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Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Walkoff Walk: Mark Teixeira Had An Unhealthy Obsession With Kurt Cobain

I believe this was around the same time A-Rod was using Alex Maggot Brain.

This all came to light in an interview with MLB Network’s Harold Reynolds that aired last night. During a sitdown at the Secaucus studios, Reynolds lobbed softballs at Teixeira interspersed with video snippets of interviews with Mark’s parents. Here’s a transcript of the juicy part:

  HR: What is this stuff about Kurt Teixeira?

  MT: You know what? When I was a kid I was a big Nirvana fan. And, uh, Kurt Cobain unfortunately passed away when I think I was in eighth grade. And when you’re twelve or thirteen years old and your favorite band isn’t gonna make any more music, you take it pretty tough. So, uh, I went by an alias for a little while.

  HR: Yeah your mom said…

  Mark’s mom (on video): Mark tried to change his name to Kurt when he was, uh, because he loved Kurt Cobain when he filled our forms he would put, he would sign “Kurt Teixeira”, so we had Kurt Teixeira things coming to the house for a while. I’d go, “what is this?” and it was because he had this thing for Kurt Cobain.

  HR: You had the mail coming to your house?

  MT: I would fill out…anytime I’d fill anything out whether it was for comic books or CD clubs or anything I would write Kurt Teixeira just because I didn’t know what I was doing. I was twelve years old and I was having fun with it.

Repoz Posted: June 22, 2010 at 08:50 PM | 223 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: history, music, yankees

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   101. Flynn Posted: June 23, 2010 at 12:18 PM (#3567401)
What kind of parties listen to Nirvana? Heaven's Gate parties?

Parties where young, beautiful people (and me) stand around, drink beer and be merry. Try one sometime.
   102. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: June 23, 2010 at 12:21 PM (#3567403)
By the way people, the best album of the 90's is Common People by Pulp. I don't know why we're even debating this.
   103. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 12:24 PM (#3567404)
edit: I'd throw XTC on my list, too. I liked them ok in the day but I like them more now. They never get much love in BBTF music threads, I've noticed. Also, my list is not exhaustive in any fashion. I don't have all day people!

I'm sad my list got caught before the turn. ;-)

XTC basically skipped the 90's entirely - their best works bookended those years. Skylarking is a sublime 80's album, and Apple Venus Volumes I and II (ok, the first was 1999, but the 90's were over by that year) are sheer brilliance. If you haven't listened to them, Shooty, buy them today, I promise you that you won't regret it.
   104. The Most Interesting Man In The World Posted: June 23, 2010 at 12:29 PM (#3567405)
I've never encountered a band that sounded like Pearl Jam or even Nirvana for that matter.

Puddle of Mudd says 'hello'.
   105. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: June 23, 2010 at 12:29 PM (#3567406)
XTC basically skipped the 90's entirely

I wasn't limiting myself to the 90's. I was just reflecting on the stuff I liked then vs what I still like now. Thanks for the tip, though. I've been meaning to get Skylarking since, well, forever I guess.
   106. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 12:48 PM (#3567413)
Oh, that was just a general comment, I wasn't calling out your classifications.

You haven't heard any of those three XTC albums? I truly envy you the first experience, especially for the latter two. As far as Skylarking, I find myself wondering on occasion if snapper has ever heard "Dear God".
   107. An Athletic in Powderhorn™ Posted: June 23, 2010 at 12:52 PM (#3567415)
I've never encountered a band that sounded like Pearl Jam or even Nirvana for that matter.

Puddle of Mudd says 'hello'."


Puddle of Mudd has a cleaner sound. Much less distortion and none of the random feedback. And, unlike Nirvana, Puddle of Mudd's lyrics make a bit of sense.

What a bunch of '90s bands (and Puddle of Mudd) did take from Nirvana was the 3-power chord, simple verse-chorus-verse song construction. Bands like The Offspring, Bush, Silverchair, The Vines, SR-71, Ash, and of course Hole and The Foo Fighters. Some of it does sound like Nirvana, I suppose, but I'd guess it's less straight imitation and more use of a beginner-friendly playing style.
   108. formerly dp Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:11 PM (#3567428)
All of the early new wave/late punk stuff (1980-) still sounds great to me. The stuff that inspired or later morphed into goth rock (Southern Death Cult, Joy Division, Echo and the Bunnymen) is absolutely some amazing music.

Any love for Jesus and Mary Chain? And no "great bands from the '90s" can be complete without NIN. I loved how Renzor pretty much positioned his stuff against grunge- "I don't give a #### if you look like the guy who pumped my gas down the street"...

Sonic Youth have aged well, in that they're still cranking out good and relevant music, and put on a great live show.

EDIT: Changed Cult to Southern Death Cult for clarity...
   109. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:14 PM (#3567430)
Any love for Jesus and Mary Chain?

I used to be a big fan. They're still listenable to me.
   110. Sheer Tim Foli Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:21 PM (#3567437)
By the way people, the best album of the 90's is Common People by Pulp. I don't know why we're even debating this.


William Shatner's cover of Common People is awesome.
   111. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:26 PM (#3567440)
Any love for Jesus and Mary Chain? And no "great bands from the '90s" can be complete without NIN

Good calls, although to me these two make a perfect case for bands who's absolute best work was their first, and they couldn't follow up. I mean, Broken is great, I love The Fragile, but Reznor was - in my opinion - unable to actually improve upon "Head Like a Hole", and that always hurt. (And to be clear, that's an all-time single, so it's not a comment on the later stuff being bad, just that it couldn't possibly be as good.) Jesus and Mary Chain really took a dive after Darklands, which was kind of a pale copy of Psychocandy anyhow. Automatic was as awful an album as I'd ever heard.

