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Monday, November 09, 2020

Chicago White Sox manager Tony La Russa charged with DUI stemming from February arrest, court docs show

Chicago White Sox manager Tony La Russa was charged with driving under the influence after he allegedly ran his car into a curb in February, leaving it smoking on the side of a Phoenix-area road, according to court records obtained by ESPN.

It is the second known drunken driving arrest for La Russa, who in 2007 pleaded guilty to misdemeanor DUI in Jupiter, Florida.

A 76-year-old Hall of Famer long regarded as one of the canniest managers in baseball, La Russa’s hiring to lead the White Sox last week after a nine-year absence from the dugout shocked observers throughout the game.

When reached by ESPN on Monday night, La Russa said, “I have nothing to say,” and hung up the phone.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 09, 2020 at 09:18 PM | 122 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: tony larussa

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   1. Dennis Eclairskey, closer Posted: November 09, 2020 at 09:43 PM (#5988008)
Cmon, Tony. I mean two of the most overused jokes on this site are references to La Russa's drinking & Jeter's gift baskets but La Russa really is making a joke of himself at this point

According to the article a White Sox spokesman said the organization was aware of the incident.
   2. Walks Clog Up the Bases Posted: November 09, 2020 at 09:47 PM (#5988009)
How 2020 would it be if LaRussa gets fired from his job before even putting on the uniform?
   3. Howie Menckel Posted: November 09, 2020 at 09:48 PM (#5988010)
I was in Scottsdale/Phoenix in 2018, and an interesting thing I learned from my various Uber drivers was how many residents have sold their cars.

they said the locals factored in annual insurance and upkeep costs along with car payments vs how much per month they would expect to spend using Uber, and it became a no-brainer (this is not exactly an area with a world-renowned mass transit system).

and these aren't even rich - or old - people.

but Tony, I guess he just loves to drive.

...................

"How 2020 would it be if LaRussa gets fired from his job before even putting on the uniform?"

Ask Carlos Beltran !
   4. The Duke Posted: November 09, 2020 at 09:51 PM (#5988011)
How can LaRussa be offered a job and then go out and put himself in a position to be arrested. Reinsdorf probably winked at him and said “don’t do it again”
   5. Jeff Francoeur's OPS Posted: November 09, 2020 at 09:59 PM (#5988013)
He'll survive this. Rosenthal says the ChiSox were aware before hiring him.

Regardless, two DUIs is disgraceful.
   6. Mayor Blomberg Posted: November 09, 2020 at 10:57 PM (#5988023)
Starting pretty much as everybody expected.
   7. Stevis Posted: November 09, 2020 at 11:28 PM (#5988027)
#3--Maybe with LaRussa driving in another states those insurance payments will come down
   8. asinwreck Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:14 AM (#5988031)
It's time for Michael Reinsdorf to take the keys away from his father.
   9. Walt Davis Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:36 AM (#5988033)
   10. "bothsidesism" word 57i66135 Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:45 AM (#5988034)
He'll survive this. Rosenthal says the ChiSox were aware before hiring him.

but were they aware that larussa would be charged before they let him put his josh hancock on the contract?
   11. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 07:58 AM (#5988036)
It's time for Michael Reinsdorf to take the keys away from his father.


Not a big deal, Jerry only makes baseball and basketball decisions. I'd much prefer the LaRussa daughters (he has 4) take the keys away from their father.
   12. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 08:50 AM (#5988044)
I'd much prefer the LaRussa daughters (he has 4) take the keys away from their father.

Yeah, unless he adjudged legally incompetent they have no power to do so.
   13. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 08:53 AM (#5988045)
I was in Scottsdale/Phoenix in 2018, and an interesting thing I learned from my various Uber drivers was how many residents have sold their cars.

they said the locals factored in annual insurance and upkeep costs along with car payments vs how much per month they would expect to spend using Uber, and it became a no-brainer (this is not exactly an area with a world-renowned mass transit system).

and these aren't even rich - or old - people.


I wonder how much that has changed with Uber subsidizing rides less, and the drivers making less. In the end it's completely unsustainable though. Once the VC money gives up, or the states correctly deem drivers to be employees, it's done. There's no profit in running a huge taxi company. Never has been.
   14. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 09:18 AM (#5988046)
Yeah, unless he adjudged legally incompetent they have no power to do so.


Well, there's 4 of them and he's an old man.

I wonder how much that has changed with Uber subsidizing rides less, and the drivers making less. In the end it's completely unsustainable though. Once the VC money gives up, or the states correctly deem drivers to be employees, it's done. There's no profit in running a huge taxi company. Never has been.


I figure the VC play is to corner the market now, even while losing money, and then replace the drivers with self driving cars. Doubt that is going to happen any time soon.
   15. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 09:47 AM (#5988052)
I figure the VC play is to corner the market now, even while losing money, and then replace the drivers with self driving cars. Doubt that is going to happen any time soon.

Good luck with that. In 2019, just in terms of operating income they lost a dollar for every two dollars of sales. $15.5B operating revenue, -$8.6B operating income.

That's a lot of losses over the next ten plus years. I also don't see what the barrier to entry is, i.e. they can't corner the market. If they try to extract monopoly prices, someone else will open.
   16. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:05 AM (#5988057)
or the states correctly deem drivers to be employees, it's done.


Prop 22 passed in liberal California, workers haven't been winning vs. labor for awhile now, so I wouldn't expect any changes there. People value convenience over worker's rights.
   17. Jay Seaver Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:18 AM (#5988060)
I figure the VC play is to corner the market now, even while losing money, and then replace the drivers with self driving cars.

Uber may talk about self-driving cars, but I can't imagine that they'd actually want to maintain a fleet, including an actual support staff and (more?) legal liability for damages should one of those cars get in an accident. The company's whole business model is based on outsourcing all the expenses.

