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Thursday, September 30, 2021

Dodgers Albert Pujols Hits the COVID-19 Injured List

As it turns out, Pujols, the future Hall of Famer, was feeling the effects of his second shot of the COVID-19 vaccination. This injury was for the greater good. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts had the update.

“It’s a covid IL. He got his second shot and he just didn’t feel good after getting it. As far as playing in a Major League game. So just to kind of give him a day to see where he’s at tomorrow, it was an easy move to activate Cody [Bellinger].”

This is normal for most COVID-19 vaccinations, thankfully. Some people feel worse after the first shot, some after the second. The probability is that Pujols should be back giving his teammates hugs by Wednesday or Thursday.


I intend for this to be the new COVID thread.

Lassus Posted: September 30, 2021 at 06:24 PM | 428 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: albert pujols

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   201. greenback used to say live and let live Posted: October 19, 2021 at 12:00 PM (#6047416)
FLIP
   202. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 19, 2021 at 12:08 PM (#6047421)
Isn't Russia's problem that the government has less trust than even ours does? IOW nobody is getting the vaccine.


I read a stat that Germans, when surveyed, were more willing to get the Sputnik V vaccine than Russians. Even allowing for the ex-DDR regions with strangely fond memories of their past arrangement, that's pretty remarkable.
   203. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 19, 2021 at 04:25 PM (#6047514)
I read a stat that Germans, when surveyed, were more willing to get the Sputnik V vaccine than Russians. Even allowing for the ex-DDR regions with strangely fond memories of their past arrangement, that's pretty remarkable.
the ones who lived, anyway.
   204. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 19, 2021 at 06:07 PM (#6047549)
A Brazilian congressional panel is set to recommend mass homicide charges against President Jair Bolsonaro, asserting that he intentionally let the coronavirus rip through the country and kill hundreds of thousands in a failed bid to achieve herd immunity and revive Latin America’s largest economy.
...
From the outset of the pandemic, Mr. Bolsonaro has gone out of his way to minimize the threat of the virus. As countries around the world locked down, and his own people began filling hospitals, he encouraged mass gatherings and discouraged masks. An avowed vaccine skeptic, he lashed out at any who dared criticize him as irresponsible.

Those actions, the report argued, amounted to mass homicide.
link
   205. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: October 20, 2021 at 02:49 PM (#6047825)
White House unveils plans to roll out coronavirus vaccines for children ages 5 to 11

Great news, but of course, even taking care of kids is apparently controversial these days…

Jay A. Winsten, an associate dean at the Harvard School of Public Health, said that despite top officials’ powerful vaccine endorsements, a far trickier messaging campaign lies ahead. Public health officials need to break down the science, possibly in question and answer form, for the lay people they need to enlist — and especially for parents who may worry about rare side effects, he said.
“I’m afraid parents will be much more attuned to reacting emotionally to what they hear from others,” Winsten said.



Despite the federal plan to prioritize doctors’ offices as vaccine sites, state health officials say they are concerned that pediatricians and family medicine clinicians have been slow to enroll in the vaccine program in some parts of the country.
   206. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 20, 2021 at 05:37 PM (#6047883)
On Tuesday, around a dozen former Washington State Patrol (WSP) troopers laid their boots and uniform hats on the steps of the Washington State Capitol in memory of those troopers lost to the coronavirus pandemic.

Wait, you think we mean lost as in died of the virus? We mean they lost or ragequit their jobs after refusing to comply with Gov. Jay Inslee’s requirement that all state employees get the coronavirus vaccine or otherwise present a valid reason for exemption, such as disability or religion. In other words, they were given the choice of being a cop or an anti-vaxxer and chose the latter.

   207. smileyy Posted: October 20, 2021 at 08:48 PM (#6047947)
I'll repeat my mantra that that shows how much cops really care about public safety, let alone their own.
   208. . . . . . . Posted: October 20, 2021 at 11:58 PM (#6048016)
So.

I am in the middle of day 3 of breakthrough COVID. Someone at my work lied about their vax status and showed up to a meeting with a cough. Most of us in the room, all vaxxed, got sick.

I’ve had three shots, 7 weeks since shot 3. My antibodies (tested, in case there was something wrong with my immune system) were sky high. Didn’t matter. Coughing guy, closed room, no masks: sick as a dog.

It is unpleasant, thought not scarily so. Other than the loss of smell - which is deeply weird - it is like the worst cold you’ve ever had. I got the Regeneron on day 1 after my positive test and who knows if it’s helping, but it can’t hurt.

It is rather disappointing that you can have a symptomatic break through with Delta, even with high antibodies after a booster, in nothing more than a bad luck, high dose exposure.

It seems I did not infect my immunocompromised wife. If I had, I would’ve murdered the guy who got me.
   209. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: October 21, 2021 at 12:52 AM (#6048021)
Damn ……, I’m sorry to hear that. Thank goodness your wife was spared.

Probably not a good idea to kill him but at a minimum lying about his vaccine status should open him up to a hell of a lawsuit, as well as immediate termination.

   210. Greg Pope Posted: October 21, 2021 at 08:54 AM (#6048034)
Also sorry to hear. I hope you have a relatively short case and thank goodness about your wife.
   211. Tony S Posted: October 21, 2021 at 09:05 AM (#6048036)
I am in the middle of day 3 of breakthrough COVID. Someone at my work lied about their vax status and showed up to a meeting with a cough. Most of us in the room, all vaxxed, got sick.


Ugh. So sorry to hear that. Hope you recover soon.

I'd investigate to see if there are any grounds to take legal action against the individual who spread it to the room.

Wait, you think we mean lost as in died of the virus? We mean they lost or ragequit their jobs after refusing to comply with Gov. Jay Inslee’s requirement that all state employees get the coronavirus vaccine or otherwise present a valid reason for exemption, such as disability or religion. In other words, they were given the choice of being a cop or an anti-vaxxer and chose the latter.


Cops who don't care about public safety are walking off their jobs? I fail to see any downside here.
   212. MY PAIN IS NOT A HOLIDAY (CoB). Posted: October 21, 2021 at 09:11 AM (#6048038)

I am in the middle of day 3 of breakthrough COVID. Someone at my work lied about their vax status and showed up to a meeting with a cough. Most of us in the room, all vaxxed, got sick.

That's awful, feel better soon.
Please tell us that the person responsible is an ex-employee of your company, that's outrageously selfish and dangerous behavior.
   213. Tony S Posted: October 21, 2021 at 09:26 AM (#6048046)
What a weird world we live in.

Puerto Rico has the highest percentage of people fully vaccinated against the coronavirus in the United States as of Oct. 19, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


I grew up in Puerto Rico. Still have family there. I am not exaggerating when I say it's got the most dysfunctional government under the US flag. By far.

