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Wednesday, May 07, 2014

USA Today: Nationals manager Matt Williams was involved in a hit-and-run while live on a radio show

A Beltway driver executes the fundamentals.

Every Wednesday morning, Nationals manager Matt Williams calls into 106.7 the Fan, a popular Washington, D.C. sports radio station.

But this week, he had a bit of an incident while talking to the Sports Junkies (...)

Williams was talking when all of a sudden he calmly said: “Sorry guys, I just had an accident … I got a police officer behind me and this guy’s going to try to escape.”

Wait what?

“There was a police car behind me and a guy in a car and he tried to get by me and he just smoked me,” he added.

Williams is not the first sports figure to have issues while talking on the phone to 106.7 personalities. Clinton Portis got pulled over for speeding while on Fred Smoot’s show on the station earlier this year.

AndrewJ Posted: May 07, 2014 at 08:56 AM | 321 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: accident, matt williams, nationals, radio

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   1. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 11:22 AM (#4702066)
Man, after the Matt Bush thread the other day, I thought from the headline that it was Williams doing the running. Glad that wasn't the case.
   2. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: May 07, 2014 at 11:31 AM (#4702080)
Man, after the Matt Bush thread the other day, I thought from the headline that it was Williams doing the running. Glad that wasn't the case.


And, tactically speaking, it wouldn't have been a good idea. Then again, it is Matt Williams, and he seems like he's pretty fond of bad ideas.

   3. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 11:50 AM (#4702104)
And they said that the hit-and-run was dead in baseball.
   4. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 07, 2014 at 11:52 AM (#4702109)
I thought from the headline that it was Williams doing the running.


Well of course. He would have had to bench himself if he didn't run.
   5. Dingbat_Charlie Posted: May 07, 2014 at 12:13 PM (#4702138)
I listened to the beginning of this interview in the car. Williams was talking about Kevin Frandsen when I got bored and changed the station, I must have just missed this.
   6. The elusive Robert Denby Posted: May 07, 2014 at 12:15 PM (#4702143)
“There was a police car behind me and a guy in a car and he tried to get by me and he just smoked me,” he added.

Williams didn't press charges because he admired the other driver's hustle.
   7. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 07, 2014 at 12:27 PM (#4702157)
I know this wasn't Williams' fault, but DON'T TALK ON YOUR CELL PHONE WHILE DRIVING, PEOPLE!!!
   8. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 12:41 PM (#4702170)
I know this wasn't Williams' fault, but DON'T TALK ON YOUR CELL PHONE WHILE DRIVING, PEOPLE!!!


Does the article say if Williams was talking on the cell via a hands free system?
   9. Bhaakon Posted: May 07, 2014 at 12:52 PM (#4702179)
Does the article say if Williams was talking on the cell via a hands free system?


While technically legal, using one of those is nearly as hazardous. Shocking, I know, but it turns out that the 'distraction' part of talking on the phone is tied to holding a conversation, and whether or not you have the phone up against your ear is close to irrelevant.

Voice-activated controls are also bad.
   10. Rusty Priske Posted: May 07, 2014 at 12:53 PM (#4702181)
So then you also shouldn't speak to someone in the passenger seat?
   11. Rickey! trades in sheep and threats Posted: May 07, 2014 at 12:59 PM (#4702188)
So then you also shouldn't speak to someone in the passenger seat?


The data sort of support this, actually. The more people in the car, the more complicated the in car conversation, the more distracted. And distracted driving isn't notably better than drunk driving in most cases.
   12. flournoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:03 PM (#4702193)
The theory is that passengers are also aware of what is happening on the road, and can respond to traffic situations appropriately. That is to say, the passenger will let a driver handle a difficult situation without interfering, while someone on the phone won't. Not all drivers or passengers are good at this, of course.
   13. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:04 PM (#4702194)
I've talked while driving for nearly a decade without even a hint of a close call, probably because I overcompensate by keeping my eyes constantly looking in all directions. I don't take anything for granted, even if I'm using my stick shift lefthanded in the middle of the conversation. If it were really all that hard, we'd be seeing accidents every minute.

OTOH when I'm dialing, I do it VERY slowly, pausing for at least two or three seconds between numbers and making sure there aren't any cars close in front of or behind me before punching in the next one, because I realize that the biggest danger is taking your eyes off the road for even a second.

And texting or internet surfing? Jesus, I may be crazy, but I'm not insane. Your eyes can be on the road while talking, but I've yet to figure out a way to text or read while you're not looking at your phone.
   14. Publius Publicola Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:07 PM (#4702198)
Isn't it against the law to use your cell while driving in DC? It is in Maryland.

   15. SandyRiver Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:19 PM (#4702213)
Dimly recalled is some research that indicated a companion in the other front seat significantly increased driver distraction. Adding one backseater didn't move the needle much, but a 2nd one in back maxed out the conversational confusion. This study also postulated a gender difference in these situations, so one can take it or leave it.
   16. depletion Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:26 PM (#4702223)
Isn't it against the law to use your cell while driving in DC? It is in Maryland.

Yes. Hands-free devices are OK, though.
   17. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:31 PM (#4702231)
I've talked while driving for nearly a decade without even a hint of a close call, probably because I overcompensate by keeping my eyes constantly looking in all directions. I don't take anything for granted, even if I'm using my stick shift lefthanded in the middle of the conversation. If it were really all that hard, we'd be seeing accidents every minute.


Um, what? Are you using your knee on the steering wheel? I am assuming I am missing something here...
   18. Bhaakon Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:34 PM (#4702233)

The theory is that passengers are also aware of what is happening on the road, and can respond to traffic situations appropriately. That is to say, the passenger will let a driver handle a difficult situation without interfering, while someone on the phone won't. Not all drivers or passengers are good at this, of course.


I'd also argue that it's less distracting to carry on a conversation with someone in person because audio quality on cell phones is often terrible and it takes more concentration to decode garbled or hushed speech.
   19. RMc is a fine piece of cheese Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:39 PM (#4702242)
Was he hustling down the highway?
   20. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:45 PM (#4702248)
Isn't it against the law to use your cell while driving in DC? It is in Maryland.

