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Monday, June 02, 2014

‘We’ve been friends long enough you’ll understand’: Vin Scully, baseball’s longest-tenured and most eloquent broadcaster, is still looking to make a connection - SBNation.com

My favorite announcer.

Jim Furtado Posted: June 02, 2014 at 02:52 PM | 56 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: announcers, vin scully

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   1. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: June 02, 2014 at 03:10 PM (#4717514)
This was excellent.
   2. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: June 02, 2014 at 03:21 PM (#4717522)
Agree, excellent. I hope people don't pass this over. The art of conversation I worry, is being lost, and Vin is one of the master practitioners of the art.

If you ever get a chance to listen to Scully calling the ninth inning of Koufax's perfect game, listen to it, its pure poetry.
   3. silhouetted by the sea Posted: June 02, 2014 at 04:52 PM (#4717628)
Here it is. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uozLFsEPu8
   4. asinwreck Posted: June 02, 2014 at 05:18 PM (#4717650)
Happy birthday, Frank!
   5. cardsfanboy Posted: June 02, 2014 at 05:34 PM (#4717658)
Excellent article. Long and totally worth the read.
   6. Perry Posted: June 02, 2014 at 05:48 PM (#4717669)
If you ever get a chance to listen to Scully calling the ninth inning of Koufax's perfect game, listen to it, its pure poetry.


I loved that in one of his recent blog posts Joe Posnanski said something about pitchers pitching like "it's always 2 and 2 to Harvey Kuenn." I loved even more that Pos just assumed his readers would get the reference without him identifying it.
   7. Perry Posted: June 02, 2014 at 05:58 PM (#4717675)
Off subject a bit, but by the way, when you keep hearing Scully referring to the time ("nine forty-six PM....") in that broadcast -- that game started at 8 pm, more or less. Koufax polished that baby off in 1:43.
   8. Batman Posted: June 02, 2014 at 06:13 PM (#4717684)
Koufax polished that baby off in 1:43.
He got help from Bob Hendley, who pitched a complete game and faced fewer hitters than Koufax did. Hendley also only struck out three, unlike Koufax's mound-hogging 14 K's.
   9. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 02, 2014 at 06:37 PM (#4717696)
And five days later, Hendley beat Koufax, 2-1.
   10. Jose Is The Most Absurd Thing on the Site Posted: June 02, 2014 at 07:10 PM (#4717715)
He got help from Bob Hendley, who pitched a complete game and faced fewer hitters than Koufax did. Hendley also only struck out three, unlike Koufax's mound-hogging 14 K's.


Wow I didn't know that. That is amazing. Gotta think that's pretty rare in a regular no hitter let alone a perfect game.
   11. Batman Posted: June 02, 2014 at 07:21 PM (#4717721)
With a walk and a double, Sweet Lou Johnson was the only one on either team to reach base in that perfect game. Two days after Hendley beat Koufax, Koufax had another perfect appearance against the Cubs, with Kuenn again ending the game.
   12. Perry Posted: June 02, 2014 at 07:47 PM (#4717729)
Two days after Hendley beat Koufax, Koufax had another perfect appearance against the Cubs, with Kuenn again ending the game.


Attendance 550 at Wrigley? Wow.
   13. vortex of dissipation Posted: June 02, 2014 at 07:55 PM (#4717732)
Three game midweek series with the Dodgers at Wrigley Field. Total attendance for all three games combined? 8,656.
   14. Batman Posted: June 02, 2014 at 08:00 PM (#4717735)
Todd Zeile was born in Van Nuys the day of the perfect game. I like to think his mom was listening to Scully's call during the birth. Well, at least as much as I like to think about Todd Zeile.
   15. Howie Menckel Posted: June 02, 2014 at 08:23 PM (#4717750)

Or his mom.
   16. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: June 02, 2014 at 08:36 PM (#4717753)
Attendance 550 at Wrigley? Wow.
Three game midweek series with the Dodgers at Wrigley Field. Total attendance for all three games combined? 8,656.
The Golden Age of Baseball. Nobody cares about baseball now.
   17. 'Spos Posted: June 02, 2014 at 08:52 PM (#4717760)
This is awesome. Do read.
   18. cardsfanboy Posted: June 02, 2014 at 08:59 PM (#4717763)
The Golden Age of Baseball. Nobody cares about baseball now.