And yet, they've been able to pull this off. Meanwhile, parts of the far wealthier mainland continue to badly lag.
   214. bunyon Posted: October 21, 2021 at 11:44 AM (#6048071)
Add my best wishes, ……. . I hope you feel better soon.
   215. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: October 21, 2021 at 12:32 PM (#6048077)
Cops who don't care about public safety are walking off their jobs? I fail to see any downside here.
So much winning, I’m getting sick of winning.

Looks like about one out of every 100 have quit over this. So I think the state of Washington will survive.
   216. smileyy Posted: October 21, 2021 at 01:52 PM (#6048105)
And thrive!
   217. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: October 21, 2021 at 05:22 PM (#6048170)
Get well soon, . . . . . ..
   218. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 21, 2021 at 08:46 PM (#6048219)
the bigger problem with West’s advice is that it ignores how, by catching the virus, you might affect other people. Vaccines don’t just reduce your risk of getting seriously ill from COVID; they also make it far less likely that you’ll get infected in the first place or pass the virus on. In contrast, you can’t get monoclonal antibodies till you’ve been diagnosed. By then, you’re likely to have infected several other people. For weeks, as West campaigned for governor, he spoke at crowded indoor events. He says his wife felt her first symptoms around Oct. 3, and he had symptoms a couple of days later. Despite these warning signs, he spoke at two indoor political gatherings on Oct. 7. He posted a picture of himself addressing a “packed house” as he stood just a few feet away from unmasked attendees.
...
When pollsters ask unvaccinated people why they’ve declined to get a shot, 59 percent say that among other reasons, they don’t think they personally need it. Thirty-one percent say they’re “making a statement about personal freedom,” and 27 percent say they’re “just not concerned about coronavirus.” Fifteen percent say they’re “personally unlikely to suffer serious long-term effects if I contract COVID-19.” These explanations are entirely self-centered.

   219. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 21, 2021 at 08:53 PM (#6048222)
“.....” I hope you get better soon.

This is the first week we’ve asked our whole team to be in the office (up until this week it’s been voluntary, and mainly just group management actually coming in). We’re only requiring them to come in two days a week right now*, and everyone has to be vaccinated. I was very clear with our team that they shouldn’t come in if they’re feeling sick, whether they have COVID or not.

* I don’t set the firm’s policy, but have some flexibility as to how it’s implemented for my team.
   220. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: October 21, 2021 at 09:16 PM (#6048229)
Looks like about one out of every 100 have quit over this. So I think the state of Washington will survive.
In fact, for every one of these "mass resignation" situations — hospitals, cops, airlines, whatever — it's been no more than 1%, and often much less, who actually follow through.
   221. Lassus Posted: October 22, 2021 at 08:39 AM (#6048280)
I know you're all waiting with bated breath for the Oneida County percentage of positive tests by week. They had held off for TWO WEEKS!

6/22/21 - 0.3%
6/29/21 - 0.4%
7/6/21 - 0.4%
7/13/21 - 0.9%
7/20/21 - 1.0%
7/27/21 - 1.2%
8/3/21 - 3.2%
8/10/21 - 3.4%
8/17/21 - 3.0%
8/24/21 - 3.2%
8/31/21 - 3.6%
9/7/21 - 4.7%
9/14/21 - 4.2%
9/21/21 - 4.6%
9/28/21 - 4.0%
10/5/21 - 4.5% - which was expected (exactly) by the pattern than had been held, so hopefully the next week will be under 4%
10/12/21 - 4.3% - Dur.
10/19/21 - 4.1% - Hmmm.

So, as uninteresting things go, we have two separate patterns above that SHOULD drop us below 4% for the first time since August next week? Overall it is a very slowwwwww creeping down at the moment, slower than any previous wave's reduction. Of course, a lot of the adjacent counties are a fucking shitshow. Here at the 7-day averages for the five counties that border our own:

Oswego: 8.1%
Lewis: 7.8%
Herkimer: 6.0%
Otsego: 3.9%
Madison: 5.9%

(Onondaga County, where Syracuse is, is separated from Oneida County by a lake so does not officially border our county. They are at 4.9%.)

The data above is from THIS page for New York State that has region and counties grouped that I only, um, just recently found. What? 18 months wasn't fast enough? (The state's page is probably more recent and accurate than the county's, I hope.)
   222. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: October 22, 2021 at 11:35 AM (#6048302)
UK reported cases are now effectively even with what they were at the very top of the initial delta peak (7-day average). They've only ever been higher for a couple weeks in January of last year. Reported deaths (7-day average) are also near as high as they have been since delta, which is still only 12% or so of the January peak.

The virus doesn't seem to want to go away without serious mitigation efforts, which include but don't seem to be limited to vaccines. Now if almost everyone were vaccinated, with effective boosters as necessary, maybe we could live with this. For regions that are lagging in vaccination though, I think unacceptable levels of hospitalization and deaths are going to continue on for a bit longer.
   223. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 22, 2021 at 12:28 PM (#6048316)
Russia’s capital city of Moscow will enter a 10-day lockdown starting next week as new cases of covid-19 and deaths from the disease reach new daily highs. The lockdown, which won’t start until Thursday, Oct. 28, comes as Russian hospitals struggle with a horrific surge of largely unvaccinated patients.

link
   224. Lassus Posted: October 23, 2021 at 10:22 AM (#6048524)
So. This new Fauci/NIH/gain of function thing. Something or nothing? I admit whenever over the last 16 months or so I see OMGGAINOFFUNCTION!!11!OMG my eyes have glazed over and I've moved on. So I'm really assuming nothing. But maybe I'm biased now?
   225. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 23, 2021 at 02:24 PM (#6048552)
#224, this is way outside my field, but it seems like nothing new to me.
   226. Srul Itza Posted: October 23, 2021 at 07:24 PM (#6048608)
Just tgot the Moderna booster

So far, so good
   227. phredbird Posted: October 23, 2021 at 11:31 PM (#6048662)

just scheduled the moderna booster ...

i'm dating a woman whose ex has brainwashed her teenage (adopted) daughter into refusing the vaccine. i can't believe how many nutballs in CA are doing this. jeez ...
   228. Mayor Blomberg Posted: October 24, 2021 at 12:34 PM (#6048717)
send her to Texas, phredbird, and she'll fit right in. I'll get my Moderna today or tomorrow, my second Shingrix in December (thanks to people on this board for setting me straight) and be all topped up.
   229. smileyy Posted: October 24, 2021 at 03:36 PM (#6048730)
[227] that's just awful. Anti-vaxxers kill and maim the innocent.
   230. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: October 25, 2021 at 09:02 AM (#6048806)
Sitting in London now, it does feel like the UK has pretty much decided that the pandemic is over, and is now getting excited about supermarket shortages and fuel supply lines as winter approaches.


Having just returned from a quick weekend jaunt through Hull, Manchester, and Birmingham - mask-wearing on public transport was down to well under 25%, and in shopping malls barely even 5%. For the UK, the pandemic is over (or at least until the climate change summit finishes, at which point it's been hinted the government might change course somewhat).

