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Friday, December 09, 2005

WaPo: Soriano Jockeys for Position (RR)

Soriano’s reaction to getting moved to the OF? [Forget] that.

First, Soriano’s favored position, second base, is already filled by veteran mainstay Jose Vidro, and Soriano, who is considered a below-average defensive second baseman, has resisted previous attempts to move him to the outfield—as the Nationals say they plan to do. If anything, his resistance could grow even more fierce given his impending free agency and the fact slugging second basemen have more value than slugging corner outfielders.

“I’m going to play second base,” Soriano told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram Thursday. “I don’t think they want me to play the outfield. I think that if they traded for me, it’s to play second base. Obviously I have the control. Of course I’m not going to play the outfield.”

NTNgod Posted: December 09, 2005 at 09:22 AM | 58 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: nationals

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   1. fra paolo Posted: December 09, 2005 at 09:45 AM (#1769379)
Ha-ha-ha!
   2. Dr. Vaux Posted: December 09, 2005 at 10:17 AM (#1769390)
The media reaction to this trade is hilarious. Everyone things the Rangers got hosed, that they "had to get pitching" for Soriano. Where, pray tell, was that fabled pitching going to come from, exactly?
   3. Jim Wisinski Posted: December 09, 2005 at 11:47 AM (#1769409)
Completely predictable.

Everyone things the Rangers got hosed, that they "had to get pitching" for Soriano. Where, pray tell, was that fabled pitching going to come from, exactly?

Didn't you know? There's a huge pitching bazaar out there where you can get anything you need, you just have to be willing to spend money or trade prospects and everyone you want will fall into your lap!

At least that's what the local radio hosts here seem to think, as well as a lot of Rays fans.
   4. BDC Posted: December 09, 2005 at 11:59 AM (#1769412)
Obviously I have the control. Of course I’m not going to play the outfield

He's right you know. If they start him in right he can run in with every pitch and stand next to the second baseman.
   5. philistine Posted: December 09, 2005 at 12:25 PM (#1769420)
I can't wait for someone to stick a microphone in Frank Robinson's face and ask for a reaction to Soriano's refusal to change positions. Another problem "outfielder" to follow in the wake of Rivera and Endy (not to mention problem pitchers Day and Ohka)?
   6. Paul S Posted: December 09, 2005 at 12:54 PM (#1769431)
Where, pray tell, was that fabled pitching going to come from, exactly?

Canada? I hear there's a stockpile of pitching up there.

Imagining Frank tearing Soriano a new one is hilarious.
   7. shoewizard Posted: December 09, 2005 at 01:42 PM (#1769456)
This is not going to end well.
   8. The Ghost of Archi Cianfrocco Posted: December 09, 2005 at 01:53 PM (#1769464)
Operation Shutdown II is in effect! Woohoo!
   9. Best Regards, President of Comfort, Esq. Posted: December 09, 2005 at 02:19 PM (#1769492)
Nice to see Fons has matured in the last couple of years.
   10. RB in NYC (Now Semi-Retired from BBTF) Posted: December 09, 2005 at 02:25 PM (#1769501)
Nice to see Fons has matured in the last couple of years.

Well, it's only logical he would given that one winter where he age like 3 years
   11. AJMcCringleberry Posted: December 09, 2005 at 02:33 PM (#1769514)
If anything, his resistance could grow even more fierce given his impending free agency and the fact slugging second basemen have more value than slugging corner outfielders

Not being able to hit in Arlington half the time is going to hurt his impending free agency more than moving positions.
   12. Grunthos Posted: December 09, 2005 at 02:37 PM (#1769517)
"Jim Bowden has never backed down from a fight."

This is just wonderful... deliberately picking a fight with a player who hasn't even arrived to play for your team yet. Bowden is reaching new lows.
   13. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 09, 2005 at 02:38 PM (#1769519)
Jeez! A free agent-to-be with no previous ties to his team doesn't want to move out of position, which could potentially halve his value going into his walk year? And the team that acquired him knew this but made the trade anyway? BOY OH BOY, WHAT A SELFISH SKUNK!
   14. Scoriano Flitcraft Posted: December 09, 2005 at 02:48 PM (#1769541)
Can Vidro play 3B or are they giving that position to the rookie Zimmerman?

