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Thursday, December 16, 2010

Iowa legend and Baseball Hall of Famer Bob Feller dies at age 92

A sad year for major league baseball just got infinitely sadder:

Hall of Fame pitcher, Bob Feller, died tonight of leukemia at age 92.  The former Major League Baseball star has been in hospice care in Cleveland for nearly two weeks. 

The native of Van Meter, Iowa struck out 15 batters in is major league debut in 1936 at age 17, and went on to a career of monumental proportions. Feller won 266 games, struck out 2,581 hitters and helped the Cleveland Indians to a World Series title in 1948.  Cleveland has not won a World Series title since. 

He was inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, NY in 1962 and opened the Bob Feller Museum in Van Meter in 1995.  He remained an active part of the Indians organization through the 2010 season.

 
Condolences to his family.

AndrewJ Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:13 AM | 69 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: hall of fame, history, indians, obituaries

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   1. Coot Veal and Cot Deal taste like Old Bay Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:38 AM (#3711948)
RIP, Robert... we'll try and keep 'em off the lawn for you.
   2. AndrewJ Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:42 AM (#3711954)
He lived nearly 49 of his 92 years as a Hall of Fame member. That's astonishing.
   3. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:45 AM (#3711956)
Ah dammmit.
   4. Best Regards, President of Comfort, Esq., LLC Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:47 AM (#3711958)
Never saw him pitch. Because he retired 21 years before I was born.
   5. kthejoker Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:51 AM (#3711960)
"Say, George, would you give a brand new rookie a pitching lesson?"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXkrHS_fQl0&feature=related

And the man's delivery is just awe-inspiring. The ball looks fast in slow motion!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e765xy7LDvI&NR=1
   6. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:55 AM (#3711964)
I hope he tells St. Peter to get off his lawn--and that they don't make Saints like they used to in the old days
   7. AndrewJ Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:55 AM (#3711965)
As was posted in an earlier thread, Bob's high school graduation ceremony was broadcast live nationwide over the NBC radio network. Never happened before or since with a high school commencement.

And he lived long enough for news of his death to be Tweeted.
   8. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:57 AM (#3711967)
He's one Hall of Famer whose autograph prices might not be affected by his passing. The joke among card collectors is there is more signed Feller memorabilia in existence than unsigned. He would gladly sign anything for anybody at any time.

Godspeed, Mr. Feller.
   9. The Yankee Clapper Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:01 AM (#3711969)
A great player who also deserves props for stepping forward without hesitation when his country was in need.
   10. The Anthony Kennedy of BBTF (Scott) Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:01 AM (#3711970)
Some of the best quotes ever, I wish I had seen him pitch. Except he retired when my father was 1.
   11. AndrewJ Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:04 AM (#3711973)
And speaking of Feller's own WWII service, his batterymate when he pitched American Legion ball in Iowa was none other than Nile Kinnick.
   12. Gamingboy Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:04 AM (#3711974)
A great ballplayer. A great American.

Rest in peace, Bob.
   13. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:10 AM (#3711978)
And the man's delivery is just awe-inspiring. The ball looks fast in slow motion!

No joke. That clip is beautiful. RIP.
   14. The Yankee Clapper Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:15 AM (#3711980)
Feller was described as "The Ace of the Greatest Generation" in an obit that just ran on the MLB Network. Sounds right.
   15. Los Angeles El Hombre of Anaheim Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:19 AM (#3711981)
R.I.P., Rapid Robert.
   16. Spahn Insane Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:20 AM (#3711982)
Shame, that. RIP.
   17. toratoratora Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:23 AM (#3711983)
Damn. A blast from the past, in more ways than one.
Hope you're throwing heat in heaven, Bob.
   18. Rich Rifkin Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:23 AM (#3711984)
92 years is a nice long life. Mixing in being one of the greatest baseball players of all time, a major leaguer as a high school student, a gunboat captain and a guy who drove his Jag into his 90s is a life well lived. I heard maybe 8-10 years ago--not that anyone really keeps such records--that Feller had the all-time record for throwing the ceremonial pitch. Hopefully Nolan Ryan will live as long and throw as well as Feller did as a very old man.
   19. Hugh Jorgan Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:24 AM (#3711985)
RIP Bob

Bob to grim reaper, "get the f*ck off my lawn!"
   20. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:26 AM (#3711987)
RIP Bob.
   21. LargeBill Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:30 AM (#3711990)
Go to BB-ref and look at his seasons before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and his 1946 season. Try to imagine his career line in uninterrupted.