I put Jane's Addiction there, too, I may be alone, but I put Ritual de La Habitual about eight notches below Nothing's Shocking, and they didn't get any better after that.

As long as we're dredging up awesome albums of our youth, I'll put in a shout-out to Love and Rockets - Express.

And Tool's work in the 90's was some of my favorite. (Although I listened to 10,000 Days yesterday and was surprised at how much I still liked it.)
   112. Mom makes botox doctors furious Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:30 PM (#3567443)
and no love for Ace of Base?
Alanis Morrisette?
Aqua?

::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::
   113. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:32 PM (#3567448)
William Shatner's cover of Common People is awesome.

Has Shatner ever done a non-awesome cover? He's pretty clearly an interpretive genius.
   114. A.T.F.W. Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:34 PM (#3567450)
By the way people, the best album of the 90's is Common People by Pulp. I don't know why we're even debating this.
Good album, though This Is Hardcore is my favorite Pulp record.
   115. An Athletic in Powderhorn™ Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:35 PM (#3567455)
I find "The Perfect Drug", "March of the Pigs", and "Closer" equal to anything Reznor ever did. But I agree that Pretty Hate Machine is hands down his best album, and the only one with no skippable tracks.
   116. formerly dp Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:51 PM (#3567471)
although to me these two make a perfect case for bands who's absolute best work was their first, and they couldn't follow up. I mean, Broken is great, I love The Fragile

Year Zero is a fantastic album. And Broken stacks up well against PHM. Renzor took everything bands like Skinny Puppy, Front Line Assembly, KMFDM, Front 242, ect were doing and made it poppy. I really didn't like anything on The Fragile- everything between Downward Spiral and Year Zero seemed kind of uninspired. YearZero s a return to a more electronic and noisy sound, which is where I think his skill lies. And another concept album, one with genius marketing. Solid the whole way through. I don't have a ton of patience for remix albums, but even the remix album of Year Zero is essential.

I love Darklands, much better IMO than Psychocandy, similar but better. Stoned and Dethroned is a different sound altogether, but enjoyable.

Never got into Express, but I really like Hot Trip to Heaven.

Saw NIN and Jane's on tour last summer. Ferrel has always annoyed me, but both bands really knocked it out of the park.
   117. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 01:58 PM (#3567475)
Saw NIN and Jane's on tour last summer.

I know this sounds annoying, but I saw them both in 1991. Holy crap, I need to sit down.
   118. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:06 PM (#3567487)
Any love for Jesus and Mary Chain?

Plenty. They're still one of my favorite bands.

As long as we're dredging up awesome albums of our youth, I'll put in a shout-out to Love and Rockets - Express.

Their later works was also quite good. I enjoyed both Hot Trip to Heaven and Sweet F.A. much more than I thought I would.
   119. Esoteric Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:07 PM (#3567490)
Great Albums of the '90s (in no order):

1.) Loveless - My Bloody Valentine (1991)
2.) Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain - Pavement (1994)
3.) OK Computer - Radiohead (1997)
4.) Blur - Blur (1997)
5.) Vitalogy - Pearl Jam (1994)
6.) In Utero - Nirvana (1993)
7.) Clouds Taste Metallic - The Flaming Lips (1996)
8.) Sci-Fi Lullabies - Suede (1998)
9.) Songs From Northern Britain - Teenage Fanclub (1996)
10.) Different Class - Pulp (1995)


By the way, XTC are one of the most fantastic bands ever, but their real golden age was the postpunk era of 1979-1982 or so. They continued to make great music long after that, in their studio-bound incarnation, but while they were a live act few bands were more explosively melodic.
   120. Esoteric Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:12 PM (#3567497)
My favorite era? POSTPUNK. The bands are incredible, the music stunning and timeless, and the albums hold up: Magazine, Wire, Joy Division, Echo & The Bunnymen, New Order, Peter Gabriel (an 'old man' who became young again as a solo artist), Talk Talk, Mission Of Burma (the only American group that really reminds me of UK postpunk)...this stuff is immortal.

Would you count Minutemen as postpunk? I put them more in the same "originally hardcore" bag as Husker Du and The Replacements. All three bands rapidly mutated into something much more sophisticated, but they began as hardcore.
   121. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:13 PM (#3567500)
A few other great albums of the 90s (also unordered):

Magnetic Fields - 69 Love Songs (the few before it are great too)
Neutral Milk Hotel - In the Aeroplane...
Belle and Sebastian - If You're Feeling Sinister
Radiohead - OK Computer (worth repeating)
The Cardigans - First Band on the Moon
Guided by Voices - Under the Bushes...
Aimee Mann - I'm with Stupid (she should've stayed electric)
Liz Phair - Exile in Guyville
Pavement - Terror Twilight (there's a few candidates really - I know most prefer the less-Malkmus solo-y, lo-fi-e-er stuff)
Beck - Odelay (Midnite Vultures close behind)
ATCQ - The Low End Theory (ages surprisingly well - it's that minimalist sound)

Thought about stuff from: Elliott Smith, Blur (Parklife or Great Escape), Lush, Morphine, The Olivia Tremor Control, Public Enemy, a few other rappers/dj's.

****

Camera Obscura is good stuff, Shooty.

Oh, and:
By the way people, the best album of the 90's is Common People by Pulp.
Never heard it. Once bought it used, but the case had the wrong disc in it.