Well, obviously one of the skill sets is to be aware enough of the road to notice a police car. You can't be oblivious to your surroundings.

-------------------------------------------------------------

Um, what? Are you using your knee on the steering wheel? I am assuming I am missing something here...

No, you weren't missing anything. It's not that hard if you're six feet tall and you've been using a stick shift all your life. And it's not like I'm using my knee to turn a corner or anything.
   21. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:51 PM (#4702257)
I pulled up next to a guy eating a bowl of cereal in his car a few weeks ago.
   22. Brian Posted: May 07, 2014 at 01:56 PM (#4702266)
Andy, I know you're older than dirt so you can't have your kids taken away but what do you have? Dog? Cat? Turtle? Whatever you've got, give it up.
   23. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:00 PM (#4702272)
I pulled up next to a guy eating a bowl of cereal in his car a few weeks ago.


Did he proceed to get rear-ended by Frank Reynolds?

D'oh!

   24. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:04 PM (#4702278)
No, you weren't missing anything. It's not that hard if you're six feet tall and you've been using a stick shift all your life. And it's not like I'm using my knee to turn a corner or anything.


So, just so I am fully understanding you, you drive a stick shift in a major metropolitan area while talking on a cell phone (in an area where that is illegal), and you shift with your left hand, while using your knee to steer, but it's ok, because you are slightly above average height and you are really, super attentive to your surroundings.

Awesome.

I've done a lot of stupid things while driving, but at least I have the courtesy to acknowledge my poor decisions.
   25. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:08 PM (#4702282)
Oh god, here comes a 1200 post debate about how what Andy is doing really isn't illegal.

By the way cellphones are legal in DC. You just have to use a hands-free device. Though you can still dial manually.
   26. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:09 PM (#4702286)


So, just so I am fully understanding you, you drive a stick shift in a major metropolitan area while talking on a cell phone (in an area where that is illegal), and you shift with your left hand, while using your knee to steer, but it's ok, because you are slightly above average height and you are really, super attentive to your surroundings.

Awesome.


It's the 21st century version of "I drive even better when I'm drunk."
   27. A Fatty Cow That Need Two Seats Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:13 PM (#4702291)
you drive a stick shift in a major metropolitan area while talking on a cell phone (in an area where that is illegal), and you shift with your left hand, while using your knee to steer, but it's ok


Don't forget his eyes darting across his entire field of vision. A rabid...bad driver guy.
   28. Spectral Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:13 PM (#4702292)
I have massive contempt for the selfish idiots that can't be bothered to wait until parked to place a phone call. There's no reasonable question about whether it increases risk of an accident, and thus places other people at risk of physical harm, and the upside is utterly trivial in almost all cases.
   29. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:14 PM (#4702293)
It's not so bad if Jolly Andy drives with his elbows while dripping lemon juice into his eyes, so long as he hand-destroys every movie he tapes off TV following a single prompt, personal viewing.
   30. Nasty Nate Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:17 PM (#4702298)
I pulled up next to a guy eating a bowl of cereal in his car a few weeks ago.



Did he proceed to get rear-ended by Frank Reynolds?


And while common sense would tell you that eating a bowl of cereal while operating a car it's reckless, it's moronic, one might even call it, 'donkey-brained'.
   31. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:20 PM (#4702300)
I have massive contempt for selfish idiots that drive cars in major urban areas. It places other people at risk of physical harm, and the upside is utterly trivial in almost all cases.
   32. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:21 PM (#4702302)
The mindboggling stupidity of it notwithsatnding, I'm curious why Andy wouldn't just put the cell phone in his left hand and use the stick shift with his more appropriate right hand.

Or, perhaps, is he also busy masturbating with his right hand, and has the cell phone propped up on his belly, right next to the sandwich he's busy eating?

   33. Spectral Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:22 PM (#4702304)
I have massive contempt for selfish idiots that drive cars in major urban areas. It places other people at risk of physical harm, and the upside is utterly trivial in almost all cases.

This too. Every time I walk through an area like Dupont Circle and see the heavy traffic, I wonder who these idiots are and why they think driving through Dupont Circle is a good plan for either them or the people around them.
   34. Golfing Great Mitch Cumstein Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:31 PM (#4702315)
Terry Francona was rearended while on a call with WEEI. I think it was during spring training.
   35. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:31 PM (#4702316)
I have hands-free phone, and I use it on occasion. There are times when I think it's a good option - for example, if you're lost and having someone talk you in the right direction, as opposed to driving with one eye on the road and one on a map (which we've all seen people doing). My car disables the ability to dial when the car is in motion, so there's little chance of me initiating a call while driving unless I use a pre-programmed number (which is a one button push, or less distraction than I'd need to change the temperature in the car). I do answer calls if they come in, most of the time.

I generally won't answer if traffic is bad, because there's too little margin for error around here, especially in rush hour, so you've got to focus like a laser on everyone playing bumper cars around you. But I'd stop talking to other people physically in the car in those situations as well, as I need to focus my attention on insulting other drivers and questioning their dubious parentage.

The whole texting/surfing/reading thing... those people are worse than Hitler. I passed a guy this AM driving 65 on the highway with the newspaper fully open on his steering wheel. I really wanted nothing more than to come up behind him, deploy my giant car spatula, and flip him and his car into a lake where he could read in peace.
   36. puck Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:33 PM (#4702317)
and the upside is utterly trivial in almost all cases.


C'mon man, the upside is we don't have to be alone with ourselves.
   37. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:38 PM (#4702325)

The mindboggling stupidity of it notwithsatnding, I'm curious why Andy wouldn't just put the cell phone in his left hand and use the stick shift with his more appropriate right hand.


Me too. I have certainly driven a manual one-handed, and used my knees to steer, but shifting with my left, other than going into 1st or reverse when initially starting out, is not something I would do.