He retired a few years before I was born, but had the pleasure of watching him pitch in old timers games. He was still bringing it fast in his 80's. Even at 90 he refused to throw ceremonial pitches from anywhere but the pitcher's mound.

Just an amazing man with a career that sounds impossible. Major league debut (with no minor league time) he struck out 15 batters.

Rest in peace, Bob we have the watch.
   22. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:34 AM (#3711992)
Kind of fitting that the news came right at the end of that 1960 World Series game 7 telecast, with many former players present (and still looking to be in pretty good shape) whose careers overlapped with Feller.
   23. Rich Rifkin Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:37 AM (#3711995)
In this video Feller sits on a panel in 2000 with a number of other old ballplayers who all served in WW2. Warren Spahn and Buck O'Neill are there, as well.
   24. SoSHially Unacceptable Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:42 AM (#3711997)
I hope some fellow Hall of Famer takes up the 'stay off his lawn' campaign directed at Pete Rose.
   25. Morty Causa Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:53 AM (#3712006)
Despite his cantankerousness there was something likable about Bob. I think you sensed you'd always know where you stood with him. And that he wasn't mean-spirited. No complicated nuances. That can be a relief, restful, even enjoyable. Reminds me of the John Wayne quote: "Some people say everything can't be black and white. I say: 'Why the hell not?'"
   26. Tuque Posted: December 16, 2010 at 05:08 AM (#3712016)
I'm kind of shocked. And it takes a hell of a 92-year-old man to shock me by dying.
   27. Rich Rifkin Posted: December 16, 2010 at 05:51 AM (#3712027)
With Bob Feller deceased, Stan Musial is now the HOF player who has been in the Hall the longest. Feller was inducted in 1962; Musial in 1969. The oldest living HOF player is now Bobby Doerr, who was chosen by the Veterans Committee in 1986.
   28. CraigK Posted: December 16, 2010 at 06:02 AM (#3712030)
God, Lee MacPhail's older and still kicking.
   29. Endless Trash Posted: December 16, 2010 at 06:10 AM (#3712032)
The oldest living HOF player is now Bobby Doerr, who was chosen by the Veterans Committee in 1986.


Wasn't he already?
   30. Joe Willie Mammoth Posted: December 16, 2010 at 06:14 AM (#3712035)
"Wasn't he already?"

sure was, by about 7 months
   31. mex4173 Posted: December 16, 2010 at 06:17 AM (#3712036)
Retired 31 years before I was born, but one hell of a life to learn about.
   32. Don Malcolm Posted: December 16, 2010 at 06:31 AM (#3712038)
Some of Rapid Robert's pitching lines from early in his career are knee-buckling:

9-13-1936 vs PHA 9-2-2-2-9-17
8-6-1937 vs NYY 9-10-6-6-10-12
5-4-1938 at WAS 10-3-0-0-9-8
8-5-1938 vs NYY 7-3-6-6-11-8

One has to wonder how many pitches he threw in some of these games. And there were at least 21 where he went more than nine innings!

He tightened his control dramatically after setting a record for most walks allowed in a season (since 1901, of course...) in '38 (with 208). Along the way, however, he did rack up the second-highest number of 10+ BB games, with 6. (Try to guess who's ahead of him without going to the Play Index...)

And we're not likely to see any other 21-year-old pitcher rack up 31 complete games (!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) the way Bob did in 1940.

