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Wednesday, September 08, 2010

Walkoff Walk: Michael Kay Eats Like An Insolent Five-Year-Old

Stay Out/Stay Alive…Please pop those condomints people.

But if you’re like me and you want a more tangible reason to dislike someone (not saying I need it, but it’s nice), then peep this New York Post article about Kay, his fiancee and his disgusting eating habits.

  Yankee announcer Michael Kay is a real meathead.

  And now that local TV anchor Jodi Applegate is about to marry him, she’s desperately trying to figure out how to please a man wedded to only three foods: steak, bacon, and chicken parmesan.

  That’s all her fiancé ever wants to eat.

  “He will eat a salad, but only if it’s iceberg lettuce, and nothing else, no dressing. So it’s basically frozen water served with a fork,” says Applegate, a self-described foodie wannabe.

How’s that for a lede? He is a meathead! Give the New York Post a moronic story about two local semi-celebs and they’re pumping out Pulitzer quality stuff.

Steak, bacon and chicken parm? I hope when these two get married he gets his own bathroom, because when he’s been in there for 25 minutes and then strolls out with the funny pages tucked under his arm it’s gonna smell like a dead Arby’s employee buried under a pile of fertilizer. It’s gonna make Dr. Atkins’ movements smell like a Glade Plug-In.

Repoz Posted: September 08, 2010 at 01:02 PM | 145 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: announcers, media, television, yankees

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   101. You Know Nothing JT Snow (YR) Posted: September 08, 2010 at 09:05 PM (#3636361)

"As a picky reader myself, I have no interest in 'broadening my horizons' or 'experiencing new things.' I don't read any books or any short stories or essays. My reading consists of TV listings and movie credits, essentially. It's not intellectually healthy at all but I'm also not concerned about my intellect. My reading habits are my preferences, damn anyone else who thinks highly enough of himself to judge me for it. The same applies to Michael Kay, regardless of his likability and his skills as a broadcaster."


*laffs*
   102. Craig in MN Posted: September 08, 2010 at 09:06 PM (#3636362)
Advice? Have a few of the little teeny christmas tree brush things stashed around....in the home/office/car/pocket/etc. They always come in handy anywhere that you might eat. You can eat almoat anything you want as long as you chew with your molars and not your front teeth. It's awkward, but can be worth it. Wax was helpful, now that I think about it. And if your wires poke you in the back, go in to have them trimmed as soon as convenient. My teeth moved a lot in between appointments, so that happened a few times. I'm not sure what else. Just have a good attitude...hopefully your orthodontist/aides are cool. I actually enjoyed going to see mine, which helped a lot.
   103. Nasty Nate Posted: September 08, 2010 at 09:25 PM (#3636370)
I luckily had braces when I was young (10-12). My orthodontist was in the projects. (edit: not that one was related to the other.)
   104. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Griffin (Vlad) Posted: September 08, 2010 at 09:30 PM (#3636373)
You can sometimes salvage a bitter melon by cooking it down into a curry or something like that.
   105. Don Lock Posted: September 08, 2010 at 09:52 PM (#3636393)
I think Michael Kay ought to branch out a bit and put Macaroni and Cheese into his go to foods. That way there would be some balance.
   106. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: September 08, 2010 at 09:56 PM (#3636398)
Jodi Applegate, huh? I always thought the only Applegate to enter into a legal partnership with Michael Kay was the one from "Damn Yankees."
   107. Steve Phillips' Hot Cougar (DrStankus) Posted: September 08, 2010 at 10:22 PM (#3636431)
I am likely going to have to get braces again, my dentist tells me. Even though I already suffered through 3 years of that during the Reagan administration.

My father had to get them in his mid-60s. He could no longer get enough bite on his molars. They had to put a plate in his palate to stretch it out.
   108. Flynn Posted: September 08, 2010 at 11:01 PM (#3636463)
My recent trip to Paris was mainly devoted to eating (and after five days in England, who could blame me)?


