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Wednesday, June 04, 2014

TSL: Adam Jones is chillin’ as an African-American All-Star. He’s a throwback to MLB’s future.

Ha! Some street smarts…even Glassey was joshin’ with you.

Gamble: Rumor has it you were a freak of nature in high school and baseball just came naturally.

Jones: “Up throughout high school it was just pure athleticism that made me good in baseball. It wasn’t coached or necessarily taught. Once I got into pro ball I began learning a lot, but before that everything else was just raw skills. I had some people around me like a guy that I don’t mention a lot but he played major league baseball – Josh Glassey. He’s from the San Diego area but he’s about seven or eight years older than me. He had an idea and knew what to expect so he gave me a little bit of a heads up a year before I experienced it. I remember when I’m starting to get into my junior and senior year; he gave me a lot of advice about the next level. Like what to expect, how to start training your body, how to be mentally prepared…just teaching me the game. Like I said, I was very raw. I wish I worked a little bit harder in high school, but I think it all worked out.”

Gamble: What’s your greatest weapon as a five-tool player?

Jones: “ It’s my passion and my respect. I respect the hell out of this game. I respect the history. I respect the veterans. I respect the chain of command. (For instance), someone who has 10-year service time, I recognize that he’s earned every day of those 10 years. They just don’t hand out service time in the big leagues. I’ve been big into respecting those aspects of the game and knowing that I will exhaust whatever I have in my tank for my teammates and the game. That’s my greatest weapon. “

Gamble: Isn’t street smarts the foundation and a weapon in the arsenal of most successful black Americans these days?

Jones: “The real world doesn’t care about street smarts. There’s no money in street smarts. Your nickel and diming it. These kids need an education. To me that’s where it all starts. If you hand in a resume and they see you went to a prestigious school, then that right there is going to get you some cool points in the job market. Saying someone is street savvy means nothing. No one cares about that stuff no more. It’s good to have street smarts once you understand how to gain success in the real world. I’m not naïve to the fact of what’s going on in the streets.”

Repoz Posted: June 04, 2014 at 04:43 PM | 49 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: history, orioles

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   1. Esoteric Posted: June 04, 2014 at 05:40 PM (#4719156)
Pretty hard to dislike Adam Jones. This Mariners fan still thinks sadly about what might have been...
   2. madvillain Posted: June 04, 2014 at 05:58 PM (#4719182)
The real world doesn’t care about street smarts. There’s no money in street smarts. Your nickel and diming it. These kids need an education. To me that’s where it all starts. If you hand in a resume and they see you went to a prestigious school, then that right there is going to get you some cool points in the job market. Saying someone is street savvy means nothing. No one cares about that stuff no more. It’s good to have street smarts once you understand how to gain success in the real world. I’m not naïve to the fact of what’s going on in the streets.”


wow, that is an awesome ####### answer. It's like he's channeling David Simon. Street smarts will help you slang rock and not get killed. But having that sort of mentality when no longer on The Streets is pretty useless. Stringer couldn't get Avon to realize this, and both ended up worse for trying.

The author was trying to lead him into saying it can be an advantage to come from the ghetto and have have a Ghetto Mentality. Jones set him straight. I'm no Glen Beck and the deck is stacked against AAs, but escaping that street, ghetto mentality is critical to black success.
   3. GEB4000 Posted: June 04, 2014 at 06:16 PM (#4719198)
I see street smarts as meaning common sense. While it's not impressive on a job resume, it does come in handy and is valued on the job.
   4. Yeaarrgghhhh Posted: June 04, 2014 at 06:19 PM (#4719202)
I see street smarts as meaning common sense. While it's not impressive on a job resume, it does come in handy and is valued on the job.

I agree and I think that's what Jones is saying. Street smarts might help you do the job, but they won't help you get the job.
   5. steagles Posted: June 04, 2014 at 07:48 PM (#4719252)
Pretty hard to dislike Adam Jones. This Mariners fan still thinks sadly about what might have been....
.220 AVG, .370 SLG.

safeco would have killed him, just like it's killed every other mariners prospect. and adrian beltre.
   6. cardsfanboy Posted: June 04, 2014 at 07:55 PM (#4719255)
safeco would have killed him, just like it's killed every other mariners prospect. and adrian beltre.