Finally, Bob is the only pitcher between 1923 (George Uhle) and 1971 (Mickey Lolich) to face more than 1500 batters in a single season (1512 in '46).
   33. Fred Lynn Nolan Ryan Sweeney Agonistes Posted: December 16, 2010 at 07:16 AM (#3712047)
Along the way, however, he did rack up the second-highest number of 10+ BB games, with 6. (Try to guess who's ahead of him without going to the Play Index...)


Nolan Ryan?
   34. Stately, Plump Buck Mulligan Posted: December 16, 2010 at 07:48 AM (#3712054)
And he lived long enough for news of his death to be Tweeted.


I'm just glad he lived long enough to see a black president.
   35. baudib Posted: December 16, 2010 at 08:04 AM (#3712055)
Great pitcher, a true hero, (formerly) a living legend.
   36. True Blue Posted: December 16, 2010 at 10:23 AM (#3712065)
He volunteered for military service after Pearl Harbor was attacked and saw combat. His father was sick at the time too.

He signed a lot of autographs and made lots of personal appearances at minor league ball parks.

He spoke out against the reserve clause in an interview with Mike Wallace in 1957, who countered that Jackie Robinson told him he had no problems with the reserve clause.

He had the opportunity early in his career to become a free agent and make big money in Judge Landis's war on farm teams. He got some extra money from Cleveland but refused the free agency saying he gave his word and that was important to him. It sure isn't today with players like Manny Ramirez and Carl Pavano. Or owners with corporate welfare stadia.

Is Bobby Doerr the oldest living HOFer in any sport? I know Milt Schmidt and Elmer Lach from the NHL are still around. Don't know about the NFL or NBA
   37. Benji Posted: December 16, 2010 at 11:19 AM (#3712066)
RIP Mr Feller. Thank you for all you did, and for filling the role of "admirable curmudgeon" so perfectly. When I go see my father today I'll thank HIM again for serving in WWII and Korea. He grew up the son of a Brooklyn scout so he didn't root for Feller, Greenberg or Williams but he respected their sacrifices.
   38. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: December 16, 2010 at 12:13 PM (#3712070)
Is Bobby Doerr the oldest living HOFer in any sport? I know Milt Schmidt and Elmer Lach from the NHL are still around. Don't know about the NFL or NBA.

Ace Parker of the NFL's HoF will be 99 in May. He also played for the A's in 1936-37, and hit a home run in his first at bat in the Majors.
   39. Jeff R. Posted: December 16, 2010 at 12:18 PM (#3712073)
Along the way, however, he did rack up the second-highest number of 10+ BB games, with 6. (Try to guess who's ahead of him without going to the Play Index...)


Bobby Witt or Charlie Hough?

Between Witt, Ryan, and Hough the Texas Rangers in the late 80's had some eye-popping pitching lines.
   40. MM1f Posted: December 16, 2010 at 12:51 PM (#3712081)
He spoke out against the reserve clause in an interview with Mike Wallace in 1957, who countered that Jackie Robinson told him he had no problems with the reserve clause.

http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/multimedia/video/2008/wallace/feller_bob_t.html
This is that interview. It is interesting for a number of reasons. Feller was a smart guy.

"I heard maybe 8-10 years ago--not that anyone really keeps such records--that Feller had the all-time record for throwing the ceremonial pitch. Hopefully Nolan Ryan will live as long and throw as well as Feller did as a very old man."

There is a clip on Youtube of Feller throwing strikes from the mound at 90 years old.
   41. depletion Posted: December 16, 2010 at 01:05 PM (#3712086)
This is great.
Even at 90 he refused to throw ceremonial pitches from anywhere but the pitcher's mound.

Perhaps this Dylan Thomas poem was written for Bob.