Or, perhaps, is he also busy masturbating with his right hand, and has the cell phone propped up on his belly, right next to the sandwich he's busy eating?


Heh. Done all these while driving, except for propping the cell phone on the belly, but not all at once.
   38. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:41 PM (#4702333)
I have massive contempt for selfish idiots that drive cars in major urban areas. It places other people at risk of physical harm, and the upside is utterly trivial in almost all cases.

Your contempt notwithstanding, I'd have a difficult time getting to work without a car. I live in a large city but work outside of the city and would have no real way to get to my job without driving through that city. (I guess I could go out the south end of the city and around to go back north, but it would add about 2.5 hours to my commute every day.) There are no trains/subways that run to or near my workplace, and no shuttle buses. If I took the regular regional bus, it would be four transfers from my house and about a 2 hour trip one-way (I mapped it) that takes me 25 minutes in the car. It would also be about 3 times the expense.

(And before you suggest that I move closer to work - I spend about 50% of my time working at a branch office in the other direction. It would be possible to catch a bus near my house, transfer to another bus to a train to a shuttle to get to work there, but it would turn a 15 minute trip one-way into about a 90 minute one, assuming everything was running on time. And if I moved to the first location, I'd still have to drive back to the city to catch the bus.)

I'd prefer not to have to rely on a car every day, but I'd also prefer to be independently wealthy and not have to go to work at all. So we don't always get what we want.
   39. jmurph Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:42 PM (#4702335)
Every time I walk through an area like Dupont Circle and see the heavy traffic, I wonder who these idiots are and why they think driving through Dupont Circle is a good plan for either them or the people around them.


Agree. I'm trying to think of a scenario in which the preferable option is to drive around any part of the circle. I think if you're going down Mass Ave towards downtown, and turning on Connecticut, going around the short part of the circle is possibly better than the alternatives. I'm not sure there is any other scenario that makes sense.
   40. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:45 PM (#4702339)
Hmmm, all this talking about driving a stick shift has got me thinking - I grew up doing it, but it's been a while now - I am not so sure it would really be all that easy to shift while knee-steering. I guess it depends on the vehicle. I mainly drove trucks or SUV's - vehicles with longer clutches - and while I am actually a fair bit taller than Andy, depressing the clutch does drop the left knee a decent amount. That leaves the right leg to work the gas and steer, and that's where I am hazy - someone else here care to elaborate on using your right knee to steer while you work the gas pedal?
   41. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:47 PM (#4702344)
Done all these while driving, except for propping the cell phone on the belly, but not all at once.

My GF bought a car without Bluetooth, and she sticks the phone in her scarf just under her chin to talk on it (I think both to stay hands free and as a cloaking device in case a cop sees her). I try very hard not to call her when she's in the car, because it seems a horribly dangerous setup. I don't seem to be able to talk her out of doing it, though I guess eventually she'll wreck that car and maybe buy one with Bluetooth next time.

As for the rest - they say eating in the car is distracting, but it's a delicious distraction. For whatever reason, that Quarter Pounder tastes better on the passenger's seat than it does when you eat it at home. (I think at home, there's the shame of knowing you could have made a better meal but didn't, while in the car there's no other food option short of rooting around under the seats for fossilized french fries.) I once watched my mother toss, dress, and eat a dinner salad while driving. It's the single more coordinated act I can recall from her life.
   42. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:48 PM (#4702345)
I'd need to know where on the map you are to be absolutely sure but as of right now I'm pretty sure you could live in a suburban locale, built for road traffic, and satisfy your needs of working in two different places without requiring much in the way of additional travel time. If you can live in a city and go in two different directions with a car then you live east or west of the city and accomplish that as well.
   43. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:50 PM (#4702348)
Agree. I'm trying to think of a scenario in which the preferable option is to drive around any part of the circle. I think if you're going down Mass Ave towards downtown, and turning on Connecticut, going around the short part of the circle is possibly better than the alternatives. I'm not sure there is any other scenario that makes sense.

In terms of cars I really hate the circles. If I'm driving I'll turn off before I hit the circles. Just an absolute horrible traffic device.
   44. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 02:59 PM (#4702360)
I'd need to know where on the map you are to be absolutely sure but as of right now I'm pretty sure you could live in a suburban locale, built for road traffic, and satisfy your needs of working in two different places without requiring much in the way of additional travel time. If you can live in a city and go in two different directions with a car then you live east or west of the city and accomplish that as well.

I'm in San Francisco, and I split my time between directly north (over the GG bridge to Marin county) and directly south (down by the airport). There is no west of the city, and east of the city you could put me in a place like Walnut Creek (I'm skipping Oakland/Berkeley, since that's essentially another city and the roads are constantly packed). But if you go east, you've got to sit in bridge traffic every day, twice a day. Plus the whole east bay area up to Vallejo and out even as far as Antioch or Livermore is just a traffic nightmare most commute days. I have friends who live in Vallejo and commute from the south bay office - there are nights that it takes them 3-4 hours just to get home.

The extra time represented by the bridge crossings and additional distance driven in gridlocked traffic every day would be, assuming I don't get up at 5 AM to go to work when the roads are relatively clear, probably 1.5-2 hours a day assuming average traffic.
   45. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:01 PM (#4702363)
So, just so I am fully understanding you, you drive a stick shift in a major metropolitan area while talking on a cell phone (in an area where that is illegal), and you shift with your left hand, while using your knee to steer, but it's ok, because you are slightly above average height and you are really, super attentive to your surroundings.

Hey, it's worked for me, and I've yet to have been in any collision other than when I was rearended a few times long before I had a cell phone. In fact other than a few speeding tickets my driving record is 100% clean.

Awesome.

I've done a lot of stupid things while driving, but at least I have the courtesy to acknowledge my poor decisions.


Whatever. If I were a cop I'd give myself a ticket and a lecture, but I'm not a cop.

-----------------------------------------------

Oh god, here comes a 1200 post debate about how what Andy is doing really isn't illegal.