On the positive side of the ledger, cases are mostly increasing among the young, so one might expect much lower rates of hospitalisation and death. On the other hand, even if the Covid rate of hospitalisation isn't as high, the NHS is already running close to capacity, and flu season has barely started. I'll be staying away until spring now.
   231. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: October 25, 2021 at 10:00 AM (#6048816)
Hospitalizations and deaths have been back on the rise in the UK in the last couple of weeks, so it's not just a matter of cases increasing in the young. Maybe it's a blip, but with winter around the corner a rise in hospitalizations and deaths already starting now, with little apparent mitigation efforts, is not a good sign.
   232. . Posted: October 25, 2021 at 10:04 AM (#6048817)
Rachel Walesnky said on national television yesterday that when the first OK to lift the masks was given, the science said that vaccinated people couldn't spread Alpha. That's patently untrue. All this would be going a lot more smoothly if people, particularly people in authority, would simply tell the truth.

The next question on the table will be regarding boosters and how many antibodies are "enough" and how do we tell if we have "enough" before being demanded to get a booster. We won't get straight answers to that one either. Everyone knows from the Johns Hopkins chart we kicked around a few weeks ago that the antibody response to the initial vaccines varies greatly, and that the waning velocity also probably varies significantly. There have been vaccinated people walking around with empty tanks for weeks now and on the flip side, there are vaccinated people who will still be good under any serious measurement for months, or even years.
   233. Tony S Posted: October 25, 2021 at 10:20 AM (#6048822)
Moderna reports good results with kids' vaccines.

Apparently the target date for immunizing kids is now early November, which probably isn't optimal for maximum mitigation by Thanksgiving, but it's better than nothing. I figured October was a bit optimistic, given the usual test-and-approval patterns.

I'm sure there will be the usual anti-vax drama from the usual sources, but getting a large number of children vaccinated should make this winter much less lethal than the last one.
   234. DCA Posted: October 25, 2021 at 02:30 PM (#6048918)
Rachel Walesnky said on national television yesterday that when the first OK to lift the masks was given, the science said that vaccinated people couldn't spread Alpha.

My read of the science is that pretty much was true (reading "couldn't" as "were extremely unlikely to"). What made it dumb policy is that it relied on unvaccinated people to continue to wear masks, when it was obvious that they would not.
   235. Mayor Blomberg Posted: October 25, 2021 at 02:39 PM (#6048919)
DCA -- right, especially because of the overlap between anti-maskers and anti-vaxers.
   236. . . . . . . Posted: October 25, 2021 at 10:18 PM (#6049039)
Update: I am better. My sense of smell is totally zapped. It was about 8 days, first symptom to feeling "well" again. Nothing we can't live with long term as an endemic disease, but I was surprised at how feisty a breakthrough infection was for a thrice-vaxxed, immunologically normal/healthy 30-something who also got the Regeneron mAbs on top.
   237. Mayor Blomberg Posted: October 25, 2021 at 11:08 PM (#6049047)
Good to hear, . . . . . .; hope the transition to droppong the quotation marks happens quickly.
   238. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 26, 2021 at 12:49 AM (#6049053)

Yes, glad to hear that you're doing better. Hope your sense of smell comes back.
   239. Bret Sabermatrician Posted: October 26, 2021 at 07:48 AM (#6049063)
Got the Moderna booster Sunday at 10:30. Started feeling off around 3. Felt progressively crappier with fever and chills while trying to sleep. Gradually felt better and was back to normal around 2 on Monday.

Basically, felt like crap, but not nearly as bad as the 2nd shot 6 months ago.

Arm still hurts like crazy though.

Oh, my wife got her booster earlier this month for Pfizer. She checked her antibodies the week before the shot and basically had none, which isn't good due to her heart condition.

So for me, this is why we need mandatory vaccination for this. Who knows how long she's basically been out of sufficient protection. Everyone's body is different. Just because you want to die making a political point doesn't mean you get to take my wife with you.
   240. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: October 26, 2021 at 08:33 AM (#6049069)
Remember that absurdly high Peru reported death numbers that closely matched their excess deaths? Well, Bulgaria has now passed Peru in excess deaths (according to the Economist). Maybe wasn't quite so absurd after all. Bulgaria has a much older population than Peru though, so Peru still has likely been hit much worse. On the other hand, Peru really does seem to be saturated at this point and may be done with large waves. Bulgaria is now going through another serious one, so their numbers will continue to climb.

On an age-adjusted basis, Bulgaria is not the second worst hit (real) country in the world though. It might not even be in the top 10. Mexico and Russia are certainly worse off. Probably other parts of South and Central America as well. Asia for sure too, though we don't have good numbers for a lot of countries in Asia outside of the rich ones.

Russia is probably the worst hit country in Europe now--with about twice as many excess deaths on an age-adjusted basis as the USA.
   241. Tony S Posted: October 26, 2021 at 08:50 AM (#6049070)
I'm glad you're getting better, Mr. Ellipsis. Hope you get your smell back soon. A friend of mine got Covid in the pre-vaccine era, wound up getting hospitalized, and had to deal with just about every symptom -- EXCEPT losing his taste and smell. This virus is going to do what it's going to do once it gets into your body.

Bret, that was pretty much my sequence when I got the Moderna booster. Low grade-fever, chills and lethargy for about 36 hours, then back to normal pretty quickly.


overlap between anti-maskers and anti-vaxers


Masks were the short-term stopgap for dealing with this virus and mitigating its spread, until we came up with a long-term solution in the vaccines. The drama queens who bleat about masks, like you said, are the same elements who don't want vaccines, and are the ones making this pandemic (and masking) linger longer than it's needed to. It would be the most monumental self-own by these plague rats if they weren't taking some of the rest of us with them.
   242. . . . . . . Posted: October 26, 2021 at 09:15 AM (#6049075)
had to deal with just about every symptom -- EXCEPT losing his taste and smell.


Fascinatingly, I lost smell but not taste. And my 'other' hobby is wine, and I'm quite a serious wine taster. Which means this has been a source of endless experimentation over the last few days, figuring out exactly what 'taste' is without smell. To sum it up: taste is simple and crude and mostly binary. You can taste sweet, salty, bitter, sour, and umami. And its maybe two bits of info in each category: very sweet-sweet-mildly sweet-unsweet.

The umami is really interesting because it doesn't taste like anything but creates a strong physiological response. If I bite into a piece of high quality salami, I get salty, sour, and "mouth watering". Even though it is impossible for me to pick up anything that says that what I'm eating is meat, because that's all smell. But the glutamates do their job regardless.

The most 'delicious' things without smell are things that are very sweet/salty, with a pleasing texture. Chocolate covered pretzels are heavenly (though I can't tell chocolate covered from yogurt covered). So are honey nut cheerios.

