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Wednesday, November 10, 2021

Boras: MLB cancer of trading veterans helped Braves win

“We have seen the championship in 60 days,” Boras said. “The rules allow them to be a less-than-.500 team at Aug. 1 and add four players, five players from teams that no longer wanted to compete, and for very little cost change the entirety of their team and season.

“And we saw this unfold to the detriment of teams that create at vast expense, planning and intellect and won over 100 games. In doing all this, we have now created an understanding that a fan would not know who the true team is until, frankly, the trading deadline.”...

— He compared Kris Bryant to actor Sean Connery, saying “he has Bond-like abilities to create a great middle of the lineup. He’s always red-hot in the hunt for October. He’s an extraordinary gentleman and is in a league of his own.”

— Former Mets outfielder Michael Conforto had become the “King of Queens,” he said, but “in free agency now, he’s kind of like the ace of many GMs’ hearts.”

— For Semien: “He kind of brings a charge in the batter’s box and kind of, you know, he insulates the middle infield. So he’s truly a modern day Semien conductor, and we all know there’s a shortage of chips worldwide.”

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 10, 2021 at 05:59 PM | 51 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: scott boras

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   1. The Duke Posted: November 10, 2021 at 07:44 PM (#6052398)
Boras, as usual, is the only one telling it like it is. He’s right about almost everything when he talks about the state of the game. I just wish more people on the owners and players side would be more honest about the issues and challenges.

The game is in a perilous state IMO. The coming decline in attendance will be a huge wake up call. All anyone has to do is attend a minor league game to see the game we used to watch at the MLB level.

The game is too slow, too one dimensional, just a long parade of relievers, populated with teams that don’t try on the one side and then super teams like the Dodgers on the other side. I was so excited to get season tickets a few years ago and then slowly I realized that being at the ballpark just isn’t that much fun anymore.

   2. McCoy Posted: November 10, 2021 at 07:52 PM (#6052402)
Boras only cares because he wants his players to be able to sign 40 million a year contracts. That's it.

If Boras got his way somebody else would write an article bemoaning the financial state of baseball and how it decides the WS winner.



Bottom line is over the last 20 odd years half the league has been able to win a WS and almost all of the teams have been in one.

So boohoo.
   3. Zach Posted: November 10, 2021 at 07:56 PM (#6052403)
Eh, the real problem is that prospects are overvalued and not enough contenders are willing to go for it.

Is Boras concerned that the Braves decided to go for it this year, or that they didn't have to trade away that much to do it?
   4. Zach Posted: November 10, 2021 at 08:04 PM (#6052404)
The ability to trade a veteran for prospects at the deadline inarguably increases the value of low cost free agents.

The effect on the top end seems less clear. Maybe Boras wants teams to get in bidding wars over the offseason to fill the last holes on their roster? But it seems just as likely that teams who seem a little bit out of contention would just assume it wasn't their year and not go after free agents at all.

Not sure what Boras's angle is here.
   5. Mike A Posted: November 10, 2021 at 08:16 PM (#6052405)
Boras makes it sound like the Braves went out and got Mike Trout and Bryce Harper.

They got a bunch of patchwork guys - most of whom hadn't been particularly good in a while - and they played well down the stretch. A couple of them caught fire in the playoffs. It happens. But it's silly to think the Braves were built by some mid-season trades.

Boras should also note that Acuna's injury caused a couple of those trades.
   6. Howie Menckel Posted: November 10, 2021 at 08:23 PM (#6052406)
that is on weird speech, I'll give Boras that.
   7. McCoy Posted: November 10, 2021 at 08:29 PM (#6052407)
Boras wants the Braves to go out and get Trout or Harper instead of doing a patch job.
   8. TJ Posted: November 10, 2021 at 08:43 PM (#6052408)
Boras may be accurate in his observation on tanking, but forgive me for being suspicious of his motives. I suspect his real beef is that teams who are rebuilding ( or tanking, if you prefer) are not likely to go overpay for free agents, especially the marginal ones. The more teams tanking means fewer teams to bid against each other for his clients.
   9. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 10, 2021 at 09:08 PM (#6052413)

that is on weird speech, I'll give Boras that.


I think he's entering the "Don King" phase of his career.
   10. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 10, 2021 at 09:55 PM (#6052415)

“And we saw this unfold to the detriment of teams that create at vast expense, planning and intellect and won over 100 games. In doing all this, we have now created an understanding that a fan would not know who the true team is until, frankly, the trading deadline.”...