I half-suspect that since the bulk of their money comes from a Saudi fund, the basic idea is to try and kill public transportation, and Softbank will prop them up for as long as they're useful in that regard.
   18. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:27 AM (#5988061)
Is there anything stopped California lawmakers from just overturning the law established by Prop 22? I mean, besides elected officials being afraid of overturning a law that passed by referendum?

As for barriers to entry: the biggest problem is that there's a serious network effect here. Part of what Uber has going for it is that everybody who wants to drive cars and make money* has it on their phones, and they have it on their phones because everybody who wants to get a ride has it on their phones. If none of your customers have your new app on their phones, there's no reason for a driver to download it, and if none of the drivers has it on their phones there's no reason for riders to download it. It's really a collective action problem - if Uber raises prices it's rational for everyone to switch, but only if everyone else switches too, and there's no reason to be the first one to move.
   19. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:43 AM (#5988063)

Uber may talk about self-driving cars, but I can't imagine that they'd actually want to maintain a fleet, including an actual support staff and (more?) legal liability for damages should one of those cars get in an accident. The company's whole business model is based on outsourcing all the expenses.


They'll lease the cars and outsource the maintenance to someone who has the experience and infrastructure to do so. The big auto leasing companies have been salivating over this opportunity for years now. I expect Uber will still have the liability in the event of an accident unless it was the result of a manufacturing defect in the car or gross negligence in the maintenance process. (This is all assuming that self-driving cars become a reality within some reasonable timeframe, something I'm not yet convinced of).

Anyway, I think Uber and Lyft are decent businesses that should be profitable at some point when the VCs get tired of burning money. But I just don't see the potential for the outsized profits that their current share prices imply. If they try to exert monopoly pricing power at some point, they'll get regulated like monopolies.

Just my personal opinion and none of this should be construed as investment advice.
   20. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:44 AM (#5988064)
Uber may talk about self-driving cars, but I can't imagine that they'd actually want to maintain a fleet, including an actual support staff and (more?) legal liability for damages should one of those cars get in an accident. The company's whole business model is based on outsourcing all the expenses.


Yeah, it does seem to be built around employees looking at the short term. People who think it's great to make $15-20 per hour while setting their own hours (A guess, I'm not sure what they generally make). But anyone who looks at the full costs - depreciation, maintenance, insurance - would probably run from that kind of job. Not to mention the cost of owning a late model vehicle that meets the standards for Uber or Lyft. If you don't have a lot of income you shouldn't be wasting your money on an expensive car. Better to do what I did until 2018 (after about a decade of 6 figure income) - drive a 1993 Corolla until the wheels fall off, if you need to have a car at all.
   21. Jay Seaver Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:56 AM (#5988066)
19 -

I'm not sure how that's going to be cheaper for Uber than a bunch of individuals supplying and maintaining their own vehicles; heck, those companies are going to have lawyers and demand a better deal than a bunch of individuals looking for a second income or something to tide them over until a better opportunity comes along will.

Uber/Lyft/etc. don't actually own anything other than a name people recognize, and while they've gotten a pretty long way on that and a bunch of venture capital, eventually they're going to either build something sustainable (which will probably cost the same as a taxi because that's what it costs to run things) or go the way of MoviePass. Hopefully that will happen before they take public transportation and other things down with it.
   22. Moses Taylor hashes out the rumpus Posted: November 10, 2020 at 11:09 AM (#5988069)
Prop 22 passed in liberal California, workers haven't been winning vs. labor for awhile now, so I wouldn't expect any changes there. People value convenience over worker's rights.

Built into (hidden in?) the prop is that to overturn it, the legislature needs to have a 7/8 majority. So, yeah, they thought about that too...
   23. Moses Taylor hashes out the rumpus Posted: November 10, 2020 at 11:12 AM (#5988070)
How can LaRussa be offered a job and then go out and put himself in a position to be arrested. Reinsdorf probably winked at him and said “don’t do it again”

Unless TLR knew he was getting this job way back in February (which, to be honest, I wouldn't put past Reinsdorf), that wasn't a problem (though knowing TLR, he might have gone out and drove home drunk after he got this job too). I'm curious why it took 9 months for them to charge him - how inconvenient for TLR it was just days after he got this job.

He'll survive this. Rosenthal says the ChiSox were aware before hiring him.

Yep. If Jerry didn't care about what people thought before hiring him - and he knew, cause he used Nightendale to float this and it was absolutely reviled - he's not gonna care about the PR now.
   24. Howie Menckel Posted: November 10, 2020 at 11:18 AM (#5988071)
I'm curious why it took 9 months for them to charge him

supposedly the original charges were filed in the wrong county (!)
   25. The Mighty Quintana Posted: November 10, 2020 at 11:37 AM (#5988072)
I would think COVID has greatly reduced the possibility of profitability for Uber.

“Everywhere is walking distance if you have the time.”
― Steven Wright

I'd like to hear Yogi's take on COVID..."Nobody goes anywhere anymore, cuz there's nowhere to go."
   26. Traderdave Posted: November 10, 2020 at 11:39 AM (#5988073)
I had a twitter discussion the other day with a well known local lefty who was lamenting Uber's abuse of workers. I noted that Uber's cash flow from operations is negative several billion, while its drivers earn many billions. Uber's losses are funded by share sales to suckers who think selling a dollar bill for 85 cents is a viable business plan. In effect, Uber is is a massive transfer of Wall St cash to the working class, something he should celebrate if he's so strong for workers' rights.