LOL... At least all of them were there to watch the game instead of going to a mallpark.
   19. theboyqueen Posted: June 02, 2014 at 09:23 PM (#4717775)
The lights are now starting to come out, like thousands and thousands of fireflies, starting deep in center field, glittering to left, and slowly the entire ballpark. A sea of lights at the Coliseum. Let there be a prayer for every light, and wherever you are, maybe you in silent tribute to Roy Campanella can also say a prayer for his well-being. Campanella, for thousands of times, made the trip to the mound to help somebody out: a tired pitcher, a disgusted youngster, a boy perhaps who had his heart broken in the game of baseball. And tonight, on his last trip to the mound, the city of Los Angeles says hello.


I seriously think Vin Scully should get a reign as poet laureate before he dies. Stuff like this is just unbelievable.
   20. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: June 02, 2014 at 09:36 PM (#4717784)
LOL... At least all of them were there to watch the game instead of going to a mallpark.
So what? Seriously, so what? The handful of hardcores still go. Now, we just have more company, and that's a good thing.

This article is completely lovely, absolutely wonderful. Read it, read it now.

   21. cardsfanboy Posted: June 02, 2014 at 09:42 PM (#4717788)
So what? Seriously, so what? The handful of hardcores still go. Now, we just have more company, and that's a good thing.


It was a joke at the expense of the SBB's of the world that bemoan the mallpark experience. I was being sarcastic(which is what I was assuming you were doing with your original post)
   22. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: June 02, 2014 at 09:50 PM (#4717793)
Sarcasm only works when I do it.
   23. Jeltzandini Posted: June 02, 2014 at 09:56 PM (#4717796)
We never really know a celebrity. Images are managed, media coverage can be biased one way or the other. But when someone's been in the public eye as long as Scully, with nothing but the highest praise from hundreds of different people, you just have to do a solid Bayesian update to your priors and be quite sure that yeah, he really is one of the all time great people in the history of the game.

65 years with the Dodgers. 65 years before Scully began with the Dodgers, Grover Cleveland began his first presidential term.

   24. Howie Menckel Posted: June 02, 2014 at 10:02 PM (#4717801)

I hope it's ok that a close pal of mine, one universally revered as the most beloved in his public but far less extensive corner of the world as the kindest and gentlest of souls, despises Scully with the fire of a thousand suns.

He watched endless hours of baseball a day, and Scully's voice for him is what Mary Hart's was for Kramer in "Seinfeld."

I have no explanation.

   25. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: June 02, 2014 at 10:51 PM (#4717834)
He watched endless hours of baseball a day, and Scully's voice for him is what Mary Hart's was for Kramer in "Seinfeld."

I have no explanation.

endless loop " twooooo and twoooo to Harveeeey Kueeeeeen"
   26. TerpNats Posted: June 02, 2014 at 11:38 PM (#4717857)
Vin's first-ever Dodger broadcast was a spring training game in Florida against the Philadelphia Athletics, managed by Connie Mack in his 50th and final season.

Vin has broadcast games in ballparks ranging from Braves Field to Roosevelt Stadium in Jersey City to the L.A. Memorial Coliseum to Jarry Park to the Sydney Grounds.

My mother, who passed away last December at age 93, heard Vin call games when she lived in Brooklyn in the early '50s. And I'll be moving to Los Angeles soon...and my apartment is wired for TimeWarner SportsNet LA. So I'll be able to hear him call many more innings from Chavez Ravine than those who can only hear the first three innings via radio simulcast.
   27. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 02, 2014 at 11:49 PM (#4717858)
Extra Innings pkg. has more than spoiled me with Vin the past decade. I remember when he did his last national radio WS for CBS radio ('95 series) thinking I'd probably not catch much more of Vin anymore. There was a little window where you could listen (Broadcast.com of all places), then I forget which year it was when game content was seized back by the clubs (MLB)
   28. boteman Posted: June 03, 2014 at 12:59 AM (#4717870)
I pitched DirecTV in favor of a totally Internet TV experience and I rarely miss it. The MLB.tv deal is a little more than half the cost of Extra Innings so I can still listen to Vin call Dodgers games on my Roku. That's a great setup.
   29. Ulysses S. Fairsmith Posted: June 03, 2014 at 01:08 AM (#4717871)
. . . despises Scully with the fire of a thousand suns.


Derek Jeter:Honus Wagner::Vin Scully:Ernie Harwell
   30. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 03, 2014 at 06:58 AM (#4717881)
Three game midweek series with the Dodgers at Wrigley Field. Total attendance for all three games combined? 8,656.

