bit of sushi is vegetarian. Koreans make sushi with cooked beef, very tasty.

The mandatory ingredient in sushi is the rice. (Plain raw fish is sashimi.) As Fish says, there is some supermarket sushi that just seems to use random rice, like Uncle Ben's Brown or something, and it is just kind of not right.
   30. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 02:57 PM (#5531692)
I really don't get the concept of trying to acquire a taste for food that repulses me.

This is how I feel about mollusks of all sorts. I'm a pretty adventurous eater, but I've already tried them and don't like it. I don't want to continue to attempt to eat unprocessed alien insects. Love sushi, though. No shrimp.
   31. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:02 PM (#5531699)
here I was hoping this was a pet food peeve.

Fancy Feast (gravy, not pate) and Authority for the cats, Nutro and Pedigree for the dogs. Newman's Own dog treats.

Any pet food peeve can be identified by my cat vomiting. Usually because he ate the dog food.
   32. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:03 PM (#5531701)
This stuff was mixed tableside and each diner got literally a softball sized portion, 12 ounces at the least. ElRoy couldn't handle the raw egg in it, I suppose.

Yeah, hold the egg and I'm fairly sure I could eat 12 ounces of tartare. Never had the opportunity to try squab, but it looks great.
   33. Chicago Joe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:04 PM (#5531702)
Our (recently acquired) dog will only eat food I have cooked. Irritating and charming all at once.
   34. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:06 PM (#5531706)
I've mentioned it before, but there's a new chain in LA and NYC called Sugarfish that I would put in the "superb sushi" category that is not at all expensive. They prove that you can take the same seafood that everyone else uses and present it so well - notably superior rice, for example, and a thoughtful omakase service style - that it really elevates the experience.

Most regular places seem to be in a kind of arms battle as to how ridiculous they can make their Kamikaze Roll (dude, salmon + tuna + salmon skin + salmon eggs + spicy mayo + fried shrimp + avocado + cream cheese + mango + octopus suckers + narwhal semen + salmon) or whatever.
   35. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:07 PM (#5531711)
Eel sushi is just about my favorite food.
I only eat sushi when my friends drag me to whatever the trendy place of the day is. Not really a fan. I think it's edible (I can't even gag down raw oysters), but I'd still usually prefer McDonalds to good sushi, even before considering that the fast food will cost 1/20 as much.

But I do enjoy myself an eel roll. Second best kind of roll, after lobster.
   36. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:11 PM (#5531719)
Fancy Feast (gravy, not pate) and Authority for the cats, Nutro and Pedigree for the dogs. Newman's Own dog treats.


My dog mostly subsists off food dropped by my children, cat food devoured from their dish when nobody is looking, and the occasional petrified cat turd filched from the litter box. People buy food for dogs? Huh.
   37. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:14 PM (#5531730)
Any pet food peeve can be identified by my cat vomiting.

My cat's pet food peeve can be identified by her not vomiting. Anything she actually enjoys gets vacuumed up and vomited out within minutes.
   38. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:15 PM (#5531731)
Also plan on getting some Kobe beef - probably cooked, but I'd be more than willing to eat it raw.

Another food I don't get. It's very tender, but lakes the flavor of a really good steak.
   39. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:18 PM (#5531733)
It also makes digesting any meat far, far easier. If you ate a 12 oz. sirloin raw, you'd likely be sick as a dog.


For the cows and portions of the cow where slicing off a portion doesn't make for a good meal - this is why we have ethiopian spiced butter and kitfo.
   40. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:18 PM (#5531734)
I find it repulsive, especially the texture. I've had very rare Tuna; ugh. Just liked I've had very rare beef; ugh.

I really don't get the concept of trying to acquire a taste for food that repulses me. There's so much good food I already like that I'd be fat as a house if I ate to my heart's content.

Yeah, fair enough. There's no pressing need to try to learn to like something you're viscerally repulsed by. My food life is plenty full and complete without ever considering eating an egg salad sandwich.
   41. Booey Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:18 PM (#5531736)
Good sushi is delicious. I was hesitant at first too; I don't think I ever dared try a real sushi restaurant until I was in my late 20's, but now it ranks up there with Italian and Mexican as my favorite types of cuisine.