It's pretty easy to eat well in England if you put in a little effort. There's still a lot of crap but the culinary situation is immeasurably better than it was ten years ago. People are more interested in their food than America and being in the EU means goodies from all over Europe pop up in supermarkets in a way they can't in America. Their palates still need a little refining though.
   109. McCoy Posted: September 08, 2010 at 11:13 PM (#3636470)
People are more interested in their food than America

Huh? Are we talking about GMO or we talking about food in general?

America is pretty much the biggest market for everything (well, we were, I believe China surpassed us on cars).
   110. Flynn Posted: September 08, 2010 at 11:23 PM (#3636480)
Being the biggest at something has nothing to do with interest.

The direction of discussions of food in this country rely heavily on the quality of its ingredients and its sourcing, celebrity chefs are actual celebrities (not just among foodies), and there has been some return towards using more artisan (even if I had that word) food methods and so on. Cooking shows here are also very popular, not just on the Food Network but running in prime time on the BBC. Restaurants here often make weight of the craft of cooking rather than it being a vehicle to shove calories into your mouth.
   111. Andere Richtingen Posted: September 08, 2010 at 11:29 PM (#3636482)
I think in the UK, even pub food has become spruced up and developed into some sort of craft cuisine.

I do remember going to a place in a touristy area of London some years ago, and figuring out that there was only one type of salad dressing. And that type was mayonnaise.
   112. McCoy Posted: September 08, 2010 at 11:29 PM (#3636484)
Sounds like you are describing America to me.

None of what you just said is unique to England or to Europe. All of that is going on in America as well.

Being the biggest at something has nothing to do with interest.

Huh?

We're the biggest because we spend the most. Putting your dollars down on something kind of implies a strong interest in something.
   113. McCoy Posted: September 08, 2010 at 11:32 PM (#3636488)
I think in the UK, even pub food has become spruced up and developed into some sort of craft cuisine.

Which America did in the 1990's when "diners" became trendy.

Everybody is paying more attention to the quality and diversity if you will of the food nowadays. That isn't really unique to any one culture. Hell, even McDonald's tried to spruce up their menus. Remember the Arch Deluxe and McDonald's attempt to go adult with their menu?
   114. Flynn Posted: September 09, 2010 at 12:11 AM (#3636510)
None of what you just said is unique to England or to Europe. All of that is going on in America as well.


Not to the same extent. Foodies know who Mario Batali is, nobody else does. Jamie Oliver's cookbooks go on the best seller list and supermarkets run promotions when Delia Smith puts out a new book. The BBC runs cooking shows in prime time, watched by more people than any show in the country in its time slot. America is not doing this and don't try and lie to me that it is, since I'm still in the country for 2 months out of the year.

Which America did in the 1990's when "diners" became trendy.


No, diners became trendy because they were retro and retro was trendy. I had a lamb shank spiced with rosemary and thyme in a pub tonight that would be happily served at most restaurants in America for twice its price. Diners aren't doing that.
   115. McCoy Posted: September 09, 2010 at 12:35 AM (#3636523)
Diners aren't doing that.

Yes they were. Every single diner in America? No. Just like not every single pub in England is doing what you think they are doing.

America has chefs on during prime time and on the networks as well.

you do realize that UK is a much smaller place than America and much less ethnically diverse than America?

Just because some guy in the Smokey Mountains doesn't know who Mario Batali is doesn't mean millions and millions of Americans don't as well.

You got about 60 million people in the UK and how many of them know who Gordon Ramsey is? 30 million? 40 million? Even if it is that high which it probably isn't that would only be around 10% of America's population. Virtually every single city in America and their surrounding suburbs have huge and deep interests in food and that completely ignores all the other places in America that care about food as well.
   116. The John Wetland Memorial Death (CoB) Posted: September 09, 2010 at 12:53 AM (#3636532)
Diners aren't doing that.


Oh, please.

That's at a freakin' gas station, 150 miles from the nearest decent sized city.