Soriano may not be patient at the plate but he knows his saberpositional value better than Bowden. Of course, Bowden may be leaving a mess behind his departure. I blame Nat ownership, if so. Who is that again?
   15. Johnny Zen Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:04 PM (#1769567)
I am a big Zimmerman fan. What are the chances this deal made Zimmerman available?
   16. Craig in MN Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:06 PM (#1769572)
Can Vidro play 3B or are they giving that position to the rookie Zimmerman?

If he can, they should trade him to the Red Sox; they could use another 3rd baseman.

Seriously, if Vidro can play 3rd, and that doesn't seem like a stretch, there's not really any problem. His hitting numbers at 3rd would still make him pretty valuable. As a matter of fact, the Twins are looking to trade for a 3rd baseman, and I can't think of a player I'd want more than Vidro, assuming he could handle it defensively. It's probably not going to happen, of course.
   17. 1k5v3L Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:07 PM (#1769575)
Is Bowden even thinking?

Supposedly Vidro's knee is pretty much effed. But he's refused to have surgery on it. I won't be shocked if he comes to spring training, limps around for a bit, then has the surgery and misses all of next year...
   18. Gainsay Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:22 PM (#1769597)
Wow, I thought this was a stupid move even when I thought the Nats must have already gotten some sign Soriano would be willing to move to the outfield. Bowden seems hell-bent on joining the Cam Bonifay/Chuck Lamar pantheon of unbelievably awful GMs.
   19. Kyle S Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:32 PM (#1769612)
I am a big Zimmerman fan. What are the chances this deal made Zimmerman available?

Less than zero. Bowden loves Zimmerman (he reached for him at #4 - local boy, all that) and Ryan's meteoric rise has done nothing to change that.

As a somewhat cool side note, one of my good friends from college was Ryan's RA his freshman year at UVA. He got him to autograph a baseball to let him out of some dumb punishment for a minor hall violation, too.
   20. Covfefe Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:45 PM (#1769638)
who is considered a below-average defensive second baseman

I don't doubt this is true -- but there should be a new rule for all journalists.

No more unattributed "is considered", no more "some say".

The world would be a better place if any statement that crosses into the subjective was made with either a bevy of backing numbers, or, at least attributed to some would be "expert"... Hell, I'd even be satisfied with a "Joe Morgan considers Vidro below average defensively".


Only Primates are allowed to make blanket statements without supporting documentation.
   21. Grunthos Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:46 PM (#1769639)
My current theory is, Bowden will deal Nick Johnson for a pitcher and play Vidro at first. You know, Baerga could handle it, right? So why not?

Projected Nats lineup, taking Bowden's competence into account:

2B Soriano
1B Vidro
CF Church
RF Guillen
3B Zimmerman
C Schneider
LF Byrd
SS Guzman

Yeah, that'll be an improvement on last year's team.
   22. Cris E Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:49 PM (#1769651)
Aren't the Dodgers also doing the second base underpants gnome thing (First, collect all the second basemen...) this winter? They should get first crack at Vidro. If that falls through maybe Bowden is planning on trading him for some toolsy outfielders. I hear Texas has a surplus.
   23. DEF Posted: December 09, 2005 at 03:58 PM (#1769674)
I am a big Zimmerman fan. What are the chances this deal made Zimmerman available?

Zero. Zimmerman can't be traded until next June at the earliest. (Recently drafted players can not be traded until a year after they've signed).
   24. Jeff K. Posted: December 09, 2005 at 04:20 PM (#1769718)
I am a big Zimmerman fan. What are the chances this deal made Zimmerman available?

Well, he hasn't pitched in a few years, but he's still kind of a fan favorite around here. I suppose we could let Jeff come your way for a prospect.
   25. Covfefe Posted: December 09, 2005 at 04:34 PM (#1769748)
Zero. Zimmerman can't be traded until next June at the earliest.

I know this is true -- but doesn't MLB generally look the other way on this rule?

I seem to recall a fair number of picks traded before they'd spent the requisite year with their drafting team (Pete Incaviglia is the only one that comes to mind, but I'm pretty sure there are others).
   26. Old Matt Posted: December 09, 2005 at 04:40 PM (#1769764)
Great trade Bowden.
   27. The Original SJ Posted: December 09, 2005 at 04:48 PM (#1769787)
I am on Sorianos side on this. His value is as a second baseman. Some team trades for him and tells him he is moving to the outfield? (forget) that, I wouldn't go either.