That was a reflection of the pathetic quality of the Cubs' play (they hadn't finished in the first division in 19 years), the fact that these were midweek day games after school was back in session, the fact that back then Wrigley Field wasn't seen as particularly unique (and it wasn't), the fact that baseball's marketing was still in its infancy, and the fact that back then the Cubs televised their home games only.

But it wasn't any particular reflection on baseball attendance as a whole, since 1965 was also a year that baseball broke its all-time attendance record. You also have to remember that while attendance per team has approximate doubled since then, the population has gone up about 64% and the upper 1% is buying out a lot more season tickets than they were 49 years ago, which pads the attendance numbers quite a bit. Look around Yankee Stadium during the late innings of many games and you'll see crowds that aren't that much denser than they were in the 1950's. Attendance then was measured in turnstile count, unlike today when it's measured in tickets sold.

None of that means that those Wrigley crowds weren't mindblowingly small, or that Cubs' fans historic devotion to baseball isn't somewhat overrated, only that you have to put those numbers in some sort of perspective.
   31. just plain joe Posted: June 03, 2014 at 08:20 AM (#4717890)
That was a reflection of the pathetic quality of the Cubs' play (they hadn't finished in the first division in 19 years), the fact that these were midweek day games after school was back in session, the fact that back then Wrigley Field wasn't seen as particularly unique (and it wasn't), the fact that baseball's marketing was still in its infancy, and the fact that back then the Cubs televised their home games only.


Crowds weren't much bigger on the weekends, even when school was not in session. During this period you could walk up to the box office 10 minutes before game time and have no trouble buying a ticket. Most of the seats in Wrigley Field then were general admission, which meant you could sit where you wanted and/or move around the park if you desired. I want to say that the general admission tickets were $1.50 then but perhaps not.
   32. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 03, 2014 at 09:02 AM (#4717895)
According to the Sporting News Dope Book, the general admission in 1965 for Wrigley Field was $1.51. I'd write that off as a misprint, but it's the same figure they had listed for 1964. $1.50 was the nearly universal price for general admission tickets back then, which translates to $11.29 in 2014 dollars. You can sometimes find tickets that cheap these days, but mostly they're in Bob Uecker's lap.
   33. Howie Menckel Posted: June 03, 2014 at 09:17 AM (#4717901)
I started making Wrigley pilgrimages in the mid-1980s, and for a number of years you could easily get bleachers seats scalped on the street corner for less than $20 (since we were flying in, we didn't want to bother buying tix in advance in case of rainouts, though since face value was only a few bucks it might have been worth the effort to call in those pre-internet days).

But that price kept going up in the 1990s. I was there in July 1998, and for a weekend game you couldn't get a scalped bleachers seats for less than $200 (!) for that series (admittedly this was Sosa v McGwire days, so maybe never mind).

   34. TerpNats Posted: June 03, 2014 at 09:41 AM (#4717907)
Between 1952 and 1967, only two teams in the majors failed to draw one million each season -- the Senators (both versions) and...the Cubs. Bad baseball draws few fans.
   35. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: June 03, 2014 at 09:49 AM (#4717910)
You can sometimes find tickets that cheap these days, but mostly they're in Bob Uecker's lap.

Is it a good idea to hunt around for things in Bob Uecker's lap?
   36. Bunny Vincennes Posted: June 03, 2014 at 10:09 AM (#4717921)
25. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: June 02, 2014 at 10:51 PM (#4717834)

He watched endless hours of baseball a day, and Scully's voice for him is what Mary Hart's was for Kramer in "Seinfeld."

I have no explanation.


endless loop " twooooo and twoooo to Harveeeey Kueeeeeen"


"Twenty nine thousand fans and a millllliiioooon butterflies."

"Right now the mound is the loneliest place in the world."
   37. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 03, 2014 at 10:39 AM (#4717933)
I started making Wrigley pilgrimages in the mid-1980s, and for a number of years you could easily get bleachers seats scalped on the street corner for less than $20 (since we were flying in, we didn't want to bother buying tix in advance in case of rainouts, though since face value was only a few bucks it might have been worth the effort to call in those pre-internet days).

But that price kept going up in the 1990s. I was there in July 1998, and for a weekend game you couldn't get a scalped bleachers seats for less than $200 (!) for that series (admittedly this was Sosa v McGwire days, so maybe never mind).


