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Saturday, April 21, 2018

White Sox pitcher Danny Farquhar in critical condition after suffering ruptured aneurysm

The commotion in the White Sox dugout was the first sign something was wrong Friday night.

Sox relief pitcher Danny Farquhar collapsed just minutes after he threw 15 pitches against the Astros in the sixth inning of an eventual 10-0 Sox loss. As the game carried on at Guaranteed Rate Field, Sox trainers and emergency medical technicians quickly surrounded him, carried him into the clubhouse and eventually loaded him in an ambulance.

After performing tests at Rush University Medical Center, doctors found Farquhar had suffered a brain hemorrhage caused by a ruptured aneurysm. As of Saturday afternoon, Farquhar was stable but remained in critical condition under the care of Dr. Demetrius Lopes and the Rush neurosurgical team.

kthejoker Posted: April 21, 2018 at 08:16 PM | 24 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: chicago white sox

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   1. TVerik, who wonders what the hell is "Ansky" Posted: April 21, 2018 at 09:42 PM (#5657783)
Is a rupture of an aneurysm in the brain usually brought on by some condition, like workplace stress? Or does it just happen if it's your time, whether you are performing your job or watching TV at home?
   2. Tom T Posted: April 21, 2018 at 10:29 PM (#5657822)
Not *exactly* my area, but to my knowledge the rupture can be strain-induced, but this is not a necessary (or sufficient) condition for it to occur.

However, this is one reason we are pushing our athletics department to let us do pre-season scans on all the athletes...if you can catch something like this aneurysm you can save a life (...at least improve quality of life).
   3. TVerik, who wonders what the hell is "Ansky" Posted: April 21, 2018 at 10:31 PM (#5657824)
What would you do if you catch an aneurysm early? It seems to me that preventative brain surgery is pretty drastic; can medication make a difference?
   4. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: April 21, 2018 at 11:09 PM (#5657844)
A ruptured aneurysm in the brain killed one of my co-valedictorians in my high school class. Getting ready to fly home for Mother's Day weekend in 2001, she collapsed dead in her apartment after complaining of severe headaches earlier that day. Her parents got worried when she never showed up after the flight. She was Chief of Staff for the Lieutenant Governor of Colorado and was only 33 years old. Here's to hoping Farquhar's story has a better ending.
   5. . . . . . . Posted: April 21, 2018 at 11:12 PM (#5657845)
However, this is one reason we are pushing our athletics department to let us do pre-season scans on all the athletes...if you can catch something like this aneurysm you can save a life (...at least improve quality of life).


Y’all might want to start small, like scanning your athletes for the clap. Just a suggestion.
   6. Perry Posted: April 22, 2018 at 01:35 AM (#5657897)
Isn't that what happened to John Olerud in college (and why he always wore a helmet on the field)?
   7. John Reynard Posted: April 22, 2018 at 02:40 AM (#5657901)
Aneurysms can be brought on by lots of things. My grandfather did many things in his life which were highly stressful including working on the atomic bomb during WWII and leading a lab at Dupont which discovered an element which at one time was called Dupontium (Russians discovered it same or similar time so not named that now). But, it was getting back from a 2-week vacation in Hawaii and sitting in his favorite chair, before bringing the luggage in, which brought on his aneurysm. At least he went out having just enjoyed himself a lot and in his comfortable space.

I wouldn't assume this was stress related to his job. I hope he has a full recovery.
   8. ptodd Posted: April 22, 2018 at 03:45 AM (#5657902)
Aneurysm is a weakness in a blood vessel. Most people are probably born with it and most never know they have one. Smoking and high blood pressure can trigger a rupture. Even activities that trigger a temporary increase in blood pressure like heavy lifting, intense exercise, caffeine etc can cause it to rupture. Most never rupture. Sometimes there are symptoms before it ruptures in which case they can assess it and take action if needed, but many ignore the warning signs

It looks like he will suffer some residual effects if he survives As most people do. Its sad but hopefully he pulls out of it OK. Gammons did survive a rupture with no apparent ill effects other than some speach difficulties , but he is not an athlete
   9. Greg Pope Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:37 AM (#5657932)
Aneurysm is a weakness in a blood vessel

So when people say things like "he had an aneurysm", they really mean a rupture? I always thought an aneurysm was an event that happened.
   10. Russlan thinks deGrom is da bomb Posted: April 22, 2018 at 06:22 PM (#5658165)
So when people say things like "he had an aneurysm", they really mean a rupture? I always thought an aneurysm was an event that happened.