He didn't see it my way...
   27. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 11:39 AM (#5988074)
Yeah, it does seem to be built around employees looking at the short term. People who think it's great to make $15-20 per hour while setting their own hours (A guess, I'm not sure what they generally make). But anyone who looks at the full costs - depreciation, maintenance, insurance - would probably run from that kind of job.

I've seen people claim that after depreciation and other car costs, the drivers basically make minimum wage. Haven't checked the math on that.
   28. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:05 PM (#5988077)
I've seen people claim that after depreciation and other car costs, the drivers basically make minimum wage. Haven't checked the math on that.


Ah, I forgot the footnote on my earlier post. My father does taxes for old people through AARP (on a volunteer basis), and he says that those who drive Uber are often shocked to find out how little they make doing it.

With the rarest of exceptions, the gig economy is for people who are either suckers or desperate. (Here's the exception. I have a friend who drives two Uber trips per day. He lives in the suburbs but works downtown. He gives someone a ride from the suburbs into town every morning on his way to work, and he gives someone a ride from downtown out to the suburbs after work every day. Basically, he carpools but gets paid for it.)
   29. Zonk Can Sell Culture Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:07 PM (#5988078)
Quite humorous...

On cars generally, though...

I got rid of mine last year. Doing the math, even though mine was paid off - it just made zero sense to pay ~$500 a year for insurance, $300 for a city/neighborhood sticker, $100 for plates... nearly a thousand bucks before we even get into any maintenance or other odds/ends (like the occasional street cleaning parking ticket).

I've had occasional annoyances not having a car ready at hand, but we're talking once every couple months. Waste of money. I've also - well, Covid aside/prior to this spring - done more walking... I found that when I had a car, I'd be very lazy. The place I generally go for meats/produce is like 3/4 of a mile... and I'd virtually always drive when I had a car. Now, I walk. Sucks in the winter, but for ~8ish months out of the year - it's a nice walk... Beyond that, while I'm long past the days where a couple drinks turns into 10, it's nice to no longer even worry about the dumb decisions potentially occurring.

I'm rather surprised myself how seamless my transition to sans vehicle has gone...
   30. Traderdave Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:07 PM (#5988079)
Ah, I forgot the footnote on my earlier post. My father does taxes for old people through AARP (on a volunteer basis), and he says that those who drive Uber are often shocked to find out how little they make doing it.


Pre Uber cab drivers weren't known for being flush...
   31. Traderdave Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:12 PM (#5988085)
Your insurance was $500/year???

Mine runs about $1500 per car and wife & I have clean records and only one of us drives to work.
   32. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:15 PM (#5988086)
Re: Zonk - I lived downtown for many years, and for 13 of those years didn't have a car. It was much cheaper, and if you're in the city, everything is walkable. Good for your health too - I was in much better shape then.
   33. Zonk Can Sell Culture Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:27 PM (#5988094)
Your insurance was $500/year???


Well, it was more before I paid off the car... but once I dropped down to the basic, yeah - I mean, it's been a year and half, but I think my bill was like $250-275 or so every 6 mo. It helps that my only claim ever was someone sideswiping my car while it was parked, I suppose.

Re: Zonk - I lived downtown for many years, and for 13 of those years didn't have a car. It was much cheaper, and if you're in the city, everything is walkable. Good for your health too - I was in much better shape then.


Yeah, I'm worried that if I did re-up with a car - I'd fall back into lazy habits. I've been amazed how many short drives I'd take that are totally walkable... Haircuts... walk to Target... The big change has really been that when shopping, I need to keep in mind what I can reasonably carry but that's really meant nothing more than better planning.
   34. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:31 PM (#5988096)
I don't need my car nearly as often these days working from home. But I have no desire to get rid of it. I think not having a car would be too much of a hassle while living in the suburbs and having 2 kids. I could even get by food-wise, as there is a Costco and Trader Joe's within easy walking distance, but I'd rather not have to go through arranging a ride every time I want to take the kids somewhere.
   35. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:32 PM (#5988097)
If 2020 became the expected every day reality I'd strongly consider getting rid of a car and just keeping one for the family. But I'm keeping both because things can change.
   36. Zonk Can Sell Culture Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:45 PM (#5988102)
Oh, suburbs and/or kids? No doubt... Sans kids and in the city?

My route to selling it was mostly a matter of yet another jackass sideswiping it and being very angry about tossing $2000 or so at bodywork... plus, I needed a brake job... plus, my plates and insurance were up in about 6 weeks...

I didn't want to hassle with a private sale, so I first tried one of those Kelly blue book things - and wasted a couple weekends where the @#!@#!! dealers lowballed me and would only honor the "offer" on a trade-in, which I explicitly made clear in getting the estimates did NOT interest me (came to find out that the a dealership consortium had basically bought out the service several years prior; hence, the bait-and-switch... @#@!#!@ dealers).

Anyway, I ended up selling it to one of those Carvana-type things -- which had its nervous moments. Uploaded pics, VIN number, and whatnot - and named my price, which was immediately accepted (and made me feel stupid because I think I lowballed myself, thanks to my experience with the @#@!#! dealers).

But - the scary/nervous part is that once the deal is accepted, you have to send them the title signed over to them and keys... Then, they arrange a pickup... THEN, within 24 hours, you either get a check mailed or direct deposit.

For the next 24 hours, I was kind of sweating bullets because I no longer had the car... no longer had the title... and well... but, sure enough, by the following afternoon - the accepted bid amount was direct deposited.

So, if you can deal with the scariness of no longer having the vehicle or any claim to it for a day or so - I recommend.
   37. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:49 PM (#5988104)
If 2020 became the expected every day reality

Of course if 2020 becomes the long-term reality, there's zero reason to live in a city, and cars become very necessary.
   38. jmurph Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:58 PM (#5988107)
Of course if 2020 becomes the long-term reality, there's zero reason to live in a city, and cars become very necessary.