Most savory things are uninteresting, unless heavily salted. Salted peanuts are OK - they taste like salty crunch balls. Crackers are useless - cardboard. Mild cheese is useless - I bought high quality soft cheese and it just tasted like eating faintly salty paste. But if there's enough glutamate and salt, cheese becomes interesting again. Good parmesan tastes good, albeit not at all cheesy.

Wine is bizarre. I can't smell fruit esters at all, so it tastes completely not-fruity, and dry wine is wildly unbalanced and tastes like tart, bitter water. But sweet wine is not unpleasant, with its sweet/sour contrast.
   243. RJ in TO Posted: October 26, 2021 at 10:49 AM (#6049095)
Bret, that was pretty much my sequence when I got the Moderna booster. Low grade-fever, chills and lethargy for about 36 hours, then back to normal pretty quickly.
This was my reaction to the first dose of AZ, and to my second dose, which was Moderna, except both also came with something that felt a hell of a lot like a migraine. Both experiences sucked, but were worth it.
   244. Mayor Blomberg Posted: October 26, 2021 at 12:28 PM (#6049130)
As my night went on, my Moderna booster experience got progressively unhappier as others described. I'm over the chills now, I think, but definitely feeling twisted and achy and lethargic now. Teaching online is for the good; we'll see how long I last.
   245. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 26, 2021 at 12:47 PM (#6049134)
Some experts referred to the potential danger on the horizon as disease X, and Graham had an idea about how we — humanity — might work together to stop it. There were about 120 viruses known to pose a potential risk to people. Those viruses could be divided into twenty-five different families. There were licensed vaccines for viruses in just thirteen of those families. Most global-health efforts focused on the troubling pathogens that had emerged in the past — but that left a whole swath of the viral landscape unknown, unprobed, unprotected against. Over the past decade, Graham had been advocating for also studying representatives in the twelve virus families for which there were no vaccines. By developing a vaccine strategy against these “prototype pathogens,” researchers would have a head start if any of their close relatives emerged one day. Instead of being one step behind an outbreak, Graham wanted humans one step ahead. Going after this new coronavirus in China was going to be a flex, a demonstration of how fast science could move in the face of a new threat.

   246. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 28, 2021 at 01:44 PM (#6049639)
Oh no—some of New York City’s, uhh, finest may be forced to join their rage-quitting compatriots over in Washington state and stop being cops rather than get the coronavirus vaccine, as on Wednesday a Staten Island judge ruled against the New York Police Department union’s effort to stop a mandate for municipal workers.
...
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, has begged police to get vaccinated and pointed out that covid-19 is, far and away, the biggest cop-killer in the nation. Over 60 employees of the NYPD have died of the coronavirus, according to CBS, which one could fairly point out is the kind of death toll that would have the PBA screaming for martial law if the culprit was criminals instead.
...
According to Reuters, the head of the main NYC firefighters union, Andrew Ansbro, said on Wednesday that he had urged firefighters to defy the mandate and “told my members that if they choose to remain unvaccinated, they must still report for duty.” The city’s fire departments say just 68% of its 17,000 employees have been vaccinated, Reuters added.

   247. Tony S Posted: October 28, 2021 at 03:13 PM (#6049661)
Oh no—some of New York City’s, uhh, finest may be forced to join their rage-quitting compatriots over in Washington state and stop being cops rather than get the coronavirus vaccine, as on Wednesday a Staten Island judge ruled against the New York Police Department union’s effort to stop a mandate for municipal workers.


As has been pointed out by many, the vaccine mandates are clearing out LEO's who don't believe in public safety, and health-care workers and educators who don't believe in science.

Some elements in the media seem to treat this like it's a bad thing.
   248. Mayor Blomberg Posted: October 28, 2021 at 03:51 PM (#6049677)
A chance to substantially integrate the NYFD. Good.
   249. Crosseyed and Painless Posted: October 28, 2021 at 04:19 PM (#6049689)
Cases seem to be increasing rapidly in a lot of Europe. They seem to not really be decreasing much any more in northern US states, which I am sorta assuming the rapid increases are on their way again after the plateau.

Womp womp.
   250. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: October 29, 2021 at 10:06 AM (#6049830)
Cases in the UK have pulled back a tad, so as has been the story for the UK over the last few months, their case trajectory has been very hard to predict. Deaths are higher now than they have been at any time since the end of the last winter wave. Still very low compared to the USA.

Speaking of which, in several states now cases are just starting to increase again. Still an open question as to whether the rest will follow, but I wouldn't be surprised to see overall cases in the USA level off soon and maybe even start to climb a bit prior to the end of November. Deaths should still continue to fall at least for the next 3-4 weeks I'd guess. The real open question is what happens when winter fully kicks in.
   251. Tony S Posted: October 29, 2021 at 11:21 AM (#6049859)
In Maryland we've had eight straight days of fewer than 1000 new cases.

Garrett County, in the far west, is the state's least-vaccinated county (41%), and unsurprisingly has by far the worst case rate (74 per 100K) over the last seven days. Washington Co. (Hagerstown) is a distant second-worst at 32 per 100K; the vax rate there is 50%. The best-performing county is Montgomery (affluent DC suburb), with a 70% vax rate and 7 cases per 100K over the last week. My own county, Frederick, is a bit better than average -- 64% vax rate, 15 cases/100K.

Our hospital system is doing OK; no one is being turned away (that I'm aware of) because of Covid overflow.

Edit: Howard Co. (very affluent; even more so than Montgomery) actually has a slightly better vax rate than MontCo (73%), though it's got a handful more cases a day (7.5).

   252. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: October 29, 2021 at 11:46 AM (#6049870)
The joke goes something like this: A ferocious storm sweeps through a town, and in the aftermath, a man clambers onto his roof to escape the floodwaters. As he sits there, someone in a canoe comes by and offers to carry him to safety. “No, thanks,” the man replies. “God will save me.” The man paddles off, and the waters continue to rise. Shortly afterward, someone in a boat pulls up to offer help. “No, thank you,” the man says again. “God will deliver me.” The waters rise higher. Finally, a Coast Guard helicopter appears; someone with a megaphone offers to drop a ladder. “No, thank you,” the man says for a final time. “I prayed for God to save me.” The helicopter flies off, the waters engulf the roof, and the man drowns. When the man arrives in heaven, he asks in confusion, “What happened, God? Why didn’t you rescue me?” God replies, “I sent you a canoe, a boat, and a helicopter. What more did you want?”
...
in the last year, a new version has cropped up.
...
Andrea Kitta, a folklorist at East Carolina University who currently studies stories told about COVID and the vaccine, said she encountered the drowning man parable alongside a parody of a vaccine card that mocked Christian anti-vaxxers by claiming its owner was “vaccinated by the Lord.” In a separate cartoon, she saw the parable as a direct analogy. “Instead of a helicopter, it’s Pfizer and Moderna,” she said.
...
But of course the vaccine isn’t just about the medical researchers and their brains. It’s about the production of a scientifically complicated product and its mass distribution. “It’s actually a miracle of institutional cooperation and collaboration,” Chang said. “And this is where the Christian blind spot comes in, thinking God only works through individuals or a church.” Christians have not been taught to think of God working through secular institutions, he said. “We’re seeing the ramifications.”

link
   253. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: October 29, 2021 at 12:03 PM (#6049873)
We just hit 5 million global reported deaths on worldometer. It's very likely the actual numbers are much, much higher. The economist's estimate is 10 to 19 million, with median estimate of 16.6 million (i.e., more than .21% of the entire world population).