Not relevant to Jones, but that is why I believe the park factors for Safeco, because you can see it in the bats. It's also why I don't believe in the park factors for Anaheim for 2012.
   7. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 04, 2014 at 08:12 PM (#4719262)

Not relevant to Jones, but that is why I believe the park factors for Safeco, because you can see it in the bats. It's also why I don't believe in the park factors for Anaheim for 2012.


Well, it depends on what you think Park Factors are measuring.

I agree that it's unlikely that Anaheim's park suddenly starting suppressing offense with the best pitcher's parks in baseball over the past three years. OTOH, if you simply believe that park factors should reflect the value of a run scored in a given year, then whatever role the park itself had in influencing the run environment is irrelevant.

And as I argued the last time this came up, I don't see any reason to think Safeco retarded development of hitters, as opposed to the pathetic tenant of the park. Suppressing offensive numbers is not the same thing as screwing up ballplayers.

   8. JE (Jason) Posted: June 04, 2014 at 08:25 PM (#4719269)
At least this J.R. Gamble piece contains some interesting nuggets. Remember the last Gamble piece that got posted here?
   9. cardsfanboy Posted: June 04, 2014 at 08:29 PM (#4719270)
And as I argued the last time this came up, I don't see any reason to think Safeco retarded development of hitters, as opposed to the pathetic tenant of the park. Suppressing offensive numbers is not the same thing as screwing up ballplayers.


Absolutely agree with that point.

I agree that it's unlikely that Anaheim's park suddenly starting suppressing offense with the best pitcher's parks in baseball over the past three years. OTOH, if you simply believe that park factors should reflect the value of a run scored in a given year, then whatever role the park itself had in influencing the run environment is irrelevant.


My issue is more about evaluating individual players based upon those numbers, if someone wants to argue Trout had a massively better year and is using the park factors(such as ops+ or War or something that relies on park factors) than someone like Cabrera, I think that they have to acknowledge that Anaheim had freaky park factor years that is inconsistent with it's history and even future as it was a two year blip. (mind you, again, it's not enough to move Cabrera ahead of Trout, but it's a point in the discussion beyond simply pointing to war/waa)
   10. steagles Posted: June 04, 2014 at 08:41 PM (#4719274)
And as I argued the last time this came up, I don't see any reason to think Safeco retarded development of hitters, as opposed to the pathetic tenant of the park. Suppressing offensive numbers is not the same thing as screwing up ballplayers.
it can be. if HRs turn into outs and doubles turn into outs, how the hell can you just tell a guy to keep doing what he's doing? look at what adrian beltre did in seattle in the prime of his career vs. what he did before and after. that's what safeco does to hitters. and it goes beyond OPS+.
   11. Joyful Calculus Instructor Posted: June 04, 2014 at 08:42 PM (#4719275)
Throwback to the future? What?
   12. Arbitol Dijaler Posted: June 04, 2014 at 08:56 PM (#4719281)

wow, that is an awesome ####### answer. It's like he's channeling David Simon.


Or Bill Cosby, for that matter. God I love Bill Cosby.
   13. JuanGone..except1game Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:02 PM (#4719284)
The author was trying to lead him into saying it can be an advantage to come from the ghetto and have have a Ghetto Mentality. Jones set him straight. I'm no Glen Beck and the deck is stacked against AAs, but escaping that street, ghetto mentality is critical to black success.


Won't lie. I have much bigger problem in your read in to the author's questions than the actual question. Sounds kind of like you are Glenn Beck.
   14. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:05 PM (#4719285)
it can be. if HRs turn into outs and doubles turn into outs, how the hell can you just tell a guy to keep doing what he's doing? look at what adrian beltre did in seattle in the prime of his career vs. what he did before and after. that's what safeco does to hitters. and it goes beyond OPS+.


And I don't buy it. Safeco didn't screw up Bret Boone, who had his best years, by far, there, or Edgar Martinez or Jay Buhner or Mike Cameron (the prevailing sentiment seems to be that it's particularly vexing to righthanded hitters, so I've just listed those types). Its magical developmentally crushing offensive prowess really didn't begin until around 2005, or about that period when the M's organization was sinking to its position as one of the worst in baseball.

Your role in developing hitters is pretty damn simple, whether your team plays in Coors or the Astrodome. Get your guys to swing at good strikes, take balls and swing hard. That's pretty much it. In some ballparks you will be rewarded with better outcomes than others, but the philosophy doesn't change. And if the ballpark was getting in the heads of these Mariners' hitters, that's still on the coaching staff/organization for letting it happen.