I would say, sign me to a deal, and pay me like an offensive second baseman, and you can move me wherever you want.

Its funny, but in 2001 Spring training, Soriano was playing left field. If Knobby could throw, he would be in LF right now.
   28. 1k5v3L Posted: December 09, 2005 at 04:48 PM (#1769788)
I suspect Minaya will be trading for Soriano sometime in August...
   29. covelli chris p Posted: December 09, 2005 at 04:49 PM (#1769790)
The world would be a better place if any statement that crosses into the subjective was made with either a bevy of backing numbers, or, at least attributed to some would be "expert"... Hell, I'd even be satisfied with a "Joe Morgan considers Vidro below average defensively".

"Curveball" considers Vidro to be the best defensive second baseman ever!
   30. Covfefe Posted: December 09, 2005 at 04:55 PM (#1769808)
"Curveball" considers Vidro to be the best defensive second baseman ever!

Now thats RDF!
   31. Sam M. Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:04 PM (#1769830)
I am on Sorianos side on this. His value is as a second baseman. Some team trades for him and tells him he is moving to the outfield? (forget) that, I wouldn't go either.

I would say, sign me to a deal, and pay me like an offensive second baseman, and you can move me wherever you want.


Herein the difference between Chipper Jones and Alfonso Soriano. Both resist switching positions even though it might well help their teams if they did so. Soriano refuses because he thinks it's going to cost him some money. Chipper refuses (or at least resists), but restructures his contract to help the team be able to afford to sign other players.

I would tell Soriano he's got two choices. He can play where the manager damn well puts him, making $10M along the way. Or he can spend the year suspended making nothing. If he chooses the first option, he can control his fate next year and sign with a team that promises to play him at second base (and will pay him accordingly). If he chooses the second, he can do the same thing, but he will have foregone $10M for the 2006 season. Your call, Alfonso.
   32. I Love LA (OFF) Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:14 PM (#1769844)
Or he can spend the year suspended making nothing.

I don't see how the union would let this happen. I mean, what's next, a team signing Eric Gagne and telling he must play catcher?

I think the best solution to this problem is either moving Vidro to another position, or to another team, preferably to the Mets in exchange for Kaz Matsui.
   33. Jimmy P Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:16 PM (#1769852)
Or he can spend the year suspended making nothing.

The NFL has set the precedence on this. Both Keyshawn and Owens have had to sit because they were jerks.
   34. Covfefe Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:25 PM (#1769871)
The NFL has set the precedence on this. Both Keyshawn and Owens have had to sit because they were jerks.

The NFL players union is a joke - they've got by far the worst CBA of any major sports (though I don't know a whole lot about the new NHL CBA).

Precedent is fine and dandy - but the terms of the MLBPA's CBA likely don't give MLB teams the same leeway to deal with players as the NFL.
   35. 1k5v3L Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:32 PM (#1769884)
If Jim Bowden had one iota of brain, he'd turn around and trade Soriano to the Mets, for anything he can get.
   36. Jimmy P Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:41 PM (#1769908)

Precedent is fine and dandy - but the terms of the MLBPA's CBA likely don't give MLB teams the same leeway to deal with players as the NFL.


Maybe not in contract issues like length, salary, bonuses, and ability to be cut, but in terms of insubordination I bet they are close to the same. It's probably not in Soriano's contract that he must play 2B, so I'm sure MLB can pull this off.

Of course, they won't, mainly because they won't have to. Vidro will be hurt. in fact, I don't think he'll ever be effective above replacement level again.
   37. Eraser-X is emphatically dominating teh site!!! Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:41 PM (#1769909)
Footbal is hilarious to me: a much more abusive sport--it's not boxing, but a lot of these guys can't walk afterwards--and they can't stick together enough to get some sort of control over the owners. And the owners have so much control that they are sometimes killing the gold goose. I don't watch football to see the logos or the fat-ass owners in their lux boxes--I want to see the world's best receivers jumping over people.
   38. E., Hinske Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:43 PM (#1769918)
I'm sure Sam M. gets more than a few questions this time of year about what court's precendents are binding on who. Now, I'm certainly not a legal scholar, but I'm pretty sure that the precedential value of a decision interpreting the NFL CBA is pretty low when we're dealing with a situation covering the MLB CBA. That said, my knee jerk reaction is that a player has to play where he's told to play. Who knows what the CBA says though.