I really don't get the concept of trying to acquire a taste for food that repulses me. There's so much good food I already like that I'd be fat as a house if I ate to my heart's content.


I agree with this though. Same with beverages (alcoholic or otherwise). When people tell me that certain things are acquired tastes, my response is always...why bother then? Doesn't make much sense to me to keep choking down something I don't like until I learn to tolerate it when there's so much better food/drink I could be having that I already like (the exception is veggies and other healthy crap people eat specifically because it's healthy rather than tasty. I get that).

I'm pretty open to most foods, but here's a couple of pet peeves:

- Pineapple on pizza. Yeah, I know that olives and tomatoes are technically fruits too (but they taste like vegetables!), but putting sweet/sour fruits on pizza? That's weird, man. Pineapple on pizza seems no different to me than putting grapes or apple slices or little mandarin oranges on it would be.

- Dipping Wendy's fries in chocolate frosty's. I know several people who do this. They say they love the sweet and salty mixture of flavor. Well, I say eat some trail mix then. Potatoes and ice cream just don't go together, dammit.
   42. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:19 PM (#5531738)
Anything she actually enjoys gets vacuumed up and vomited out within minutes.

Yeah, you might want to take that cat to the vet.
   43. BDC Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:20 PM (#5531743)
Fancy Feast (gravy, not pate) and Authority for the cats

Once you get into cats, plural, I have found that each cat wants to eat something different. We have a cat that will only eat kibble and white bread. The other one is more omnivorous, but it helps if you keep changing to new foods, because old ones get uninteresting to him.
   44. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:21 PM (#5531744)
Yeah, hold the egg and I'm fairly sure I could eat 12 ounces of tartare. Never had the opportunity to try squab, but it looks great.

Ever had kitfo, Ethiopian, raw seasoned ground beef? Masterful. The best French tartare isn't in the same zip code.


Another food I don't get. It's very tender, but lakes the flavor of a really good steak.

Haven't had Kobe, but I had a similar reaction to what I've been made to understand is the B team, Wagyu. It didn't seem distinctive.
   45. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:22 PM (#5531747)
Ever had kitfo, Ethiopian, raw seasoned ground beef? Masterful. The best French tartare isn't in the same zip code.

I have - there's a good Ethiopian restaurant two blocks from where I live, happily. Good stuff.
   46. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:23 PM (#5531750)
but it helps if you keep changing to new foods, because old ones get uninteresting to him.

We have two, and they generally do OK with the same thing, when the fat one isn't gobbling up the dinner of the thin one. But I do change the kibble when I can. They won't eat anything but their preferred canned Fancy Feast flavors, however. Any deviation, even within the brand, is grounds for projectile vomiting at 3 AM.
   47. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:23 PM (#5531751)
Yeah, you might want to take that cat to the vet.

For everyone's sake, she has long been on a treat-free, dry-food-only diet to manage this problem.
   48. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:23 PM (#5531753)
When people tell me that certain things are acquired tastes, my response is always...why bother then?

And then I remember how much I hated those first 20 beers. Some tastes are worth acquiring.
   49. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:24 PM (#5531754)
My beef - so to speak - with Kobe beef is that it is very marbled. And I do think that very marbled beef - if it isn't to be minced and spiced in a raw beef dish - does indeed benefit from fire.

That's supposed to be the whole point of the marbling.

It's the less marbled cuts that I think work better in filet form just warmed with a flashlight.
   50. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:26 PM (#5531758)
Few people have had real kobe beef - a tiny amount of it makes it out of Japan, and much of that to the casinos in Macau and similar places. I doubt there are five restaurants in NYC that have real kobe on their menus tonight. There might be zero.

Real kobe is so fatty that it basically occupies a totally different place in one's meal than does a steak. You wouldn't eat 8 ounces of it, even if you could afford to.

I've never had it. Some day!

I've certainly had Wagyu, which can be hit or miss. I suspect that any cow that is 1/64 wagyu is now being marketed as wagyu.
   51. Booey Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:28 PM (#5531763)
And then I remember how much I hated those first 20 beers. Some tastes are worth acquiring.