Yes.
   11. Walks Clog Up the Bases Posted: April 22, 2018 at 06:37 PM (#5658175)
So when people say things like "he had an aneurysm", they really mean a rupture? I always thought an aneurysm was an event that happened.


Correct. Many people do not survive the rupture, and if they do, many suffer residual effects.

My mom actually suffered a ruptured brain aneurysm many years ago. I was living at home at the time, but was at a friend's house watching the Tigers/A's ALCS opener when this apparently happened. Rather than heading out to a bar with friends after the game, I decided to head home, in part because I wanted to tell my mom that the Tigers had won. That was likely what saved her life, as I found her barely conscious and completely incoherent in her room.

I called for an ambulance and they got her to the hospital quickly, but things looked bleak. At the hospital, the crisis counselor told me that her condition had declined upon arrival at the hospital and that I should probably call any family members I wanted there in case my mom's condition continued to degrade. I don't think I'll ever forget how surreal it felt standing over her in that hospital room with family members as a priest gave her her last rites.

Thankfully, they were able to stabilize her condition, though her chances of survival remained touch and go for several days. They were finally able to stabilize her condition enough that they could perform a procedure to place a stent in her head, at which point, we could start focusing on the road to recovery. She remained in a medically-induced coma for several weeks and then went through several months of rehab.

Her recovery was actually quite incredible considering most people suffer noticeable lasting effects if they survive the rupture. Within four months, they determined she was capable of living on her own again, and a few months after that, she was driving again. Her memory isn't the greatest, but she was always a bit absent minded, anyway, so the difference is negligible.

In the years since, I've come to be even more aware of how unusual her bounce back was. I've had several friends who have lost a parent to the same thing. I've known of a few people who survived a rupture, but were basically a shell of their former selves afterwards. My mom knows how to get on my nerves, but stories like this always remind me that I should be grateful that more than a decade later, she's even still around to needle me.
   12. RMc's Unenviable Situation Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:42 PM (#5658200)
I wanted to tell my mom that the Tigers had won. That was likely what saved her life


Friends, I don't often use the word "hero", but...

I'm glad your mom is OK. Hope Farquhar will be, too.
   13. Howie Menckel Posted: April 22, 2018 at 07:46 PM (#5658202)
wow, 11 is just an incredible story. thanks much for that
   14. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 22, 2018 at 08:16 PM (#5658215)
Farquhar is 31, made it to MLB briefly in 2011, and has bounced around up & down over parts of 7 MLB seasons, accruing 3.135 years of service time, according to BB-Ref. I believe that gives him a modest pension at 55, and life-time health benefits, but he's not set for life if this is a career-ending condition. Of course, the life-threatening aspect is the immediate concern. Hopefully, he gets the best possible outcome.
   15. Walt Davis Posted: April 22, 2018 at 08:37 PM (#5658220)
I guess the previous baseball example that springs to mind is JR Richard who suffered a stroke (actually 3 per Wiki). He made a few comeback attempts but never made it back to the majors. Despite the "dead arm" issues that preceded the stroke, he struck out 9.4/9 and had a 174 ERA+ in 1980.

In his case, there were several warning signs, initially not taken seriously but eventually resulting in examinations ... which didn't diagnose the danger. Per his Wiki page, "later examinations showed that Richard was suffering from extensive arterial thoracic outlet syndrome." So next time we see a pitcher diagnosed with TOS, we know how serious it can be.
   16. Howie Menckel Posted: April 22, 2018 at 08:46 PM (#5658227)
um, that was Matt Harvey, wasn't it?
   17. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 22, 2018 at 09:32 PM (#5658239)
Bit of an update:
White Sox reliever Danny Farquhar was in stable but critical condition Sunday, a day after undergoing surgery to relieve swelling on his brain after suffering a brain hemorrhage while in the dugout during a game.

