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Tuesday, December 08, 2020

Major League Baseball umpire Brian O’Nora was arrested in Ohio in human trafficking sting

Major League Baseball umpire Brian O’Nora was arrested this weekend as a part of a human trafficking sting. The operation targeted people seeking to purchase sex through the internet.

A person with knowledge of the incident confirmed to USA TODAY Sports that the suspect was O’Nora. The person requested anonymity because of the sensitive nature of the issue.

O’Nora, 57, and 13 other men were arrested Sunday in Youngstown, Ohio, and charged with soliciting, a third-degree misdemeanor, and possessing criminal tools, a first-degree misdemeanor, announced Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost and Liberty Township Police Chief Toby Meloro.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: December 08, 2020 at 05:16 PM | 49 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
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   1. flournoy Posted: December 08, 2020 at 07:35 PM (#5993225)
possessing criminal tools, a first-degree misdemeanor


A quick search reveals that this "crime" is when you are in possession of items that Big Brother suspects you will use to commit a crime, even if no actual crime has been committed. A thought crime, which these days is the most egregious type of crime.
   2. Tin Angel Posted: December 08, 2020 at 07:37 PM (#5993226)
Not defending him at all but how does "seeking to purchase sex through the internet" = human trafficking?
   3. 185/456(GGC) Posted: December 08, 2020 at 07:58 PM (#5993228)
Is Liberty Township home of the Ohio police force with a speed trap on the interstate?

This is not practicing safe social distancing.
   4. Jay Seaver Posted: December 08, 2020 at 09:14 PM (#5993238)
2 - There are occasional cases where sex workers are trafficked, and law enforcement seizes on this to paint every arrest they make look like they're doing something noble and heroic rather than just harassing two consenting adults not bothering anybody. Sure, the average case is obviously somewhere in between, but usually closer to the latter than the former.
   5. puck Posted: December 08, 2020 at 09:21 PM (#5993239)
Not defending him at all but how does "seeking to purchase sex through the internet" = human trafficking?


Same thing happened when Robert Kraft was arrested. I'm sure human trafficking is involved in prostitution but from the Kraft thing it seemed like that label gets attached to many prostitution stings as it's a lot easier to rally around fighting human trafficking.
   6. puck Posted: December 08, 2020 at 09:23 PM (#5993240)
A quick search reveals that this "crime" is when you are in possession of items that Big Brother suspects you will use to commit a crime, even if no actual crime has been committed


Isn't that like getting caught with bolt cutters? What would that mean in regards to soliciting prostitution, a phone and a computer?

BTW, do we know who this guy is? His name didn't ring a bell for me. I assume if there are ever crowds at baseball games again, he's going to hear about this.
   7. "bothsidesism" word 57i66135 Posted: December 08, 2020 at 09:37 PM (#5993242)
Same thing happened when Robert Kraft was arrested. I'm sure human trafficking is involved in prostitution but from the Kraft thing it seemed like that label gets attached to many prostitution stings as it's a lot easier to rally around fighting human trafficking.
congress literally deleted craigslist like this.
   8. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: December 08, 2020 at 10:01 PM (#5993243)
possessing criminal tools

Is Felix Martinez the toolsiest player to commit multiple crimes against baseball? Matt Bush? Josh Hamilton?
   9. flournoy Posted: December 08, 2020 at 10:08 PM (#5993245)
Isn't that like getting caught with bolt cutters?


There are perfectly legal reasons to have bolt cutters. Say you have an old padlock on a shed in your backyard to which you have lost the key. Another good reason would be, "None of your business why I have what I have." Hopefully this is still the US and not Minority Report.

BTW, do we know who this guy is? His name didn't ring a bell for me.


I recognize his name as that of an MLB umpire, but nothing beyond that.

I assume if there are ever crowds at baseball games again, he's going to hear about this.


I suppose some people will latch onto anything to heckle umpires, but does anyone actually care?
   10. Tin Angel Posted: December 08, 2020 at 10:15 PM (#5993246)
There are perfectly legal reasons to have bolt cutters. Say you have an old padlock on a shed in your backyard to which you have lost the key.


Or you are having a problem with someone that needs to learn a lesson and have a toe removed.
   11. tshipman Posted: December 08, 2020 at 11:40 PM (#5993254)
A thought crime, which these days is the most egregious type of crime.


I mean, shouldn't you engage with this part of the story?

According to the Mahoning Valley Human trafficking Task Force, who worked with the Liberty Township Police Department, the arrests were made when the men arrived at a local hotel to pay for sex.


That's a bit more than thought crime.
   12. Brian C Posted: December 08, 2020 at 11:47 PM (#5993255)
I feel like, merits of the charges to the side, this is dreadfully irresponsible journalism.