Today's insane ticket prices are a result of many factors, but if there's such a thing as "demand" that could be measured in isolation, I doubt if that would account for much of it.

Since the 1970's, you've had all these things come into play in increasing attendance and / or increases in ticket prices way beyond the CPI, listed in no particular order:

---big increases in population combined with shrinking ballpark capacity

---greater amounts of disposable income among the upper 20% or so of the population, the result of growing income gaps and reduced marginal taxes

---huge advances in marketing techniques

---the shift from measuring "attendance" from turnstile count to ticket sales

---the huge spike in corporate profits, which gives companies lots of cash to buy tax deductible season tickets. Here's where the gap between turnstile count and nominal "attendance" really begins to show up.

---the growth of mini-plans that reduce availability of single game tickets

---the elimination of the general admission ticket, which often results in huge empty gaps in the high priced areas while the bleachers and nosebleed sections are filled to near capacity. This category elimination also serves to disguise what are really much bigger price increases that don't show up in deceptive apples to oranges comparisons.

---the growth of the auction mentality and the concept of "premium" tickets

---the wild card system that lets many more teams remain in postseason contention in the last weeks of the season

I'm sure there are other factors, but every one of those has either contributed to increased attendance or increased ticket prices, and usually both.




   38. Rob_Wood Posted: June 03, 2014 at 10:44 AM (#4717936)
I might be mis-remembering, but I think it cost a quarter for bleacher tickets to Cubs games in the 1950's. General admission I think were $1. Box seats were more expensive, maybe $2.50.
   39. asinwreck Posted: June 03, 2014 at 10:47 AM (#4717938)
Is it a good idea to hunt around for things in Bob Uecker's lap?
Safer than Bill Conlin's lap.
   40. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 03, 2014 at 11:06 AM (#4717954)
I might be mis-remembering, but I think it cost a quarter for bleacher tickets to Cubs games in the 1950's. General admission I think were $1. Box seats were more expensive, maybe $2.50.

The first year that the Dope Books listed ticket prices was in 1955. In that year the Wrigley bleachers were 60 cents, general admission $1.25, and box seats $2.50. The Indians and the White Sox also had 60 cent bleacher seats, the Pirates' were a buck, and all the other teams' were 75 cents. Ticket prices across baseball back then were much more uniform than they are in 2014, regardless of a team's record or the wealth of the city in which it was located. In the year of the Maris/Mantle home run chase, you could still get a general admission upper deck ticket behind the plate in Yankee Stadium for all of $1.30.

Here's the catch: Box seats made up nearly 40% of Wrigley's capacity. But here's the consolation: Since there were no reserved seats other than the boxes, that $1.25 got you a view that would cost you a small fortune today.
   41. eddieot Posted: June 03, 2014 at 01:12 PM (#4718070)
I have the the ticket stub from my first ballgame, at the Vet in 1973. It was $4 for a reserved seat in the lower second deck AND it was Willie Montanez bat day so I got to see a game and got a fully functional wooden youth bat that I used for years. Wayne Twitchell threw a CG 5-hitter in an 11-0 blowout over the Padres, who had Cito Gaston starting in RF. Cesar Tovar started at 3B for the Phillies over rookie Mike Schmidt who was scuffling at .204.

I am an old. Sigh.

Boxscore
   42. Moeball Posted: June 03, 2014 at 03:19 PM (#4718248)
My dad took me to the All Star game at Anaheim Stadium in 1967 - I think tickets were only about $10 apiece.

I took my dad to the All Star game at Anaheim Stadium in 1989. Tickets were, shall we say, quite a bit more!

LOL... At least all of them were there to watch the game instead of going to a mallpark.


So what? Seriously, so what? The handful of hardcores still go. Now, we just have more company, and that's a good thing.

Sometimes. Sometimes it's a lot of fun to have the energy of the crowd. Especially if you are there with a reasonably intelligent crowd.

Other times, however...well, at a lot of the Padres games I go to - particularly if it is a "giveaway" game - there may be 40,000 people there, but it seems that only about 5,000 are there to actually watch the game and the other 35,000 are there to get drunk, start fights and generally be a**holes.

Or maybe my aged brain is confusing Padres games with Chargers games.