White Sox vice president Ken Williams told USA Today Sports that Farquhar remained Sunday in the neurosurgical ICU unit at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago and was being closely monitored by neurosurgeons after undergoing a complicated procedure Saturday night.

"He's a fighter, and he's in the fight of his life right now,'' Williams told the paper. "They had to do another surgery, cracking his skull open, and putting a clamp on it. My God.
   18. Rear Admiral Piazza Posted: April 22, 2018 at 10:25 PM (#5658255)
An aneurysm is a malformation in the wall of a blood vessel. In the brain this weakness in the wall usually creates a berry-shaped bulge.

At his age it was almost certainly congenital. Bad stuff like smoking or cocaine can make them more likely to form later in life.

If caught you can either put a clip at its base or send a coil up into it. If caught quikly a coil is ideal and is likely what they did here.
   19. Walt Davis Posted: April 23, 2018 at 01:34 AM (#5658298)
um, that was Matt Harvey, wasn't it?

There have been a few. Hopefully all caught long before Richards's was diagnosed (not until after he had a stroke it seems). Again from Wiki:

An angiogram revealed an obstruction in the distal subclavian and axillary arteries of the right arm. Richard's blood pressure in his left arm was normal but pressure was nearly absent in his right arm due to the completely obstructed artery. Note, further examination cleared him to resume pitching! On July 25, however, the arteries in his neck were studied, and the doctors reached a conclusion that all was normal and no surgical treatment needed to be performed.[9]

Later examinations showed that Richard was suffering from extensive arterial thoracic outlet syndrome. While pitching, his clavicle and first rib pinched his subclavian artery.

So it sounds like, if left untreated, the TOS can close off the artery which obviously is very, very bad. Hopefully guys like Harvey are getting properly diagnosed before that causes long-term problems. Wiki also says that Richard had obstructed arteries elsewhere too, including a massive blockage in his right carotid artery. If I'm reading Wiki correctly, he had at least three different blockages, at least one outside his arm.
   20. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 08:04 AM (#5658314)
A good friend of mine died of a brain aneurysm just a few months ago, at the age of 38. He had a bad headache one evening, went to bed, and when his wife woke up the next morning he wasn't breathing. They rushed him to the hospital and put him on life support for a couple of days, but there was nothing they could do for him at that point.
   21. bunyon Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:06 AM (#5658336)
Man, this thread.

Hug your loved ones, folks. (This could be read as sarcasm on the internet; it is not).
   22. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: April 23, 2018 at 09:22 AM (#5658349)
Wiki also says that Richard had obstructed arteries elsewhere too, including a massive blockage in his right carotid artery. If I'm reading Wiki correctly, he had at least three different blockages, at least one outside his arm.

I was a 12-year-old voracious reader of all things baseball at the time, and the Astros were the closest major league team to where I lived. Let's just say there were a lot of unsavory stories at the time of what a malingerer Richard was right up until his actual collapse on the field.
   23. Walt Davis Posted: April 23, 2018 at 05:13 PM (#5658672)
#22 ... I was a bit older and yes, it was disgusting. Even from the distance of Chicago, we heard those stories about his malingering and they were obviously bullshit. Richard was a mean ol' guy of the Bob Gibson variety, and probably on his way to a CYA given that first half ... then suddenly we were to believe that he was lazy and dogging it? He was jealous of Nolan Ryan? The ease with which many believed that storyline was an example of the type of "perceptual racism" that gets the cops called on 2 black guys waiting at a Starbucks. If it had been Ryan instead, that storyline never would have emerged.
   24. Batman Posted: April 23, 2018 at 05:25 PM (#5658678)
Richard's last start was against Phil Niekro, which must have been an interesting matchup. Richard doubled in his only at bat, Houston's only hit until Joe Morgan singled in the ninth.

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