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Friday, December 06, 2019

Ahoy, San Diego: 2019 Winter Meetings Preview

Commentary on what to expect from the Winter Meetings- here is a sample of this approach:

Major League Baseball vs. Minor League Baseball

One thing a lot of people don’t know about the Winter Meetings is that it’s put on, primarily, by Minor League Baseball as an organization and the vast majority of the people on the ground at the Winter Meetings either run or work for or are trying to sell stuff to minor league teams. Almost every team’s owner comes and brings along some staffers. Coaches, trainers, scouts, and other team employees who spend most of their year out in the bushes as opposed to back at the big club’s home base attend meetings and hobnob with one another.

Normally that’s all pretty routine. This year, however, it probably won’t be thanks to Rob Manfred’s plan to contract 42 minor league clubs and rearrange a great many more of them across levels and leagues.

As we noted earlier today, that scheme has set off a political firestorm and is no doubt the top agenda item and point of concern for every single minor league official and employee at the Winter Meetings. There are, reportedly, already meetings going on in San Diego about all of this. Expect some news about it at any point in the next week. At this point I’d expect anything from Manfred totally scrapping the plan, to him doubling down on it, to reports of general acrimony and possible legal action and everything in between.

 

QLE Posted: December 06, 2019 at 11:21 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: business, free agents, hall of fame, managers, minor leagues, rule 5 draft, trades, winter meetings

The Hall of Fame Case for Thurman Munson

To share an opinion against my own:

The case against his induction:

We cannot know where Munson’s career would’ve ended up had he not died in that 1979 plane crash. The big question — unanswerable in my view — is what to do about that with respect to his Hall of Fame case.

Given that Munson had shown a pretty noticeable offensive decline in 1978 and the first half of 1979, it seems analytically unwarranted to make assumptions that he’d have continued to be an elite-hitting and fielding catcher for several more years into the 1980s. Of course it also seems kind of heartless to say “welp, sorry, he only played ten and a half seasons, so he falls short.” I suppose this is part of why I left Munson’s story for last. I really didn’t want to contend with that. It’s just sad.

Where does that leave us? With a nice but not overwhelming peak, and with career value that is a notch below his ballot-mate Simmons. If you’re a voter who is big on peaks, postseason performance and fame, Munson probably passes muster for you. If you like to see greater overall career value or a period of unequivocal dominance you might find him lacking. Either way, he’s one of the tougher cases on the ballot.

Well, that’s all the candidates- it will be interesting to watch Sunday night for the results.

QLE Posted: December 06, 2019 at 11:17 PM | 2 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, thurman munson

The Hall of Fame Case for Ted Simmons

As is the case for Lou Whitaker and Dwight Evans, a lot of Simmons’ value came in statistical categories that weren’t appreciated nearly as much during his career as they would be later, leading him to be underrated.

On-base percentage was huge, as he notched a .348 OBP in his career and a .367 OBP during his best seasons, 1971-1980. Durability was another one that was not as admired as much during Simmons’ time. Catching is the toughest position physically speaking but he racked up 150+ games behind the plate an astounding eight times. If that were to happen today we’d be calling the guy a freak of nature. At the time it was noted, but perhaps not as much as it should’ve been.

Not that everything he did flew under the radar. Simmons finished with more than 100 RBI in three seasons and 90+ RBI eight times. He complied 2,472 hits. He was an All-Star eight times. He won a Silver Slugger award and got at least a few MVP votes in seven different seasons. He was not just a good hitter for a catcher. He was a legitimately good hitter for most any position, finishing with a career batting line of .285/.348/.437, giving him an OPS+ of 118 for his career, which is excellent for a catcher.

His offensive production and his durability made him one of nine catchers with 50 or more WAR in their careers. The other eight — Johnny Bench, Gary Carter, Pudge Rodríguez, Carlton Fisk, Gabby Hartnett, Yogi Berra, Mike Piazza and Bill Dickey — are all in the Hall of Fame. In all, there are 14 catchers in the Hall, which means that Simmons had a higher-career WAR than six of them. He falls pretty squarely in the middle of the pack of Hall of Fame catchers in numerous other offensive categories, ranging from homers to batting average to runs scored. He’d not be a borderline pick for his position.