I recommend the Lobster Taquitos and the Wild Buffalo Meatloaf, both of which are exquisite.

The idea that anything is happening in the UK that hasn't already happened here is, as you chaps put it, a load of bollocks.
   117. Crashburn Alley Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:24 AM (#3636546)
#101

Equating food with reading is pretty hilarious, indeed. One function is cumulative and ever-expanding; the other is static.
   118. Foster Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:31 AM (#3636551)
I am having my birthday dinner next week at Restaurant Gordon Ramsay; never been to London and am looking forward to some good eating, overall.
   119. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:35 AM (#3636553)

No, diners became trendy because they were retro and retro was trendy. I had a lamb shank spiced with rosemary and thyme in a pub tonight that would be happily served at most restaurants in America for twice its price. Diners aren't doing that.


Uh, America is full of Gastropubs. You can't throw a rock without hitting some Gastropub type place in Boston or New York.
   120. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:37 AM (#3636554)
And I was more or less kidding about English food. We ate pretty well in London, especially the Indian and Pakistani food. Salloos in Belgravia was awesome.

Paris was one phenomenal meal after another...though we researched our choices carefully, didn't just pick places at random. I'm sure lots of those touristy looking cafes serve junk.
   121. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:39 AM (#3636556)
Also, it's definitely time for Kevin to go home on Top Chef tonight. He sucks sucks sucks. Sending home Tiffany last week was truly an outrage.
   122. bobm Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:48 AM (#3636558)
[111] there was only one type of salad dressing. And that type was mayonnaise.

A/K/A "viscous salad dressing" :)
   123. Greg K Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:52 AM (#3636561)
I choose to accept Flynn's side of the argument as I am moving to the UK on Saturday.
I was slightly worried about food in England, my gameplan was to find the nearest Indian community and eat all their food. Though it sounds like good food is more pervasive than I had hoped.
   124. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:59 AM (#3636570)
Remember printing in the 80s when the paper had those little holed strips on the side you had to rip off. Don't know why I mention it here but I just thought of that for the first time in like forever. MAn, that was wierd.
   125. Howie Menckel Posted: September 09, 2010 at 02:00 AM (#3636572)
"It turns out Ripken is quite likable in person. What a letdown that was."

I once met Cal and Billy Ripken on the same day, group of about 15-20 in a working environment, but a good amount of time spent.

Cal is - professional. A bit stiff, but gave off no douchiness vibes. Just not great at small talk.

Billy, as you guys would probably guess from that silly Topps card, is mischievious. He lights up the room a lot more than Cal does, ironically, unless I guess there was an "awe" factor involved.

A non-baseball fan who spent time with them might be startled that Cal is the legendary one, not that talking a good game is some guarantee of athletic prowess, of course.
   126. Der-K and the statistical werewolves. Posted: September 09, 2010 at 02:05 AM (#3636576)
I had a lamb shank spiced with rosemary and thyme in a pub tonight that would be happily served at most restaurants in America for twice its price. Diners aren't doing that.
I'm with the USA crowd here - many are. It all depends on where you go - my understanding is that England is no different in this respect.

Thanks, Craig. I just bought a bunch of those awesome little brushes last night.

Hope they're mistaken, Dr. Stankus...
   127. Mr. J. Penny Smoltzuzaka Posted: September 09, 2010 at 03:34 AM (#3636617)
“He will eat a salad, but only if it’s iceberg lettuce, and nothing else, no dressing.


I've had to eat salad made from lettuce other than iceberg and have felt that the only reason it was made with other types of lettuce was because iceberg lettuce was unavailable. I don't like dressing either.