The bold is the key part. He wants the teams that spend the most to be rewarded for it.
   11. Mike A Posted: November 10, 2021 at 10:10 PM (#6052420)
The bold is the key part. He wants the teams that spend the most to be rewarded for it.
For that to happen, you'd have to shrink the playoffs back to two or four teams. The system right now is set up for teams like the Braves to win occasionally.

It should also be noted that 2 of the 3 100-win teams didn't have crazy payrolls (Braves and Giants had roughly the same payroll, Tampa obviously much lower).

As noted, this is a weird rant. I hardly think the Marlins trading Adam Duvall was a 'race to the bottom.' It's Adam frickin' Duvall.
   12. Walt Davis Posted: November 10, 2021 at 10:30 PM (#6052430)
“he has Bond-like abilities to create a great middle of the lineup. He’s always red-hot in the hunt for October. He’s an extraordinary gentleman and is in a league of his own.”

Let's not mention Zardoz

   13. Walt Davis Posted: November 10, 2021 at 10:38 PM (#6052432)
I think Boras' excerpted comment is suggesting two things. The Braves should have to buy their OF depth on the FA market, not just figure they skimp here and there on their opening day roster knowing they can (a) wait to see if they're compteitive and (b) fill holes for only 1/3 of the season then. That increased demand will also mean the Marlins can't sit there until Feb 17 (about when pitchers and catchers report) and sign a guy like Duvall for 1/$3. For a flawed analogy, the Braves are outsourcing -- rather than bringing on permanent workers that they have to pay during times of low demand, they bring on temporary labor as needed. For guys like Duvalle, it's a gig economy. That always sucks for labor.

Granted, there's nothing in that excerpt that offers a "solution" to this "problem."
   14. Mike A Posted: November 10, 2021 at 11:05 PM (#6052440)
The Braves' opening day OF cost 32m: Marcell Ozuna (18m), Ronald Acuna (5m), and Cristian Pache (rookie) with Ender Inciarte as backup (8m).

Ozuna was suspended for domestic violence, Acuna blew out his knee, Pache had a rookie flameout, and Inciarte was Inciarte. The best laid plans of mice and men...
   15. salvomania Posted: November 10, 2021 at 11:44 PM (#6052445)
It's Adam frickin' Duvall.

You mean the guy who hit 38 homers and led the NL in RBI, oh, and who also won a Gold Glove this year?

I get your point---it's not Mike Trout or Juan Soto, but Duvall was a pretty valuable player this year.
   16. Buck Coats Posted: November 11, 2021 at 07:31 AM (#6052468)
For that to happen, you'd have to shrink the playoffs back to two or four teams. The system right now is set up for teams like the Braves to win occasionally.


I think this is backwards actually - the wild card spots almost always go to the "big-money" teams, when the "cheaper" teams make the playoffs it's usually by winning the division. It's a lot easier to spend your way to 85 wins then it is to spend to 100.
   17. Jose is Absurdly Correct but not Helpful Posted: November 11, 2021 at 08:20 AM (#6052471)
If I were a player I would hire Boras in a heartbeat. He gets his guys what they want and to my knowledge anyway he's never been involved in even a whiff of scandal with financial malpractice or anything like that.

But he's kind of becoming a parody of himself even if I think Duke is accurate that Boras is right about the state of economics in the game a lot more than he's wrong. Those comments in the excerpt at least read like a Gammons bot wrote them.
   18. bob gee Posted: November 11, 2021 at 08:34 AM (#6052474)
And about Kris Bryant going back to the Cubs, if they offer a gajillion dollars? Never Say Never Again.
   19. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2021 at 08:49 AM (#6052475)
I think this is backwards actually - the wild card spots almost always go to the "big-money" teams, when the "cheaper" teams make the playoffs it's usually by winning the division. It's a lot easier to spend your way to 85 wins then it is to spend to 100.


The Braves weren't a wild card. And if they hadn't gotten better at the deadline, then an even shittier team would have had a chance to do what they did.