Quite frankly, the games I go to where there are only 15-20 thousand in attendance are WAY more enjoyable. Fortunately, as poorly as the Padres have been playing, there will be a lot more of those games after the All Star break, when most of the people who are only early season bandwagon jumpers will have already jumped off.
   43. Rob_Wood Posted: June 03, 2014 at 03:33 PM (#4718262)
That 40% figure for pct of box seats at Wrigley Field seems high to me. When I first started going to Cub games, there were few box seats (and the entire upper deck was general admission on days they opened the upper deck). That was one of P.K. Wrigley's legacies -- to have a lot of good inexpensive seats available to walk-ups. And, I am sure most people know, Fridays were Ladies Days when any female gets in for free.

I think it was around the mid-1960's that they converted a section of general admission seats to box seats, so maybe the 40% figure applies to that time frame. If I remember right, George Halas screamed bloody murder since the box seats were larger (wider) than general admission so that the switch to box seats cost him some capacity for his sold out Bears games. Cub games were very rarely sold out.
   44. Moeball Posted: June 03, 2014 at 03:45 PM (#4718271)
Actually, now that I think of it - we all have our favorite teams that we root for and are "invested" in cheering on - but what about fans of other teams?

1)Which fans of teams other than your favorites have you found to be the most enjoyable to share a game with - in terms of being knowledgeable, just enjoying the game, having a sense of humor, etc.

2)Which fans have your experiences taught you...are at the opposite end of that scale?

I've met many fans over the decades from several other teams, and in my limited, admittedly unscientific polling experience:

A)Most knowledgeable - Orioles fans. Don't often find them on the west coast but the ones I've met have all pretty much been very astute
B)Most "fun" - just having a good time, good senses of humor - Cubs fans, Tampa Bay
C)Most "loyal" - Yankees, Red Sox, Cubs, Cardinals fans
D)Most drunk - Yanks, BoSox, Phillies fans
E)Most arrogant - Red Sox fans by an order of magnitude. I thought Yankee fans would rule this category until I met a zillion Red Sox fans who all assured me that the universe revolves around them.
F)Least knowledgeable - Rockies, Phillies fans. I've met many Rockies fans who never believed Coors Field was a good hitters park that was impacting stats. I've met Phillies fans who still, to this day, would boo and cuss out Mike Schmidt if they met him on the street. Sad to say, I can't say a lot for Padres fans, either.

Full disclosure - I admit that there are probably fans who think I'm insufferably arrogant as well, but I was just curious to see what other Primates have found other fans to be like in their baseball travels over the years.
   45. Rob_Wood Posted: June 03, 2014 at 03:53 PM (#4718277)
eddieot, great story about your first game. for a fleeting summer cesar tovar became my favorite player (this was when willie mays had gotten old). wow, having tovar and montanez on the same team must have been fun since both were notorious hot dogs. infield practice must have been awesome.

the summer tovar was my favorite is the season i think he led the american league in hits, runs, doubles, and triples. okay, i better look this up since memories are often rose-colored ... ... [going to bb-ref.com] ... ... tovar did lead AL in doubles and triples in 1970, but was 2nd in runs to yaz, and 3rd in hits to oliva and alex johnson. tovar led league in hits the following year. his other claim to fame, of course, is that tovar played all nine positions in a single game, something that yaz never did (ha)
   46. Moeball Posted: June 03, 2014 at 03:53 PM (#4718278)
Oh, and Vin Scully is awesome.

I have been very lucky growing up in Southern California.

For much of my life:

Vin Scully to listen to in the summer...
...Chick Hearn in the winter.

If there are or ever were any better announcers, I'd like to hear them because I don't know of any.
   47. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: June 03, 2014 at 03:56 PM (#4718280)
tovar led league in hits the following year. his other claim to fame, of course, is that tovar played all nine positions in a single game, something that yaz never did (ha)

his other other claim to fame is that some idiot from Minneapolis named Max Nichols voted him #1 in the MVP race in '67, denying Yaz unanimity
   48. Brian Posted: June 03, 2014 at 04:19 PM (#4718300)
I remember that the 1967 pennant race was a 4 team dogfight. One of the networks actually showed a primetime out of market game during the week in the last few days, unheard of then. It was great to watch a meaningful game as the Yankees were eliminated by Memorial day I think.
   49. Batman Posted: June 03, 2014 at 04:26 PM (#4718308)
BB-Ref says this for the 9/16/65 game:
Attendance: 550 (at the top)
Attendance: Not Given (under the hitters' and pitchers' lines)