I sure hope not, because I'm under no illusions about the law here. Going 80 in a 65 zone is also illegal, but how many of you haven't done that?

-----------------------------------------------

The whole texting/surfing/reading thing... those people are worse than Hitler.

Substitute "Ray" for "Hitler", and I'd fully agree. I'd be scared to death to text/surf/read while driving.

-----------------------------------------------

This too. Every time I walk through an area like Dupont Circle and see the heavy traffic, I wonder who these idiots are and why they think driving through Dupont Circle is a good plan for either them or the people around them.

Here's the simplest three part plan for survival that I've ever been able to come up with: When you're walking, assume no motorist cares whether you live or die. When you're driving, assume every pedestrian wants to sue you for even giving him a dirty look. And whether you're driving or walking, assume the worst about bicyclists.

And here's my considered thought about jaywalking: It should be fully decriminalized, but any pedestrian hit by a non-speeding car in an area where the pedestrian doesn't have the right-of-way forfeits his right to any damages if the car should hit him. And if said accident occurs while the pedestrian is yakking on his cellphone and not paying attention to where he's walking, the yakker should also have to buy the motorist a new car.

There, that should hold y'alls for a few hours. (smile)
   46. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:01 PM (#4702364)
I like traffic circles. Most studies show that they reduce traffic time and greatly reduce accidents, though I think that's only true in ares where people know how to use them. If you haven't grown up with them and don't understand how/when to pull in/out, they can be a real logjam.
   47. ASmitty Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:02 PM (#4702366)
There is no west of the city


Get a seaworthy houseboat.

   48. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:02 PM (#4702367)
And if said accident occurs while the pedestrian is yakking on his cellphone and not paying attention to where he's walking, the yakker should also have to buy the motorist a new car.

I'm intrigued by your ideas and would like to subscribe to your newsletter.
   49. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:04 PM (#4702369)
Get a seaworthy houseboat.

On the plus side, there's little maritime traffic. And both offices are kind of near water, though I'd still have to figure out how to get inland.

On the minus side, I'd be living on a boat and probably get mauled by a sea lion or a dolphin.
   50. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:13 PM (#4702380)
I like traffic circles. Most studies show that they reduce traffic time and greatly reduce accidents, though I think that's only true in ares where people know how to use them. If you haven't grown up with them and don't understand how/when to pull in/out, they can be a real logjam.

I'd say it depends on the circle. The traffic circle near Vassar college is simple and efficient. It also doesn't have thousands of cars trying to go through it every hour. Dupont Circle on the other hand is a major foot traffic area as well as being the terminus for something like a dozen road entrances/exits and then throw in the fact that they decided to put a median in the middle of road and you got something that certainly doesn't seem to be more efficient and safer than other options.
   51. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:16 PM (#4702385)
Dupont Circle on the other hand is a major foot traffic area as well as being the terminus for something like a dozen road entrances/exits and then throw in the fact that they decided to put a median in the middle of road and you got something that certainly doesn't seem to be more efficient and safer than other options.

Yeah, Dupont Circle has too much going on. I guess I'm thinking more along the lines of side street intersections where they replace stop signs/lights with a circle.

Dupont Circle is more like Columbus Circle. Yes, it's a traffic circle, but no, it doesn't make anything better because of it.
   52. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:17 PM (#4702389)
I'm in San Francisco, and I split my time between directly north (over the GG bridge to Marin county) and directly south (down by the airport). There is no west of the city, and east of the city you could put me in a place like Walnut Creek

Never been to SF but couldn't you live near the highway just south of SF like people do in upstate NY (read just north of NYC) and in NJ? Perhaps the drive north is slightly longer but you drive south would be shorter. Plus all of your driving in the city would be on roads built for heavy traffic and no pedestrian traffic.
   53. The Yankee Clapper Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:23 PM (#4702403)
I'm sure all have noted that in his rather lengthy but limited defense of his driving habits (#45), Andy makes no attempt to deny the accusation that he shifts left-handed because he's simultaneously masturbating, eating & phoning with his right. Looks like he's guilty as charged, although perhaps he just didn't want to admit to something worse, like using his right hand to apply his make-up. Or maybe sort his bootleg movies.
   54. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:23 PM (#4702404)
Hey, it's worked for me, and I've yet to have been in any collision other than when I was rearended a few times long before I had a cell phone. In fact other than a few speeding tickets my driving record is 100% clean.


Andy, I would rather not wait until you've killed somebody in an accident before bringing this up as a problem. People do stupid stuff all the time, and a successful outcome doesn't mean that the initial decision was any less stupid.
   55. ASmitty Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:25 PM (#4702406)
Never been to SF but couldn't you live near the highway just south of SF like people do in upstate NY (read just north of NYC) and in NJ? Perhaps the drive north is slightly longer but you drive south would be shorter. Plus all of your driving in the city would be on roads built for heavy traffic and no pedestrian traffic.


The only thing worse than driving through SF is trying to drive around SF.
   56. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:30 PM (#4702412)
The only thing worse than driving through SF is trying to drive around SF.

Okay but I would imagine living in the city and driving through it to go north or south to be a pretty shvtty thing. So half the time you avoid it completely (if you split your time equally) while the other half of the time you're on the highway instead of being on city streets and then the highway.
   57. Nasty Nate Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:40 PM (#4702430)
Driving in cities is not some nightmarish ordeal for which turning your life upside-down for the sake of avoidance is necessary.
   58. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:41 PM (#4702432)
Never been to SF but couldn't you live near the highway just south of SF like people do in upstate NY (read just north of NYC) and in NJ? Perhaps the drive north is slightly longer but you drive south would be shorter. Plus all of your driving in the city would be on roads built for heavy traffic and no pedestrian traffic.

You'd still have to drive through the city to go north. The alternative would be trying to go north on the highways that run along the edge of the city, go across the Bay Bridge to the East Bay, then further north and back across another bridge to come back to where my office is.