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.
   42. AndrewJ Posted: December 16, 2010 at 01:14 PM (#3712089)
He attended Stephen Strasburg's second MLB start. Imagine if Jim Creighton had seen Feller pitch in 1936 -- it's the same time difference.
   43. Rants Mulliniks Posted: December 16, 2010 at 01:23 PM (#3712092)
God bless and RIP. The doctor who authorized chemo for a 92 year old should be taken out behind the woodshed and whupped good.
   44. BDC Posted: December 16, 2010 at 01:35 PM (#3712100)
RIP and fond memories of an iconic ballplayer (who, yes, retired three years before I was born ...)
   45. MM1f Posted: December 16, 2010 at 01:39 PM (#3712103)
God bless and RIP. The doctor who authorized chemo for a 92 year old should be taken out behind the woodshed and whupped good.


Isn't it possible that Feller, who stayed active into his 90s and wasn't ever content to just be an old man, said "Doc, its just leukemia, if younger folks can beat it with chemo so can i?"

As #41 alludes to, I can't imagine Feller being a guy who said say "I'm 92, I've had a great life. I guess this is the end of a good run."
It really seems like Feller wanted to pitch off a mound in 2011 or 2012.
   46. Morty Causa Posted: December 16, 2010 at 01:47 PM (#3712107)
http://www.hrc.utexas.edu/multimedia/video/2008/wallace/feller_bob_t.html
This is that interview. It is interesting for a number of reasons. Feller was a smart guy
.

What I've always like also about that interview was how Feller was visibly straining to be diplomatic--to not be the in-your-face Bob Feller of later years we came to know and love just yet.
   47. Don Malcolm Posted: December 16, 2010 at 02:28 PM (#3712135)
The pitcher with more 10+ BB games than Feller: here's a clue...he was active in the AL during the 40s and 50s.
   48. Cabbage Posted: December 16, 2010 at 02:28 PM (#3712137)
John Sickels was on NPR this morning talking about Feller.
   49. Devin has a deep burning passion for fuzzy socks Posted: December 16, 2010 at 02:30 PM (#3712141)
Along the way, however, he did rack up the second-highest number of 10+ BB games, with 6. (Try to guess who's ahead of him without going to the Play Index...)


Tommy Byrne?

[Edit: For the record, I said that before I saw Don's clue.]
   50. Rally Posted: December 16, 2010 at 02:59 PM (#3712167)
The pitcher with more 10+ BB games than Feller: here's a clue...he was active in the AL during the 40s and 50s.


Early Wynn? - What a great name for a pitcher. If you saw that in fiction it would not be considered believable.
   51. stig-tossled,hornswoggled gef the talking mongoose Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:03 PM (#3712175)
And we're not likely to see any other 21-year-old pitcher rack up 31 complete games (!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!) the way Bob did in 1940.


We're probably not particularly likely to see any other 21-year-old pitcher rack up 31 complete games in a career, I'd say.

John Sickels was on NPR this morning talking about Feller.


Heard that driving into work, which -- being computerless & TV-less at home -- was how I learned of his death. RIP.
   52. Clemenza Posted: December 16, 2010 at 03:07 PM (#3712178)
And the man's delivery is just awe-inspiring.

I liked this picture so much I bought it this fall at an art gallery in Sausalito...

http://www.baseballinwartime.com/images/feller_cleveland.jpg
   53. RMc Has Bizarre Ideas to Fix Baseball Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:02 PM (#3712241)
1936. Nineteen thirty-six. 1936 was Bob Feller's first year in the major leagues. Seventy-four years ago.

In 1936, two-thirds of the countries in the UN didn't exist.
In 1936, World War I was still called the World War, or the Great War.
In 1936, Adolf Hitler was chancellor of Germany.
In 1936, there were no black players in the majors.
In 1936, many people who watched the first NL season in 1876 were still alive.
In 1936, George Wright, who played for the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, was still alive.
In 1936, Babe Ruth had just retired as an active player.
In 1936, my father was seven years old. (I wouldn't be born for almost three decades.)
   54. AndrewJ Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:18 PM (#3712258)
My father was born in 1936.
   55. Lest we forget Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:28 PM (#3712265)
Bobo Newsome?