Again...why? Why not just stick with something you liked better? There's no shortage of different alcoholic beverages to choose from.
   52. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:28 PM (#5531764)
I gotta say, this thread is leading me to the RDP position on having pets. Is the companionship really worth it when so much of the interaction apparently consists of cleaning up barf?
   53. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:28 PM (#5531766)
Ever had kitfo, Ethiopian, raw seasoned ground beef? Masterful. The best French tartare isn't in the same zip code.


Wholly agree with this... I'll grant that my experience with top shelf French restaurants isn't extensive, but I've never had a French version of tartare that matches even the middling iterations I've had from the Ethiopian presentations.

Sadly, though... this is another food that I'm forever forced to only get from restaurants. I have tried on a couple of occasions to prepare my own -- the first time also trying to make my own injera (a disaster) and the second time deciding to go a little easier and just focus on the kitfo and all I got was sadness.
   54. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:29 PM (#5531768)
And then I remember how much I hated those first 20 beers. Some tastes are worth acquiring.

Again...why? Why not just stick with something you liked better? There's no shortage of different alcoholic beverages to choose from.

Because 20 vodka tonics would have really f***ed me up at that wedding, that's why.
   55. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:30 PM (#5531771)

Again...why? Why not just stick with something you liked better? There's no shortage of different alcoholic beverages to choose from.


You can't win this argument, because beer is fantastic, and it enriches my life. Acquiring the taste was unquestionably worthwhile.

(As for "why?" Probably peer pressure, I don't think I was being far-sighted about beer connoisseurship to be honest.)


I was a little icky about raw oysters the first few times. Now I love them. I dunno. I could come up with many examples, I'm sure.
   56. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:32 PM (#5531774)
And then I remember how much I hated those first 20 beers. Some tastes are worth acquiring.

I agree with this. A good, stout beer is one of my favorite things. It surely was not the first time I tried one.

Though with beer, even when you hate it, you get the benefits of alcohol. If you hate something like sushi, you're just torturing yourself by eating it unless/until you do acquire that taste. Much less appealing.
   57. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:32 PM (#5531775)
Is the companionship really worth it when so much of the interaction apparently consists of cleaning up barf?

Well, it's not "so much", and, yes. I suppose like sushi, it isn't for everyone.
   58. Booey Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:32 PM (#5531776)
You can't win this argument, because beer is fantastic, and it enriches my life. Acquiring the taste was unquestionably worthwhile.


Heh. I never made it to 20, so I'll defer to your expertise. ;-)
   59. BDC Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:36 PM (#5531784)
Acquiring the taste was unquestionably worthwhile

I think that most acquired tastes are bitter, and bitter tastes tend to be unique: sweet, salty and sour are always the same, and all people like them in various degrees, but everybody's different on the bitter flavors, and kids all tend to hate them.

Thus beer, and coffee, and many green vegetables are grown-up things, and worth working at a little.

I always liked beer (at least from the time I was 12 and allowed to have a can of Schlitz every Sunday night), and coffee (at first with lots of sugar), and even broccoli (at first with lots of cheese). It took me a longer time to like mustard or almonds or grapefruit. I was a weird kid.
   60. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:37 PM (#5531786)
snapper and I have had this argument many times. He thinks that even if you restrict yourself to several cuisines, one continent for vacations, etc, the things you already know you love, there is MORE than enough tasty things, fascinating travel opportunities, etc, for a lifetime. Personally, I cannot understand the argument, it's contrary to my every impulse. I always want more variety and more opportunity for new experiences.
   61. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:38 PM (#5531788)
Is the companionship really worth it when so much of the interaction apparently consists of cleaning up barf?

Companionship? She'll come find me when she wants her belly rubbed or her chin scratched, but otherwise she merely grudgingly accepts my presence. She's there because she's cute and because it's entertaining to watch her battle inanimate objects.
   62. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:39 PM (#5531789)
Is the companionship really worth it when so much of the interaction apparently consists of cleaning up barf?


That's not an entirely fair characterization. There's also a lot of cleaning up poop and urine.
   63. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:40 PM (#5531791)
You can't win this argument, because beer is fantastic, and it enriches my life. Acquiring the taste was unquestionably worthwhile.

I've actually lost the taste for beer. I'll drink it, but only if there's no whiskey.
   64. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:42 PM (#5531797)
I've actually lost the taste for beer. I'll drink it, but only if there's no whiskey.