Safeco (or the old Astrodome or PETCO) will suppress hitting outcomes; it shouldn't suppress the hitting process. The latter is what the good organizations are developing.
   15. steagles Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:12 PM (#4719288)
And I don't buy it. Safeco didn't screw up Bret Boone, who had his greatest season ever there, or Edgar Martinez or Jay Buhner or Mike Cameron (the prevailing sentiment seems to be that it's particularly vexing to righthanded hitters, so I've just listed those types). Its magical developmentally crushing offensive prowess really didn't begin until around 2005, or about that period when the M's organization was sinking to its position as one of the worst in baseball.
hmmm. what else started happening around 2005? oh, that's right, a precipitous decline in league-wide offensive production.


*edit* that sounds a bit too snarky, so i'll clarify it in another post in a few minutes.
   16. cardsfanboy Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:18 PM (#4719292)
it can be. if HRs turn into outs and doubles turn into outs, how the hell can you just tell a guy to keep doing what he's doing? look at what adrian beltre did in seattle in the prime of his career vs. what he did before and after. that's what safeco does to hitters. and it goes beyond OPS+.


And it's the coaches job to teach/train the players to not let the park get into your head. If you fail to train that, then it's the coaching fault that the players fail to develop and not the parks fault. Same could be said about Coors field for both hitters and pitchers.
   17. steagles Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:27 PM (#4719299)
okay, so i don't think it can be denied that MLB has seen a decline in offensive production over the last few years. but that's a result, not a cause.

the cause (or at least one of them), is that batted balls (specifically fly balls) are not travelling as far as they were 10 years ago. that effects players equally in all parks (with exceptions for humidity, wind, altitude, etc.).

however, with a stadium like safeco, that effect is magnified because of its larger dimensions (and, i guess it's also negatively effected by humidity, wind AND altitude, so you're really getting dinged in every possible way). they have fewer HRs to start with, but also, a higher percentage of the HRs that were hit, fell into the 10 or 15 or 20 or so feet beyond the walls that those balls are no longer traveling. and those balls, that would be HRs anywhere else, turn into outs at safeco.
   18. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:27 PM (#4719300)
</blockquote>ook at what adrian beltre did in seattle in the prime of his career vs. what he did before and after. that's what safeco does to hitters. and it goes beyond OPS+.</blockquote>

Oh, come off it. Dodger Stadium was then and always has been one of the more sever pitcher's parks in the league.

Why hasn't this crippled the Dodgers' ability to produce talents like Piazza, Kemp, Cey, or any of the other good players they've developed? Why haven't the Rays struggled to produce hitters in the last few years? How did the Astros come up with Morgan, Wynn. Biggio, Bagwell, Berkman, etc?

The Mariners' hitters don't develop because the Mariners draft hitters poorly and coach them poorly. Full stop.
   19. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:33 PM (#4719305)
hmmm. what else started happening around 2005? oh, that's right, a precipitous decline in league-wide offensive production.


For Seattle, it looks like its offensive output (relative to the rest of the AL) dipped precipitously between 2003 and 2004 (not really sure how league-wide offensive production is even relevant, but there you go). Unless you can show how Safeco changed from 2003 to 2012 (since, in fact it did change before the 2013 campaign), which isn't evident from the Park Factors, then I don't know how the park went from one where righties had no trouble putting up nice numbers to one where all their hopes and dreams were crushed.

   20. steagles Posted: June 04, 2014 at 09:40 PM (#4719310)
The Mariners' hitters don't develop because the Mariners draft hitters poorly and coach them poorly. Full stop.
And it's the coaches job to teach/train the players to not let the park get into your head. If you fail to train that, then it's the coaching fault that the players fail to develop and not the parks fault. Same could be said about Coors field for both hitters and pitchers.


nope. i can understand why you'd like to think those things are true, but they aren't. at least not as it relates to hitters in safeco and pitchers in coors.
   21. cardsfanboy Posted: June 04, 2014 at 10:16 PM (#4719336)
nope. i can understand why you'd like to think those things are true, but they aren't. at least not as it relates to hitters in safeco and pitchers in coors


Yep, I'm right and you're wrong.
It's the coaches job to preach and teach to the players. Players fail to develop if they try to exceed their capabilities and if the coaches are teaching them that it's not possible to put up good numbers, and to stay within what works for you and improve on those categories and don't try to change something that isn't going to improve.
   22. Sweatpants Posted: June 04, 2014 at 10:24 PM (#4719341)
okay, so i don't think it can be denied that MLB has seen a decline in offensive production over the last few years. but that's a result, not a cause.