Band I love that doesn't get much mention on this site: Of Montreal (post-E6 phase). Possibly my favorite band today.
   122. Esoteric Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:17 PM (#3567505)
Terror Twilight is easily Pavement's worst album, the only one that I can't actually bring myself to listen to all the way through very regularly. It has three great singles ("Major Leagues," "Spit On A Stranger," "Carrot Rope") one ruined song ("The Hexx," so much better in its earlier incarnation), and a bunch of unlistenable mush.

And yet a ton of people love it. I don't get it. The production might be better, but...where's the melodies? Where's the beef?

I'm not trying to pick a fight with Der Komminsk-sar or anything...I just don't get how so many people praise an album I find execrable. And it's not like I'm not heavily on-board with the band in the first place, either.
   123. A.T.F.W. Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:20 PM (#3567514)
Songs From Northern Britain - Teenage Fanclub (1996)

Belle and Sebastian - If You're Feeling Sinister
I was going to do one of those "No love for?" posts, but it's been covered now.
   124. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:22 PM (#3567528)
Best Portland OR 90's rock bands nobody's ever heard of:

Team Dresch
30.06

(Everyone loved Hazel and Quasi, but, meh.)
   125. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:23 PM (#3567531)
Magnetic Fields - 69 Love Songs (the few before it are great too)

This actually dates back to the 90s?

The Cardigans - First Band on the Moon

I'm always greatly confused by how much I enjoy this album.

Thought about stuff from: Elliott Smith, Blur (Parklife or Great Escape), Lush, Morphine, The Olivia Tremor Control, Public Enemy, a few other rappers/dj's.

You really should have included something from Blur. Their entire output has been excellent, and they put on a thoroughly entertaining live show.
   126. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:29 PM (#3567552)
69LS - Yup, '99.

Blur - Couldn't pick one - they had a whole bunch of just missed. Weird tangent - if we were doing an oughts list, the Deltron 3030 album (which is strongly realted to the first Gorillaz album) would make it - easily Del's best work and very accessible.

Thought about Jason Falkner (if I made a best of from his first two albums...) as well. Oh, and El Oso by Soul Coughing. That guy's solo stuff isn't so good, though.

First Band on the Moon - I know! The ones before and after it are really good too. (Post Gran Turino - ecch.)

Terror Twilight - That was a bit of a contrarianism, I guess - but I really do like it a lot - tied w/ Slanted and Enchanted. Not gonna worry about why.

Team Dresch was okay.
   127. Esoteric Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:33 PM (#3567559)
You really should have included something from Blur. Their entire output has been excellent, and they put on a thoroughly entertaining live show.
They way they reinvented themselves between The Great Escape and Blur was also really rather remarkable. Honestly, I like their earlier Kinkish material, but they only truly became interesting when they went art-rock on the s/t album. God bless horrible noise!
   128. Bad Doctor Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:34 PM (#3567560)
Terror Twilight is easily Pavement's worst album, the only one that I can't actually bring myself to listen to all the way through very regularly.

The love for Terror Twilight is confusing me. I bailed on Pavement right before that album and have never listened to it. When my buddy and I got tickets for the reunion tour I asked him if I needed to bone up on it, and his response was, "Nah, I think Pavement even recognizes what subpar crap it is, and I would anticipate them conveniently forgetting its existence when putting a set list together."
   129. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:39 PM (#3567578)
They way they reinvented themselves between The Great Escape and Blur was also really rather remarkable. Honestly, I like their earlier Kinkish material, but they only truly became interesting when they went art-rock on the s/t album. God bless horrible noise!

I actually preferred The Great Escape to Blur, but that's probably at least partially due to the total market saturation achieved by Song 2. To be honest, my favorite album of theirs is Think Tank, which was a massive departure from their previous sound.
   130. Esoteric Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:39 PM (#3567580)
"Nah, I think Pavement even recognizes what subpar crap it is, and I would anticipate them conveniently forgetting its existence when putting a set list together."
It's not completely worthless at all. Those three songs I mentioned are genuine Pavement classics (some say they're 'too commercial' but seriously, screw those people; a good song is a good song). "The Hexx" is a real pisser though, a textbook example of a band overthinking a song and losing the heart of it.

The rest is mostly trash. I get a few laughs out of "Folk Jam" and "You Are A Light," but not enough to justify putting the album on very often.
   131. Bad Doctor Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:41 PM (#3567583)
Team Dresch

Ah, I think this has been the omission so far. Personal Best is a tremendous album. On a list of best '90s albums, it's kinda the yin to In the Aeroplane ...'s yang. They both came out of nowhere, the bands didn't have sustained excellence, but the albums contain powerfully wonderful music that holds up to repeated listening. Even though they're about 180 degrees apart from each other musically and lyrically.
   132. Esoteric Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:43 PM (#3567588)
Confession: I have never actually listened to In The Aeroplane Over The Sea. Not even a single note. I actually know the NAMES of some of the songs ("King Of Carrot Flowers," WTF?), but I've never heard the thing. I'm convinced that it can't help but be a huge letdown now.

OTOH, Loveless managed to live up to the hype, so I suppose anything's possible. But it damn well better transport me to another universe the way My Bloody Valentine did, then.
   133. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:51 PM (#3567604)
Is Mano Negra a '90s band? They were pretty cool.
   134. SoSH U at work Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:51 PM (#3567605)
By the way people, the best album of the 90's is Common People by Pulp.