That's happened to me as well over the past few years. Beer is ok, but unless I'm outdoors in excruciatingly hot weather, I'd rather just drink whiskey. Might be a middle aged taste bud thing.
   65. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:43 PM (#5531799)
But when you're 16 you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between whiskey, tequila and rubbing alcohol. That was an acquired taste too, unless you just drowned it all in orange juice.
   66. Booey Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:44 PM (#5531800)
Thus beer, and coffee, and many green vegetables are grown-up things, and worth working at a little.


I don't like veggies any more now than I did as a kid. I eat them entirely because they're healthy and I need to to get a balanced diet. But I never really acquired a taste for them.

Is the companionship really worth it when so much of the interaction apparently consists of cleaning up barf?

That's not an entirely fair characterization. There's also a lot of cleaning up poop and urine.


You could ask the exact same questions about raising kids.
   67. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:46 PM (#5531802)
Few people have had real kobe beef - a tiny amount of it makes it out of Japan, and much of that to the casinos in Macau and similar places. I doubt there are five restaurants in NYC that have real kobe on their menus tonight. There might be zero.

Real kobe is so fatty that it basically occupies a totally different place in one's meal than does a steak. You wouldn't eat 8 ounces of it, even if you could afford to.

I've never had it. Some day!

I've certainly had Wagyu, which can be hit or miss. I suspect that any cow that is 1/64 wagyu is now being marketed as wagyu.


For a good portion of the aughts and early teens - it wasn't (USDA mad cow scare bans) and even thereafter, you're exactly right that exports were rare.... that's changed somewhat the last few years -

   68. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:50 PM (#5531807)
You could ask the exact same questions about raising kids.

Oh, I'm well aware. 40, no kids thus far, still very much on the fence.
   69. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:52 PM (#5531808)
But when you're 16 you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between whiskey, tequila and rubbing alcohol.


Nah, they were easily distinguished from one another. They just all tasted bad, which is why 16yos drown whatever booze they can get their hands on with coke or juice or whatever.

You could ask the exact same questions about raising kids.


In theory kids grow up, or at least don't require as much poo/pee/vomit cleanup past a certain point. Cats and dogs are like eternal toddlers, with the only saving grace being you can lock them in the basement overnight if you're sick of their shit and nobody'll call the cops on you.
   70. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:57 PM (#5531816)
In theory kids grow up, or at least don't require as much poo/pee/vomit cleanup past a certain point.

Pets die a lot quicker than kids.

   71. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:58 PM (#5531817)
zonk, from your link:

UPDATE July 2016: In the past few months, the distribution of Kobe beef has greatly increased. While the vast majority of restaurants claiming to serve Kobe still lie, here are now 9 licensed restaurants in the US


It's more than that because there are some licensed distributors, but I don't know how many more. Not much. I clicked on a link of "top 15 kobe beef dishes in NYC" and they're almost all certainly bullshit.
   72. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 03:59 PM (#5531819)
This is pretty much the exact point at which pets die.


I've got a 16 year old cat going strong...
   73. Lassus Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:00 PM (#5531821)
Yeah, my edit was too slow.
   74. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:02 PM (#5531822)
But when you're 16 you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between whiskey, tequila and rubbing alcohol. That was an acquired taste too, unless you just drowned it all in orange juice.


The identical plastic bottles the kid variants come in lends a big clue there :-)

I continue my lifelong attempt to appreciate whiskey, but 25 years into it - I'm increasingly convinced that my young days experiences of price/volume purchasing (and Jack being the shot of choice among my herd) have ruined any chance I might have of appreciation.

Gin, OTOH... that's a work towards acquiring the taste that I've found has paid off.
   75. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:03 PM (#5531824)
snapper and I have had this argument many times. He thinks that even if you restrict yourself to several cuisines, one continent for vacations, etc, the things you already know you love, there is MORE than enough tasty things, fascinating travel opportunities, etc, for a lifetime. Personally, I cannot understand the argument, it's contrary to my every impulse. I always want more variety and more opportunity for new experiences.