My opinion of M Kay went up as a result of the article... granted that as a nine year old I only ate hot dogs and peanut butter sandwiches.
   128. Dale Sams Posted: September 09, 2010 at 03:47 AM (#3636622)
My opinion of M Kay went up as a result of the article... granted that as a nine year old I only ate hot dogs and peanut butter sandwiches


Ill eat anything but avocado and guac (natch). But was well into my 30's before whatever switch turns in the adult brain that says.."Hey, we're kinda bored with pepperoni pizza and Whataburger."
   129. Swedish Chef Posted: September 09, 2010 at 04:50 AM (#3636654)
Of course they're more interested in the food in the UK, it's only in the last 15 years or so that they discovered that food actually could be tasty. it's all so new to them.
   130. villainx Posted: September 09, 2010 at 06:21 AM (#3636674)
you do realize that UK is a much smaller place than America and much less ethnically diverse than America?

If one were to watch Food Network, Americans taste is so uniform, it's all about blandness and comfort food and adding a bit of color, and crap like that.

Though if you watch the food show on public television, it's mostly great.

But I guess Food Network is more about the corporate demands of the parent company.

And to the degree that a lot of the med range quality places are opening up due to the popularity of the UK gastropub phenomenon, some credit is due. But America, in NY, Chicago, and small and big towns pretty much everywhere, have more than caught up.
   131. Martin Hemner Posted: September 09, 2010 at 08:48 AM (#3636692)
If one were to watch Food Network, Americans taste is so uniform, it's all about blandness and comfort food and adding a bit of color, and crap like that.

Food Network isn't about gourmet food. It's about getting people interested in cooking. Hosts like Sandra Lee and Rachael Ray are there to encourage people to give cooking a try. I don't think anyone believes that you can become the next Wolfgang Puck just by watching "Throwdown" and "Five Ingredient Fix".

To their credit, the Network selected a "Food Network Star" of Indian origin, challenging your blandness and comfort food stereotype. My wife, who 12 months ago wouldn't know a saucepan from a skillet, is now cooking four nights a week, and just ordered a bunch of the Indian spices she learned about from watching the unfortunately named "Aarti Party". I don't think she'll be cooking for the White House anytime soon, but her interest in the Food Network has definitely changed my eating habits for the better.

Food Network execs: Please send my endorsement checks and autographed Paula Deen picture (the one with the smiling pig) c/o M. Hemner, York, PA.
   132. McCoy Posted: September 09, 2010 at 09:16 AM (#3636693)
But America, in NY, Chicago, and small and big towns pretty much everywhere, have more than caught up.

I laughed at this. America has caught up to the culinary prowess of the UK? Now that is funny.
   133. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: September 09, 2010 at 09:35 AM (#3636694)
I was slightly worried about food in England, my gameplan was to find the nearest Indian community and eat all their food. Though it sounds like good food is more pervasive than I had hoped.


You'll be fine if you're in a major city. I don't think I've found as many good restaurants in London as I did in Amsterdam, but that's partly because in Amsterdam the food was going on expenses . . .

The only real missing element is decent Mexican food, I think (it exists, but it's not popular). My wife, previously living in Las Cruces, bemoans that at least once a month, though the Chipotle's opening up on Charing Cross Road has helped matters.
   134. Lassus Posted: September 09, 2010 at 11:51 AM (#3636707)
I laughed at this. America has caught up to the culinary prowess of the UK? Now that is funny.

I have a friend from Kent who spent ten years working towards his eventual American citizenship and who constantly said he did so because of the food in England.
   135. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:36 PM (#3636785)

Equating food with reading is pretty hilarious, indeed. One function is cumulative and ever-expanding; the other is static.


Which is which? I mean, a couple of nights ago I brought home a package of shirataki noodles, which I've never had (& had barely ever heard of) before.
   136. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: September 09, 2010 at 01:40 PM (#3636791)

The only real missing element is decent Mexican food, I think (it exists, but it's not popular). My wife, previously living in Las Cruces, bemoans that at least once a month, though the Chipotle's opening up on Charing Cross Road has helped matters.