"Feller was described as "The Ace of the Greatest Generation""

Off the top of my head, can't think of any competition to that claim.
   56. Lest we forget Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:28 PM (#3712266)
edit: double hit
   57. John DiFool2 Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:31 PM (#3712270)
All these lawn comments are making me feel guilty. When I meet him again, I'll rake up all his leaves, ok?
   58. Harveys Wallbangers Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:31 PM (#3712271)
In 1936, many people who watched the first NL season in 1876 were still alive.

What was the average lifespan in 1936? Between WWI and the Spanish Flu folks sixty years old were not everywhere as they are today.

I had not yet been to my first baseball game in 1936. Or should I say a major league baseball game. As some already know, my uncle lived in Chicago and once a year my dad would travel to Chicago to visit him and we would always catch some ballgames of whichever team was in town. My uncle was the bigger baseball fan. My father just liked to get away from mom, work, the farm for a week. Taking me gave him the pretense that the week would be filled with mostly clean behavior. I always got the reminders down and on the way back that mother was not to know how we spent the evenings. Which were at my uncle's bar with me running around.
   59. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: December 16, 2010 at 04:56 PM (#3712290)
In 1936, two-thirds of the countries in the UN didn't exist.
In 1936, World War I was still called the World War, or the Great War.
In 1936, Adolf Hitler was chancellor of Germany.
In 1936, there were no black players in the majors.
In 1936, many people who watched the first NL season in 1876 were still alive.
In 1936, George Wright, who played for the 1869 Cincinnati Red Stockings, was still alive.
In 1936, Babe Ruth had just retired as an active player.
In 1936, my father was seven years old. (I wouldn't be born for almost three decades.)


Bob Feller made his MLB debut two days after teh Spanish Civil War began. It was also two days after Carl Hubbell began his 24-game winning streak.

When Feller debuted in MLB, the Cubs were defending NL pennant winners.

Don Drysdale wasn't born when Bob Feller first played for the Indians. Neither was Buddy Holly. Nor was Elizabeth Dole, John McCain, Abbie Hoffman, Jim Henson, Morgan Freeman, Saddam Hussein, or Wilt Chamberlain. Casey Stengel was, but he wasn't yet a genius.

Jesse Owens was largely an unknown, except to track & field fans, so he was largely unknown.

Life magazine hadn't been published. The Hindenberg still floated.

Life, Liberty, Landon.

It was still controversial if social security was constitutional.

Ned Hanlon, Hall of Fame manager from the 1890s, was still alive. So was John D. Rockefeller, Jean Harlow, Amelia Earhart, and Erich Ludendorff.
   60. Kiko Sakata Posted: December 16, 2010 at 05:04 PM (#3712300)
1936. Nineteen thirty-six. 1936 was Bob Feller's first year in the major leagues. Seventy-four years ago.


My father was born in Cleveland (actually, Parma) the year before Feller's debut. He remembers dancing in the street with his brother-in-law as a 13-year-old when the Indians won the World Series. The fact that my dad's childhood hero was still alive and kicking was very comforting to me.

RIP Rapid Robert.
   61. Pasta-diving Jeter (jmac66) Posted: December 16, 2010 at 05:11 PM (#3712306)
My father was born in Cleveland (actually, Parma)

well, then we know what color socks he wore...
   62. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: December 16, 2010 at 05:24 PM (#3712320)
What was the average lifespan in 1936?

About 56 and change for a man, and 60 and change for a woman. That's about 15 years lower than today's, but a big chunk of that gap disappears once you eliminate infant and early childhood deaths from the pool.

---------------

It was still controversial if social security was constitutional.

Let's just hope Nieporent doesn't see that implication. (smile)
   63. Don Malcolm Posted: December 16, 2010 at 05:27 PM (#3712323)
Devin got it--it's positively, definitely the quintessential wild-ass lefty of all time, Tommy Byrne--who had seven 10+ BB games in his career, three of which came in consecutive starts in 1951 after he was exiled to the St. Louis Browns. Aside from poor Steve Blass in '73, Byrne in '51 was probably the wildest pitcher ever--he started out with the Yanks and walked 8 batters in 3 1/3 IP in his first start of the year. He was given a month off in May to try to get his "mechanics" fixed (to try to get his BB/9 back down to six rather than nine...), but when he came back he walked 19 men in 12 IP and Stengel was supposedly quoted as saying: "Get rid of him before he puts me in an early grave."