A player of interest to watch, given how close he came to induction the last time he was up.

 

QLE Posted: December 06, 2019 at 11:14 PM | 4 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, ted simmons

Thursday, December 05, 2019

The Hall of Fame Case for Tommy John

The case for his induction:

He had a long career — 26 seasons! — in which he was almost always an above average pitcher. In the end that led to some pretty impressive numbers: 288 wins, a 3.34 ERA, 4,710.1 innings pitched and a WAR of 62.1 WAR. Only Nolan Ryan pitched in more seasons than John and the only pitcher of the modern era with more wins than John who isn’t in the Hall of Fame is Roger Clemens who, as we know, is a bit of a special case for Hall of Fame purposes.

Beyond his pitching stats John is obviously notable for being the first recipient and namesake of Tommy John surgery. The procedure has revolutionized baseball, has saved countless pitching careers, and John was proof of concept.

It certainly revitalized John’s career. In his second season back from the surgery John won 20 games with a 2.78 ERA and finished second in the 1977 National League Cy Young Award vote. He’d win 20 games two more times in the next three years, meaning that all three of his 20-win seasons came after he went under the knife. This was, such as it was, his career peak, as he went 80-35 with a 3.12 ERA in that four-year stretch. He’d start for the Dodgers in the 1977 and 1978 World Series and for the Yankees in the 1981 World Series.

A brief summary this time around for the one pitcher on this ballot.

 

QLE Posted: December 05, 2019 at 09:50 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, tommy john

The Hall of Fame may have a Harold Baines problem

This weekend a veterans committee from the Hall of Fame will give 10 oft-debated Cooperstown candidates another look. Don Mattingly, Dale Murphy, Lou Whitaker and Tommy John are among those wondering if this is the year they finally get a call to the Hall.

This weekend we’ll also learn whether Cooperstown — as many people have feared for the past year — now has a Harold Baines problem. Because if Harold Baines is in, then Dale Murphy now makes a lot more sense, right? What about Dave Parker? Dwight Evans? Aren’t they better candidates now?

We’ll find out in a few days. The vote happens Sunday at the Winter Meetings in San Diego, from one of the Hall of Fame’s veterans committee. Nowadays, these committees are defined by era and each year offers a different era another chance at getting into baseball’s most famous fraternity.

This time it’s the Modern Baseball Era Committee, which covers 1970-1987. The whole ballot includes Dwight Evans, Steve Garvey, Marvin Miller, Thurman Munson, Dave Parker and Ted Simmons, in addition to Mattingly, Murphy, Whitaker and John. A 16-member panel of Hall of Famers, baseball executives and historians will decide whether each is worthy of Cooperstown. We’ll find out the results Sunday at 8 p.m. ET on MLB Network.

I have to wonder how we would have written about Frankie Frisch’s cronies in the Hall of Fame if the contemporary Internet was in place….

 

QLE Posted: December 05, 2019 at 09:40 PM | 98 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, harold baines, veterans committee

Wednesday, December 04, 2019

The Hall of Fame Case for Don Mattingly

In a change of pace, some comments on the commitee:

Nothing would surprise me after Harold Baines got in last year. Which, as I argued last year, was in no small part a function of Tony La Russa, Jerry Reinsdorf and Pat Gillick being on the committee. Each of those three employed and, quite apparently, admired Baines during his career.

Do we have anything like this year? Let’s look at the Committee:

George Brett;
Rod Carew;
Dennis Eckersley;
Eddie Murray;
Ozzie Smith;
Robin Yount;
Sandy Alderson;
Dave Dombrowski;
David Glass;
Walt Jocketty;
Doug Melvin;
Terry Ryan;
Bill Center;
Steve Hirdt;
Jack O’Connell; and
Tracy Ringolsby

Not that I expect cronyism as a matter of course, but unless I’m missing a connection here I can’t see any of those guys stumping for any of the individual candidates on this year’s ballot like La Russa quite clearly stumped for Baines.

For those interested, a consideration of Don Mattingly- for those not interested, there are only three of these to go…..

 

QLE Posted: December 04, 2019 at 10:04 PM | 78 comment(s)
  Beats: don mattingly, hall of fame

Tuesday, December 03, 2019

The Hall of Fame Case for Dave Parker

Would I vote for him?