Never heard it. Once bought it used, but the case had the wrong disc in it.

Don't feel bad, neither did Shooty. The album was Different Class.

And Ryan, isn't this the point in the 90s music discussion where you (or Sam H.) brings up the greatness that is Archers of Loaf, and I nod in agreement?

And Lassus, don't fear the letdown and listen to In the Aeroplane... My favorite album, period.
   135. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:54 PM (#3567614)
And Ryan, isn't this the point in the 90s music discussion where you (or Sam H.) brings up the greatness that is Archers of Loaf, and I nod in agreement?

Yes. Yes, it is. Archers of Loaf were ####### awesome, and I'm still pissed off that they were never quite able to break into the mainstream.
   136. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 02:56 PM (#3567618)
And Lassus, don't fear the letdown and listen to In the Aeroplane... My favorite album, period.

You mean Esoteric, but hilariously, I've never heard it either.
   137. SoSH U at work Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:03 PM (#3567634)
You mean Esoteric, but hilariously, I've never heard it either.


Sorry about that. I'd like to think it's a one-time thing, but I routinely confuse his posts with yours and vice versa, though I'm not sure why. Maybe I could just sense that neither of you had experienced the brilliance of NMH.
   138. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:04 PM (#3567635)
I'm convinced that it can't help but be a huge letdown now.
Probably would be - it's very much an acquired taste. Honestly, I'm not sure why so many people have acquired it.

Pulp - I was thinking of This Is Hardcore anyhow.
   139. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:10 PM (#3567645)
I'd like to think it's a one-time thing, but I routinely confuse his posts with yours and vice versa, though I'm not sure why.

Similarly self-important semi-encyclopedic blathering about musical eras shrinking faster and faster in our rear-view mirrors? :-D
   140. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:31 PM (#3567701)
Favorite albums of the '90s:

Loveless - My Bloody Valentine
Rumor and Sigh - Richard Thompson
Are You Driving Me Crazy? - Seam
The Hot Rock - Sleater-Kinney
Whatever - Aimee Mann
New West Motel - The Walkabouts
Achtung Baby - U2
Reading, Writing, and Arithmetic - The Sundays
Car Wheels on a Gravel Road - Lucinda Williams
Jordan: The Comeback - Prefab Sprout

I'm sure I'm forgetting something I love...
   141. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:34 PM (#3567705)
This thread should be renamed, "Bands not as cool as Van Halen."
   142. JPWF13 Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:46 PM (#3567738)
aged well


Too subjective, for instance, my first thought was 80's electronic music, techno and house stuff aged really really badly... then first thing I read was a post claiming that stuff aged really well...

After I finished my basement (to turn into a toddler playroom) I rediscovered my stash of cassettes, a hundred or so purchased between 1980-1990... so as I was spending time down their with the boy, I started playing them (many I hadn't listed to in 10+ years)

what aged well/badly?

The Cars, their music aged really badly, some of their melodies are ok, but the "sound" is just really dated.
Led Zep aged well, one thing I hadn't noticed before is how Plant adopted almost wholly different vocal personas from album to album
Hole- one of the last cassettes I ever purchased (Celebrity Skin)- I vaguely recall it having been "good" at the time- upon years later re-listening: undistinguished generic hard rock filler, nary a decent song in sight
Pearl Jam: Vitalogy is surprisingly strong, plus the album art is a hoot
Def Leppard: dated, but some songs are surprisingly decent
The Fixx: decent
White Lion (what on earth was I thinking???)
Faith no More (good)
Jane's Addiction "I was made with a heart of stone, to be broken by one he=ard blow, I've seen the ocean break over the shore, come together no harm done"
Queensryche (Operation Mindcrime), still reasonably strong
Sass Jordan (female version of black crowes... neither aged well)
Steppenwolf, still a hoot
Bruce Springsteen: NO ONE in the history of music has ever been more overrated by CRITICS than Bruce.
Bangles: still harmless fun
Foreigner: still harmless fun
Metallica: "Master of Puppets" is the greatest thrash album ever made
"... and Justice for All" is a dead and rotting beached whale carcass

there was a ton of mainstream hype when "...and justice for all" came out- this was the album that was going to launch Metallica and a whole genre into the mainstream and... well... nope, boy what a horrible mistake, they should have thrown the master tapes in the garbage and started over again. The songs were terrible [One was decent] and the sound quality was just awful- it's like they were mixing the album and said, "nothing we do will fix this, so lets just press the damn thing now and get it over with"

Tesla: harmless fun (good covers, originals were uninspired)
Talking Heads, sound now like they did then
The Smiths (criminally overrated, I'd love to slug Morrissey)
   143. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:50 PM (#3567764)
Sass Jordan (female version of black crowes... neither aged well)

Like Hell. The Black Crowes are still quality stuff, and they provide the added bonus of being possibly the ugliest succesful band in history.

The Smiths (criminally overrated, I'd love to slug Morrissey)

I have their Greatest Hits album. It's good, I enjoy it, and I have no interest in ever owning anything else in their catalogue. One album of The Smiths is plenty.
   144. JPWF13 Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:55 PM (#3567782)
This thread should be renamed, "Bands not as cool as Van Halen."


I'm old enough to remember when when David Lee Roth was COOL, he was the epitome of cool, then in the span of 5 years or so he transmogrified from being cool to being the biggest dork imaginable.