the cause (or at least one of them), is that batted balls (specifically fly balls) are not travelling as far as they were 10 years ago. that effects players equally in all parks (with exceptions for humidity, wind, altitude, etc.).

however, with a stadium like safeco, that effect is magnified because of its larger dimensions (and, i guess it's also negatively effected by humidity, wind AND altitude, so you're really getting dinged in every possible way). they have fewer HRs to start with, but also, a higher percentage of the HRs that were hit, fell into the 10 or 15 or 20 or so feet beyond the walls that those balls are no longer traveling. and those balls, that would be HRs anywhere else, turn into outs at safeco.
Yeah, I'm pretty sure you're just talking out of your ass here. Richie Sexson went to Safeco Field and hit like Richie Sexson (to be fair, he became terrible pretty quickly). Raul Ibanez had his best seasons in Safeco. Russell Branyan played arguably the best baseball of his career in Safeco. Kyle Seager is presently gunning for his third consecutive 20-homer season. Plenty of guys have hit in Safeco.

You brought up Adrian Beltre, who went to Safeco and was about average as a hitter. It wasn't surprising that he hit like that, though. He was a good-glove 3B with erratic offense. His LA OPS+ was 108, and it dropped all the way to 101 with Seattle. He hit .798 on the road from '05-'09, and he's hit .856 on the road since. It's possible that Safeco was stifling him in a way that spilled over to his road performance, but I think it's a lot more likely that his game just took a while to mature.
   23. Infinite Joost (Voxter) Posted: June 04, 2014 at 10:46 PM (#4719361)
nope. i can understand why you'd like to think those things are true, but they aren't. at least not as it relates to hitters in safeco and pitchers in coors.


"Despite all the evidence to the contrary, I continue to assert something stupid."

That's what you've said. You're completely and totally wrong, and have been proven wrong. Admit it or shut the #### up.
   24. The Clarence Thomas of BBTF (scott) Posted: June 05, 2014 at 12:04 AM (#4719407)
I haven't gotten deep into the weeds on this, but I don't find STEAGLES argument to be specious on its face. So really we should probably all take a step back and try to cajole someone smart enough to do the math but stupid enough to take on the legwork to look all this up for us.
   25. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 05, 2014 at 12:21 AM (#4719418)
I haven't gotten deep into the weeds on this, but I don't find STEAGLES argument to be specious on its face. So really we should probably all take a step back and try to cajole someone smart enough to do the math but stupid enough to take on the legwork to look all this up for us.


I don't think there's a way to tease it out. His argument is that Safeco is retarding the development of the M's hitters. Ours is that the known-shittiness that was the Mariners 2004-mostly present is the culprit of whatever developmental failures occurred there. I don't see any way to isolate these factors from one another.

What we have on our side, however, is the fact that before the organization went in the shitter, the team had no problem getting solid performances out of its hitters, with several developing right there in the Emerald City. That and the fact that players have historically been able to develop as hitters in parks that were even more offense-deflating than Safeco.





   26. Walt Davis Posted: June 05, 2014 at 12:43 AM (#4719424)
the cause (or at least one of them), is that batted balls (specifically fly balls) are not travelling as far as they were 10 years ago.

Evidence?

Cuz HR/FB hasn't changed a bit really. None of the on-contact numbers have really changed.

AL
2013 7.9%
2008 7.3%
2003 7.8%
1998 8.0%

We've been over this plenty of times. The offensive drop is almost entirely due to increased K rates. Batters are getting the same results when they hit the ball as they were getting in the sillyball era.

   27. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: June 05, 2014 at 01:15 AM (#4719431)
#26

Well then that proves it, it was all about the PEDs. Without PEDs, of course batters are swinging and missing more. It's so logical, how could we not see this. The fact was that PEDs gave every batter better eyesight!
   28. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: June 05, 2014 at 05:05 AM (#4719447)
#27

The stronger you are, the faster you can swing a bat. The faster you can swing a bat, the later you start your swing. The later you start your swing, the more time you have to assess the location and hittability of a pitch, which I would assume leads to decreased Ks.