I am personally very grateful to be living in a city during this mess, but obviously mileage varies.
   39. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 12:58 PM (#5988108)
   40. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:03 PM (#5988110)
Last time I sold one I took it to Carmax. There wasn't going to be a trade because we bought a replacement car from some friends who were moving overseas. Just had to get rid of one. I probably didn't get the best price, but I was satisfied with their offer, didn't have to do the sale myself and they made it easy.

In the on ramp to Carmax there were some people handing out flyers trying to get people to go into Carmax, get an appraisal, and then they'd give you $100 bucks or so more than Carmax offered. I didn't like their business approach - getting Carmax to do the work for them and coming as close as they can get to trespassing on their property, so I didn't bother with them. People like that would probably try and bait and switch, once they get you in tell you it's only good for $100 over the Carmax offer if you buy one of their cars.
   41. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:03 PM (#5988111)
Good for Marcus.
   42. Mayor Blomberg Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:16 PM (#5988115)
He didn't see it my way...

I can imagine
   43. Zonk Can Sell Culture Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:38 PM (#5988118)
Of course if 2020 becomes the long-term reality, there's zero reason to live in a city, and cars become very necessary.

I am personally very grateful to be living in a city during this mess, but obviously mileage varies.


I agree... There are two conflicting elements -

First, if one cannot walk to the park, to the theater, to the ballpark, to see a band at an intimate venue, or any of the bazillion things people do pay premiums to live in the city - well... it's no longer worth paying the premium.

However, even in a Covid world - there *are* still advantages to living in densely populated areas... if "eating out" means takeout/delivery? Well, I doubt one finds kitfo in many small towns (and given that I can't even make good pancakes, I wouldn't even want to try my hand at injera). Delivery servicing and pricing is inevitably going to be logistically cheaper and more available if Amazons of the world can plan to hit 10 stops a given day than one.... that's without getting into the fact that other critical services (like healthcare) are simply more per capita available in densely populated areas.

So, I'd agree... the premium price does seem to need to drop, but it doesn't drop to an equilibrium.

   44. Darren Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:48 PM (#5988119)
I had just convinced myself that this wasn't such a crazy hire. I was thinking that LaRussa had been away from managing forever, but it's only been 9 years, which is long, but not that crazy. LaRussa has had a lot of success with different types of teams. People that he's worked with of late say he can relate to young players. So, maybe it's not all that nuts?

Then this comes out and now that 2007 incident looks like part of a pattern. Then all this stuff about his poor relationships with black players comes up (which I guess I didn't know or had forgotten), and now Stroman saying he'd never play for him for any amount of money.

So this one goes back into the category of crazy clown town.

I had a twitter discussion the other day with a well known local lefty who was lamenting Uber's abuse of workers. I noted that Uber's cash flow from operations is negative several billion, while its drivers earn many billions. Uber's losses are funded by share sales to suckers who think selling a dollar bill for 85 cents is a viable business plan. In effect, Uber is is a massive transfer of Wall St cash to the working class, something he should celebrate if he's so strong for workers' rights.

He didn't see it my way...



That's because you didn't say anything to refute the idea that Uber takes advantage of its drivers.
   45. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:51 PM (#5988120)
but obviously mileage varies
Not if you don't have a car!


Try the veal, it's fantastic. Tip your bartenders well.
   46. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:56 PM (#5988122)
@JeffPassan
ESPN obtained the full arrest report for Chicago White Sox manager Tony La Russa's DUI charge.

"Do you see my ring?" La Russa said to the arresting officer. "I'm a Hall of Famer baseball person. I'm legit. I'm a Hall of Famer, brother."


LOL
   47. Zonk Can Sell Culture Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:59 PM (#5988123)
It would have worked better if he weren't drunkenly urinating on the officer's shoes and wearing the ring where one normally does not wear such jewelry when pointing to it....
   48. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:59 PM (#5988124)
LaRussa then attempted to halt the arrest, insisting that a left-handed police officer be brought to the scene before it could continue.
   49. jmurph Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:00 PM (#5988125)
"Do you see my ring?" La Russa said to the arresting officer. "I'm a Hall of Famer baseball person. I'm legit. I'm a Hall of Famer, brother."

That's honestly a good effort. I mean, you're a Hall of Famer, you gotta shoot your shot.
   50. Zonk Can Sell Culture Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:03 PM (#5988126)
It's sad that the LaRussa sibling rivalry has reached such a point.
   51. jmurph Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:04 PM (#5988127)
However, even in a Covid world - there *are* still advantages to living in densely populated areas... if "eating out" means takeout/delivery? Well, I doubt one finds kitfo in many small towns (and given that I can't even make good pancakes, I wouldn't even want to try my hand at injera). Delivery servicing and pricing is inevitably going to be logistically cheaper and more available if Amazons of the world can plan to hit 10 stops a given day than one.... that's without getting into the fact that other critical services (like healthcare) are simply more per capita available in densely populated areas.

Yeah I had all those things in mind, especially the access to many delivery services that my family members in rural areas simply do not have access to. I also have two young kids, and the ability to walk/bike/or drive extremely short distances to a ton of different playgrounds and parks, etc., is huge for us right now. I mean practically everywhere has access to some kind of playground (as long as there is an elementary school somewhere in your community), but the variety has been key to us in keeping them entertained in a time where they don't really get to see their friends much or at all.
   52. Jay Seaver Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:05 PM (#5988128)
Of course if 2020 becomes the long-term reality, there's zero reason to live in a city, and cars become very necessary.