It's not the economic system that made it possible for an 88-win team to claim the title. It's the postseason structure of allowing many lesser teams in.
   20. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: November 11, 2021 at 09:09 AM (#6052480)
I don't get the angst of an 88-win team winning the World Series. There was a period in the mid-to-late 1980s - when there were only two teams per league making the playoffs - and the World Series champion was:

1984 - Detroit Tigers juggernaut
1985 - Royals team that nobody took seriously compared to the AL East teams of the time
1986 - Mets juggernaut
1987 - Twins team that won 85 games and was seen as quirky, gimmicky, flukey champion, could only win at home, only had two starters, etc.
1988 - Dodgers defeat the Mighty A's on the backs of Hershiser and Gibson

Now, with many more teams in the playoffs, it is even more of a crapshoot - and that is fun to watch. It certainly makes earning a wild card slot more valuable, because there is a feeling that if you can "make the tournament", anything can happen. For my Red Sox this year, it almost did: We had to basically sweep the Nationals just to make the Wild Card, then we were not favored against the Yankees, or the Rays, and we had the Astros on the ropes.

This is always more likely to happen in baseball than other major team sports, because so much of the result of a given game or small series of games is based on such things as the starting pitchers that day, the strike zone that day, or luck-based stuff like BABIP. Also, compared to other sports, home field doesn't matter so much. Baseball is a marathon, and then we ask teams to turn it into a sprint filled with luck - and then people are surprised when the best marathon runner doesn't win the sprint?

   21. BDC Posted: November 11, 2021 at 11:08 AM (#6052496)
Exactly. Braves went 11-5 in the postseason, none of their series went the maximum. They are a perfectly good champion.

If an 82-80 club won a 163, Wild Card, and then three series in five, seven, and seven games, each time defeating a team whose top two hitters, ace starter, and closer had walked into open manholes before the deciding game, it would be time to despair, but not this year.
   22. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: November 11, 2021 at 11:27 AM (#6052499)
Baseball is a marathon, and then we ask teams to turn it into a sprint filled with luck - and then people are surprised when the best marathon runner doesn't win the sprint?


It's not surprise, it is, as you said, angst. Because of the luck. The NL West had a team that won 18 more games than the Braves in the regular season, and had to win those games playing, in part, against a team that won 19 more games than the Braves, and this team had to play an anything-can-happen-lets-just-roll-the-dice one game playoff to advance. And then they were eliminated by the Braves in a short series, even though their record, INCLUDING the series that they lost to the Braves, was 17 games better than that of the Braves.
   23. BDC Posted: November 11, 2021 at 11:38 AM (#6052500)
But the same thing has been happening since the 1906 White Sox beat the Cubs. All those upsets can't be injustices.
   24. bfan Posted: November 11, 2021 at 12:29 PM (#6052505)
Because of the luck.


This may be in part be making Boras' point, but the Braves team that won the title had finished 37-19, after they acquired their new outfield, and that team is the one Milwaukee, LA and Houston faced. I think even for the year they Braves/ pythag was 94-68, so they were not that much worse for the entire year than the 3 teams they beat.
   25. Rough Carrigan Posted: November 11, 2021 at 12:38 PM (#6052507)

Now, with many more teams in the playoffs, it is even more of a crapshoot -

Couldn't you just as well argue that with more teams making the playoffs and more rounds that a winner has to go through that it's less of a crapshoot?
If 162 games better measures how good a team really is, don't more rounds of playoffs also do that better than fewer?
If a 1973 Mets sneaks into the playoffs, they have to match up well with one team and they're in the series. If a 2021 Braves get in they have to go through more rounds.
   26. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2021 at 12:43 PM (#6052508)
Couldn't you just as well argue that with more teams making the playoffs and more rounds that a winner has to go through that it's less of a crapshoot?


The odds for any team winning now are longer, so there's less chance of a specific team winning.

In 1960, the odds of the season's best team winning the World Series was, at worst, 1 in 2.

In 1973, the odds of the season's best team winning the World Series was, at worst, 1 in 4.

Now, it's around 1 in 8.

The more teams you throw into the mix, the more shot crap you're going to get.
   27. Nasty Nate Posted: November 11, 2021 at 12:53 PM (#6052511)
The odds for any team winning now are longer, so there's less chance of a specific team winning.

In 1960, the odds of the season's best team winning the World Series was, at worst, 1 in 2.

In 1973, the odds of the season's best team winning the World Series was, at worst, 1 in 4.

Now, it's around 1 in 8.

The more teams you throw into the mix, the more shot crap you're going to get.
Right, but having to be successful over 11-20 games versus 8-14 games slightly reduces the luck factor.
   28. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:08 PM (#6052514)
Right, but having to be successful over 11-20 games versus 8-14 games slightly reduces the luck factor.


I don't know that it does. It certainly takes more luck to win 3 to 4 straight series than it does to win 1 or 2. It also probably requires you playing better.