For its part, the CDC estimates around 970,000 excess deaths in the US by now, once you adjust for delays in reporting. Most other estimates are probably a little lower, but very comfortably above 900,000 now, and probably closer to 950,000. Basically, in the USA we're likely to have just as many deaths in 2021 as we did in 2020. A huge chunk of that was from January-March of this year though, so next year really should be much better unless we get another even nastier variant.
   254. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 29, 2021 at 04:42 PM (#6049947)
It was comical when someone asked "Where Does Ron DeSantis Go to Get His Apology" in May 2020. It's sociopathic when someone basically asks the same question in October 2021.


Florida has the lowest COVID-19 case rate in the country. They did it without vaccine mandates, without mask mandates in school and with no restrictions on businesses. Life simply went on.

Over the summer, when Florida was experiencing a spike in cases, the media was wall-to-wall news about the numbers. Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis was a frequent target for the blame. His sensible moves, such as not forcing low-risk kids to wear masks, was treated as akin to murder by the media.

In August, President Biden criticized DeSantis, although not by name, saying: “Some state officials are passing laws that forbid people from doing the right thing. I say to the governors, please help. If you’re not going to help, get out of the way of the people that are trying to do the right thing.”

But what DeSantis understood is that there is no absolute “right thing” where COVID-19 is concerned, that we are living in an endemic (no longer a pandemic thanks to vaccines) and that there is very little political action that can be implemented to stop it. At the time of Florida’s spike, the state had an above-average vaccination rate when compared with the rest of the country. They weren’t doing anything differently than places with lower case rates, they were simply at the peak of their seasonal spike.


Maybe other places will see a similar "seasonal spike" in Dec/Jan, but like I said, it's sociopathic to point to Florida's track record over the past few months as some sort of success story. Sure, they've had 20,000+ COVID deaths since July 30, but "Life simply went on"...for everyone else, I guess.
   255. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 29, 2021 at 05:31 PM (#6049957)
Florida *still* reporting over 100 COVID deaths per day, weeks after they passed the Delta peak. 867 this week, an average of 124 per day.
   256. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: October 29, 2021 at 10:39 PM (#6049996)
FLA: 7th in the US in per capita deaths is a success story.
   257. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 30, 2021 at 12:35 AM (#6050025)
I did the math the other day, and since the vaccines became widely available at the end of April, FL has >5x as many COVID deaths per capita as NY.

I don’t know if they’re the highest in the country over that time period - AL or MS might be worse — but again it’s not something to emulate.
   258. Hank Gillette Posted: October 30, 2021 at 03:01 PM (#6050086)
In Maryland we've had eight straight days of fewer than 1000 new cases.
Dr. Robert Redfield (former head of CDC under Trump, and now an advisor to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan) apparently told Fox News a couple of weeks ago that 40% of the recent Covid deaths in the state of Maryland were among people who are fully vaccinated. Some people are going crazy over this, saying that this proves the vaccines are useless.

If Redfields numbers are correct (and I can’t find anywhere to verify or refute them), it still does not mean the vaccines are useless. 78% of Maryland adults are fully vaccinated, but only had 40% of the Covid deaths. That means that the 22% of unvaccinated adults had 60% of the Covid deaths. By my calculations, that means that you are still 5.3 times as likely to die of Covid if you are unvaccinated, but I am not sure of my math.

Could someone check my calculation and if I am wrong, give the correct number?
   259. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 30, 2021 at 03:14 PM (#6050088)
Your math is right. But it’s actually better than that, because it tends to be older, more vulnerable people who are vaccinated and younger people who are unvaccinated. The CDC publishes age-adjusted vaccine effectiveness stats and while I can’t vouch for their methodology, those consistently showed 11-12x as many per capita deaths among the unvaccinated through early Sept (the most recent week available).
   260. Tony S Posted: October 30, 2021 at 04:56 PM (#6050118)
If Redfields numbers are correct (and I can’t find anywhere to verify or refute them), it still does not mean the vaccines are useless. 78% of Maryland adults are fully vaccinated, but only had 40% of the Covid deaths. That means that the 22% of unvaccinated adults had 60% of the Covid deaths. By my calculations, that means that you are still 5.3 times as likely to die of Covid if you are unvaccinated, but I am not sure of my math.


As Dave said, you're interpreting it correctly. The common analogy is seat belts -- if most drivers wear seat belts, then in most fatal accidents the driver will be wearing one. What matters is that there are much fewer fatal accidents to begin with.
   261. Tony S Posted: October 30, 2021 at 05:10 PM (#6050124)
Good news from Israel.

A large-scale Israeli study published Friday showed that a third booster shot was 92% effective in preventing serious illness compared to those who received only two doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus vaccine.


If I'm reading this right, it's not a 92% improvement over the unvaccinated, it's a 92% improvement over two doses. If this holds up, it's excellent news.

There are cross-factors, of course, which still need to be isolated -- one of them being how much charge, so to speak, did the original vaccines still retain in the two-dose group. But even the most pessimistic estimates suggest that a third dose is a significant improvement.

The next question is, how long does shot #3 remain effective?
   262. Mayor Blomberg Posted: October 30, 2021 at 05:56 PM (#6050129)
That certainly does appear to be what it says, and it makes my post-booster experience well worth it.
   263. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: October 31, 2021 at 09:56 AM (#6050322)
According to The NY Times tracker, cases have kind of plateau’d the last few days, although that may be a data anomaly since hospitalizations are still going down.

It looks like the increase is being driven by states in the West, so I looked at California. They do appear to be having a spike in cases recently, and hospitalizations *there* have been going up the past few days. SF and a few other counties are doing well but cases are up in much of the state. Maybe this is just a temporary blip, but it’s worth keeping an eye on as we head into winter.

In New York, cases and hospitalizations have been declining recently after staying flat for a long time. New York City actually has a much lower hospitalization and death rate than the rest of the state over the past week, a trend I’ve been noticing for a while now. (All according to The NY Times tracker).
   264. base ball chick Posted: November 01, 2021 at 11:23 AM (#6050502)
couple questions

1 - anyone know what percent of people who test positive for covid who are under 65 with no health problems (including obesity) have long covid?

2 - anyone find any info on what percent of vaccinated people who catch covid go on to long covid?