I see your point with respect to new things that one feels neutral toward, or even has some indistinct aversion. But when one is actively and viscerally repulsed, (a) it would probably take a lot of work even to attempt to acquire a taste, and (b) the chances of overcoming the repulsion are probably pretty slim, and overcoming it to the point where you enjoy it enough to get a significant benefit is even slimmer. For me with sushi, it was more lack of exposure and intellectual incuriosity than active revulsion, so I was able to get on board fairly easily. Mayo, now that's a different story.
   76. Booey Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:05 PM (#5531826)
I've got a 16 year old cat going strong...


We had 5 cats growing up, and I remember my Mom saying that most of the ones she had as a kid lived about 15 years, with one outlier that made it to 18. That sounded really old at the time, but all 5 of mine and my siblings cats ended up outliving my Mom's record holder. Two made it to 20, the other three died at 19.
   77. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:06 PM (#5531827)
I hear you ElRoy. We all have limits too, I'm not saying I'd rather go Haiti for the novelty of it than take another trip to Italy.
   78. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:09 PM (#5531830)
We had cats on my grandparents' farm when I was growing up. You couldn't get too attached, because between the freedom to wander away as they pleased, coyotes and hawks, occasional traffic on the country road, etc., they didn't tend to last all that long. It was more like a rotating ensemble cast of cats - they had pet "cats" as a general concept, not particular cats.
   79. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:09 PM (#5531831)
Maybe the difference is that I actively enjoy and relish the experience of conquering an aversion. snapper also seems to have less than zero patience for anything that makes him uncomfortable, whereas I really don't mind some discomfort at all. Yeah, I'll try the rancid shark in Iceland, why the hell not.
   80. SandyRiver Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:10 PM (#5531834)
I don't know that I've ever heard of your standard north american, freshwater game fish making for good sushi


Ever tried cold-smoked salmon? Or lox? Pretty much the same texture as fresh from the water. I got introduced to sushi and sashimi during our Japan trip last year, and liked the former enough that now I'll grab a few pieces from a buffet. Kimchi, too. The tuna sashimi I had in Japan was good, the octopus chewy and bland, the scallops a disappointment - I love properly (meaning, barely) cooked scallops. Raw, their flavor was so subtle as to be lost amid the aromas from other foods - to me, a waste. We had a fair amount of cold-smoked salmon in Norway last month, also some half-cooked "fish-on-a-stick" at the Bergen fish market; hours-from-the-sea fish was tasty even when barely heated past lukewarm.

Cat food has dropped in quality over the +/-60 years since I took care of the neighbor's 2 Siamese while the family was away. The canned tuna (dark, strong-flavored, from whatever species was sufficiently cheap to feed cats) was really tasty, though given the battle skills of that pair - together, more than a match for any dog in the neighborhood - I dared not eat too much lest they turn on me.

As for keeping pets, I recently read this encouragement, "Be the kind of person your dog thinks you are." Reaching for high standards is always a good thing.
   81. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:13 PM (#5531836)
Cat food has dropped in quality over the +/-60 years since I took care of the neighbor's 2 Siamese while the family was away. The canned tuna (dark, strong-flavored, from whatever species was sufficiently cheap to feed cats) was really tasty, though given the battle skills of that pair - together, more than a match for any dog in the neighborhood - I dared not eat too much lest they turn on me.

Did you parents not feed you??
   82. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:16 PM (#5531839)
But when you're 16 you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between whiskey, tequila and rubbing alcohol. That was an acquired taste too, unless you just drowned it all in orange juice.

The difference between beer and whiskey is that you can't mix beer. You can start out drinking whiskey in sweet cocktails (you can make a Manhattan or an Old Fashioned or Sour very palatable) and then gradually reduce the sweetness.

Whiskey on the rocks is good when you're savoring, but at dinner or a party, I still mostly drink cocktails.
   83. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:18 PM (#5531840)
Yeah, I'll try the rancid shark in Iceland, why the hell not.

I would imagine it's not binary - I think, whether they consciously realize it or not, most people have some range of new tastes/experiences within which their reaction is "yeah, why the hell not," and outside of which it's a "hell no." I've found my "why not" sphere has expanded significantly in recent years, to include (for example) chapaulines (not a bad experience) and raw ghost pepper (not a good experience). But rancid-smelling things, up to and including Greek yogurt, are still actively repulsive.
   84. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:19 PM (#5531843)
Whiskey on the rocks is good when you're savoring, but at dinner or a party, I still mostly drink cocktails.