I also love how when Eddie Van Halen fired Sammy Haggar he complained to some journalists that he had to re-write some lyrics on the last album because Sammy's were "cheesy"... really? just noticed that now did you? After having read extensively about both CCR and Van Halen I'm undecided over which one out of Eddie Van Halen or John Fogarty is the biggest ####### in rock, of course that's not fair, both obviously have some emotional problems...

Oh, CCR- aged well
Van Halen 1 and 1984- both aged well
   145. JPWF13 Posted: June 23, 2010 at 03:57 PM (#3567791)
Like Hell. The Black Crowes are still quality stuff, and they provide the added bonus of being possibly the ugliest succesful band in history.


I won't argue with the second half of that

keep in mid they are trying to look good here
   146. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:03 PM (#3567812)
Weird tangent - if we were doing an oughts list, the Deltron 3030 album (which is strongly realted to the first Gorillaz album) would make it - easily Del's best work and very accessible.

That album has some great stuff, but there's so much great hip hop in that genre from the aughts, I don't know if they'd make the cut for me.
   147. Lassus Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:10 PM (#3567825)
The Black Crowes are still quality stuff, and they provide the added bonus of being possibly the ugliest succesful band in history.

I won a bar trivia contest once on the question: What band had a label that would only put their two good-looking members on album covers, making sure the remaining two were only on the back?
   148. PreservedFish Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:10 PM (#3567827)
I haven't read a damn thing in this thread, just noting that I am seeing Pavement on Friday. Yeeehaw. I watched some Youtube videos of them and they look pretty old, and I am not sure how awesome this is going to be. Still excited though.
   149. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:20 PM (#3567838)
146: That's fair but, man, do I love the album, 'cause: 1) I'm a big fan of Nakamura (his 'mixtape' Wanna Buy A Monkey? is sitting in front of me, in fact), 2) the sci-fi construct makes for (imo) a more effective setting for Del's battle raps, wordplay, and slacker persona. His 'character' fits better in that world than in the real one.

David Byrne is a neat guy. I like his forays into Latin music - Rei Momo is one of the other albums I brought to work today (my mp3 player finally, thankfully, died). [The third is a bunch of tracks I'm trying to sort through... a few of which are by Roger Joseph Manning, Jr., who was in...]

Jellyfish: This is distinctly a minority opinion, but I like their post-band work (counting Brion here, probably wrongly) better than what that band accomplished, by and large. Not sure why, but a lot of their songs don't click for me - I think because I'm not big on Sturmer's voice.
   150. BFFB Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:20 PM (#3567839)
There is a criminal lack of Portishead and Massive Attack being mentioned as producing great albums from the 1990's. Dummy is nearly perfect and Blue Lines isn't far off. Carboot Soul from Nightmares on Wax is also a favourite of mine.

Honorable mentions also go to Future Sound of London for Liefeforms, Moodymann's Silent Introduction, Squarepusher for Hard Normal Daddy and Music is Rotted One Note, Amon Tobin for Permutation and Roni Size for New Forms and that's without going to Orbital, Underworld, Boards of Canada and others.
   151. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:24 PM (#3567842)
Like Hell. The Black Crowes are still quality stuff, and they provide the added bonus of being possibly the ugliest succesful band in history.

I won't argue with the second half of that


No one can argue with the second half of that. Years ago, I saw them perform at the Warehouse in Toronto, and I'm pretty sure that the keyboard guy had a boil that had a boil. They're great live, but it's a better show if you're not too close to them.
   152. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:26 PM (#3567844)
That's fair but, man, do I love the album, 'cause: 1) I'm a big fan of Nakamura (his 'mixtape' Wanna Buy A Monkey? is sitting in front of me, in fact)

Nakamura is extremely good at what he does. I still can't decide whether I prefer his work on the first Gorillaz album, or his work with Prince Paul on Handsome Boy Modeling School, but both are thoroughly enjoyable.
   153. Forsch 10 From Navarone (Dayn) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:28 PM (#3567848)
Magnetic Fields - 69 Love Songs

One of my three or four favorite albums ever.
   154. The elusive Robert Denby Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:29 PM (#3567849)
I have their Greatest Hits album. It's good, I enjoy it, and I have no interest in ever owning anything else in their catalogue. One album of The Smiths is plenty.

There are times when I can listen to "Singles" every other day. There are many more instances when I listen to four songs and have to fight the urge to track down Morrissey and hit him over the head with a raw chicken.

Other great '90s albums:

In the Presence of Greatness, Velvet Crush
Nobody's Cool, Lotion (with liner notes by Thomas Pynchon)
   155. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:29 PM (#3567850)
Honorable mentions also go to Future Sound of London for Lifeforms


While FSOL did produce several high-quality albums in a very short period, I've had a hard time keeping them in memory. For whatever reason, their music hasn't held my attention to the same way that other acts from that era have. I may have to haul those CDs out from storage and see if I can figure out why.
   156. Mark S. is bored Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:31 PM (#3567851)
"... and Justice for All" is a dead and rotting beached whale carcass

there was a ton of mainstream hype when "...and justice for all" came out- this was the album that was going to launch Metallica and a whole genre into the mainstream and... well... nope, boy what a horrible mistake, they should have thrown the master tapes in the garbage and started over again. The songs were terrible [One was decent] and the sound quality was just awful- it's like they were mixing the album and said, "nothing we do will fix this, so lets just press the damn thing now and get it over with"


Whole-heartedly agree. After listening to Master of Puppets, I ran out and got "...and Justice for All" when it came out. I listened to it once, tossed it in the corner and never listened to it again. Man was that bad.
   157. PreservedFish Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:35 PM (#3567853)
Radiohead - OK Computer
Radiohead - The Bends
Beastie Boys - Check Your Head
Portishead - Dummy
Pavement - Crooked Rain
Belle & Sebastian - Tigermilk
Liz Phair - Exile in Guyville
Yo La Tengo - I Can Hear the Heart...
Tribe Called Quest - People's Instinctive Travels...
Neutral Milk Hotel - In the Aeroplane...