What does that mean?
   50. Rob_Wood Posted: June 03, 2014 at 04:34 PM (#4718313)
yes, i remember that saturday twins-bosox game when jim kaat threw a pitch, got the ball back from his catcher, shook his head, called manager out to mound, shook his head again, and then walked off to the dugout -- the most mysterious (and sad) thing i think i had ever seen
   51. Jeff Frances the Mute Posted: June 03, 2014 at 04:46 PM (#4718317)
There are only two things that upset Vin Scully:

1) Sylvester Stallone's landscaping
2) People forgetting about D-Day
   52. Gold Star - just Gold Star Posted: June 03, 2014 at 04:58 PM (#4718325)
3) Fans interfering with balls in play.
   53. Batman Posted: June 03, 2014 at 05:02 PM (#4718328)
4) When Charley Steiner leaves his beard shavings in the sink
   54. Baldrick Posted: June 03, 2014 at 05:19 PM (#4718341)
A)Most knowledgeable - Orioles fans. Don't often find them on the west coast but the ones I've met have all pretty much been very astute
B)Most "fun" - just having a good time, good senses of humor - Cubs fans, Tampa Bay
C)Most "loyal" - Yankees, Red Sox, Cubs, Cardinals fans
D)Most drunk - Yanks, BoSox, Phillies fans
E)Most arrogant - Red Sox fans by an order of magnitude. I thought Yankee fans would rule this category until I met a zillion Red Sox fans who all assured me that the universe revolves around them.
F)Least knowledgeable - Rockies, Phillies fans. I've met many Rockies fans who never believed Coors Field was a good hitters park that was impacting stats. I've met Phillies fans who still, to this day, would boo and cuss out Mike Schmidt if they met him on the street. Sad to say, I can't say a lot for Padres fans, either.

I seriously doubt that there is much meaningful difference among fanbases. We're talking about huge numbers of people. It's pretty implausible that there is a genuine cultural difference large enough to radically reconfigure the general character of 'baseball fan.'

I think most of what drives perceptions of fanbases is a) success of the team and b) portrayal by the media. Success causes people to see fans as arrogant. And success also draws in less hardcore fans, who will act the part. And, yeah, I'm sure there is some feedback there, where the general perception of the fanbase starts to influence the fanbase. But really, I've met all sorts of fans of all sorts of teams. There are idiots and smart people and jackasses and turds and super friendly folks in all places. Even for the Yankees, as much as it pains me to admit.
   55. hee came hee seop'd he choi'd Posted: June 03, 2014 at 06:41 PM (#4718388)
If you're sitting under the press box at dodger stadium around the seventh inning stretch I encourage you to look up towards Vin. every time I've looked up at him he's standing up and enthusiastically belting out take me out to the ballgame like the game was his first. love this man so much.
   56. Jolly Old St. Nick Is A Jolly Old St. Crip Posted: June 03, 2014 at 07:06 PM (#4718399)
My dad took me to the All Star game at Anaheim Stadium in 1967 - I think tickets were only about $10 apiece.

Probably you sat in the box seats, because reserved seats for that game (at least some of them) were only $6.00 or $8.00.

-----------------------------------------------

That 40% figure for pct of box seats at Wrigley Field seems high to me. When I first started going to Cub games, there were few box seats (and the entire upper deck was general admission on days they opened the upper deck). That was one of P.K. Wrigley's legacies -- to have a lot of good inexpensive seats available to walk-ups. And, I am sure most people know, Fridays were Ladies Days when any female gets in for free.

That 1955 Dope Book lists 14,208 box seats, 19,297 general admissions, 3,250 bleachers and no reserved seats other than the boxes. The 1965 Dope Book shows the first 10 rows of box seats at a 50 cent premium ($3.50 to $3.00) over the rest of the boxes, but other than that the seat divisions are almost identical to 1955's. My guess is that they restricted general admission to the upper decks on big crowd days, but otherwise may have let G.A. ticketholders infiltrate the upper parts of the lower deck. Even with those Andy Frain ushers, most ballparks weren't nearly as hardassed about keeping people out of unoccupied seats as they've been for the past 20-odd years. I know that in Griffith Stadium a 75 cent child's general admission ticket got me into almost any unoccupied seat in the park after about the 3rd or 4th inning. And even with big crowds, that 75 cents got me into the 9th row behind the boxes, including behind the plate in the lower deck.

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