Of course, that's true to a large extent in much of the U.S. as well. I got really spoiled re: Mexican food while going to grad school in the Phoenix area back in the early '80s; these days, the thought of going back to any of the local humdrum Tex-Mex establishments here in Montgomery feels me less with apathy than with a mild form of dread. (I really need to hit some of the taquieras that've showed up over the last few years.)
   137. villainx Posted: September 09, 2010 at 03:23 PM (#3636941)
I laughed at this. America has caught up to the culinary prowess of the UK? Now that is funny.

I just remember a lot of restaurants in NY that referenced UK's gastropub as the starting point, probably most notable is Spotted Pig.

No doubt, there was already a big shift going on, especially with local sourcing. And probably a zillion other trends.
   138. villainx Posted: September 09, 2010 at 03:27 PM (#3636944)
To their credit, the Network selected a "Food Network Star" of Indian origin, challenging your blandness and comfort food stereotype.

I'll have to catch this and see.
   139. Pingu Posted: September 09, 2010 at 03:49 PM (#3636982)
Equating food with reading is pretty hilarious, indeed. One function is cumulative and ever-expanding; the other is static.


Which is which? I mean, a couple of nights ago I brought home a package of shirataki noodles, which I've never had (& had barely ever heard of) before.


I actually think the reading/eating comparison is apt. I probablly eat something I've never eaten before at least once a week. Just today I found out about something called a bitter melon, which I've never heard of but most likely have eaten at some point. Food is nowhere near being static.

I think one of the greatest gifts of living in the modern world is that I can eat foods from around the world whenever I want. I feel somewhat sorry for people who either dont try or dont enjoy a big range of food choices. I understand it doesnt work for ya, and I'm not judging by any means, but I get a heck of a lot of pleasure out of eating. I gotta imagine eating the same thing every day would be more like a chore that needs attending and less like an experience worth doing.
   140. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: September 09, 2010 at 04:10 PM (#3637003)
You can sometimes salvage a bitter melon by cooking it down into a curry or something like that.


That's why I mentioned taking it to the nearest Indian restaurant, actually; AFAIK, a vegetable curry (or something close to it) is the only form in which I've had bitter melon, a couple of times. It was ... edible, yeah, but hardly the highlight of the dish, & when I went back for seconds (blessedly, the restaurant in question has a lunch buffet, though having been diagnosed with type II diabetes back in April I hardly ever go, since I need to keep rice & breads like naan to a minimum, dammit, plus as always I'm just absurdly broke, anyway) I'm pretty sure I avoided including any more of the melon in my portion.
   141. Greg K Posted: September 09, 2010 at 04:12 PM (#3637009)
EDIT:
Deleted due to my inability to read the English language
   142. villainx Posted: September 09, 2010 at 04:23 PM (#3637025)
a vegetable curry (or something close to it) is the only form in which I've had bitter melon, a couple of times.

Chinese food use bitter melon too. But it's the typical beef and bitter melon stir fry, usually with the bitterness fairly assertive (some of which can be toned down to a degree by a brief boil bath).

Use to hate it, but I mind it less these days figuring (probably wrongly) anything that bad must be really healthy.
   143. A big pile of nonsense (gef the talking mongoose) Posted: September 09, 2010 at 04:31 PM (#3637035)
I think it is supposed to be healthy; the Indian restaurant I mentioned has a dry-erase board (or whatever those are called) touting the supposed benefits of some of the quasi-exotic spices, vegetables, etc. that they often feature, & I think bitter melon is on it.

There must be some way to make it palatable. I mean, eggplant doesn't strike me as particularly appetizing unless one blanches the hell out of it, at the very least, but eggplant parmawhatever is a huge favorite of mine.
   144. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: September 09, 2010 at 05:05 PM (#3637096)
Remember printing in the 80s when the paper had those little holed strips on the side you had to rip off. Don't know why I mention it here but I just thought of that for the first time in like forever. MAn, that was wierd.


Nice.
   145. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: September 09, 2010 at 06:12 PM (#3637153)
autographed Paula Deen picture


also, Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall is the best.
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