He falls short for me.

Parker’s prime was fantastic, but it was too short to carry a peak-heavy, Sandy Koufax-style Hall of Fame candidacy and the fact that he was in the wilderness for a good five or six years harmed his overall career value.  If that hadn’t happened — if he had kept himself in shape and off the blow during what should have been the prime-to-late-prime of his career — sure, we’d be having a different conversation right now. Indeed, we’d probably be talking about one of the greatest players to ever play the game.

But it didn’t go down like that and one’s Hall of Fame candidacy should not be judged on potential. In the end, Parker had less overall career value than his 1978 MVP counterpart Jim Rice did, and Jim Rice is a pretty low bar all things considered.

Can’t say that I’d argue with Craig on these points, no.

QLE Posted: December 03, 2019 at 09:53 PM | 1 comment(s)
  Beats: dave parker, hall of fame

The Hall of Fame Case for Dwight Evans

In a change of pace, some comments as for why Evans isn’t in the Hall:

First, let’s talk about why Evans got no love from the BBWAA when he was on the ballot between 1997-99. And I mean no love: Evans received just 5.9% of the vote in his first year, 10.4% in his second, and then dropped off with only 3.6% of the vote in his third.

There were a few reasons for this.

The first was the arc of his career. He was, not unreasonably, considered a defense-first outfielder early in his career, not breaking out with the bat until he was almost 30. He was extraordinarily productive in his 30s, but the perception of him being a glove man who, sure, could help you with the bat, as opposed to a great all-around ballplayer, stuck despite the fact that he broke out so thoroughly on offense later. Almost every Hall of Famer went from phenom in his early 20s to great in his mid-to-late 20s, to excellent and then solid veteran into his late 30s. Evans didn’t look like that and Hall of Fame voters have always had a hard time assessing guys who don’t look like that.

The second reason is one that we discussed when we talked about Evans’ contemporary, Lou Whitaker: even with the late offensive surge, so much of his value was tied up in defense and on-base ability, and those are parts of the game that were either ignored or greatly discounted by the ball writers who covered him in the 70s and 80s and who made up the BBWAA electorate when Evans hit the ballot.

So, what chance does he have of getting out of this predicament?

 

QLE Posted: December 03, 2019 at 09:48 PM | 24 comment(s)
  Beats: dwight evans, hall of fame

Monday, December 02, 2019

The Hall of Fame Case for Steve Garvey

In contrast, both why Garvey isn’t a good candidate, and part of other factors that have affected his candidacy:

Most of it has to do with the general change in thinking about what makes a player valuable we’ve seen since the late 90s and into the 21st century.

Yes, Garvey hit .300 and he hit 20 dingers and he drove in a hundred a bunch of times, but he hardly ever walked. He never walked more than 50 times in a season and he only walked more than 40 times once. That’s pretty astounding for a guy in the middle of a deep and talented lineup on a team that was always in contention. As such, that superficially impressive .294 career batting was matched by a pretty poor .329 on-base percentage.

It also meant that he never scored 100 runs in a season. And while he hit 20 homers a lot, he only once topped 30, which isn’t all that great for a first baseman who doesn’t get on base. He had a pretty 1970s stat line but a pretty lacking late 1990s-on stat line, philosophically speaking. Even if you’re not the most sabermetrically-oriented person, I’d guess you’d agree that Garvey’s case is not as good as it might’ve seemed back in the day.

There’s also some stuff about Garvey that, while I don’t personally think is legitimately part of the case against him, is probably an explanation for why voters soured on him beyond just the baseball analysis. It’s tied up in his image as a player vs. his image following his career and a healthy amount of schadenfreude.

 

QLE Posted: December 02, 2019 at 09:35 PM | 58 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, steve garvey

The Hall of Fame Case for Lou Whitaker

A reminder of why his case has been a flash-point:

Here’s a thing I didn’t know until just a few years ago: before Jack Morris and Alan Trammell were elected to the Hall of Fame in December 2017, the 1984 Tigers and the 1981 Dodgers were the only two World Series champions who do not have a player in the Hall of Fame. The 1981 Dodgers seem to be permanently out of luck, but those Bless You Boys Tigers have a chance to gain three in the space of two years. And they dang well should get that third player in Lou Whitaker.