Crossing the bridges is generally the worst part of the traffic here. I live where I do specifically because it eliminates the need for any bridge crossings except the Golden Gate (which, if you're against the flow of traffic, generally isn't too bad provided you don't try to cross around 5:30-6:00 when they're changing the lane direction alignment). There is no way around the city here short of going far afield to the east and coming back. To get to the Golden Gate bridge, the only way from the south is through the city, and when you get off from the north it deposits you into the city. There are no workarounds, bypasses, or anything else short of avoiding it completely.

I think SF is a special case here, because of the limits of its design. Your choices are a shorter trip congested city streets or a longer trip on very congested bridges and alternate routes. It's seriously a 1.5-2 hour difference on an average day, and on days where there are bad accidents or bad traffic (Giants games/etc.), you might be looking at 3-4 hours extra time in the car. I would quit my job before I did that, without a second thought.
   59. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:45 PM (#4702438)
Hey, you'll live where McCoy tells you to, Buster.
   60. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:47 PM (#4702439)
You'd still have to drive through the city to go north. The alternative would be trying to go north on the highways that run along the edge of the city, go across the Bay Bridge to the East Bay, then further north and back across another bridge to come back to where my office is.

I have no problem with highway travel.


Driving in cities is not some nightmarish ordeal for which turning your life upside-down for the sake of avoidance is necessary.


The issue isn't about it being a nightmare for a driver but that heavily populated condensed urban areas shouldn't allow cars on their roads. Period.
   61. Nasty Nate Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:51 PM (#4702443)
Dear Mr. President, There are too many states nowadays. Please eliminate three. P.S. I am not a crackpot.
   62. SandyRiver Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:51 PM (#4702444)
In terms of cars I really hate the circles. If I'm driving I'll turn off before I hit the circles. Just an absolute horrible traffic device.


Agreed. One of my favorite bumper stickers was observed shortly after I moved from northern Maine to a town just south of the capitol: "This car survived the Augusta rotaries." There's one at each end of the main in-town bridge over the Kennebec, metal manglers for sure.

Eating while driving is a fairly common occurrence for me, but then I'm almost always driving in very light Maine traffic, and unwrap/grasp by feel rather than sight. (When driving to see family in Illinois, the driver always has a spouse to unwrap and hand over.) I also avoid such activities on logging roads in winter, when the trucks load heavier and run faster.
   63. ASmitty Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:54 PM (#4702450)
The issue isn't about it being a nightmare for a driver but that heavily populated condensed urban areas shouldn't allow cars on their roads. Period.


Exactly. Why should motorists be allowed to drive straight from point A to point B at speeds that make fatal accidents an impossibility, when they could instead be made to drive a much longer, slower, indirect routes at much more dangerous speeds?

   64. Publius Publicola Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:54 PM (#4702452)
Yeah, Dupont Circle has too much going on. I guess I'm thinking more along the lines of side street intersections where they replace stop signs/lights with a circle.


At least you can drive under it if you are traveling north or south.
   65. Bhaakon Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:55 PM (#4702454)
Okay but I would imagine living in the city and driving through it to go north or south to be a pretty shvtty thing. So half the time you avoid it completely (if you split your time equally) while the other half of the time you're on the highway instead of being on city streets and then the highway.


There is no proper highway cutting north-south through the city. There was one about 2/3rds of the way completed in 1989, but it was torn down after the earthquake. Anyone who needs to traverse San Francisco north to south is forced onto city streets for a significant stretch of the journey.

And since San Francisco is surrounded by water on three sides, it's rather impractical to go around.
   66. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:55 PM (#4702455)

You're all crazy.
   67. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:57 PM (#4702458)

Exactly. Why should motorists be allowed to drive straight from point A to point B at speeds that make fatal accidents an impossibility, when they could instead be made to drive a much longer, slower, indirect routes at much more dangerous speeds?


Apparently somebody has never driven in a city if he thinks the speed of travel make fatal accidents an impossibility.
   68. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 03:59 PM (#4702460)
I have no problem with highway travel.

I don't either, assuming the cars actually move. That's not always the case here. I took that route from south SF to the east bay one Friday afternoon around 2 PM (I was heading out of town for the weekend). At 4 PM, I was still in Oakland, sitting on the highway. 2 hours to go about 15 miles.

Listen, if you like sitting in the car, then by all means this is a solution. But I'm not willing to give up 7-10 hours a week on average just to make it a little easier for pedestrians on my particular route (which, BTW, doesn't go anywhere near downtown where the real congestion is). That's a ridiculous trade-off, and no one in their right mind actually faced with that choice would choose otherwise. Not to mention the extra gas I would consume and pollution it would create from sitting in traffic, which I assume you'd also be against.

It's easy to make blanket statements like "everyone who drives in the city is an idiot". It's a little less easy when you're actually in that position and have to figure out whether that principle you're so ready to espouse is worth a significant hit to your life.

(And I don't have kids, which would make it even more clear cut. Let me come up with 7-10 extra hours per week of child care, or make it much more difficult to be able to leave work and tend to a sick kid at school, etc. I'm just a single guy living in his mother's basement... er, living alone.)
   69. Spectral Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:07 PM (#4702470)
Why should motorists be allowed to drive straight from point A to point B at speeds that make fatal accidents an impossibility...


I hesitate to use the buzzword, but this is coming from a place of privilege. If you see 35 MPH as a speed that "make[s] fatal accidents an impossibility", you have not spent much time as a pedestrian or cyclist. Experiencing cities from the vantage point of someone that's easily broken body parts instead of from the standpoint of someone ensconced in a ton or two of steel changes how you view roadways.
   70. Spectral Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:09 PM (#4702471)
It's easy to make blanket statements like "everyone who drives in the city is an idiot".


I reserve that blanket statement for specific cities. People that drive in DC, by and large, really are being idiots. They might be perfectly lovely people for the most part, but driving in DC is a really poorly thought out idea that indicates poor planning. Everywhere in this city is easily accessible by metro. Cycling here is entirely viable as well, and would be even more viable if it weren't for the idiots that insist on driving through the city.
   71. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:18 PM (#4702482)
Terry Francona was rearended while on a call with WEEI. I think it was during spring training.