I also don't see where anyone has mentioned PEDs in this thread, so I'm not sure why you felt the need to make that comment.
   29. the Hugh Jorgan returns Posted: June 05, 2014 at 05:50 AM (#4719450)
#27
Try turning on your sarcasm meter....
   30. Publius Publicola Posted: June 05, 2014 at 07:33 AM (#4719461)
It looks to me like Gamble is trying to be the next Ralph Wiley.
   31. AROM Posted: June 05, 2014 at 09:38 AM (#4719512)
Yeah, I'm pretty sure you're just talking out of your ass here. Richie Sexson went to Safeco Field and hit like Richie Sexson (to be fair, he became terrible pretty quickly). Raul Ibanez had his best seasons in Safeco. Russell Branyan played arguably the best baseball of his career in Safeco. Kyle Seager is presently gunning for his third consecutive 20-homer season. Plenty of guys have hit in Safeco.


Sexson was a righty. The other 3 are lefties. Safeco is much tougher on righties than on lefty hitters.

The stronger you are, the faster you can swing a bat. The faster you can swing a bat, the later you start your swing. The later you start your swing, the more time you have to assess the location and hittability of a pitch, which I would assume leads to decreased Ks.


Evidence is against that assumption. Bonds did decrease his strikeouts. Pretty much every other steroid slugger increased their K's at the same time they increased their homers and overall production. What it might be is this: faster bat speed = less time where bat is in the hitting zone.
   32. alilisd Posted: June 05, 2014 at 10:11 AM (#4719542)
Hey, Josh Glassey is the son of my high school baseball coach. Cool!
   33. Ray (RDP) Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:02 AM (#4719596)
Or Bill Cosby, for that matter. God I love Bill Cosby.


There's solid evidence that Cosby is a serial sexual predator.
   34. Ray (RDP) Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:04 AM (#4719601)
I do think the current iteration of Safeco is killing Mariners' hitting prospects, as I've noted before.

No, I can't "prove" it; I haven't studied the issue. But it's pretty hard to miss the fact that a number of their good hitting prospects have flopped in recent years.

To use an example (granted not of a prospect), Cano has no home runs there this year. I mean, Cano knows how to hit home runs. And his skills don't appear to have atrophied. But it's hard to hit home runs in that park, and everything flows from there. He's only hit 2 home runs on the road but he has more XBH on the road; his SLG is 90 points higher on the road.
   35. Ray (RDP) Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:10 AM (#4719604)
And I don't buy it. Safeco didn't screw up Bret Boone, who had his best years, by far, there, or Edgar Martinez or Jay Buhner or Mike Cameron


Different era.
   36. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:14 AM (#4719608)
I do think the current iteration of Safeco is killing Mariners' hitting prospects, as I've noted before.


Yes, but you're wrong a lot. (-:

Cano's got a 131 OPS+, a bit down from the last two years but above his career average. He's hitting fine.

Kyle Saeger has developed nicely. Michael Saunders seems to be progressing as a hitter.

Prospects sometimes flop, particularly those playing for crappy organizations as the M's have been for the better part of the decade. This magical Safeco Prospect Destruction Ability seems to be concentrated on the period between 2004-2011, since before and after it wasn't ever noticed or evident. As theories go, it's quite lacking.

Different era.


What changed at Safeco between 2001 and 2004?
   37. Ray (RDP) Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:18 AM (#4719614)
Yep, I'm right and you're wrong.
It's the coaches job to preach and teach to the players. Players fail to develop if they try to exceed their capabilities and if the coaches are teaching them that it's not possible to put up good numbers, and to stay within what works for you and improve on those categories and don't try to change something that isn't going to improve.


"Coaching" doesn't cause multiple good prospects to flop.

The ballpark has been the one constant. Have you even shown that the coaches have been the same all the way through? Because they're certainly not the same coaches in A vs AA vs AAA, etc.

And the ballpark issue seems to be more than just "pitcher's park." Established hitters have fallen off there too.


   38. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:23 AM (#4719617)
Same Primate, of course, but for some reason it amuses me to think of #35 as the response to #33.
   39. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:26 AM (#4719622)
"Coaching" doesn't cause multiple good prospects to flop.


Why not? KC has seen numerous decent prospects fail to develop at the major league level, but no one blames Kauffman for those failures.

The ballpark has been the one constant. Have you even shown that the coaches have been the same all the way through? Because they're certainly not the same coaches in A vs AA vs AAA, etc.


Yes, and the ballpark was the same in 2001 and 2012 as it was in 2005-11. So why wasn't it killing development then.

Prospects fail for a variety of reasons - early ceilings, injury, poor coaching, they weren't that good to begin with, etc. The M's had a handful of them go splat at a time when the M's were screwing up just about everything (failing to identify which guys to keep and which guys to deal would show up here). The idea that an inanimate object, which only three years earlier (and to a lesser extent, a few years later) had displayed no such ability, was responsible for the inability to players to properly develop their skills is folly.