Whitaker, infamously, received only 2.9 percent of the vote when he first appeared on the ballot in 2001, knocking him off that ballot for good after just one year. The insult was compounded when, in 2017 — the last time the Modern Baseball Era Committee dealt with this current era — Whitaker wasn’t even included on the dang ballot. For that you can blame the BBWAA too, as an “oversight committee” of that guild was responsible for coming up with nominees.

This despite the fact that Whitaker more than deserves induction.

Whitaker had a career WAR of 75.1, which is seventh all time for second basemen. The six men in front of him — Rogers Hornsby, Eddie Collins, Napoleon Lajoie, Joe Morgan, Rod Carew, and Charlie Gehringer — are all Hall of Famers. Many behind him, including Ryne Sandberg, Roberto Almoar, Craig Biggio, Nellie Fox, Joe Gordon, and Bobby Doerr are Hall of Famers. The average WAR for Hall of Fame second baseman is 69.4. Lou Whitaker is above average compared to all Hall of Fame second baseman and not only has he not been elected, he was a one-and-done with the BBWAA and was literally left off the ballot when they could have given him a second chance.

 

QLE Posted: December 02, 2019 at 09:32 PM | 32 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, lou whitaker

Wednesday, November 27, 2019

The Hall of Fame Case for Marvin Miller

For those wondering why he’s proposed as a candidate:

It is impossible to overstate Miller’s impact on Major League Baseball. While some — including Hall of Fame voters — have long given Miller short shrift (or piled on utter disdain), baseball today cannot be understood without understanding Marvin Miller’s contributions. He was a truly transformative figure who, after Jackie Robinson, did more to correct the excesses and injustices delivered onto players by baseball’s ruling class than anyone.

When Miller took over as the head of the MLBPA in 1966 there was no free agency. Players were told by ownership what they would make the following year and if they didn’t like it, tough. They couldn’t switch teams. They couldn’t do what any other worker can do and shop their services elsewhere. They were stuck thanks to baseball’s reserve clause and the ridiculous Supreme Court decision which exempted baseball and its owners from the antitrust laws.

Miller took all of that on and he won. He started small, negotiating the union’s first collective bargaining agreement with the team owners in 1968, which raised the game’s minimum salary from $6,000 to $10,000. In 1970 he got the owners to agree to arbitration for the first time. In 1970 Curt Flood, with Miller’s support and guidance, challenged baseball’s antitrust exemption — and the dreaded reserve clause, which kept players tied to one team against their wishes — in the courts. Flood ultimately lost that case in the landmark 1972 Supreme Court decision. The decision did not, however, blunt Miller’s resolve, and he took his fight to other forums.

In 1974 he exploited a loophole — and an oversight by Oakland Athletics owner Charlie O. Finley — to get Catfish Hunter free agency and baseball’s first $1 million contract.  Up next: the whole enchilada. In 1974, he got Andy Messersmith and Dave McNally to play out the season without contracts, placing them in cross-hairs of the reserve clause and giving them standing to fight the provision in arbitration. In 1975 they won, with the Seitz Decision ushering in the age of free agency. Baseball players’ indentured servitude was over.

 

QLE Posted: November 27, 2019 at 09:57 PM | 18 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, marvin miller

Tuesday, November 26, 2019

The Hall of Fame Case for Dale Murphy

Cutting to the chase:

Would I vote for him?

Back when he was on the BBWAA ballot I was a much smaller-Hall kind of guy than I am these days, so if you search around the Internet you’d probably find a lot of things I wrote at the time saying I’d not vote for Murphy. And, to be sure, if he were on a BBWAA ballot today — and the BBWAA actually let me vote — he’d be someone whom, if there were a lot of other good candidates, I’d have to look at closely when it came time to bump people to make room. Whatever we think about Murphy’s swift decline and injury-shortened career, he did decline and did have the productive part of his career cut short. It’s not his fault, but a Hall of Fame resume is a Hall of Fame resume. Or it isn’t. Players don’t get credit for what we imagine they might’ve done had they stayed healthy.

