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Sunday, April 26, 2020

Let’s build a roster using the sons of ex-players

Families have bonded over baseball since it became our national pastime. Whether it’s early childhood hitting lessons in the backyard, a trip to the ballpark imprinting a permanent love for the sport or the nightly experience of watching a game together, baseball creates memories that can last a lifetime.

From Ken Griffey Sr. and Jr. to Bobby and Barry Bonds, multi-generation families have been a crucial part of MLB’s history. Now, a trio of baseball sons of superstar dads—Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Cavan Biggio and Bo Bichette—are the core of the Blue Jays’ present and future. But these “Baby Blue Jays” are hardly the only ones impacting the game.

It left us wondering: What is the best 2020 roster composed exclusively of active players whose fathers made it to The Show?

The criteria for this “All-MLB-Sons Team” was simple: For a player to be eligible, his father must have played in MLB, whether it was one game or a Hall of Fame career.

Interesting line-up- which ones could you assemble using players that were all contemporaries?

 

QLE Posted: April 26, 2020 at 01:34 AM | 61 comment(s)
  Beats: fathers and sons, teams

Monday, April 06, 2020

Sunday Notes: Keston Hiura Can Hit, But The Book He’d Write Would Be Boring

The first time I interviewed Keston Hiura was over the phone. This was a few months after he’d been taken ninth overall by the Milwaukee Brewers in the 2017 draft. Kiura was playing for the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers, and he called at the assigned time from a Midwest League ballpark after batting practice. I don’t recall which ballpark.

I was in Lowell, Massachusetts at a New York-Penn League game that had already started. It was loud at LeLacheur Park, so I talked to Hiura from the relative quiet of a stairwell down the left-field line. The interview went well. I found the former UC Irvine Anteater to be both forthcoming and articulate.

The second time I interviewed Kiura was at the Brewers spring training complex, four weeks ago. Standing face-to-face — closer than the six-foot distance now deemed necessary — I accused him of being boring.

Truth be told, the pertinent ground had already been covered. In our earlier long-distance conversation we’d gone over the toe tap into a high leg kick, the inside-out swing with a high finish, the way he kept both hands on the bat. For good measure, we’d touched on his patience-paired-with-aggression approach.

For those who want to hear about unpaid bets from the 1980s, players who spent a year playing baseball in Japan, and the manager we hate this most.


Friday, March 20, 2020

Project GOAT review: Building the greatest rotisserie team of the fantasy baseball era

All of this began with Mike Schmidt.

Schmidt was the first nomination in fantasy baseball’s first rotisserie auction way back in 1980. At $26, he was also a filthy steal. He led the National League in home runs (48) and RBI (121) by huge margins that season, winning the first of his three MVPs. Schmidt would average 37 homers per year from 1980 to 1987, dominating roto’s formative period.

And somehow, in his biggest power season, he went for just $26. Of course, in that first year, at the first auction, nobody was an expert. Prices were guesses.

Rotisserie’s original scoring rules were conceived by writer Dan Okrent, who pitched the concept to various friends and colleagues until he found a small group of curious/willing players. The game itself was named for a New York restaurant frequented by league members, La Rotisserie Francaise (now defunct).

So, based on the rules established, what teams would you have created?

 

QLE Posted: March 20, 2020 at 12:27 AM | 0 comment(s)
  Beats: fantasy baseball, history, rotisserie baseball, teams

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Which MLB Teams Will Disappoint in 2020?

Every year features its share of surprise teams. Last year the Twins won 103 games, up from 78 the season before. On the flip side, the defending world champion Red Sox dipped from 108 wins in 2018 to a playoff-less, 84-win season in 2019. With that example in mind, which team is going to surprise in all the wrong ways this year? SI’s MLB staff weighs in

Riffing off of this: what differences would be present if this wasn’t just based on how the team will perform compared to last year, but looked at all the ways teams can disappoint us?

QLE Posted: February 25, 2020 at 12:54 AM | 23 comment(s)
  Beats: disappointment, predictions, teams

Sunday, January 15, 2012

MLB Trade Rumors: Bartolo Colon Agrees to Sign With Unknown Team

Bartolo Colon has agreed to a deal with an unknown club reports Bob Nightengale of USA Today (on Twitter). The right-hander wouldn’t divulge the team because he has not yet passed his physical.

Pretty sure it’s either the All-Stars or the Champs.


Tuesday, December 27, 2011

Jeff Wilpon Meets Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

This made my day when I saw it (OK, so I was having a lousy day).

Mike Emeigh Posted: December 27, 2011 at 03:09 PM | 2 comment(s)
  Beats: mets, teams

Monday, December 26, 2011

ESPN: Yorvit Torrealba suspended in Venezuela

Texas Rangers backup catcher Yorvit Torrealba has been suspended 66 games by the Venezuelan League for striking an umpire, league president Jose Grasso Vecchio announced Monday morning on Twitter.

The suspension covers the rest of this season and all of next season in the Venezuelan League. Penalties in winter ball do not carry over to Major League Baseball.

Have to think MLB or the Rangers will take some action, too.

Mike Emeigh Posted: December 26, 2011 at 06:49 PM | 19 comment(s)
  Beats: rangers, teams

Friday, December 16, 2011

Kovacevic: Pirates still playing small ball

Totally fair if somewhat brutal assessment:

And I really can’t see where Huntington was coming from when he made these remarks to reporters last week in Dallas: “We’ll still look to find moves to make us better, but we feel like we’ve taken a big step forward, whether it’s bigger or smaller moves. We’ve put this organization in position to take another big step forward next year.”

Big, clearly, is a relative concept.

Mike Emeigh Posted: December 16, 2011 at 04:03 PM | 2 comment(s)
  Beats: pirates, teams

Friday, September 30, 2011

Powers: Twins need to run a tighter ship next season

Currently, the players and their agents are in charge. They decide when to play, when to train, when to seek medical advice and how to rehab an injury. The inmates are running the asylum. And it flat-out didn’t work in 2011.

Hey, if you mean Joe Mauer, say Joe Mauer!!

Mike Emeigh Posted: September 30, 2011 at 11:26 PM | 7 comment(s)
  Beats: teams, twins

 

 

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