One of my regrets is not being old enough to have seen Tommy Byrne pitch, especially in the 1948-51 period. It must have been quite an experience. He actually went down to the PCL in '54 and someone there (Jerry Priddy?) managed to tighten up his windup. He won 20 games there and Yanks brought him back--in '55 he was 16-5 for them and walked "only" 4.9/9 innings.

He was also a very good hitting pitcher, but--in keeping with his wayward nature--he was a bust as a pinch-hitter, going only 5-for-63.
   64. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 16, 2010 at 05:49 PM (#3712353)
Bob Feller's debut was a couple of weeks before Jesse Owens' gold medal runs in Berlin. It was a couple of weeks before the last public execution in the United States. It was a couple of weeks before Nat "King" Cole's first recording session. It was a couple of weeks after NBC did its first experimental broadcast of television for licensees, on 9-inch screens. Disney's "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" was in its early production stages. Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster were still shopping their "Superman" character to uninterested publishers. New inventions included sunscreen, cigarette lighters, and the operational helicopter. B-movie actor John Wayne was still three years away from his first hit. Mount Rushmore had one finished head.
   65. Rich Rifkin Posted: December 16, 2010 at 06:03 PM (#3712371)
For no good reason, I ran the quickest connection between Feller and baseball's current youngest major leaguer, Starlin Castro:

Bob Feller played with Minnie Minoso for the 1949 Cleveland Indians
Minnie Minoso played with Harold Baines for the 1980 Chicago White Sox
Harold Baines played with Bob Howry for the 2001 Chicago White Sox
Bob Howry played with Starlin Castro for the 2010 Chicago Cubs

In 1871, Cap Anson was a rookie in the National Association for the Rockford Forest Citys. (I had never heard of this "major league" team. I "knew him" as a Chicago Cub.) Here is the quickest chain connection from Anson to Feller:

Cap Anson played with Bill Dahlen for the 1893 Chicago Colts
Bill Dahlen played with Zack Wheat for the 1911 Brooklyn Dodgers
Zack Wheat played with Lloyd Brown for the 1925 Brooklyn Robins
Lloyd Brown played with Bob Feller for the 1936 Cleveland Indians
   66. BWV 1129 Posted: December 16, 2010 at 08:27 PM (#3712539)
I've had Sickels' Feller bio sitting around for a couple of years now. Should probably crack that open.
   67. RMc Has Bizarre Ideas to Fix Baseball Posted: December 17, 2010 at 01:38 AM (#3712729)
Bob Feller played on the 1936 Cleveland Indians with Jamie Moyer, who played for the 1846 New York Knickerbockers.
   68. Ron Johnson Posted: December 17, 2010 at 06:47 PM (#3713166)
Sadness. A fun guy to make fun of, but in truth a fun guy period.

As I said in another thread I had hopes he's be too stubborn to die.
   69. Ron Johnson Posted: December 17, 2010 at 06:53 PM (#3713173)
#32 Don, using the pitch count estimator provided by some guy you might know:

The highest average I've been able to find would have been Ryan in 1977 (just over 140) and 1974 (just under 140)

Bob Feller peaked at around 135. Gibson at about 120. (And it's worth noting that Gibson never pitched in a pure 4 man rotation and seems to have been given an extra day off from time to time after some really heavy use)
   70. AndrewJ Posted: December 17, 2010 at 06:54 PM (#3713174)
There were still plenty of Civil War veterans around in 1936 as well as old men who, as boys 70+ years earlier, saw Lincoln in person. Across the pond, there were even a few original D'Oyly Carte performers still alive. W.S. Gilbert's widow died in 1936.

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