I’ve softened quite a bit over the years on this stuff, though, and I’m inclined to say Murphy is a Hall of Famer. Or at least I’d like to thine he is if, of all people, Harold Freakin’ Baines is. Yes, part of this is bias as I became a Braves fan when he was their biggest star at the time, but per the previous paragraph, I think you can be confident that I’m not overly-influenced by Murphy nostalgia.

Still, we have the problem of ballot space. The Modern Baseball Era Committee voters each get four votes. As we’ll see as we go through the candidates over the next two weeks, there are probably four candidates whom I’d pencil in before Murphy. Even if I hope that, somehow, he gets in and even if I’d be thrilled if he did.

 

QLE Posted: November 26, 2019 at 10:21 PM | 51 comment(s)
  Beats: dale murphy, hall of fame

Monday, November 25, 2019

Shaking Up MLB’s Hall of Fame Voting

The march toward next summer’s Hall of Fame induction began this week with the release of a fresh ballot. Derek Jeter headlines the field of newcomers and represents the only shoo-in among the candidates. The debates are sure to rage on about Barry Bonds, Roger Clemens and their Steroid Era counterparts.

But a scenario was presented to SI’s MLB staff this week: If you could pick one name on the ballot to automatically enshrine with no fuss and no debate, who would it be?

Take a look.

In summary:

One good choice, one choice I’m on the fence on (depending on what future defensive statistical assessments will tell us), one choice where I understand the point but feel it a bit wasted, one bad choice, and tremendously bad choice.

 

QLE Posted: November 25, 2019 at 02:26 PM | 16 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, voting

Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Bobby Abreu has a better Hall of Fame case than you think

The 2020 Hall of Fame ballot was revealed earlier today. Derek Jeter, of course, headlined the group, but also found on the list was outfielder Bobby Abreu. As Craig mentioned, Abreu spent much of his career being underrated and though baseball fans and writers have become a lot more stats-savvy since his retirement, it is hard to see him getting the groundswell of support necessary to earn induction in Cooperstown.

Abreu, now 45 years old, retired with exactly 60 Wins Above Replacement, according to Baseball Reference. Among Hall of Famers who played at least 50 percent of their games in the outfield, Abreu is in the same neighborhood as Andre Dawson (64.8 WAR), Dave Winfield (64.2), Vladimir Guerrero (59.4), Willie Stargell (57.5), and is substantially ahead of Kirby Puckett (51.1).

During his prime, 1998-2004, Abreu accrued 41.5 WAR, per FanGraphs. The only outfielders with more WAR in that span of time were Barry Bonds (66.8) and Andruw Jones (43.4). He should have been a perennial All-Star but, through no fault of his own, he wouldn’t get his first All-Star nod until 2004. He would repeat in 2005. Similarly, Abreu won just one Gold Glove and one Silver Slugger, again through no fault of his own.

A few words on a player who deserves BBWAA consideration- whether or not he gets it, on the other hand…..

 

QLE Posted: November 20, 2019 at 01:14 PM | 65 comment(s)
  Beats: bobby abreu, hall of fame

Stark: Five things to watch on the 2020 Hall of Fame ballot – The Athletic

Read the whole thing.

3. Can Walker make a historic leap to Cooperstown?
According to Baseball-Reference.com, Larry Walker remains hitless in his last 5,161 days on Planet Earth. But because Hall of Fame voting is so frigging weird, that didn’t stop Walker from making the biggest surge of any player on the 2019 ballot. That was in the form of a 20.5-percent, 88-vote leap to 54.1 percent, which left him 87 votes shy of election.

That would be an eye-popping jump for anyone. But it’s almost incomprehensible for a guy who was only attracting 68 votes total (344 short of election) as recently as five years ago.

Jim Furtado Posted: November 20, 2019 at 08:28 AM | 2 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, pay site

Monday, November 18, 2019

Ryan Thibs’ Hall of Fame Tracker

The Thibs Hall of Fame Tracker is back.

Baldrick Posted: November 18, 2019 at 12:27 PM | 372 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, son of gizmo

Monday, November 04, 2019

2020 MODERN BASEBALL ERA BALLOT

Nine former big league players and one executive comprise the 10-name Modern Baseball Era ballot to be reviewed and voted upon Dec. 8 at the Baseball Winter Meetings.

