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Sunday, June 20, 2021

College baseball pitcher Sang Ho Baek dies after complications from Tommy John surgery

Sang Ho Baek, a college pitcher at George Mason University, died after complications due to ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction, otherwise known as Tommy John surgery. That’s according to a GoFundMe page created for Baek by one of his teammates.

“After battling through injuries throughout the season, Sang required Tommy John surgery,” the page stated. “He suddenly passed away due to complications with his surgery. As a team, we are all mourning his passing.”

Baek’s father, Seong Han Baek, said that his son went in for the fairly common surgery for baseball pitchers on June 8. Baek died on Saturday, June 12. He had recently completed his freshman year of college.

“Our family is devastated and we want answers to why our healthy son would die so suddenly after routine surgery,” Seong Han Baek said.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: June 20, 2021 at 06:04 PM | 19 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: tommy john surgery

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   1. Rough Carrigan Posted: June 20, 2021 at 06:34 PM (#6025389)
Another hospital dealing inadequately with infections?
   2. Bhaakon Posted: June 20, 2021 at 07:53 PM (#6025391)
I haven't been able to find an article that states or even hints at a cause. Which, obviously, the medical professionals involved are barred from providing information, but you expect the family to have an idea of the proximal cause of death if not the entire chain of events leading to it.

That being said, routine isn't the same as risk free, elective surgeries are still surgery, and a terrible outcome doesn't automatically mean malfeasance.
   3. "bothsidesism" word 57i66135 Posted: June 20, 2021 at 08:01 PM (#6025393)
I haven't been able to find an article that states or even hints at a cause. Which, obviously, the medical professionals involved are barred from providing information, but you expect the family to have an idea of the proximal cause of death if not the entire chain of events leading to it.

my first thought was that he might have been allergic to the anesthesia agent.
   4. Eric L Posted: June 20, 2021 at 08:06 PM (#6025395)
My fiancée died after elective surgery. In this case it went:
Accidentally severed artery
Embolism stops heart
CPR
Crushed aorta
Endgame

There’s a lot that can go wrong in any surgery.
   5. RJ in TO Posted: June 20, 2021 at 08:32 PM (#6025400)
my first thought was that he might have been allergic to the anesthesia agent.


Reportedly, it was a blood clot.
   6. AndrewJ Posted: June 20, 2021 at 08:34 PM (#6025401)
Eric L>> I can't even. My condolences.
   7. The Duke Posted: June 20, 2021 at 09:35 PM (#6025415)
Blood clot was cause. No surgery is without risks. No anasteshia (??) is without risk.

Life is not without risks
   8. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 20, 2021 at 11:28 PM (#6025484)
My condolences indeed.
If I had a nickel for overtime I heard my wife (an anesthesiologist) tell me there is no such thing as routine surgery..(surgery w/o serious risks). As tragically noted by Eric L in #4, its a helluva thing to have a person(s) put someone under, and then have another person(s) do the things they do to a patient and then bring them back again.
   9. TomH Posted: June 21, 2021 at 07:12 AM (#6025502)
#7, well said, and said concisely.

At a funeral last week, my pastor quoted that people often spend more time planning for their vacation than planning for their demise.
   10. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: June 21, 2021 at 07:19 AM (#6025504)
Eric L, I’m very sorry for your loss.

Someone once said to me “Routine surgery is surgery that’s happening to someone else.” It’s never routine when it’s happening to you (or a loved one).
   11. SandyRiver Posted: June 21, 2021 at 07:33 AM (#6025505)
Blood clot was cause. No surgery is without risks. No anasteshia (??) is without risk.

Last month a young (33 y.o.) friend of my wife and I had successful surgery for colon cancer, and the next morning clots in the lungs resulted in her passing into eternity. One never knows...
   12. Lassus Posted: June 21, 2021 at 08:21 AM (#6025508)
there is no such thing as routine surgery..(surgery w/o serious risks)
No surgery is without risks. No anasteshia (??) is without risk.