Or something like that.
   158. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:39 PM (#3567856)
149, yeah--"A Much Better Tomorrow" and "Deltron 3030" were revelations when I first heard them. I probably prefer Mr. Lif's "I, Phantom", Cannibal Ox, or some of the other El-P productions more, but that's not taking anything away from the Automator.
   159. Mark S. is bored Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:41 PM (#3567859)
Van Halen 1 and 1984- both aged well


1984 didn't age that well. The synthesizer stuff is brutal. Everything else on it aged well.
   160. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:43 PM (#3567861)
or his work with Prince Paul on Handsome Boy Modeling School
First one was good ... the second, eh.

Not big on Yo Lo Tengo either, for some reason. Like individual songs. Sugarcube(?) had a great video. Great name for a band. Still, I skip past 'em on my Matador comps or whatever.

Dave/158: That's great stuff, too. Viva quality!
   161. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:44 PM (#3567862)
If you ever get the chance to go to a Mr. Scruff live show, Go!!

I remember he had a CD/DVD where you could "mix" cartoons to go along with the songs. If he does anything like that live, it could be a great time. Plus, his music tends to be goofy, dance-y fun.

I heard the Roots play "Smells Like Teen Spirit" (instrumentals only) at a show the other night. It was pretty cool.

?uestlove can do no wrong in my eyes.
   162. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:50 PM (#3567870)
Jellyfish: This is distinctly a minority opinion, but I like their post-band work (counting Brion here, probably wrongly) better than what that band accomplished, by and large. Not sure why, but a lot of their songs don't click for me - I think because I'm not big on Sturmer's voice.


A lot of Sturmer's work with PUFFY (Puffy AmiYumi) is absolutely wonderful. He wrote and produced much of their best work in 2000-2006. "Invisible Tomorrow", "Nice Buddy", "Violet", and "Flowers to the Heart" are virtually perfect pop songs.
   163. Benji Gil Gamesh Rises Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:51 PM (#3567871)
Queensryche (Operation Mindcrime), still reasonably strong


Queensryche semi-positively mentioned in a BTF music thread, I might go into shock. "Eyes of a Stranger" is still an alltime favorite.

Rage for Order is pretty good too -- sortof a prog-metal OK Computer (in terms of theme, not musically).
   164. PreservedFish Posted: June 23, 2010 at 04:52 PM (#3567872)
I heard the Roots play "Smells Like Teen Spirit" (instrumentals only) at a show the other night. It was pretty cool.


I saw the Roots perform at a 95% white college. This was 7 years ago. They played "Smells Like Teen Spirit" and a variety of other famous rock n roll songs in a huge medley that must have taken 30 minutes or so. It was neat for a bit, but in the end it became very tiring. They were sort of just showing off their virtuosity in a really naked way, and what seemed like a spontaneous fun moment dragged out into an unecessary display. A number of people thought they were saying to themselves: "Let's watch these white kids dance." I don't know how to explain it - it left a bad taste in my mouth for some reason.
   165. BFFB Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:10 PM (#3567889)
I remember he had a CD/DVD where you could "mix" cartoons to go along with the songs. If he does anything like that live, it could be a great time. Plus, his music tends to be goofy, dance-y fun.


He's great live. He just keeps going for 6-7 hours straight expertly mixing nearly every genre you can think of.
   166. Manny Coon Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:17 PM (#3567893)
List of favorite 90's records, off the top of my head, in no order:

Flaming Lips - Soft Bulletin
Neutral Milk Hotel - In the Aeroplane Over the Sea
Bjork - Post
Olivia Tremor Control- Dusk At Cubist Castle
Silver Jews - American Water
Nirvana - In Utero
Mogwai - Young Team
Old 97s - Too Far to Care
Pavement - Slanted and Enchanted
Mercury Rev- Deserter's Songs
Wilco - Being There
   167. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:19 PM (#3567894)
I'm old enough to remember when when David Lee Roth was COOL, he was the epitome of cool, then in the span of 5 years or so he transmogrified from being cool to being the biggest dork imaginable.


Diamond Dave never lost his cool, you just dorked out and didn't notice. He was the greatest thing on stage during the 2008 reunion tour, the guy still has it.
   168. mex4173 Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:19 PM (#3567897)
Metallica: "Master of Puppets" is the greatest thrash album ever made


I really could not disagree more. Just in the same year (1986) there was:

Kreator - Pleasure to Kill
Megadeth - Peace Sells
Slayer - Reign in Blood (not equal to the those two, but better than Puppets)
Dark Angel - Darkness Descends

Bathory - Under the Sign of the Black Mark is the same year as well, if we want to call that thrash.

My pick for greatest thrash album would probably be:

1. Coroner - Mental Vortex
2. Vio-lence - Eternal Nightmare
3. Morbid Saint - Spectrum of Death
   169. RJ in TO Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:19 PM (#3567898)
Bjork - Post

My only criticism of this album is that she released far too many single remixes, which cost me a lot of money.
   170. smileyy Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:33 PM (#3567911)
(Dragging NIN back into this)

See, I liked all of PHM, Broken, TDS and The Fragile, all for different reasons.