Dwight Evans, Steve Garvey, Tommy John, Don Mattingly, Marvin Miller, Thurman Munson, Dale Murphy, Dave Parker, Ted Simmons and Lou Whitaker are the candidates the Modern Baseball Era Committee will consider for Hall of Fame election for the Class of 2020. All candidates are former players except for Miller, who was the head of the Major League Baseball Players Association from 1966-82. All candidates except for Miller and Munson are living.

Any candidate who receives votes on 75 percent of the ballots cast by the 16-member Modern Baseball Era Committee will earn election to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and will be inducted in Cooperstown on July 26, 2020, along with any electees who emerge from the 2020 Baseball Writers’ Association of America election, to be announced on Jan. 21, 2020.

The Modern Baseball Era is one of four Era Committees, each of which provide an avenue for Hall of Fame consideration to managers, umpires and executives, as well as players retired for more than 15 seasons.

The BBHOF season has now started- what say we concerning this ballot?

 


Friday, November 01, 2019

BB Hall of Fame gets nice array of World Series artifacts

COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — Artifacts from the World Series are headed to the Baseball Hall of Fame, including the ball hit by Washington’s Howie Kendrick off the right-field foul pole for the go-ahead home run in Game 7.

Following the Nationals’ 6-2 win over the Houston Astros on Wednesday night, the Nationals and players donated several pieces. Other items include a jersey worn by World Series MVP Stephen Strasburg in his Game 6 victory, a cap worn by starting pitcher Max Scherzer in Game 7, and the ball Juan Soto hit for a home run in Game 1.

Something to look for, the next time you’re in Cooperstown…..

 

QLE Posted: November 01, 2019 at 01:06 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: hall of fame, memorabilia, world series

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

MLB.com: Who Will Make Hall of Fame From 2019 World Series

.  .  . the most Hall of Famers to play in any World Series was way back in 1932, when 13 eventual inductees played for the Yankees (Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Earle Combs, Bill Dickey, Lefty Gomez, Tony Lazzeri, Herb Pennock, Red Ruffing and Joe Sewell) and the Cubs (Kiki Cuyler, Burleigh Grimes, Gabby Hartnett and Billy Herman). Three other Hall of Famers—Yankees manager Joe McCarthy, Cubs manager Rogers Hornsby (in the Hall as a player) and umpire Bill Klem—were also involved in that Series.

Probably fewer this year, but some worthies.


Saturday, October 19, 2019

CC Sabathia has a case for Cooperstown

I’m sure it was not how CC Sabathia wanted to go out: injured, in a Yankees loss, with his final “pitch” being a warmup toss that revealed that he was too injured to go on. But bad endings to long, illustrious careers tend to wash out of people’s memories in pretty short order. When a great player’s time in the game is over, we almost always remember the greatness, and that will be the same with CC Sabathia.

As I’ve written in this space in the past, it’s rather reductive to only reflect on such careers through the lens of “is he Hall of Fame-worthy?” There are a number of great players who had great, memorable careers which fell short of Cooperstown for some reason or another and, frankly, a whole lot of guys who are in Cooperstown who weren’t necessarily great. Talking about guys only with reference to their Hall of Fame credentials causes us to spend too much time talking about the already well-remembered and risks us forgetting those who should not be forgotten.

But hey, let’s be reductive! It’s OK in this case because, in my estimation, CC Sabathia does have an actual Hall of Fame case and, if I had to bet on it, I’d say he’s inducted at some point down the road.

It’s not a slam dunk case. He’s not some brainless first-ballot guy. A lot of voters will look at his career ERA of 3.74 and think “man, that’s high for a Hall of Famer.” The smarter ones — and the Hall’s electorate gets smarter with each passing year — will note that his ERA+, which adjusts for the mostly high-offense era and hitter-friendly parks in which he pitched, is a respectable 116. Again, that’s not knock-you-off-your-feet great, but it’s in the neighborhood of a good number of Hall of Fame pitchers including Tom Glavine (118), Bert Blyleven (118), Gaylord Perry (117), Fergie Jenkins (115), Steve Carlton (115), and Jim Bunning (115), and is way better than guys like Jack Morris (105), Herb Pennock (106), Pud Galvin (107), Burleigh Grimes (108) and a decent handful of others. Yes, some of those guys were very different pitchers with other things going for them that Sabathia may not have. I’m just saying that Sabathia’s worst Big Stat selling point, his ERA, would not be crazily out-of-whack with Hall of Fame standards.