Well. I mean, OK. But if you have a greater chance of being struck and killed by lightning, there has to be some kind of examination of the definition of "serious risk", doesn't there?
   13. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: June 21, 2021 at 10:05 AM (#6025522)
The former Mrs. PRD had a "routine" laparoscopy "day surgery" several years ago for gall bladder removal. It was so routine that they were almost done and starting to cut the anesthesia when -- according to the story -- an artery between the liver and gall bladder "dissolved" and she basically started to bleed out right there on the table. They suddenly had to reverse course and put her back fully under and prep for an emergency "whatever the opposite of laparoscopy is" surgery so they could finish the surgery while getting the bleeding under control.

She needed a few pints of blood when it was all over.... I don't remember how many, and that day surgery ended up being several days in ICU and a few days in a regular room followed by a weeks-long recovery.

Cokes all around to the "no surgery is routine" crowd.
   14. TomH Posted: June 21, 2021 at 10:09 AM (#6025523)
Selfishly I am glad my wife just came through elective surgery (cervical vertebra fusion, disk was touching spinal cord) BEFORE I read this thread!
   15. The Duke Posted: June 21, 2021 at 10:26 AM (#6025524)
I have been put under for a colonoscopy - which I think is a lower level of sedation than invasive surgery. My doctor friend told me to endure the discomfort next time - he said he would never go under unless he absolutely had to
   16. Dr. Pooks Posted: June 21, 2021 at 12:45 PM (#6025543)
whatever the opposite of laparoscopy is"


The opposite of a laparoscopy (surgery done via tiny puncture incisions into the abdominal cavity with a scope for vision) is laparotomy, where the surgeon performs surgery using the more traditional method of making a larger, linear incision directly over the area of concern with a scalpel.

Laparoscopic surgery techniques are revolutionary in that they reduce recovery times, scarring, hernias and postoperative pain for the patient.

The problem, as your harrowing tale describes, is that laparoscopic methods are like trying to perform surgery through a straw. They require lots of training to master the motor skills required and are best reserved for cookbook-type procedures that follow the same steps every time.

When things go wrong, it's time to stop fooling around and let the surgeon get their hands dirty.
   17. SandyRiver Posted: June 21, 2021 at 02:26 PM (#6025572)
Selfishly I am glad my wife just came through elective surgery (cervical vertebra fusion, disk was touching spinal cord) BEFORE I read this thread!

"Elective" is a matter of semantics. I had elective 2-level fusion at C-4 in April 2011 because a herniated disk had crushed my spinal cord to half it's normal width. Walking on anything but straight and level was an adventure and I was nearly to the point of having Velcro substituting for shoelaces. Between my PCP and the neurosurgeon, I learned that even a minor fall could make me a quadriplegic, or gone. Fortunately the surgery was completely successful, with 70-80% recovery from nerve damage.
   18. Ron J Posted: June 21, 2021 at 03:56 PM (#6025587)
#13 The staple marks on my stomach have finally gone away from the work done to remove my gallbladder -- and the aftermath. It's been several decades and there's still visible evidence.

I was lucky to survive given that the whole situation started out with a misdiagnosis (they were about to start treating me for a heart attack. Bad things happen when they treat you for a heart attack that you aren't having)
   19. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: June 22, 2021 at 01:17 AM (#6025677)
Maybe people know this happens, but my wife (and her partners) will cancel a surgery from time to time, basically telling the surgeon 'we're not doing this case', because X or Y Z reasons. Its an interesting 'thing' for me a lay person to hear about. The patient's H&P (history and physical) combined with new information or information which wasn't, to the satisfaction of the anesthesiologist, thoroughly examined in the day(s) leading up to the scheduled surgery considered. Not always welcomed as you can imagine (by patient or surgeon)#. Its not just the patient who shows up admitting to eating a workingman's breakfast of eggs bacon and toast the morning of the surgery (an obvious reason to cancel). They always tell you not to eat or drink before surgery, I always tell my wife they should show a video of what can happen to patients who ignore the advice.

#disclosure, she's in an outpatient surgery center, where many of the procedures are 'elective'. Separately, my Dad had a blood clot, day after a surgery to remove a kidney, led to a 'stroke' the following day. He's recovered pretty well, but it is always the first thing I think about if someone dies following surgery.

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