As for the new NHL CBA, it's bad for the player but not nearly as lousy as the NFL CBA, or so it seems. At least they've still got guaranteed contracts.
   39. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:47 PM (#1769925)
I seem to recall a fair number of picks traded before they'd spent the requisite year with their drafting team (Pete Incaviglia is the only one that comes to mind, but I'm pretty sure there are others).

That would be why it's still called the Incaviglia Rule by some. As for MLB looking the other way, I suppose it's true if what you mean is the PTBNL loophole. But if I'm taking Zimmerman in a trade, I want him now, not at mid-season. And it would suck for Zim, since he'd have to waste a half a season at AAA.
   40. Jimmy P Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:48 PM (#1769927)
As for the new NHL CBA, it's bad for the player but not nearly as lousy as the NFL CBA, or so it seems. At least they've still got guaranteed contracts.

The thing about the NHL CBA is the revenue linkage. It could be very bad for the players if league revenue goes down, but it could be very good for the NHL (not the owners, the league itself) because the players now need the league to do better to get more money. You won't see many guys come out like Yzerman did a week or two ago saying that it's not hockey.
   41. E., Hinske Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:48 PM (#1769929)
What do you think that the problem is with the NFLPA E-X? I'm writing my sports law paper at the moment, making the argument that the NHLPA is better off reorganizing into 30 separate team unions for a number of reasons. I can't figure out why the NFLPA is so weak exactly. The weakness is a new thing for the NHLPA and I think that they're going to take steps to address it-there are pending labour complaints right now, the union's in turmoil but there at least seem to be a significant percentage of people who want to address it. I don't understand why the NFLPA is satisfied with being so weak. Your point about the damage to the body is right on-I'd rather be an NHL player for 20 years than an NFL player for 5.
   42. Sam M. Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:48 PM (#1769930)
I don't see how the union would let this happen. I mean, what's next, a team signing Eric Gagne and telling he must play catcher?

But a team would never do that, because it would be pure folly. Refusing to play Soriano at second base (if that's what happens) because he's a lousy second baseman, you've got Jose Vidro (if he's healthy), and you need an outfielder, is not folly. It's simple common sense. If a player refuses to play the position the manager assigns him to play, he would unquestionably be in violation of his contract and could, I am confident, be suspended for it.

Technically, he could be suspended only for a certain period of time. Then he'd be reinstated, refuse to play the OF, and be suspended all over again.

Now, all that said, the player can play the game much smarter than Soriano is with these stupid public statements about how he won't do it, period. He can make a half-hearted effort in spring training. He can gripe and grouse. But outright refusal? That would give the team all the ammunition it needed.
   43. Fat Al Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:48 PM (#1769931)
Herein the difference between Chipper Jones and Alfonso Soriano. Both resist switching positions even though it might well help their teams if they did so. Soriano refuses because he thinks it's going to cost him some money. Chipper refuses (or at least resists), but restructures his contract to help the team be able to afford to sign other players.

I'm not particularly looking to defend Soriano, but calling the Nationals "his team" in the same way that the Braves are "Chipper's Team" is a little disingenuous, no? He got traded without his consent, which the rules allow, but the rules also allow him to make noise if he's unhappy about it. We can argue all day long about whether this makes him a jackass, or, for that matter, whether Manny and Tejada whining is appropriate or inappropriate. The fact is that Soriano got traded into a bad situation and he's unhappy about it. I don't see how that is the subject of disciplinary action.
   44. blue Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:49 PM (#1769933)
Does it have to come to lawsuits? A long time ago, Soriano didn't want to leave the shortstop position, either, but he was persuaded. Obviously the situation here is different- he's an established player with a lot of money at stake, not a minor-leaguer just trying to get a spot on the big team- but who's to say a deal can't be made somehow?
   45. Dog on the sidewalk Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:53 PM (#1769941)
I don't see how the union could win this one. I doubt there is anything in Soriano's contract specifying second base, and it's not like it is some bizarre and new idea to change a pleyer's position. As the team paying Soriano's contract, the Nationals have the right to choose where he plays. I understand why Soriano wouldn't want to move, but as long as he is accepting pay checks his job is to play where is told. I'm not one to generally side with the owners, but I hope they don't give in to Soriano.
   46. E., Hinske Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:54 PM (#1769942)
The thing about the NHL CBA is the revenue linkage. It could be very bad for the players if league revenue goes down, but it could be very good for the NHL (not the owners, the league itself) because the players now need the league to do better to get more money. You won't see many guys come out like Yzerman did a week or two ago saying that it's not hockey.