One of the great appeals of whiskey to me is that I don't need anything to enjoy it other than a glass to put it in (and not even that in a pinch). It doesn't need to be cold, it doesn't require mixers, etc.
   85. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:19 PM (#5531844)
The difference between beer and whiskey is that you can't mix beer.

Nonsense. Bartender, a shandy please for my friend Snapper.
   86. SandyRiver Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:20 PM (#5531845)
But when one is actively and viscerally repulsed, (a) it would probably take a lot of work even to attempt to acquire a taste, and (b) the chances of overcoming the repulsion are probably pretty slim, and overcoming it to the point where you enjoy it enough to get a significant benefit is even slimmer.


Reminds me of the story about a man who was hitting himself on the head with a shovel. When asked why, he answered, "Because it feels so good when I stop!"

Yeah, I'll try the rancid shark in Iceland, why the hell not.


Only had 2 days in Iceland, on the way to Norway, so no opportunity for that, but I found skyr - the local dairy specialty - to be wonderful, about 2 levels above good yogurt.

"Did you parents not feed you??"

More than I needed... wasn't really hungry, but its aroma drew me in. There are almost no foods that I don't like, but my one sample of gamelost (translation: "old cheese") was more than enough. Trying it was kind of a rite of passage while visiting one of my wife's Norwegian-born grandfathers. My (very) faint praise is that it doesn't taste quite as bad as it smells.
   87. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:21 PM (#5531846)
I am not anxious to taste the Sardinian maggot cheese.
   88. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:25 PM (#5531850)
Ever tried cold-smoked salmon? Or lox? Pretty much the same texture as fresh from the water. I got introduced to sushi and sashimi during our Japan trip last year, and liked the former enough that now I'll grab a few pieces from a buffet. Kimchi, too. The tuna sashimi I had in Japan was good, the octopus chewy and bland, the scallops a disappointment - I love properly (meaning, barely) cooked scallops. Raw, their flavor was so subtle as to be lost amid the aromas from other foods - to me, a waste. We had a fair amount of cold-smoked salmon in Norway last month, also some half-cooked "fish-on-a-stick" at the Bergen fish market; hours-from-the-sea fish was tasty even when barely heated past lukewarm.


Ah yes - you're right... I've had Russian iterations of salted/smoked salmon - uncooked - and I am very much a fan.

GF's stepmom is Russian - and they do a whole holiday first course of lots of raw fish that is only smoked or otherwise salt cured - and I enjoyed it immensely. Don't recall the complete list of what we had, but the salmon was definitely a highlight.
   89. BDC Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:27 PM (#5531854)
One of the great appeals of whiskey to me is that I don't need anything to enjoy it other than a glass to put it in

My Irish ex-in-laws said that Scotch could not be drunk without water added, so I never tried it any other way. I never liked it. Somebody gave me a bottle of Johnnie Walker Red the other month and I finally opened it last week, and just had a finger of it neat. I thought it was fairly acceptable – though you're probably going to tell me that Johnnie Walker Red is mostly methanol or worse.
   90. BDC Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:30 PM (#5531859)
GF's stepmom is Russian - and they do a whole holiday first course of lots of raw fish that is only smoked or otherwise salt cured - and I enjoyed it immensely

La Dernière's brother is Danish and lives on the Baltic, a couple hundred meters from a smokehouse. I told her the other day that I was really looking forward to their smoked-fish buffet next time we visit him – only nine months or so to go :-D
   91. Nose army. Beef diaper? (CoB) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:31 PM (#5531860)
Yeah, I'll try the rancid shark in Iceland, why the hell not.


I have to admit, I've always been fascinated by the How? of how hakarl came about.

It must have been something like this ...

2 months? ####, Sven's dead, put it back.

3 months? Dammit, there goes Olaf, put it back.

4 months, Bjorn, stop puking and pick up your axe! The rest of you, put that down.

5 months? Vlad's looking fine, dig in boys!!!

From Wiki:

Chef Anthony Bourdain described kæstur hákarl as "the single worst, most disgusting and terrible tasting thing" he has ever eaten.[1]
   92. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:33 PM (#5531863)
My Irish ex-in-laws said that Scotch could not be drunk without water added, so I never tried it any other way. I never liked it. Somebody gave me a bottle of Johnnie Walker Red the other month and I finally opened it last week, and just had a finger of it neat. I thought it was fairly acceptable – though you're probably going to tell me that Johnnie Walker Red is mostly methanol or worse.