I once talked to a lady on the phone who said she was being rearended. The call cost me $4.99 a minute and was totally discreet.
   72. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:19 PM (#4702484)
I reserve that blanket statement for specific cities.

I would agree that anyone who owns a car in NYC is an idiot. Not only because it's a dangerous and crazy place to drive, but also because the mass transit system is excellent and renders driving largely unnecessary. Between gas, maintenance, parking, and insurance, you're almost certainly paying more as a driver than you would for an unlimited monthly subway pass.

If we had an equivalent subway/train system here in SF that would drop me relatively close to work and home, I'd happily forego my daily drive. I love the subway/train - I'd much rather sit and read for an hour every day than sit and try to avoid crazy drivers.
   73. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:20 PM (#4702488)
Terry Francona was rearended while on a call with WEEI. I think it was during spring training.

I had a radio program in college. I used to have my roommate call in live "traffic" updates from his cell phone by driving around during my show and calling in at random to report on how many cars were on the road where he was. He got a speeding ticket one day live on the air.
   74. Pooty Lederhosen Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:24 PM (#4702491)
This book discusses the cell phone issue in some detail. That's merely one aspect of what the book covers. It was an interesting read, and covered a lot of the available research at its publication date.

To summarize it as best I can, we're not NEARLY as good at driving as we think we are. We get distracted often, sometimes by nothing at all, and we do lots of stupid things as a result. It's a wonder that there aren't more accidents.
   75. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:28 PM (#4702493)
After spending years driving around Washington, DC (quite literally one of the worst areas in the US to drive in, whether it's the District proper or 495 you're talking about), I have been pleasantly surprised at how un-terrible getting around in downtown Chicago is. Don't get me wrong, the highways leading in and out of the city are often obscenely congested -- I live in River North now and can see the traffic backing up on the Dan Ryan's Ohio St. exit on a daily basis -- but actually moving around on the city streets? It's shockingly easy compared to the DC experience. I'll take Michigan & Wacker or Grand & Halstead over the nightmare that is Dupont Circle (as mentioned above) or Massachusetts Avenue anyday. And as bad as I-90/I-94 can get, I still don't think it's nearly as terrible as my daily commute to and from Potomac, MD was via the I-270/495 spur back in the Metro DC area. Five lanes turning into four lanes turning into TWO lanes...hell on earth.
   76. Robert in Manhattan Beach Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:29 PM (#4702496)
Isn't it against the law to use your cell while driving in DC? It is in Maryland.

Well, obviously one of the skill sets is to be aware enough of the road to notice a police car. You can't be oblivious to your surroundings.

-------------------------------------------------------------

Um, what? Are you using your knee on the steering wheel? I am assuming I am missing something here...

No, you weren't missing anything. It's not that hard if you're six feet tall and you've been using a stick shift all your life. And it's not like I'm using my knee to turn a corner or anything.


Love this. I also call/text/surf all the time while driving. Don't give in. I'm a better driver that everyone, I'm just bringing myself down to the level of everybody else.
   77. Nasty Nate Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:32 PM (#4702501)
I would agree that anyone who owns a car in NYC is an idiot. Not only because it's a dangerous and crazy place to drive, but also because the mass transit system is excellent and renders driving largely unnecessary. Between gas, maintenance, parking, and insurance, you're almost certainly paying more as a driver than you would for an unlimited monthly subway pass.

If we had an equivalent subway/train system here in SF that would drop me relatively close to work and home, I'd happily forego my daily drive. I love the subway/train - I'd much rather sit and read for an hour every day than sit and try to avoid crazy drivers.


I don't see anything idiotic about people in NYC both owning a car and using mass transit. If I lived there and could afford it, I would own a car - that doesn't mean that I'd be using it for my daily commute though.
   78. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 04:45 PM (#4702511)
I don't see anything idiotic about people in NYC both owning a car and using mass transit. If I lived there and could afford it, I would own a car - that doesn't mean that I'd be using it for my daily commute though.

This is where something like ZipCar is useful. There are occasions when having a car is a definite plus - driving out of the city for the weekend, or going to a warehouse/home store to stock up on stuff. You can have the convenience of a car without the crazy maintenance expense of paying to leave it sitting in a garage 95% of the time.

I know a lot of people who live and work in SF without a car, and they get by using ZipCar when they really need one.
   79. Nasty Nate Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:01 PM (#4702528)
I would think a lot of NYC car owners use free on-street or driveway parking. NYC isn't just Manhattan (and in parts of Manhattan, on-street parking is realistic).
   80. Jeltzandini Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:01 PM (#4702529)
Quibbling, NYC is more than Manhattan and the nearby parts of Brooklyn. Wide swaths of the outer boroughs are not particularly near the subway, and are full of single family homes. Cars there are used like cars most other places.
   81. Canker Soriano Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:16 PM (#4702544)
Good point - I guess I was thinking more of Manhattan than the outer boroughs. Cars in Staten Island are probably not much different than cars elsewhere.
   82. TerpNats Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:18 PM (#4702547)
Add Staten Island to the equation, too, which can be reached without a car only via ferry and SIRT, though I believe one of the Brooklyn local MTA buses crosses the Verazzano.
   83. JE (Jason) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:24 PM (#4702553)
This too. Every time I walk through an area like Dupont Circle and see the heavy traffic, I wonder who these idiots are and why they think driving through Dupont Circle is a good plan for either them or the people around them.

How exactly is heavy traffic in Dupont so awful for pedestrians? If anything, it makes it easier for us to cross against the light.
   84. Bourbon Samurai Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:28 PM (#4702555)
I have been pleasantly surprised at how un-terrible getting around in downtown Chicago is.


Chicago was a lovely city to drive in. A terrible city to park in, but what can you do.
   85. JE (Jason) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:28 PM (#4702558)
Dupont Circle is more like Columbus Circle. Yes, it's a traffic circle, but no, it doesn't make anything better because of it.