3 - anyone find any info about why people who are vaccinated and have good antibody levels catch covid anyway?

zop am glad you are ok and hope you get your sense of smell back.

i wonder what percent of people who "recover" don't get their sense of smell back
   265. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: November 01, 2021 at 12:11 PM (#6050512)
According to The NY Times tracker, cases have kind of plateau’d the last few days, although that may be a data anomaly since hospitalizations are still going down.
You'd generally expect hospitalizations to lag by a week or more. By Friday we should have a very good idea if this is a blip, a plateau, or the beginning of winter. Even if cases go back up, there are significantly more people vaccinated now than there were when delta first hit, so hopefully, and likely, hospitalizations and deaths won't rise as much as cases.

In New York, cases and hospitalizations have been declining recently after staying flat for a long time. New York City actually has a much lower hospitalization and death rate than the rest of the state over the past week, a trend I’ve been noticing for a while now. (All according to The NY Times tracker).
NYC metro area and the rest of the state haven't really been that much in synch for all of covid. NYC has generally had it's peaks earlier, with quicker dropoffs. And, at least since the fist peak, I think have had lower hospitalization and death rates, as the rest of the state has been playing catchup. NYC still has a significantly higher excess death percentage than the rest of the state (.41% v .27%), especially once you adjust for age (NYC is a little bit younger).
   266. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: November 01, 2021 at 12:26 PM (#6050513)
At this point there are a few states that have surpassed NYC in excess deaths, led by Mississippi (about .49%) but also including Alabama, Louisiana, and Arkansas. Maybe a couple others. On an age-adjusted basis there might be only a couple that have passed NYC, but definitely Mississippi has gone way past. Probably Texas has gone slightly past NYC as well.
   267. Hank Gillette Posted: November 01, 2021 at 12:36 PM (#6050516)
base ball chick asked:

1 - anyone know what percent of people who test positive for covid who are under 65 with no health problems (including obesity) have long covid?
The CDC breaks down cases by age here, but not by health problems. The younger the age group, the fewer health problems, I would think, but the CDC says that 42.7% of Americans are clinically obese, and that 9.2% are severely obese.

If you have ever looked at the Herman Cain “awards” on Reddit, the overwhelming number of younger (<65) people dying seem to be overweight.

2 - anyone find any info on what percent of vaccinated people who catch covid go on to long covid?
A June article in Time magazine suggested 25%. This more recent article suggests more than ⅓. Regardless, it looks as though it is going to be a large number with long-term effects on U.S. healthcare (we’ve had at least 46 million cases of covid in the U.S.).

3 - anyone find any info about why people who are vaccinated and have good antibody levels catch covid anyway?
This is speculation, but even early on, they were saying that your chances of being infected, and the severity of the infection were related to the viral load you were exposed to. I think a lot of breakthrough cases have occurred in close quarters with inadequate ventilation (which is why I still won’t fly or eat in restaurants).

That is essentially what happened in the Cape Cod incident last summer where 74% of the 469 infections were among people who were vaccinated. People partied in close quarters, danced, and did not wear masks (admittedly, they were relying on CDC advice that if you were vaccinated you could resume your former activities. Apparently, the CDC was unaware of the former activities of the crowds that gather on Cape Code.). It’s worth noting that only five people were hospitalized (four of them vaccinated) and there were no deaths.

The Delta variant also has played a part. I seem to remember reading that Delta is more infectious because people infected with shed more virus.
   268. Tony S Posted: November 01, 2021 at 12:50 PM (#6050519)
This is speculation, but even early on, they were saying that your chances of being infected, and the severity of the infection were related to the viral load you were exposed to. I think a lot of breakthrough cases have occurred in close quarters with inadequate ventilation (which is why I still won’t fly or eat in restaurants).


I've mentioned this before, but my fully-vaxxed nephew (Moderna) caught Covid in the early summer. He had a summer job as an EMT worker in a low-vax southern state, had constant close contact with patients who were probably unvaxxed for the most part. He did recover quickly.

I still rarely eat at restaurants (I did during the post-vax, pre-delta eye of the hurricane, but I'm doing it far less now). I did just fly a couple of weeks ago, but masking was VERY good at the two airports I dealt with (Baltimore and Denver). Still, it was stressful (on top of the usual hassles of air travel). I'm driving next time.
   269. Hank Gillette Posted: November 01, 2021 at 12:52 PM (#6050520)
#259:
Your math is right. But it’s actually better than that, because it tends to be older, more vulnerable people who are vaccinated and younger people who are unvaccinated. The CDC publishes age-adjusted vaccine effectiveness stats and while I can’t vouch for their methodology, those consistently showed 11-12x as many per capita deaths among the unvaccinated through early Sept (the most recent week available).
Yeah, I decided to ignore the fact that the vaccinated group has the overwhelming number of older people to just try to figure out basic odds.

If I came up with the right number, I must have done it right, but it took me a while, and I would have to futz around with it again if I wanted to calculate another scenario.

Can you tell me the generic formula for how much more likely an event is when you know the percentages of the two groups and the number of events for for each group?
   270. DCA Posted: November 01, 2021 at 01:21 PM (#6050527)
relative risk of E in group A relative to group B is:

(E(a)/N(a))/(E(b)/N(b))

where E is the number of events and N is the number of people. If B is the complement of A (e.g. vaccinated vs unvaccinated) then this reduces to:

(p(E)/p(N))/((1-p(E))/(1-p(N))) = (p(E)*(1-p(N)))/(p(N)*(1-p(E)))

where p(E) is the proportion of events E in group A, and p(N) is the proportion of individuals in group A.

So if 20% of people are unvaccinated, and they make of 40% of cases, the relative risk is:

(0.4*0.8)/(0.2*0.6) = 2.67
   271. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 01, 2021 at 01:23 PM (#6050529)
Hank,

If x = % of people who are vaccinated (in your example, 78%); and
y = the % of people who died that were fully vaccinated (40%)

Then the calculation would be

[(1 - y) / (1 - x)] / [y / x]; or

[(1 - y) * x] / [(1 - x) * y] = (.6 * .78) / (.4 * .22) = 5.3x

EDIT: Coke to DCA
   272. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 01, 2021 at 02:21 PM (#6050538)
270-271: See now, if you just explained it to the anti-vaxxers like that, they'd fall in line in a second!
   273. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 01, 2021 at 02:59 PM (#6050541)

If I was explaining it to anti-vaxxers, I'd show that there have been 200 COVID deaths per 100,000 people among the unvaccinated and only 20 deaths per 100,000 people among the vaccinated, or whatever the actual numbers are.
   274. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: November 01, 2021 at 03:10 PM (#6050542)
(p(E)/p(N))/((1-p(E))/(1-p(N))) = (p(E)*(1-p(N)))/(p(N)*(1-p(E)))