I don't really see it that way, but then I've never had a car (grew up in the suburbs and haven't looked back since college 25 years ago). Part of why I do is not wanting a car in the first place, but it being in a city during this time means a bunch of services are close by and able to respond rapidly, and that's before you get to the other things which are not completely lost to the before-times.
   53. Howie Menckel Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:07 PM (#5988130)
"I'm a Hall of Famer, brother."

"It's sad that the LaRussa sibling rivalry has reached such a point."

or maybe the cop is black, based on previous comments

#ohbrother
   54. Traderdave Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:19 PM (#5988132)
That's because you didn't say anything to refute the idea that Uber takes advantage of its drivers.


Willingly signing up at terms disclosed in advance =/= being taken advantage of
   55. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:26 PM (#5988133)
Do you see my ring? I'm a Hall of Famer baseball person as there's a drive into deep left field by Castellanos and that'll be a home run. And so that'll make it a 4-0 ballgame. I'm legit.
   56. Jeff Francoeur's OPS Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:32 PM (#5988134)
Find someone who loves you like Marcus Stroman loves himself.
   57. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: November 10, 2020 at 02:52 PM (#5988137)
TLR has repeatedly questioned the "sincerity" of those who kneel to protest police brutality.

When it comes to light that he is a habitual public offender, putting human lives at risk, his response: “I have nothing to say,” and hung up the phone.

What a piece of garbage.
   58. Darren Posted: November 10, 2020 at 03:02 PM (#5988138)
Willingly signing up at terms disclosed in advance =/= being taken advantage of


Terms can be unfair and people can be desperate.
   59. RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 03:07 PM (#5988141)
Speaking of insincere, from 2007:

'I accept full responsibility for my conduct, and assure everyone that I have learned a very valuable lesson and that this will never occur again,'


Narrator: It did occur again.
   60. Lowry Seasoning Salt Posted: November 10, 2020 at 05:22 PM (#5988160)
Darren Posted: November 10, 2020 at 01:48 PM (#5988119)
I had just convinced myself that this wasn't such a crazy hire. I was thinking that LaRussa had been away from managing forever, but it's only been 9 years, which is long, but not that crazy. LaRussa has had a lot of success with different types of teams. People that he's worked with of late say he can relate to young players. So, maybe it's not all that nuts?


I'd had similar thoughts (before this DUI news), but the NY Times article on his hiring got me back to waffling. At the end of the article, after talking about his ability to adapt to broader cultural shifts the piece moved into cultural shifts within the game.

La Russa gave a similar answer about bat flips and showmanship, another evolving aspect of baseball’s culture. He added that with increased scrutiny of the modern game, “I see how that impacts players emotionally.”

That scrutiny will naturally extend to La Russa himself, with every decision judged through the prism of his adaptation to today’s game. He will consume the data, he vowed, while understanding its limits.

“There’s a lot of great, new information, a lot of great ways that you can improve how you coach up or prepare,” he said. “The difference is that once the game starts, there is no formula that can measure the head, heart and guts of a player that day.”


Maybe I read too much into that final LaRussa quote, but it came across to me like, "There's data and there's other stuff. And I get the other stuff that other people won't understand." Just made me think back to his post-game press conferences when he would be obtuse and feisty. Again, maybe I read too much into those words.

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/10/29/sports/baseball/tony-la-russa-white-sox-manager.html
   61. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 10, 2020 at 06:09 PM (#5988168)
Maybe I read too much into that final LaRussa quote, but it came across to me like, "There's data and there's other stuff. And I get the other stuff that other people won't understand."
Yep. That last part is what Bill James used to call a bullsh*t dump. "There's a lot of great, new information...that I get to disregard whenever I want, because guts."
   62. Walt Davis Posted: November 10, 2020 at 07:00 PM (#5988180)
#60-61 ... sure, 99% BS ... but LaRussa would not have pulled Blake Snell. Now I suspect no proper stats model would have recommended pulling Snell either but Cash was pretty clearly slavishly devoted to some table.

LaRussa's issues with black players is, as you might guess, in dispute. When he was first appointed, I did a quick websearch. (That was 2-3 weeks ago now I guess, my details may be a bit off but it wasn't hard to find.) He really pissed off Ozzie Smith. He may have also pissed off Royce Clayton which is weird since Clayton was the reason he pissed off Ozzie. He pissed off Ron Gant who said something like "go talk to Brian Jordan and (I think) Ray Lankford" ... which the reporter did and found Jordan and Lankford had nothing bad to say. Obviously lots of good reasons a player would keep quiet even if something did happen but it wasn't as clear as my memory thought it was.

More recently he did say stupid #### about Kaepernick which could be a real problem with some of the Sox players.
   63. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 10, 2020 at 07:16 PM (#5988185)
He really pissed off Ozzie Smith. He may have also pissed off Royce Clayton which is weird since Clayton was the reason he pissed off Ozzie.
How does Edgar Renteria feel about him?
   64. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 07:17 PM (#5988187)
Yeah I had all those things in mind, especially the access to many delivery services that my family members in rural areas simply do not have access to. I also have two young kids, and the ability to walk/bike/or drive extremely short distances to a ton of different playgrounds and parks, etc., is huge for us right now. I mean practically everywhere has access to some kind of playground (as long as there is an elementary school somewhere in your community), but the variety has been key to us in keeping them entertained in a time where they don't really get to see their friends much or at all.

Why is everyone assuming the alternative is some rural area bereft of amenities? I live in the burbs 25 miles from Manhattan. You get 4x the square footage per dollar, your own land as a buffer to annoying neighbors, and still have parks within walking distance, plenty of food options, medical care, etc., etc.