PHM: Synth-poppy angst
Broken: Metal anger
TDS: Really dark depression/anger
The Fragile: Real moodiness

Ok, I could really have done without Starfuckers, Inc.

Some of the remix/add-on albums (Fixed, Further Down the Spiral, Still) are just as good as the originals, in different ways.
   171. Johnny Sycophant-Laden Fora Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:36 PM (#3567913)
I really could not disagree more. Just in the same year (1986) there was:

Kreator - Pleasure to Kill
Megadeth - Peace Sells
Slayer - Reign in Blood (not equal to the those two, but better than Puppets)
Dark Angel - Darkness Descends


wow your aesthetic is so far gone from mine that no response I make will really matter.

but then this is all subjective

anyway, remember the 1980s Hair Bands?
A musician friend of mine put them into 3 categories:
1: Motley Crue- bunch of uncaring asshats- but actually some talent lurking under the marketing crap- so every now and then they come up with a decent song- only every now and then because the band had no interest in working at their craft
2: Cinderella- not much talent, but the only "hair band" that was actually TRYING to be something more.
3: All the rest- mix n match, toss in a blender, didn't matter
   172. smileyy Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:37 PM (#3567915)
Also, in addition to a lot of agreement about what's been mentioned, my personal semi-known treasure, The Afghan Whigs -- Gentlemen and Black Love in particular.
   173. PreservedFish Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:39 PM (#3567916)
wow your aesthetic is so far gone from mine that no response I make will really matter.


We should just shorten this as an acronym for ease of future community use. WYAISFGFMTNRIMWRM
   174. Shooty Survived the Shutdown of '14! Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:44 PM (#3567920)
We should just shorten this as an acronym for ease of future community use. WYAISFGFMTNRIMWRM

We should probably just rename the site this.
   175. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:48 PM (#3567924)
164 - I saw the Roots in NY a few years ago and they did something similar--a 20-minute medley of rock/pop/old school hip hop. It was a very mixed crowd and there didn't seem to be anything cynical about it. One of the best shows I've been to.
   176. Swedish Chef Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:49 PM (#3567925)
WYAISFGFMTNRIMWRMBICAMAP

...But I Couldn't Agree More About Pavement.
   177. PreservedFish Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:54 PM (#3567927)
I don't know, the conflicting opinions on Terror Twilight threaten to tear a rift in the groupthink.

By the way, remember when Wilco was the stereotypical Primate band of choice? When did Pavement steal that crown?
   178. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 23, 2010 at 05:55 PM (#3567928)
Also, in addition to a lot of agreement about what's been mentioned, my personal semi-known treasure, The Afghan Whigs -- Gentlemen and Black Love in particular.


"When We Two Parted" is one of the most intense songs I've ever heard. Just a slow burn about a relationship disappearing down a black hole.
   179. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: June 23, 2010 at 06:05 PM (#3567939)
He's great live. He just keeps going for 6-7 hours straight expertly mixing nearly every genre you can think of.

This is what I miss about going to DJ shows. One of the first ones I attended had a great Aretha Franklin / Led Zeppelin mix going as I walked in the door. It got even better from there. And, yes, unlike rap shows, the DJ shows could go on for A-while.
   180. Good cripple hitter Posted: June 23, 2010 at 06:19 PM (#3567947)
"When We Two Parted" is one of the most intense songs I've ever heard. Just a slow burn about a relationship disappearing down a black hole.


For my money, My Curse is better. Marcy Mays just comes out of nowhere to sing it, and the rest of the album just fades away. Totally shook me up the first time I heard it, plus it led me to her band (Scrawl), which I like better than the Whigs.

And Team Dresch is some awesome music, except they had an annoying tendency to make their songs 20-30 seconds longer than I would've liked.
   181. A.T.F.W. Posted: June 23, 2010 at 06:28 PM (#3567954)
My pick for greatest thrash album would probably be:

1. Coroner - Mental Vortex
2. Vio-lence - Eternal Nightmare
3. Morbid Saint - Spectrum of Death
Maybe it's a difference of opinion on what constitutes "thrash", but I don't know how you could have such a list and leave off To Mega Therion.
   182. Accent Shallow Posted: June 23, 2010 at 06:37 PM (#3567967)
2. Vio-lence - Eternal Nightmare

Now this is a fun album, and I'm not even a metalhead.
   183. Famous Original Joe C Posted: June 23, 2010 at 07:16 PM (#3568011)
OK Computer is the best album of the '90s. You of course have the right to disagree, no matter how wrong that makes you.
   184. Kurt Posted: June 23, 2010 at 07:39 PM (#3568044)
There hasn't been nearly enough mocking and derision on this thread, so to provide a convenient target I'll mention that I still enjoy listening to Sublime, SOAD, Tool and (to a lesser extent) 311.
   185. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 07:44 PM (#3568057)
So, what do you like, Monty?
   186. Kurt Posted: June 23, 2010 at 08:45 PM (#3568168)
Speaking of completely different musical universes the Then That's What They Called Music! series of columns at avclub has been pretty entertaining, even if I never heard 90% of the songs being discussed.
   187. Nasty Nate Posted: June 23, 2010 at 08:48 PM (#3568169)
Speaking of completely different musical universes the Then That's What They Called Music! series of columns at avclub has been pretty entertaining, even if I never heard 90% of the songs being discussed.


I've seen those columns but never read any. What are they?
   188. Jorge Luis Bourjos (Walewander) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 08:58 PM (#3568174)
For the record, I said "'80s electro-pop" not "'80s pop"- there's a huge difference.