Except that Dupont has only two local lanes and they're consistently clogged.
   86. Spectral Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:39 PM (#4702568)
How exactly is heavy traffic in Dupont so awful for pedestrians?


Negative effects on air quality, wasted space that should be pedestrian and bikepaths, occasional injurious accidents.
   87. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:50 PM (#4702572)
I'm sure all have noted that in his rather lengthy but limited defense of his driving habits (#45), Andy makes no attempt to deny the accusation that he shifts left-handed because he's simultaneously masturbating, eating & phoning with his right. Looks like he's guilty as charged, although perhaps he just didn't want to admit to something worse, like using his right hand to apply his make-up. Or maybe sort his bootleg movies.

Say, whose side are you on, anyway?

------------------------------------------------------------

Um, what? Are you using your knee on the steering wheel? I am assuming I am missing something here...


No, you weren't missing anything. It's not that hard if you're six feet tall and you've been using a stick shift all your life. And it's not like I'm using my knee to turn a corner or anything.

Love this. I also call/text/surf all the time while driving.


Yeah, well I used to rev my '69 Beetle between the right lane and the parking lane for blocks at a time, and laughed at the suckers who were sitting there stuck in rush hour traffic. OTOH I was probably the safest driver that Central Delivery ever had.

Hey, when you're working on commission you gotta do what you gotta do. They're not paying you for idling.

------------------------------------------------------------

You're all crazy.

Of course we are, for crissakes. Here we are spending our time yakking about politics on a baseball site. We'd be more productive if we were driving ambulances from the crash scene to the hospital while calling our dispatcher for directions.
   88. JE (Jason) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 05:51 PM (#4702574)
Negative effects on air quality, wasted space that should be pedestrian and bikepaths, occasional injurious accidents.

Hang on: Vehicular traffic in some cases is getting worse *because* of lane changes to accommodate bikepaths, M Street between 16th and 21st Streets being the most obvious example.

As for air quality, well, that's pretty much true of any street downtown on weekdays.

There's probably more chance of accidents when cars are moving rather freely since the traffic-light setup can be confusing to visiting motorists.
   89. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: May 07, 2014 at 06:44 PM (#4702598)
I have been pleasantly surprised at how un-terrible getting around in downtown Chicago is. Don't get me wrong, the highways leading in and out of the city are often obscenely congested -- I live in River North now and can see the traffic backing up on the Dan Ryan's Ohio St. exit on a daily basis -- but actually moving around on the city streets?


This is generally true except for the Loop during rush hours. Two major problems: 1) lines of buses that back up into intersections, blocking cross traffic when it gets the green light, and 2) the near-total and inexplicable lack of right-turn arrows, which creates major backups in the right lanes as cars have to wait for a break in pedestrian traffic (which often doesn't come) to turn. Lake Shore Drive is another problem, with the ill-conceived Chicago Ave. stop light and the idiocy of motorists, all of whom seem to think it's so important to get off at Belmont that the whole drive gets clogged from the jam at that exit all the way back downtown. If maybe a third of those people just went up to Irving Park and doubled back, not only would they save time despite the inefficient route, but the remaining Belmont exiters wouldn't have to wait so long and the whole thing wouldn't create a blockage.
   90. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: May 07, 2014 at 07:10 PM (#4702605)
Yeah, well I used to rev my '69 Beetle between the right lane and the parking lane for blocks at a time, and laughed at the suckers who were sitting there stuck in rush hour traffic. OTOH I was probably the safest driver that Central Delivery ever had.


Clearly you are a veritable driving god living amongst us mere mortals. I shudder to think of your time we have wasted with our substandard driving skills.
   91. madvillain Posted: May 07, 2014 at 07:25 PM (#4702608)
One time for a job I had to drive a box truck from LIC, through Manhattan, through the Holland tunnel, up to Poughkeepsie and back to LIC -- god that was ####### nerve racking. I was 23 at the time and had only been living in NYC about a month. Luckily I had been driving regular cars for the job through the city quite a bit during that time, so I was sorta prepped. But you cannot see out of your mirrors in a box truck, that's kinda a bad thing in rush hour.

_____________

Traffic in Seattle is awful, mostly by design. The dumbass drivers here don't help. I swear to god if I had a nickel for every time some idiot ceded the right-away in my 4 years driving here I'd be a millionare.

Fine folks of Seattle that drive: it's ok to not let people in that don't have the rightaway. Smarter people then you and I have deemed traffic laws and right-aways as a good thing to keep everyone moving, don't #### with the plan.
   92. Rennie's Tenet Posted: May 07, 2014 at 07:48 PM (#4702614)
For whatever reason, that Quarter Pounder tastes better on the passenger's seat than it does when you eat it at home.


The once-a-year McRib is the classic of this genre, as you get the quiet thrill of wiping down the steering wheel before you get home.

Since this is sort of a DC traffic thread, I'll just throw in that our Metro people are now putting signs up directing people to stations that are not open yet.
   93. McCoy Posted: May 07, 2014 at 08:07 PM (#4702620)
Taco Bell Mexi-melts used to taste awesome in the car. But then one day I got a girlfriend and we went to Taco Bell and she broke me of my desire to eat in the car. Ever since then I don't eat in the car.
   94. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: May 07, 2014 at 08:29 PM (#4702627)
Clearly you are a veritable driving god living amongst us mere mortals. I shudder to think of your time we have wasted with our substandard driving skills.

I suspect you might have died an early death if you'd ever seen my old Central Delivery dispatcher in action when he drove Diamond Cab #1 in DC.** He made me seem like a frightened 16-year old taking his first driving test with the test monitor sitting beside him.

**Harvey Fry was a Mississippi-raised redneck with an IQ through the roof who earned nearly $200,000 a year in today's dollars in the mid-60's, by accepting no rides going anywhere but between National Airport and either Georgetown or Foggy Bottom. He had every Diamond dispatcher and every airport cop on the take, and talked his way out of more traffic tickets than anyone could count. I only wish that Jim Jarmusch had met him before he filmed Night on Earth. And trust me, you would have loved him.