You could give me a free 2 bedroom apartment in the primest location in Manahattan, and I wouldn't set foot in it right now. If you're stuck spending 20+ hours a day inside, you need space.
   65. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 10, 2020 at 07:21 PM (#5988188)
Now I suspect no proper stats model would have recommended pulling Snell either
Yeah, they pretty much do. The “head, heart, guts that day” position was debunked in that 5 innings of dominant pitching from a starter do not predict continued success. “He just had it that day, everyone could tell” is not really a thing.
   66. Zach Posted: November 10, 2020 at 08:13 PM (#5988197)
and then replace the drivers with self driving cars. Doubt that is going to happen any time soon.

Probably not. Autonomous cars seem to be plateauing well below human safety standards, even bearing in mind that they're not even touching the truly hard stuff yet.
   67. Dennis Eclairskey, closer Posted: November 10, 2020 at 09:29 PM (#5988206)
La Russa really seemed like he was ready to retire during the 2011 World Series so I was really shocked to see him coming back to manage
   68. Jay Seaver Posted: November 10, 2020 at 09:44 PM (#5988208)
Why is everyone assuming the alternative is some rural area bereft of amenities?


I don't know that we're assuming that, but 25 miles from Manhattan is different from 20 miles outside Boston is different from, like, ten miles outside Portland, ME.

You could give me a free 2 bedroom apartment in the primest location in Manahattan, and I wouldn't set foot in it right now. If you're stuck spending 20+ hours a day inside, you need space.


Eh, I haven't found that to be the case, but I'm not sharing my 2-bedroom with anybody, and the folks in my area are taking everything seriously; seeing someone unmasked on the street or in a store is rare. Still, people want different things. I did my time in the suburbs when I was young, and quite honestly the idea of having to care for a lawn or screw around with cars and the like are things that I'm happy paying a premium on my rent to avoid (it's almost winter and there's, like, four feet from the porch to the sidewalk to shovel). The whole "buffer" thing is kind of overrated, too - I joke with my folks that I feel safer knowing there are people around even if I don't know them, and city-dwellers are pretty good about giving each other as much privacy as they want. You've got physical space in the suburbs but everybody seems to be up in each other's business more.
   69. The Honorable Ardo Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:00 PM (#5988216)
As I see it, LaRussa's misdeeds are worse than either Hinch's or Cora's. Neither A.J. nor Alex endangered the lives and property of everyday people outside of baseball. He has no business managing the White Sox next year.
   70. baxter Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:34 PM (#5988223)
22. Wow, 7/8 vote of the legislature. Ordinarily, would take 2/3 vote to overturn a statute passed by initiative. One way to overturn would be to place another initiative on the ballot (costs $ to gather signatures) or the legislature could put the initiative on the ballot.
   71. Rally Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:39 PM (#5988225)
LaRussa would have pulled Snell. Then he would have tried to pull Anderson for a lefty after one batter, and gotten ejected after throwing a tantrum when the umps tell him he can’t do that anymore.
   72. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 10, 2020 at 10:40 PM (#5988226)
Still, people want different things. I did my time in the suburbs when I was young, and quite honestly the idea of having to care for a lawn or screw around with cars and the like are things that I'm happy paying a premium on my rent to avoid (it's almost winter and there's, like, four feet from the porch to the sidewalk to shovel).

We can hire people to do all those things, for far less than the extra $5,000 a month a comparable apartment (but still less than half the size) would cost me.

The whole "buffer" thing is kind of overrated, too - I joke with my folks that I feel safer knowing there are people around even if I don't know them, and city-dwellers are pretty good about giving each other as much privacy

I had apartment neighbors who 1) got up every morning at 6 AM and walked around her apartment in heels (above my head) for 30+ minutes, 2) came home at 9 PM every night and burned some sort of meat, stinking up the hallway and my living room and kitchen, 3) has a screaming fight with his girlfriend at least once a weak at 2 AM, and yet somehow never broke up. Hard pass.

As for the safety, that's what an alarm and a firearm are for. Even if firearms aren't your thing, the cops come A LOT quicker in the burbs. We had a patrol car here in 5 minutes the other day because a parked truck was blocking traffic in front of our house.

   73. Jay Seaver Posted: November 10, 2020 at 11:06 PM (#5988229)
Dude, I am not trying to convince you that you'd rather live in the city, I'm saying that this is why I would. Like I said, people want different things, and I find the city much more pleasant than the burbs.
   74. Tin Angel Posted: November 11, 2020 at 12:23 AM (#5988236)
As for the safety, that's what an alarm and a firearm are for. Even if firearms aren't your thing, the cops come A LOT quicker in the burbs. We had a patrol car here in 5 minutes the other day because a parked truck was blocking traffic in front of our house.


Sounds like heaven!
   75. jmurph Posted: November 11, 2020 at 07:44 AM (#5988243)
You get 4x the square footage per dollar, your own land as a buffer to annoying neighbors, and still have parks within walking distance, plenty of food options, medical care, etc., etc.

Like Seaver I am not trying to convince anyone to move, but I do want to point out that all of these things are also true for most American cities outside of, like, the 5 or 6 most densely populated or most expensive ones.
   76. BrianBrianson Posted: November 11, 2020 at 09:52 AM (#5988256)
And really, even rural places have all kinds of amenities and not that far. Yeah, true wilderness doesn't, but nobody's talking about move two hundred miles west of Timmins, Ontario. Town of 1000 people will have all the services you need on a weekly basis. Ten thousand, pretty much everything, especially if it's far from anywhere bigger.

Cars aren't necessary for a lot of day to day stuff if you live in an urban or suburban setting. I didn't buy one upon arriving in France, and really, it's occasionally irritating because trying to go to historic or what passes for wilderness in France becomes a pain. Being able to up and drive to some random castle when I lived in the UK was great. But, COVID is validating the choice for me, so that's nice.
   77. base ball chick Posted: November 11, 2020 at 10:13 AM (#5988259)
snapper

are you seriously trying to say that burbs 25 miles from manhattan is not a city????
cmon
you believe that only manhattan is a city?

as for not having a car

well, you would have to live very close to a grocery store or pay for delivery. we live about 1 1/2 - 2 miles from the nearest one and i can't imagine walking back and forth with heavy grocery bags. and i would have to go pretty much every day after work when i am already tired.