In 2014, the Giants beat an equal team in the one-game playoff, then a superior team in the NLDS, then were immensely fortunate to play a team that was arguably worse than them in the NCLS (that team having beaten the superior team in its division series), then another wild card in the World Series.

The 1973 Mets had to beat a massively superior Reds team, then follow that up with an almost equally good O's team.

So it really depends a lot on what we mean by luck. The Mets were surely lucky they were able to beat much better teams. On the other hand, the Giants were extraordinarily lucky that most of the better teams were beaten by someone else, and so they didn't have to.

But if simply remove all skill from the question, we're left with this: it's easier to get lucky if your odds of winning are 1 in 4. It requires more luck to win when your odds are 1 in 8.
   29. and Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:22 PM (#6052516)
As one who argues for the role of luck in postseason baseball, I'll clarify what I mean by luck: I mean the usual luck that is associated with baseball. It just isn't a game where the better team is going to win most of the games. The best teams in baseball win around 60% of their games. The worst win 40%. A one game playoff would be of very little use in determining who was better (yes, I'm saying every Game 7 world champion ever has, essentially, won a coin flip). It takes a lot of games before one team's superiority is likely to affect the outcome.

What Boras does get right is that with a system where the nature of the team usually changes dramatically from April to September, we probably never really know a team's true quality unless they're a perennial doormat or champion. Some of us like that, some of us don't. I think what Boras is saying is that it provides less of a rationale to spend a lot of money to go from 95 wins to 105 wins and he doesn't like that one bit. No sir.
   30. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:31 PM (#6052522)
####, I was confusing the 1973 WS loser Mets with the 1969 champs. It doesn't really change the point.
   31. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:33 PM (#6052523)
I mean the usual luck that is associated with baseball.


Seriously, what is the usual luck that is associated with baseball? I think it's a term that's so widely used, to describe so much, that it has little meaning.
   32. and Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:41 PM (#6052525)
Some description above: strike zone variation, balls hopping, or not, over fences, is one starter dominant that day? Hard hit balls at fielders, bloops that fall in.

Every sport has some luck like that. Baseball has more.
   33. BDC Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:51 PM (#6052529)
the nature of the team usually changes dramatically from April to September, we probably never really know a team's true quality unless they're a perennial doormat or champion. Some of us like that, some of us don't

After Joey Gallo got traded this past summer, my partner said that they shouldn't be able to do that, the team you started with should be the team you ended the season with. (She does not care about baseball but she has a sense of principle.)

That would be a very interesting challenge for pro sports. In effect we are used to it from college sports, players don't transfer mid-season. (Or can they now? I don't really understand the "portal." Anyway, past college sports in any case.)

So: no trades or acquisitions. If you have injuries, if a player is really inadequate, you have to use the depth chart, both up and down the organization. Probably would conflict with various union desires about promotion and demotion. A lot of the players' and teams' interests are bound up with in-season movement, particularly of journeymen. And you still couldn't count on the team you started with being the final team. Acuna can't play on a torn ACL no matter what the roster rules.
   34. Tom Nawrocki Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:52 PM (#6052530)
It is the nature of all playoffs that lesser teams are given a second chance to beat teams that proved better than them over the course of the regular season. That's not a bug or even really a feature; it is quite literally what playoffs are. It's what lets the Giants beat the Patriots, or Villanova beat Georgetown, or the Dodgers beat the A's.

The only arguable exception is when you had the old World Series with champions of entirely separate leagues square off, but I don't know of any sport that operates like that any more.
   35. Nasty Nate Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:52 PM (#6052531)
I don't know that it does. It certainly takes more luck to win 3 to 4 straight series than it does to win 1 or 2. It also probably requires you playing better.
The playing better part was what I was getting at. If you are winning games, a larger sample indicates that it was more due to playing better as opposed to baseball luck - not in absolute terms, but compared to a smaller sample.
   36. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 11, 2021 at 01:54 PM (#6052532)
But the same thing has been happening since the 1906 White Sox beat the Cubs. All those upsets can't be injustices.

Of course not. Without the upsets, the sport would suck.
   37. Tom Nawrocki Posted: November 11, 2021 at 02:16 PM (#6052535)
It's not the economic system that made it possible for an 88-win team to claim the title. It's the postseason structure of allowing many lesser teams in.