This is overstated, I think. The link between Yzerman complaining that it's not hockey and how much money the NHL makes is pretty tenuous. On the linkage though, is the NFL cap not linked to how much revenue the league takes in? I thought it was. With the NHL, the risk to the players of a collapse in revenues is, again, overstated I think. There was never any real TV money. It's a gate driven league and it's doing just fine in the cities where it's always done well and sucking in the American South. That's fine-we don't give a #### about college football. If the league does well and makes inroads, the players will share but they won't get nearly as much as they could.

Incidentally, I'd love to know how much new revenue is being poured into MLB teams pockets this off-season. There's been a lot of reference to new money but I've yet to see anything like X million dollars per team. Anyone know?
   47. Jimmy P Posted: December 09, 2005 at 05:58 PM (#1769951)
I can't figure out why the NFLPA is so weak exactly. The weakness is a new thing for the NHLPA and I think that they're going to take steps to address it-there are pending labour complaints right now,

I think that the NFL is weak because of two things. First, I think they have poor leadership. Second, they gave in years ago, and since they've been walked all over. of course, I think that will change when the NFL CBA ends. A lot of players are looking at what's happened to Antonio Gates, Owens, and Hines Ward - they are grossly underpaid (Gates, Ward) or a contract that is written to be cut (Owens). I think the NHL is so weak because there was too much of a difference between the top and the bottom, and the middle ground was disappearing. I worked out with a NHL player's brother last year, and he did not want to be locked out, he just wanted to play. Of course, he was near the bottom of the pay scale.
   48. E., Hinske Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:06 PM (#1769968)
I think the NHL is so weak because there was too much of a difference between the top and the bottom, and the middle ground was disappearing. I worked out with a NHL player's brother last year, and he did not want to be locked out, he just wanted to play. Of course, he was near the bottom of the pay scale.

My impression is that this was much more of a problem in the NBA and even MLB thne it was in the NHL. If anything, the new NHL will likely see an even more disproportionate amount of the money handed to the stars while the guys at the bottom end earn less. I think that the poor bastards just didn't have a plan that they were really willing to get behind and the whole culture of hockey kind of frowns upon guys getting out of line and pointing that out. I'm relatively optimistic that they'll fix their issues though.
   49. Justin T drives a crooked hoss Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:09 PM (#1769976)
If Soriano plays the outfield and has an awful season at the plate (which he will), at least then he can probably sucker some GM into giving him a big deal and letting him play 2nd again, where he will be comfortable and can hit like he always has. But if he plays 2nd and has an awful season, he can get the same GM to give him the money because he will hit better away from RFK. So, nevermind.
   50. Greg Maddux School of Reflexive Profanity Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:19 PM (#1769994)
Or he can spend the year suspended making nothing.

The NFL has set the precedence on this. Both Keyshawn and Owens have had to sit because they were jerks.


The NFL has done no such thing. Neither player was suspended for the season wihout pay; Johnson was de-activated and paid in full, and Owens was suspended the maximum four games without pay, and he will be de-activated and paid for the rest of the season.
   51. Covfefe Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:22 PM (#1770001)
What do you think that the problem is with the NFLPA E-X?

I think Jimmy P is spot on...

The NFL owners basically "broke" the NFLPA during the 80s (specifically, the lost 87 strike). Unlike MLB - where the MLBPA's strikes were largely successfully in at least maintaining a large degree of status quo, the NFLPA caved almost entirely. They decertified after the 87 debacle, reconstituted as a much weaker body in 93, and have been working under the same basic constructs since then (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Football_League_Players'_Association for a good overview of the history).