What about Autobahn? They were ugh, "technopop", though.
   189. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: June 23, 2010 at 09:14 PM (#3568190)
If I'm going to pick up a Pavement album after never having heard one before, which one is a good place to start?
   190. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 09:19 PM (#3568197)
I was even a college radio DJ for a year
Me too (well, for three - b/w '92 & '95). As I've recounted on other threads, I really didn't listen to music at all (I was mostly exposed to hair metal, CCM, and rap - of which only the latter has any appeal for me. Well, a bit of 'oldies' too, now that I think about it.) before that point and started DJing as a means to figure out what I might enjoy. That period formed the basis of what I like - by the end of the decade (say, '97/'98) I was no longer completely broke and began buying albums rather than taping the radio or borrowing stuff - so most of what I like came out b/w then and, say, 2007, when my first kid was born and my search time for new music dropped way off.
But, I digress.

I've seen those columns but never read any. What are they?
Nathan Rabin cracking wise about terrible music, mostly. They're a decent read...
   191. Der Komminsk-sar Posted: June 23, 2010 at 09:24 PM (#3568205)
Vlad, you could go with a Greatest Hits album (Quarantine the Past). Otherwise, Slanted and Enchanted has the best mix of quality, accessibility, and - um - characteristicness. IMO.
   192. Swedish Chef Posted: June 23, 2010 at 09:26 PM (#3568208)
If I'm going to pick up a Pavement album after never having heard one before, which one is a good place to start?

I would recommend either Slanted & Enchanted (their first album, it is the most lo-fi of the albums, but still pretty poppy and listenable) or Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain (It contains the hits!).
   193. Kurt Posted: June 23, 2010 at 09:34 PM (#3568218)
I've seen those columns but never read any. What are they?

Basically what Der Komminsk-sar said. They're snarky reviews of the Now That's What I Call Music! compilations that starting coming out in the late nineties, with a lot of Britney Spears, Nickelback, one hit wonders, etc. For me it's like a journey into an alternate universe.
   194. Repoz Posted: June 23, 2010 at 10:26 PM (#3568269)
If I'm going to pick up a Pavement album after never having heard one before, which one is a good place to start?

Slanted & Enchanted. Not only is it the best Pavement album...it's better than Red Rose Speedway!
   195. The Kentucky Gentleman, Mark Edward Posted: June 23, 2010 at 10:59 PM (#3568300)
I am not a big fan of 69 Love Songs. It's hard to put into words for me, but it seemed like the Magnetic Fields tried to include all these different genres into the album & they come across as "genre tourists." Sort of like what Vampire Weekend does with African pop and (as they did on their latest album) electronic music. Not that being a "genre tourist" is necessarily a bad thing, I just don't think the Magnetic Fields did it well on 69 Love Songs.

Blur is the best band of the last 20 years. I was not in England during the 1990s, but I don't understand why Oasis was considered their equals during that time.
   196. Swedish Chef Posted: June 23, 2010 at 11:42 PM (#3568345)
Blur is the best band of the last 20 years. I was not in England during the 1990s, but I don't understand why Oasis was considered their equals during that time.

Oasis vs Blur:
North vs South
Dole vs Art School
Beer vs Champagne
Beatles vs Kinks
Man City vs Chelsea
   197. Esoteric Posted: June 24, 2010 at 12:02 AM (#3568360)
If I'm going to pick up a Pavement album after never having heard one before, which one is a good place to start?
Ignore Repoz, he gives poor recommendations to mess with people's heads. The answer is the 2-CD (but cheap) reissue of Crooked Rain, Crooked Rain. Cannot emphasize ENOUGH how important it is to get the 2CD version and not just the original album -- the B-sides and extra tracks are INCREDIBLE.
   198. Esoteric Posted: June 24, 2010 at 12:05 AM (#3568369)
Blur is the best band of the last 20 years. I was not in England during the 1990s, but I don't understand why Oasis was considered their equals during that time.
Well this is ridiculous hyperbole, of course (Pavement and Radiohead easily beat them, Arcade Fire may be coming close, and Flaming Lips have a strong case as well). But I will grant you that Blur is infinitely superior to Oasis. The first three songs of 13 alone are superior to Oasis's entire output.

One reason why Radiohead's superiority to Blur is so obvious, incidentally, is the almost perfect quality of their B-sides. Blur's B-sides are surprisingly disappointing. They released a LOT of junk on flipsides.
   199. Esoteric Posted: June 24, 2010 at 12:07 AM (#3568371)
...it's better than Red Rose Speedway!
Which is not an entirely worthless album, I might add. "Little Lamb Dragonfly" is among my all-time favorite McCartney songs, solo or with The Beatles.
   200. The Kentucky Gentleman, Mark Edward Posted: June 24, 2010 at 12:58 AM (#3568425)
Esoteric,

Radiohead is certainly in the discussion for best recent (last 20 years) band IMO. I'd take Blur over Radiohead because I like Blur's experimental stuff (13, Blur, & Think Tank) over Radiohead's; I think Parklife is better than any album released by Radiohead; Blur's worst album (Leisure) is better than Radiohead's worst (Pablo Honey); this doesn't matter too much, but I like Damon Albarn's side projects (Gorillaz/Monkey) over Yorke's solo work. Johnny Greenwood did an excellent job with the There Will Be Blood soundtrack, though.

I like Pavement lots and don't understand the hatred for Terror Twilight, but neither Wowee Zowee or Brighten the Corners do anything for me.
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