Are there more 88-win teams winning the World Series these days? Here are all the World Champions under the 162-game schedule that won fewer than 90 regular-season games:

2021 Braves
2014 Giants
2006 Cardinals
2000 Yankees
1987 Twins

So it looks like things changed when the playoffs expanded in 1994*, but the cadence has been pretty regular since then. The second wild card has not, as of yet, made much of a difference in lesser teams winning it all. (Note too that only one of these teams, the 2014 Giants, was a wild card.)
   38. and Posted: November 11, 2021 at 02:32 PM (#6052539)
Despite being a Braves fan and falling in love with our midseason acquisitions, I actually love the idea of set the rosters, say, March 15, and then living with it until November 15. Especially in a sport like baseball where a team has oodles of guys all the way down to rookie league (or did, anyway). That is, I'd rather see a team call a guy up than trade for someone who already has a shot at the big time.
   39. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2021 at 02:40 PM (#6052543)
(Note too that only one of these teams, the 2014 Giants, was a wild card.)


Yes, but all three of the more recent teams are only playoff teams because of the expanded playoffs/three division format. If you just had the old two-divisions structure and the same teams in place, the Braves, Yanks and Cards don't win divisions.

It's not just the creation of the wildcard that results in lesser teams joining the playoffs. The move to smaller divisions that accompanied the WC also can contribute.
   40. base ball chick Posted: November 11, 2021 at 04:19 PM (#6052565)
The Duke Posted: November 10, 2021 at 07:44 PM (#6052398)

Boras, as usual, is the only one telling it like it is. He’s right about almost everything when he talks about the state of the game. I just wish more people on the owners and players side would be more honest about the issues and challenges.

The game is in a perilous state IMO. The coming decline in attendance will be a huge wake up call.


- as well as decline in cable subscribers.

see, rights and leftys CAN agree on some things


All anyone has to do is attend a minor league game to see the game we used to watch at the MLB level.
.

- ida know bout that - minor leaguers are just obvious NOT near as good as major leaguers. if you mean pace of game, no idea bout that but i can tell you that i have been to a couple of college games in the past few years and they delay and drag just like the ML. same holding the ball on the mound for 30 seconds, same batters stepping out wasting time after every ****ing pitch

The game is too slow, too one dimensional, just a long parade of relievers, populated with teams that don’t try on the one side and then super teams like the Dodgers on the other side.


- yep

like michael jackson said - they don't care about US
   41. Mike A Posted: November 11, 2021 at 05:32 PM (#6052574)
I sold Duvall short, though to be fair he is 33 with 8.0 career fWAR. He had a solid season - 81st amongst position players in fWAR thanks mainly to surprising defensive numbers. Still, none of the guys the Braves traded for were real radar movers. And pretty much all of them aside from Duvall were having bad years to that point, as none of the four had an OBP% over .300.

Boras also complains about the Braves being under .500 at the trade deadline, but their Pythag was at 55% (88 win pace, ahead of the Mets/Phillies' 81 win Pythag pace). It's not their fault they were in the NL East. If the Braves were still in the NL West, Anthopoulos would have taken one look and gone 'nope.' But AA took a chance on regression to the mean in both players and team and it worked. It was also lucky.

Boras's shot about the Braves, Marlins, Cubs, Twins, etc not 'respecting the integrity of the 2021 season' annoys me.
   42. Walt Davis Posted: November 11, 2021 at 05:55 PM (#6052579)
BDC in #33: Actually that's pretty much how baseball operated in the reserve era. Joey Gallo doesn't get traded at the deadline in 1955. The Cubs obviously don't trade Rizzo, Bryant and Baez ... especially not for a bunch of middling prospects ... because they were trading away the entire remainder of their careers. So there were midseason trades but they were "fairer" and rarely involved mid-career all-stars. You'd still see a guy like Nelson Cruz move maybe -- nearing retirement, the trading team wasn't giving up much or getting much back. You'd still see salary dumps a la Connie Mack I suppose but probably easier to do that in the offseason.
   43. Walt Davis Posted: November 11, 2021 at 06:09 PM (#6052582)
As an example, the 63 Dodgers won the WS. B-R reports only 4 mid-season transactions (actually the first was probably the end of spring training) -- Snider sold to the Mets, Daryl Spencer released, Don Zimmer sold to the Sens and Ed Roebuck traded to the Sens for Marv Breeding. They won again in 65 and made 3 transactions -- they lost a player on waivers, bought a swingman who was terrible and signed Jim Gilliam again in late May. The 66 team lost the WS with 6 transactions -- signing Gilliam in late April, traded Podres for nothing, traded nobodies with the Angels, grabbed Wes Covington's last 41 awful PAs after the Cubs released him, grabbed Dr Strangeglove after the Mets released him (he helped a bit and got 2 PA in the WS), made a Sept trade for Dick Schofield (looks like 3B was a problem all year but he didn't play in the WS, I assume ineligible).
   44. Tony S Posted: November 11, 2021 at 07:26 PM (#6052591)


(a) Baseball has more short-term randomizing factors than the other sports. That's why you need a long 162-game season to determine who's best.