FAKE NEWS
   275. Hank Gillette Posted: November 01, 2021 at 04:44 PM (#6050562)
Thanks, DCA and Dave, but you did come up with different numbers. I assume you are calculating different things?
   276. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: November 01, 2021 at 04:48 PM (#6050564)
If I was explaining it to anti-vaxxers, I'd show that there have been 200 COVID deaths per 100,000 people among the unvaccinated and only 20 deaths per 100,000 people among the vaccinated, or whatever the actual numbers are.
...which would have approximately the same effect.
   277. Ron J Posted: November 01, 2021 at 06:26 PM (#6050589)
275 DCA was using hypothetical numbers. Dave used the numbers you quoted.
   278. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: November 01, 2021 at 06:43 PM (#6050595)
2 plus 2 is 4.
minus 1 that's 3.
quick maths.
   279. smileyy Posted: November 02, 2021 at 05:47 PM (#6050784)
CDC's committee on vaccinations (ACIP) has recommended by a 14-0 vote to authorize the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine for 5-11 year olds. I'm beyond ecstatic.
   280. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: November 03, 2021 at 12:16 PM (#6050977)
I’m pretty pissed that it took this long. All the study results were submitted months ago and the votes at both the fda and cdc were unanimous, which tells me there was nothing really controversial in them.

Just bureaucrats being bureaucrats, waiting for a meeting to make a decision. But now my son won’t be vaccinated in time for thanksgiving.

Anyway California’s “my turn” web site hasn’t been updated yet to support kids but I was able to schedule through Walgreens.

It seems like it would also be a lot more efficient to do the vaccines at the schools rather than forcing millions of people to take time off work to go to Walgreens…
   281. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: November 03, 2021 at 02:23 PM (#6051020)
No doubt you’ve seen quotes from the FDA meeting flying around on social media; the sound bites were a nightmare for those of us working to stem the tide of vaccine hesitancy. The committee members used phrases like “the toughest decision,” “I’m having some challenges with this one,” and “close call.” Taken out of context, they made the vaccine sound downright dicey. For example, Dr. Eric Ruben—a member of the committee, M.D./Ph.D., Harvard professor of immunology and infectious diseases, and editor in chief of the New England Journal of Medicine—really did say, “We’re never gonna learn how safe the vaccine is until we start giving it.” This statement was, of course, taken out of context and flew far and wide on social media. It was pulled by Facebook’s fake news police bots but probably too late. Talking about the vaccine like it’s a close call in terms of being worth the risks—understandably—makes parents feel jumpy.
...
The final discussion was especially galling. Committee member after member described the dilemma of deciding whether the benefits outweigh the risks of this vaccine. Member after member talked about how close it is, weighing clinical risks and clinical benefits in a population where both are tiny.
...
When the FDA looks only at clinical risks and clinical benefits, like it did during the Oct. 26 meeting, it completely ignores all the benefits at the population level. They’re pretending that children aged 5 to 11 do not live with other people. In short, they are very seriously underestimating the benefits of vaccines for this age group.

As soon as you start accounting for prevention of onward transmission, the balance immediately tips toward vaccination.
...
Vaccines are not like aspirin. Vaccines are by definition intended to operate at both the clinical and the population level, protecting us from disease by stimulating our immune systems and producing immunity. Yes, they reduce the severity of a COVID-19 case even if you still end up getting COVID-19, and that’s wonderful. But they also have an effect at the population level.

   282. Lassus Posted: November 04, 2021 at 01:18 PM (#6051250)
I still rarely eat at restaurants (I did during the post-vax, pre-delta eye of the hurricane, but I'm doing it far less now). I did just fly a couple of weeks ago, but masking was VERY good at the two airports I dealt with (Baltimore and Denver). Still, it was stressful (on top of the usual hassles of air travel). I'm driving next time.

We had a trip planned to Palm Springs for my wife's 50th last weekend (which was - pre-Delta - ITALY) and MAYBE I should have been more careful, but I've been pretty manic in daily life and it honestly seemed like decent masking and staying away from people would make it OK. We had super-early dawn flights and the airports weren't really crowded and I double-masked with an N95 on the planes. All of our meals but one were outside (and we were the one of two tables in the whole place). Honestly, I haven't been that concerned about it. We got back yesterday, and while I suppose anything could happen in the next couple of days I feel pretty good with our trip.


That being said, in NEVER GOING AWAY news, after Oneida County hit a 7-day rolling positive test average low of 2.8% on 10/25/21 (lowest since August 18th), we've crawled back up to 3.5% on 11/1/21 and that's part of a rising trend, so. Annoying.
   283. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: November 04, 2021 at 01:59 PM (#6051261)
As soon as you start accounting for prevention of onward transmission, the balance immediately tips toward vaccination.
I think as soon as you start considering the long term risks that have been identified, such as long-term cognitive issues, it’s hard to justify not acting sooner.

I definitely agree that the public debate on the topic was very poorly handled.

My wife is a social worker; she sent a link out today to the ca my turn site, as well as a number of other scheduling resources. Within minutes some moron parent complained to the agency director, and she was directed to “remain neutral when sharing resources. I encourage you to continue sharing resources with the team with neutrality in mind”.

   284. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: November 04, 2021 at 06:04 PM (#6051320)
Cases have basically plateaued in the US for the last week now. My guess is another week or so of near plateau and then the start of a rise. I wouldn't even try to guess how steep the rise will be. I would guess deaths will continue to decline for at least another 2-4 weeks, and potentially longer.

Cases have started to come down again in the UK, but deaths are higher than they have ever been since delta hit. I think these will also come down a little bit soon, but it's hard to know. Still very low compared to the US.
   285. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: November 04, 2021 at 06:09 PM (#6051323)
it didn’t take long for SARS-CoV-2 to make itself comfortable in other animals beside us. Cats, dogs, weasels, and even other primates like gorillas have all been documented carriers of the virus, along with deer.
...
The virus has also been shown to be capable of spreading from animal to animal, particularly among weasels
...
Researchers at Penn State and elsewhere tested lymph node samples collected from nearly 300 captive and free-living deer living in Iowa, looking for the presence of coronavirus RNA. The samples came from an already-established surveillance program for chronic wasting disease, an emerging illness in deer that many states are tracking. Between September 2020 and January 2021, about a third of these samples tested positive for the virus.
...
“Our results suggest that deer have the potential to emerge as a major reservoir host for SARS-CoV-2, a finding that has important implications for the virus genomic diversity and future trajectory of the pandemic,” the authors wrote.
...
a virus that jumps between multiple species can pick up a wider array of mutations as it adapts, some of which could make the virus more likely to evade a person’s existing immunity or more likely to cause serious illness. A more traveled SARS-CoV-2 also has opportunity to mingle with other coronavirus species, allowing for unlucky genetic jumbles to occur.
link
   286. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 04, 2021 at 06:09 PM (#6051324)
California has charts that shows vaccine effectiveness through Oct. 24 for cases and Oct. 10 for deaths (the national chart from the CDC only has data through Sept. 5).