AND you would also need to live pretty close to either your kids schools or to the bus stop that is going to take them to the school they do go to (and i mean the school bus and not a city bus). you would have to get a uber to work for both of you, and then home again - not cheap if you don't work down the street. your kids wouldn't be able to go anywhere besides home and back. forget ever seeing their friends outside of school. forget ANY extracurricular activities - how they gonna get there? kids are not allowed to go alone in a uber and with both parents working, not gonna be done. this city is like 60 - 70 miles east to west and north to south. there really isn't a huge difference between the "burbs" on ths outer parts of the city and the "burbs" in the inner part of the city except the rich little subdivisions toward the edges of harris county tend to be racist/sexist/religion-ist

there is usually nowhere to walk TO. forget any kind of shopping.

if you LIKE being stuck in a 1 mile radius in the burbs without no car - seriously - you gonna walk further there and back to do basically anything? maybe taking ubers everywhere is pocket change to all yall. shrug

- as for living in a "rural" area??? like, we would want to live in redneck USA with a bunch of trump luvvers like WHY? i would want to live in the middle of a bunch of racists with crappy school systems like WHY? and the rural school systems are lousy. it's not like the city of houston is this fantastic deal but you CAN get your kid into one of the good ones if you do some work. the private "religious" (the religion is money and lack of skin color) ones exclude anyone who can't pay the 20K a year tuition and yeah they do pick out a few scholarship students to show how open minded they are so as your poor kid can get treated with contempt by all the other rich kids. no thanks

i guess if you work completely from home and have anything you want or need delivered and don't like going anywheres more than a short walk, and have no kidz, well, then - i guess no car is no big deal

- oh yeah, forgot - TLR is a shtttbag. i despise drunk drivers. there is ZERO excuse for a rich man to be driving after drinkiing,. and the - don't you know who i am - crap is barf city. what, he thinks that his stupid ring means he doesn't have to follow laws? seriously **** him. sideways. without lube
   78. jmurph Posted: November 11, 2020 at 10:31 AM (#5988261)
Town of 1000 people will have all the services you need on a weekly basis.

We're talking pandemic times, though. Many small towns (or more to the point, rural areas outside of small towns) in the US do not have grocery delivery or food delivery options. But yeah, generally speaking, sure.
   79. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: November 11, 2020 at 10:38 AM (#5988262)
Maybe it's different in France, but in most places in the US renting a car is cheap if you want to get away for a weekend. (Renting a car in Manhattan might be expensive, but in lots of places it isn't.) During my 13 carless years, my wife and I did this plenty of times. Not having a car doesn't mean you're stuck in the city, it's just a bit more work to get out of it.

And yes, once you get a car slipping back into habits of laziness is very easy. I live about a mile and a half from work, and my son's preschool is even on the way, and yet, now that I have a car, I usually drive. It's totally unforgivable for a commute that short (especially since I could use the exercise), but I do it anyway.
   80. BrianBrianson Posted: November 11, 2020 at 10:50 AM (#5988263)
Renting cars in Europe is generally cheaper than in the US, in my experience, but living in a Parisian suburb, I'm not at all close to a car rental place (and ... uhm ... various problems with American and French bureaucracy means I'm not sure if it'd be legal for me to drive, anyhow). Really, owning a car lets you do spur of the moment, last minute, whatever, than renting isn't convenient for. When I lived in the States, we'd drive ~5 miles to the mountains to go hiking for an hour, something I wouldn't have done if I'd had to rent a car to do that, you know? A week-end, sure. An afternoon, not so much.
   81. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2020 at 10:52 AM (#5988264)
There are so many variations on living that the whole city/not city argument is not very helpful.

I certainly would not have enjoyed living in an apartment during the last eight months, which I think is what snapper is envisioning. But not all cities are alike (as mentioned, you can have homes and yards and live in a major American city). Not all suburbs are alike. And, obviously, rural living has its own challenges, both inside and outside a pandemic.

I will say that having a nice-sized home and a yard which was connected directly to a walking trail was certainly appreciated by me during the height of the shutdowns. And my decent-sized suburb had most of the amenities one would want, if not every kind of dining option that wouldn't have appealed to my youngest son anyway. As always, one's family situation plays heavily into the optimal conditions for living.
   82. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 11:01 AM (#5988266)
snapper

are you seriously trying to say that burbs 25 miles from manhattan is not a city????
cmon
you believe that only manhattan is a city?


It doesn't function like a city. People drive everywhere except local parks. There's ample free parking everywhere. It's 90% single family detached houses.

Driving around our town you'd have no reason to think there was a huge city near by, except for the train station.
   83. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 11:26 AM (#5988271)

are you seriously trying to say that burbs 25 miles from manhattan is not a city????
cmon
you believe that only manhattan is a city?


Some parts are, some aren't. Downtown White Plains is a city, albeit a small one. But I grew up in a town similar to what snapper describes -- population of 10,000, nothing within walking distance except residential homes, parks and schools.
   84. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 11:50 AM (#5988280)
Some parts are, some aren't. Downtown White Plains is a city, albeit a small one. But I grew up in a town similar to what snapper describes -- population of 10,000, nothing within walking distance except residential homes, parks and schools.