(b) Baseball needs a postseason, for entertainment purposes and to give the season a suitable climax and a sense of closure and structure.

Because of (a) and (b), you'll often have the "best" team not win the sport's championship. I don't see why this is a problem or anything to wring one's hands over -- it's always been the case. The best system, IMHO, is the one baseball had from 1969-93 -- you have your postseason, but its small size ensures some quality control when it comes to the participants.

Yes, you had some flukes like the 73 Mets or the 87 Twins or (in the other direction) the 80 Orioles and the 93 Giants. You're going to have some anomalies now and then no matter what system you have.

And I know we're not going back there. But to me that's the best way to balance out these "issues".
   45. BDC Posted: November 11, 2021 at 09:01 PM (#6052606)
Interesting, Walt – you’re right, the dump-‘em while you can trade was not a reserve-clause thing. There were famous mid-season acquisitions like the Cubs getting Hank Borowy in 1945, but far fewer than today.

As to baseball’s long season: that’s not based on a need to determine a definite champion, is it? I think it’s more that it’s a game you can play every day & might as well while it’s nice outside. Historically, everybody’s most memorable regular seasons are ones like 1908, 1948, 1951, 1967 etc. that came down to a game or two at the end anyway.
   46. baxter Posted: November 11, 2021 at 10:48 PM (#6052622)
Don King phase? I thought it was an "Onion" article. Not Don King b/c nothing tops "We have a system of justice and jewishprudence."

On Bryant, why couldn't Boras say that Bryant is really good at "The Offense" and so versatile that he can man "The Hill" just like Ohtani.

There, two Connery/Lumet references.

Why, I bet that Bryant is so into preparation, when facing the Braves he watches the Ian Anderson tapes.
   47. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: November 12, 2021 at 12:15 AM (#6052624)
— He compared Kris Bryant to actor Sean Connery, saying “he has Bond-like abilities to create a great middle of the lineup. He’s always red-hot in the hunt for October. He’s an extraordinary gentleman and is in a league of his own.”


Sean Connery was in A League of Their Own?
   48. DFA Posted: November 12, 2021 at 01:24 AM (#6052627)
Eh, the real problem is that prospects are overvalued and not enough contenders are willing to go for it.


Quoted for truth!
   49. bfan Posted: November 12, 2021 at 07:49 AM (#6052636)
I think people fundamentally misunderstand what Boras is. He is a salesman, and his inventory is player seasons for sale.

Thus, it is in his economic interest to drive up player salaries. If through his exhortations he drives player salaries up by 10% in an off-season, then the value of his inventory goes up 10% and his take goes up by 10%, with no additional effort on his part. That is not a criticism of Boras, but all he is doing is acting in his own self-interest; he doesn't have the best interest of baseball at heart; he has one laser focus, and bully for him for doing that well, but that is all this is. He is no different than the head of Frito-Lay hawking Cheeto consumption.
   50. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 12, 2021 at 10:09 AM (#6052654)
I think people fundamentally misunderstand what Boras is. He is a salesman, and his inventory is player seasons for sale.

Thus, it is in his economic interest to drive up player salaries. If through his exhortations he drives player salaries up by 10% in an off-season, then the value of his inventory goes up 10% and his take goes up by 10%, with no additional effort on his part. That is not a criticism of Boras, but all he is doing is acting in his own self-interest; he doesn't have the best interest of baseball at heart; he has one laser focus, and bully for him for doing that well, but that is all this is. He is no different than the head of Frito-Lay hawking Cheeto consumption.
I think people know this perfectly well. They’re just disgusted, to varying degrees, by his clownish rhetoric and disingenuousness, part of which is framing his incessant self-interested sales pitch as being in the best interest of baseball.
   51. SoSH U at work Posted: November 12, 2021 at 10:14 AM (#6052655)
I think people know this perfectly well. They’re just disgusted, to varying degrees, by his clownish rhetoric and disingenuousness, part of which is framing his incessant self-interested sales pitch as being in the best interest of baseball.


Yeah, I don't think anyone is confused about Boras's aims.

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