Never too early for a thread like this, is it?

 

QLE Posted: October 19, 2019 at 12:20 AM | 36 comment(s)
  Beats: cc sabathia, hall of fame

Wednesday, October 09, 2019

 The Cooperstown Case for Yadier Molina, Russell Martin, and Brian McCann - The Ringer

Isn’t this a little early for Hall of Fame discussions? The World Series isn’t over yet.

Jim Furtado Posted: October 09, 2019 at 07:20 PM | 109 comment(s)
  Beats: brian mccann, hall of fame, russell martin, yadier molina

Thursday, October 03, 2019

Baseball Hall of Famer Rube Waddell Gets His Due at the Curtis Theatre

As befits America’s sport, baseball is all about stories, both actual and apocryphal. Such as whether Babe Ruth actually “called his shot” in the 1932 World Series. Or if Waddell would run off the mound in mid-game to chase fire engines. Did he wrestle alligators, punch a lion in the face, or a have a contract forbidding he eat crackers in bed?

It is those sepia-tinged tales, the “Field of Dreams” fantasies, that make Waddell seem like baseball’s Peter Pan.

There are troubling stories as well. Did Waddell conspire with gamblers to fake an injury and sit out the 1905 World Series? Was he affected by a psychosis or attention deficit disorder? Because many mental disorders were not studied or diagnosed at the time, that part of Waddell will never be known.

 

DanG Posted: October 03, 2019 at 05:12 PM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: biography, hall of fame, mental illness, philadelphia a's, rube waddell

Saturday, September 14, 2019

DOES DAVE STIEB DESERVE ANOTHER CHANCE AT THE HALL OF FAME?

Stieb appeared on one BBWAA (Baseball Writers Association of America) ballot, in 2004. A total of 506 ballots were cast. Stieb received a measly 7 votes. With a 1.4% tally, Stieb was wiped away from future BBWAA ballots, having failed to meet the minimum threshold of 5%. Did Stieb get a raw deal? Did he deserve a longer look? And, does he deserve another look this fall by the “Modern Baseball” Eras Committee, the second chance balloting process that used to be called the Veterans Committee?

Dennis Eclairskey, closer Posted: September 14, 2019 at 07:07 PM | 66 comment(s)
  Beats: blue jays, dave stieb, hall of fame, veterans committee

Monday, July 29, 2019

SI.com: Baseball Hall of Fame Inductions Are Heading for a Bleak Period

There’s a chance, then, that 2021 could be another one-man BBWAA class, this time in the person of Schilling. Bonds and Clemens have an outside chance of joining him, but the better bet that year is Omar Vizquel, who has steadily climbed since debuting on the ballot in 2018 and finished with 42.8% of the vote last year. A relatively uncontroversial candidate, Vizquel is a favorite among the older crowd, earning more votes on private ballots than those publicly released, and has an easy hook as one of the best defensive shortstops of all time.

DanG Posted: July 29, 2019 at 03:55 PM | 180 comment(s)
  Beats: bbwaa, derek jeter, hall of fame, hof ballot

Saturday, July 27, 2019

Baseball Hall of Famers considering boycotting Derek Jeter’s induction

Derek Jeter didn’t make many enemies while playing shortstop for the New York Yankees for 20 seasons.

It’s been a much different story in his less than two years as the leader of the Miami Marlins ownership group.

Since taking over the team in 2017, Jeter has garnered animosity through many of his business and baseball-related decisions. And one of those decisions may lead to two Baseball Hall of Famers boycotting Jeter’s surefire induction during the summer of 2020.

Those two men are Andre Dawson and Tony Perez. Both were part of a group of special assistants, along with Marlins legends Jack McKeon and Jeff Conine, that were unceremoniously fired during Jeter’s first round of house cleaning. And both are still harboring ill-will over how the situation was handled.

On the bright side, this sort of thing might swing a few BBWAA voters to not include Jeter on their ballot, and injuring his ego like that is a wonderful thing….

 

QLE Posted: July 27, 2019 at 11:06 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: andre dawson, derek jeter, hall of fame, tony perez

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