Right, and even parts of White Plains are totally suburban, like Gedney Farms.
   85. Posada Posse Posted: November 11, 2020 at 01:16 PM (#5988296)
“There’s a lot of great, new information, a lot of great ways that you can improve how you coach up or prepare,” he said. “The difference is that once the game starts, there is no formula that can measure the head, heart and guts of a player that day.”


“And no one had more heart and guts every single day than Hall of Famer Harold Baines!”
   86. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 11, 2020 at 01:25 PM (#5988298)
I wonder how the effects on a player's performance caused by the heart differ from those caused by the guts, presumably his stomach and intestines? I suppose for the latter we have a data point in Chan Ho Park.
   87. Itchy Row Posted: November 11, 2020 at 02:32 PM (#5988303)
If only Baines could have traded some of his heart and guts for two functioning knees.
   88. depletion Posted: November 11, 2020 at 02:54 PM (#5988307)
I grew up in White Plains. The population has been about 50,000 for a long time. 43 minutes to Grand Central on one of the plentiful express trains. There was still a small dairy farm in the northern part, near the former Nike missile site, when I was growing up. I assume the farm's gone the way of the Anti-Ballistic Missile program. It had a nice, walkable, shopping downtown. You could do a lot worse, as suburbs go.
   89. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 02:58 PM (#5988310)
I grew up in White Plains. The population has been about 50,000 for a long time. 43 minutes to Grand Central on one of the plentiful express trains. There was still a small dairy farm in the northern part, near the former Nike missile site, when I was growing up. I assume the farm's gone the way of the Anti-Ballistic Missile program. It had a nice, walkable, shopping downtown. You could do a lot worse, as suburbs go.

Nice thing about Westchester in general is the mix of smallish cities, villages, and suburban neighborhoods. There's also generally lots of parking, and very little traffic except on 5 or 6 highways at rush hour.

Of course the property taxes are batshit crazy, but better than paying an extra 4% income tax in they city.
   90. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 03:22 PM (#5988317)

Yeah, my parents moved to downtown White Plains once my father couldn't drive anymore due to vision problems. Lots of stuff that he could walk to, including his office. And if he needs to come to Manhattan for anything he can walk a mile or get a quick ride to the train station.
   91. Lassus Posted: November 11, 2020 at 03:30 PM (#5988319)
The idea of White Plains not being a city is pretty insane.

Here it was in 1958.

Here it is now.

   92. SoSH U at work Posted: November 11, 2020 at 03:44 PM (#5988324)

Of course the property taxes are batshit crazy,


The village I grew up in was once the sole exception, though I suppose even that's coming to an end.
   93. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 03:49 PM (#5988325)
Sure, but the idea that anything within 25 miles of NYC is a city is also not true.

Anyway, I live in a 2 bedroom apartment in Manhattan and it is perfectly fine for me even during COVID. There's enough space and if I want to go outside there are parks within a 5 minute walk. That being said, my wife feels differently and I know she would prefer to be out in the country right now.
   94. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 03:49 PM (#5988326)
.
   95. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: November 11, 2020 at 04:02 PM (#5988327)
The idea of White Plains not being a city is pretty insane.

Parts of White Plains are most definitely a city. Parts of White Plains are completely suburban.
   96. Walt Davis Posted: November 11, 2020 at 09:55 PM (#5988410)
This discussion started with "is your car so necessary you can't replace it with Uber" not about the livability of cities nor whether you live within walking distance of a grocery store.

So (1) if you live in an area not covered (effectively) by uber, the question is moot. (2) I don't know the economics of uber and supermarkets but I'm guessing if your area is dense enough to be covered by uber, I'm pretty sure it's gonna have grocery delivery. I wouldn't be surprised if it's more likley you're covered by delivery than uber. To the extent it's limited, it's probably something like "order of $150+" in which case you do one big shop.

No jugdments -- I'm a lazy bastard who currenlty drives just about everywhere. I was also going batty in my flat during lockdown and while I wish I'd had more space, I'm not sure it would have helped much -- I got good outdoor time, it was more "FFS, I'm tired of every room in this place."

EDIT: I realize part of the discussion is basically around the issue of #1 and whether one might want to move to such an area.
   97. BrianBrianson Posted: November 12, 2020 at 02:47 AM (#5988422)
I certainly would not have enjoyed living in an apartment during the last eight months


If you're imagining living in a 370 square foot apartment with a five year old who literally wasn't allowed outside for three straight months, you're right to be certain.
   98. TomH Posted: November 12, 2020 at 07:24 AM (#5988424)
#77 - I am sure that some "rural" areas resemble your diatribe. But please don't paint them all that way.

Resident of a county of barely 100K people, top of the line public AND private schools (not costing a fortune), very few racists, a few rich people who hold little contmept for the less fortunate and in fact we have bookoo programs and volunteers to support those in need, split between GOP/Dem politics, own a wonderful home for under $300K, great neighbors. Public trans even tho kinda rural. It's a nice life. C'mon down, and maybe alter your perspective a bit....
   99. SoSH U at work Posted: November 12, 2020 at 07:49 AM (#5988426)
#77 - I am sure that some "rural" areas resemble your diatribe. But please don't paint them all that way.

Resident of a county of barely 100K people,


I'm having a hard time reconciling rural and barely 100K. The rural counties I've lived in had 1/4 of that.
   100. Rally Posted: November 12, 2020 at 08:02 AM (#5988429)
It all depends. Some states divide up into a lot more counties than others. The 2 I've lived in for my adult life are Kentucky and Maryland. Population of each state is not that different (KY 4.5 million, MD 6.0) but Kentucky has 5x as many counties. All but 7 of Kentucky's counties are under 100K. Harford and Carroll counties in MD are over 100K, but are about as rural as many Kentucky counties. The biggest difference is that if MD divided things up like Kentucky did, Carroll would be 5 counties of about 35,000 people each.
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