I think part of the NFL's problem is just part and parcel of the sport -- unlike baseball, where you've got plenty of 15-20 year veterans that can provide leadership from club to club, it's tough to find a good pool of team reps in the NFL.

Plus - the NFLPA never really had a good CBA from the player's perspective... while the MLBPA fought long and hard for an advantageous deal, and I think the importance of it and what it's meant to every MLB player is something that veterans stress to younger players. You'd better believe guys like John Smoltz are handing down the gospel to the Jorge Sosas, just like Smoltz probably got it handed down from a guy like Charlie Leibrandt (who probably had it drilled into him by Dennis Leonard, etc).

I think in terms of union leadership - MLB probably has a greater number of qualified member advocates than the other big 3 combined.

Now... I'll grant that some of the basic differences between the NFL and MLB (roster sizes, injury frequency, short careers) would make it impossible for the NFLPA to push for a CBA based off the MLB's, but I can't honestly see how any hotshot young athlete with a choice- love of games being equal - would choose the NFL over the NBA, MLB, or even the NHL....
   52. Jimmy P Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:23 PM (#1770006)

The NFL has done no such thing. Neither player was suspended for the season wihout pay; Johnson was de-activated and paid in full, and Owens was suspended the maximum four games without pay, and he will be de-activated and paid for the rest of the season.


You're right.

But, it's still a decent punishment since Keyshawn, Owens, and Soriano have or will be free agents after the season they were suspended. It's tough to make your case for more money when you don't play.
   53. The District Attorney Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:29 PM (#1770017)
Anyone who has paid attention to Soriano's career -- much less anyone in the baseball business considering trading for him -- should be aware that he has repeatedly stated that he does not want to move to OF. I agree that, if Washington had no reason to think that that had changed and traded for him anyway intending to move him to OF, that was not smart (making the trade even worse than it was to begin with) -- making players miserable is not a good way to have them perform well. I agree that Soriano is allowed to have emotions, and although he really should say this stuff to Washington management rather than to the newspaper, that's mostly just letting off steam and is a minor infraction, especially since he had publicly said it before anyway.

Those things said, I don't think it's contradictory to ALSO say that, when push comes to shove, if the Opening Day lineup card has him in the outfield, he needs to go play there, do the best job he can, and stop complaining at that point. I think his statements that "he has the control" and "he's not going to play outfield" are crazy, and if he attempts to hold to them, I will have no sympathy for him at all.
   54. Pops Freshenmeyer Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:30 PM (#1770019)
I'm pretty sure that the precedential value of a decision interpreting the NFL CBA is pretty low when we're dealing with a situation covering the MLB CBA

Zero, that was an arbitrator's decison WRT Owens.

I would be willing to bet that any Soriano dispute would also go to arbitration (as per the CBA) but I don't actually know.
   55. The District Attorney Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:33 PM (#1770023)
Addendum: Possible Gordian knot solution: Move him (back) to SS. I think he'd probably be fine with that, and even making a mockery of the position defensively, he'll still be better than Guzman.
   56. Al Peterson Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:37 PM (#1770031)
Nationals should just throw away the defense and stick with the following: Johnson at 1B, Scoriano at 2B, Vidro at 3B, Zimmerman at SS. Zimmerman tried SS in the minors last year for awhile.

Frank Robinson would take about 2 months of seeing the middle infield woes before he let out a good tirade in the press.
   57. Covfefe Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:44 PM (#1770045)
I would be willing to bet that any Soriano dispute would also go to arbitration (as per the CBA) but I don't actually know.


You're right -- actually -- there are "stages" of grievances, and if I'm reading it right, there are actually 2 steps before they reach arbitration.

You can see the whole MLB CBA here.

Incidentally - I think everyone's right about Soriano and suspensions.... The CBA only specifies "just cause" -- I assume the specifics of that term are defined by individual contracts, though I'd bet it's pretty much boilerplate language.
   58. cercopithecus aethiops Posted: December 09, 2005 at 06:59 PM (#1770076)
...just throw away the defense and stick with the following: Johnson at 1B, Scoriano at 2B, Vidro at 3B, Zimmerman at SS...

Well, if you could get yourself three GG-caliber CFs and an extreme flyball pitching staff in that park, this just might work.

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