   40. Ray (RDP) Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:26 AM (#4719623)
Cano's got a 131 OPS+, a bit down from the last two years but above his career average. He's hitting fine.


I'm loathe to read too much into 200 PA splits, but as noted his power is down at Safeco. Do you concede that?
   41. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: June 05, 2014 at 11:31 AM (#4719626)
I'm loathe to read too much into 200 PA splits, but as noted his power is down at Safeco. Do you concede that?


Of course. No one disputes Safeco has been a pitcher's park, one that's ranged from mild to solid, just as many others before it. Cano should not expect his raw numbers to be as surface impressive as they were when he played in New York. That's a much different thing than saying that the ballpark is responsible for retarding development of the skill of hitting, as is the claim.
   42. Jose Can Still Seabiscuit Posted: June 05, 2014 at 12:25 PM (#4719677)
The ballpark has been the one constant. Have you even shown that the coaches have been the same all the way through? Because they're certainly not the same coaches in A vs AA vs AAA, etc.


Most organizations have an "organizational philosophy" so while the specific coaches change it is likely that the approach is fairly similar.
   43. Zach Posted: June 08, 2014 at 01:34 AM (#4721208)
Wow, great interview.
   44. cardsfanboy Posted: June 08, 2014 at 01:55 AM (#4721212)
"Coaching" doesn't cause multiple good prospects to flop.


Did someone actually say that? One of the stupidest things ever uttered on this site, and that's saying a lot.
   45. bookbook Posted: June 08, 2014 at 09:45 AM (#4721235)
+The Mariners' hitters don't develop because the Mariners draft hitters poorly and coach them poorly. Full stop.+

As with everything in life, it ain't that simple.

Unlike some other pitcher' sparks, Safeco suppresses batted ball distance (air, cool temps, orientation of the field). There have also been problems with visibility and the batter's eye - hopefully addressed by now.

I know we like to pretend all intangible factors don't matter, but if you're a young hitter and you square up the ball only to have it die short of the warning track on a regular basis, (when it would be a solid home run in a neutral park), it's absolutely more difficult to build the confidence to believe that you belong in the major leagues. It's no excuse for the pathetic M's front office, but it's a factor.

The M's position player drafting strategy ought to be "draft only arrogant #############." Sensitive PAcific northwesters like Ackley and Smoak need not apply.

(Edgar, Buhner, Cameron etc. May have hit well in Safeco, but who besides gap-power lefty guy Seager ever developed there? The coaches may have sucked, but they weren't all notable failures elsewhere. )
   46. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 08, 2014 at 10:24 AM (#4721238)
Cano's got a 131 OPS+, a bit down from the last two years but above his career average. He's hitting fine.

What Cano's done this year (so far) is to transform himself into the hitter he was once being compared to.

Cano 2014: .332/.379/.420/.799/130 OPS+ / .369 BABIP

Rod Carew: .328/.393/.429/.822/131 OPS+ / .359 BABIP
(career)

There are other metrics that show more of a split, but this isn't the Robinson Cano of yesteryear who'd averaged 28 homers a year in Yankee Stadium 3. Right now he's on a pace for about 5 or 6.
   47. Dale Sams Posted: June 08, 2014 at 10:49 AM (#4721247)
Wow, great interview.


Still needs an editor. Or is punctuation just The Man?
   48. Jarrod HypnerotomachiaPoliphili(Teddy F. Ballgame) Posted: June 08, 2014 at 12:01 PM (#4721273)
Kyle Seager is presently gunning for his third consecutive 20-homer season.


Seager's hit just one of his nine home runs this year at Safeco. Not that that invalidates your argument, just pointing it out.
   49. cardsfanboy Posted: June 08, 2014 at 02:17 PM (#4721327)
I know we like to pretend all intangible factors don't matter, but if you're a young hitter and you square up the ball only to have it die short of the warning track on a regular basis, (when it would be a solid home run in a neutral park), it's absolutely more difficult to build the confidence to believe that you belong in the major leagues. It's no excuse for the pathetic M's front office, but it's a factor.


Nobody is arguing against that, they are more or less saying that it's the managers/coaches job to not let that happen. Not to let the park get into your players head. This is where the Rays of the world don't think it matters, that there is no way to coach a player's mentality.

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