I really don't see any sign of waning effectiveness there. For the most recent week, the case rate in unvaccinated people was 6.8x the case rate in vaccinated people. If you pick any point in time going back to July, it looks like that ratio was in the 6-8x range.

Same thing with deaths. The COVID death rate for unvaccinated people was 18.2x higher than that for vaccinated people. Picking random dates in July and August I'm seeing ratios of 16.9-19.0x.

I know there is data out there showing the vaccines wane in effectiveness over time, but I'm not seeing it here.

In any case, I have my booster shot scheduled for tomorrow morning. I got J&J the first time but I'm getting a Pfizer booster.
   287. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: November 04, 2021 at 06:33 PM (#6051327)
Right-wing rag Newsmax has sidelined its White House correspondent Emerald Robinson over tweets claiming the Covid-19 vaccines contained a ​​bioluminescent marker called “luciferase” that somehow or another acted as a tracker. This isn’t true.

Robinson posted the since-deleted Tweet on Monday, it read, “Dear Christians: the vaccines contain a bioluminescent marker called LUCIFERASE so that you can be tracked. Read the last book of the New Testament to see how this ends.” She was likely making reference to the end times war involving Lucifer in the Book of Revelations and the “Mark of the Beast” that some Christians believe will be mandatory for buying goods during the apocalypse. Twitter temporarily locked Robinson’s account over “repeated violations of our COVID-19 misinformation policy,” according to The Daily Beast. Robinson has just over 438,000 Twitter followers.

The name is derived from the original Latin word for Lucifer, which Merriam Webster notes translates to “​light-bearing,” but isn’t intended to be linked with Satan or any other derivation of the Prince of Darkness. Again, it’s an enzyme...commonly found in fireflies. There’s also no evidence the aforementioned devil can use luciferase to track people.

   288. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: November 04, 2021 at 06:41 PM (#6051328)

#287 it's also not actually in any of the vaccines.

I'm sure her other reporting was equally coherent and unbiased...
   289. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: November 04, 2021 at 07:15 PM (#6051337)
After reading through her twitter feed, I am convinced she is completely sane and unbiased.
   290. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: November 04, 2021 at 07:42 PM (#6051343)
After reading through her twitter feed, I am convinced she is completely sane and unbiased.
but would you say she's a very stable genius?
   291. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: November 04, 2021 at 08:26 PM (#6051347)
No. I was taught in business school to avoid using the word “very” as an adverb because it will cause potential investors to think you’re a moron with a limited vocabulary.

I would probably say she is an “uncommonly” stable genius.
   292. Tony S Posted: November 05, 2021 at 09:49 AM (#6051379)

287 -- as long as there is a sizable audience that believes that stuff, you and I will never have to worry about making a living. We'll have a ready-made market for anything.

Surprised she didn't work in the "demon sperm" thing so popular among that crowd a year ago.

Meanwhile, USA! USA!

The United States had the second-steepest decline in life expectancy among high-income countries last year during the pandemic, according to a study of death data spanning several continents.

The only country studied that saw a starker overall trend was Russia.


I don't know by what standard Russia is considered a "high-income" country, but if we're only better than the most marginal member of the category, that doesn't make us look any better.



   293. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: November 05, 2021 at 11:51 AM (#6051403)
Here’s one for …..- Jimmy Kimmel taking on ######## who lie about their vax status:

https://apple.news/AAkr6I1C9Rv2juUroZBu0-g

Kimmel then rewound the tape, adding comical air quotes to Rodger’s assertion that he had been “immunized.”

“We now know he is not vaccinated, because unvaccinated players who test positive have to isolate for 10 days,” he continued. “Had he been vaccinated, he would have had a chance to play this weekend.”

Noting that Rodgers reportedly received a “homeopathic treatment” instead of the vaccine over the summer, Kimmel joked that “we should have known” because “nothing says ‘I heal myself with crystals’ like the player’s top-knot haircut.

“Aaron is a Karen, that’s the fact of the matter,” the host declared. “Honestly, the only thing worse than not getting vaccinated when you’re in close contact with other people is letting them think you’re vaccinated when you’re not. It’s basically the COVID equivalent of ‘the condom fell off.’”

Earlier, Kimmel mocked Rodgers’ fellow anti-vaxxer athlete Kyrie Irving, who may get a chance to rejoin the Brooklyn Nets if New York’s new mayor Eric Adams relaxes the city’s vaccine mandate.

“I just hope he’s able to finish his research first,” he joked. “You know, he’s been doing his own research. What if he enjoys that so much he decides to become a researcher full time?”


   294. base ball chick Posted: November 05, 2021 at 12:27 PM (#6051412)
Tony S Posted: November 05, 2021 at 09:49 AM (#6051379)


The United States had the second-steepest decline in life expectancy among high-income countries last year during the pandemic, according to a study of death data spanning several continents.

The only country studied that saw a starker overall trend was Russia.


the anti-vaxxers (let em all die from my sickness) will just claim it is all because of people committing suicide/overdoses/homicide which if we had done absolutely nothing except ignore the deisease and give the antivaxxers ivermectin and hydrocloquin, there wouldn't be anyone dead

BTW

has anyone else seen this study where the researchers show that there is brain "change" in people who had Covid who weren't real too particular sick?

unsure what exactly is all that change or what is the difference in change in people of different ages
   295. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: November 05, 2021 at 01:21 PM (#6051430)
has anyone else seen this study where the researchers show that there is brain "change" in people who had Covid who weren't real too particular sick?
Yes, that is what I was referring to earlier, and why I believe the push to basically ignore the risk in children because they rarely die is so misguided.
   296. base ball chick Posted: November 05, 2021 at 02:30 PM (#6051442)
agree

we got ZERO idea what is happening inside their brains...

also, we don't know if people who tested positive vaccine or no, who had NO symptoms, also have brain "change"
   297. we all water; we all 57i66135 Posted: November 05, 2021 at 03:06 PM (#6051445)
Steve Popper @StevePopper
Aaron Rodgers just said he presented his research to the NFL. "They thought I was a quack."

   298. Mefisto Posted: November 05, 2021 at 03:13 PM (#6051447)
QAaron. Or maybe KAaron.
   299. Tony S Posted: November 05, 2021 at 03:50 PM (#6051450)
Yes, that is what I was referring to earlier, and why I believe the push to basically ignore the risk in children because they rarely die is so misguided.


Get with the program. The authorities are displeased with your non-binary attitude. Either the virus kills you, or all is honey and roses and you can get back to work as the human resource you are meant to be.

/s, just in case
   300. Mayor Blomberg Posted: November 06, 2021 at 01:35 AM (#6051519)
Aaron Rodgers just said he presented his research to the NFL. "They thought I was a quack."


And in return, Aaron Rogers lies about the doctors. What an #######.
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