Yeah. Johnnie Walker Red is borderline undrinkable. It's the cheap stuff for bars and clubs to mix. To me, it's several clear notches below Dewar's White Label, which is the cheapest scotch I actually can enjoy.

The Black and Green are very good, and the Blue is exquisite (and also $175 a bottle).

I've generally heard that you always want at least one piece of ice, or a little bit of water to open up the whiskey. Even a few drops is a big improvement over neat.

BTW, I just made myself a Manhattan. Thanks guys!
   93. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:39 PM (#5531874)
My Irish ex-in-laws said that Scotch could not be drunk without water added, so I never tried it any other way. I never liked it.


Drink your whiskey however you like it. I'll make fun of people who overpay for a whiskey and then drown it with water/ice, but eh, it's their dime.

Somebody gave me a bottle of Johnnie Walker Red the other month and I finally opened it last week, and just had a finger of it neat. I thought it was fairly acceptable – though you're probably going to tell me that Johnnie Walker Red is mostly methanol or worse.


It's cheap blended scotch. If you like it neat that's actually great news. You'll always be able to find a bottle and won't have to spend very much. You're winning scotch! Some of the most knowledgeable and experienced bourbon drinkers I know drink mostly Wild Turkey 101 ($24 or less per bottle) as their everyday tipple.
   94. The Good Face Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:43 PM (#5531877)
Chef Anthony Bourdain described kæstur hákarl as "the single worst, most disgusting and terrible tasting thing" he has ever eaten.[1]


It smelled like a very dirty litter box to me. Tastes better than it smells, but that's a low threshold.
   95. PreservedFish Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:43 PM (#5531879)
I have to admit, I've always been fascinated by the How? of how hakarl came about.

2 months? ####, Sven's dead, put it back.


Rancidity microbes actually usually outcompete the most dangerous pathogens, so rancid food isn't necessarily unsafe to eat. I just learned that they actually specifically design fish shrink wrapping to encourage rancidity so that customers throw it in the garbage quickly. If it's packed in low-oxygen pathogens can make the fish dangerous without triggering our "yucky" response.
   96. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:44 PM (#5531881)
Chef Anthony Bourdain described kæstur hákarl as "the single worst, most disgusting and terrible tasting thing" he has ever eaten.[1]

This is significant, in that it apparently tops the minimally cleaned warthog rectum from the Namibia episode of No Reservations.
   97. Covfefe Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:48 PM (#5531887)
Chef Anthony Bourdain described kæstur hákarl as "the single worst, most disgusting and terrible tasting thing" he has ever eaten.[1]


So the Malört of food...

That's an (allegedly) human consumable substance that really has no reason to exist.
   98. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:51 PM (#5531889)
Malort exists so that people can post pictures of other people making Malort faces. I tried the stuff once. Did not enjoy it. Will not try it again.
   99. Omineca Greg Posted: September 14, 2017 at 04:57 PM (#5531901)
On Sunday I had some sushi in Kamloops. One of the things I had was Spicy Salmon Roll. It was swimming in sriracha and sriracha mayonnaise. First time that had ever happened to me. I didn't like it. One piece was OK, but after that...not as much. You could barely tell there was salmon in there.

And the agedashi had some sort of gelatin type substance around each piece. I'd never had that before either. It was alright.

In BC, all fish that's to be served raw has to be frozen to kill parasites. Does that happen in other places in the world, or just here? Whenever I've had sushi in other places, it's seemed really good to me, not that I haven't had good meals here, but each time I've been abroad and had sushi, it seemed that much better.
   100. Nose army. Beef diaper? (CoB) Posted: September 14, 2017 at 05:04 PM (#5531904)
Rancidity microbes actually usually outcompete the most dangerous pathogens, so rancid food isn't necessarily unsafe to eat.


What I guess I left unsaid was that hakarl came about because the raw shark meat in question was poisonous as caught ... I was just wondering about the thought process behind "this thing is poisonous, let's bury it in the sand for a while and see what happens" ...
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