   95. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: May 07, 2014 at 11:31 PM (#4702693)
I am absolutely one of the biggest public transit advocates/geeks you can find, but shocker of shockers, I've come around a bit on driving into New York City from NJ in certain instances.

Just recently I finally bought a house in one of those leafy green North Jersey suburbs I swore I'd never live in when I was a 20 something who fled Jersey for Boston. Our house has great bus service...a bus to midtown manhattan stops basically right in front of our house. It takes 45 minutes to an hour and costs $9 one way...pretty reasonable. BUT, if are going with a few people that really adds up: $72 for a round trip for four people. And if you have small children the bus can be hell. In a car you only pay the $13 for the bridge or tunnel. But, Weekly Journalist, I hear you saying, what about the astronomical cost of parking? Well I am one of those annoying cheapskates who will drive around for as long as it takes to find street parking. Plus the fact that munimeters take credit cards makes it easier.

All that said, I still prefer the bus or train when it's just myself or me and my wife. Napping, reading, or farting around on BTF on my phone is a lot more fun than driving.

BUT, after years of telling anyone who would listen that you should take the train to Yankee Stadium, I am definitely softening there as well. Taking a bus or train to midtown then the subway to the bronx is quite a shlep. For the Friday night Angels game a couple weeks ago I just zipped in over the GWB, no traffic, parked for $0 on the street, and got home at a reasonable hour. Unless you're a stupid ####### moron who parks in the stadium lots for $40, it's not too bad.

So yeah, driving to and in NYC can sometimes make sense, generally on weekends, especially for trips to the outer boroughs. If I commuted to NYC, however, no way in hell. Good old NJ Transit works just fine for that.
   96. tshipman Posted: May 08, 2014 at 12:58 AM (#4702703)
I'm in San Francisco, and I split my time between directly north (over the GG bridge to Marin county) and directly south (down by the airport). There is no west of the city, and east of the city you could put me in a place like Walnut Creek (I'm skipping Oakland/Berkeley, since that's essentially another city and the roads are constantly packed). But if you go east, you've got to sit in bridge traffic every day, twice a day. Plus the whole east bay area up to Vallejo and out even as far as Antioch or Livermore is just a traffic nightmare most commute days. I have friends who live in Vallejo and commute from the south bay office - there are nights that it takes them 3-4 hours just to get home.

The extra time represented by the bridge crossings and additional distance driven in gridlocked traffic every day would be, assuming I don't get up at 5 AM to go to work when the roads are relatively clear, probably 1.5-2 hours a day assuming average traffic.


You should not live in SF. You should probably, but not certainly, live around Daly City for commute purposes. You could take 19th avenue/Highway 1 through the city to the GG bridge, and then take 280/101 to your stuff in the south bay.

But it's like whatever. You don't live in the city because it's convenient for your commute--that's ridiculous. You live in the city because you want to, and you're making some lame justification because you're in an argument on the internet. So whatevs.
   97. JE (Jason) Posted: May 08, 2014 at 01:38 AM (#4702707)
Since this is sort of a DC traffic thread, I'll just throw in that our Metro people are now putting signs up directing people to stations that are not open yet.

Metro is expanding because the folks who run the system are doing such a wonderful job maintaining the track and stations that's already operational. (Sigh.)

Which brings up another point: Anyone who rides Metro on the weekend, with few exceptions, is a damn fool. Every Saturday and Sunday there is one-tracking and 20-24 minute waits between trains throughout the system.
   98. OCF Posted: May 08, 2014 at 02:31 AM (#4702713)
On traffic circles: in Long Beach, CA there's one. Its very name, in the vocabulary of nearly everyone, is "the traffic circle" - singular, as in there being no ambiguity in what is meant. I know any number of people who are utterly terrified by it, but it's rather inconvenient to try to avoid it, and it actually works quite well once you accept it. It has a very large radius, so the entrances and exits are pretty well separated. There are four ways out: SE, NE, N, and W. It has no pedestrian traffic at all. (You would try to avoid it if you were on foot.) Go to Google maps, zoom in until you're sure you're looking at Long Beach, switch to satellite view, hide the labels - you'll find it for sure.)

It's also not on my commute. I have the rare good fortune of living two miles from where I work. And on a recent exercise kick, I'm back to walking that at least twice a week. But I will drive if I have any sort of errand to attend to.

The SF area bridge I've driven across most often? The Richmond bridge. Traffic usually isn't all that bad on that one. That comes from vacation trips starting in Southern California and heading to Point Reyes or the Sonoma coast or the redwood country. I-5 through the San Joaquin Valley, entering the metro area through the Altamont Pass, then through Oakland and Berkeley and then the bridge to Marin County. (But sometimes such trips have also involved the Monterey area, and I also know of the GG bridge and 19th Avenue/Highway 1.)
   99. Depressoteric feels Royally blue these days Posted: May 08, 2014 at 03:23 AM (#4702715)
driving in DC is a really poorly thought out idea that indicates poor planning. Everywhere in this city is easily accessible by metro.
Yeah, unless you live in Adams-Morgan or Georgetown. Or want to get anywhere on a semi-reasonable schedule during the weekends or after 10:00pm. Whatever else the problems of Chicago's CTA or NYC's MTA, at least they operate on a schedule befitting an actual, you know, city.

Also, while the city itself has reasonable Metro coverage outside of the above-mentioned deadzones, suburban Maryland access is pretty pathetic, particularly in comparison to NoVA. And don't even get me started about the lack of Metro access to Dulles Airport. Been paying the premium to fly in and out of Reagan for years now simply because it allows me to use the Metro, whereas Dulles demands either 1.) an exorbitant cabfare (I lived in Potomac); 2.) an interminable shuttle-bus/Metro trek that tacks on an extra two hours of commute time; 3.) paying extortionate prices for airport parking.
   100. JE (Jason) Posted: May 08, 2014 at 03:35 AM (#4702716)
Flip.
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