To begin with, referring to it as a "human trafficking sting" seems more than a bit credulous to me, but nonetheless, O'Nora seems to have not been charged with any actual human trafficking. He was charged with two misdemeanors. Linking his arrest to "human trafficking" seems sensationalistic to me relative to the actual nature of the charges, and at the very least requires some explanation.

Secondly, O'Nora's arrest was leaked by an anonymous source "with knowledge of the incident", who was kept anonymous "because of the sensitive nature of the issue." What justification is there to provide this source with anonymity? What exactly is "the sensitive nature" that this source is #####-footing around?

Thirdly, the "criminal tools" charge really needs to be explained, if this arrest actually warrants reporting at all. WTF does that even mean?

Basically it seems like USA Today is letting themselves be used by law enforcement to help put the screws to this guy. This doesn't seem newsworthy in the least to a national publication that isn't even sports-focused, and it's written in a way to be highly prejudicial against the guy being charged and completely deferential to law enforcement.
   13. CStallion Posted: December 08, 2020 at 11:52 PM (#5993256)
I recognize his name as that of an MLB umpire, but nothing beyond that.


That and he seems to have worked a lot of Jays game in the early oughts when I still watched regularly. Either that or the broadcast crew just liked saying his name a lot.
   14. Athletic Supporter is USDA certified lean Posted: December 08, 2020 at 11:57 PM (#5993257)
[12] Well, I think we've found O'Nora's burner.
   15. Mayor Blomberg Posted: December 09, 2020 at 12:28 AM (#5993261)
And mesides, maybe O'Nora has a genuine interest in Moldovan culture.
   16. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 12:55 AM (#5993265)
I’m not an apologist for Johns and definitely not for sex traffickers, but it’s hard for me to disagree with any of the points in #12.

Was anyone ever charged with human trafficking in the Robert Kraft-related cases? From what I remember, despite lots of use of the phrase in articles and press releases, no human trafficking charges were actually brought.
   17. depletion Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:00 AM (#5993266)
Mayor, is actual sex trafficing really that humorous? If I had to guess, "sting" and "criminal tools" implies he installed software, probably given or sold to him, to allow purchasing sex services on his computer. There's a decent chance he was told that the software encrypted to evade law enforcement. There were no prostitutes; it was a sting. In isn't infrequent, unfortunately, for adult men to be arrested for arranging sexual encounters with teenage girls who don't exist. I don't have sympathy for guys who seek out underage women, but if a John makes an effort to ascertain that the woman is over 18 it's certainly a lesser crime.
   18. BrianBrianson Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:02 AM (#5993267)
Well, we're rewarding the author by reading the sensationalist version of the story. It's the motivation we're providing them, to act like this.
   19. flournoy Posted: December 09, 2020 at 04:37 AM (#5993271)
I mean, shouldn't you engage with this part of the story?


Maybe, but I didn't click through, so I've only read the excerpt.

The bit you posted doesn't change my opinion, though, unless he did something else not specified in that excerpt. So he "arrived at a local hotel to pay for sex." Did he actually do it? I'm not interested in trying to determine his intentions, as obvious as they may seem. It sounds to me like no crime was committed, and the argument is that, "We think he would have committed a crime if there had been a prostitute here instead of a cop." Well, there wasn't, and he didn't. I'm very uncomfortable with people being arrested for crimes they never committed.
   20. Lassus Posted: December 09, 2020 at 08:26 AM (#5993275)
There are perfectly legal reasons to have bolt cutters. Say you have an old padlock on a shed in your backyard to which you have lost the key. Another good reason would be, "None of your business why I have what I have."


When you're caught with bolt cutters outside a new car lot with a hole started in the fence 10 feet from you, it might actually be someone else's business.

I'm not against legalizing sex work at all; until then there's a lot of inhuman shit that goes on behind the scenes that's been fully ignored, like in the past 50 years with the HEY MAN POT DOESN'T HURT ANYONE crowd. And it's legalization that (helps) fix a lot of that. Ignoring the ugly crap does not.

I do see your argument, and I give it credit as a valid argument. Ultimately I just think you're overselling here, slippery slope and all.
   21. depletion Posted: December 09, 2020 at 08:27 AM (#5993276)
19) Including murder for hire and bribery of elected officials? I’m cool with these arrests.
   22. Lassus Posted: December 09, 2020 at 08:40 AM (#5993279)
/Krusty the Clown quote
   23. RoyalFlush Posted: December 09, 2020 at 09:18 AM (#5993285)
The bit you posted doesn't change my opinion, though, unless he did something else not specified in that excerpt. So he "arrived at a local hotel to pay for sex." Did he actually do it?


Do they actually have to have intercourse for you to be OK with an arrest? I mean, there are plenty of legal reasons to give a prostitute money... in a hotel. What if she had an old pad lock and needed to buy bolt cutters? You were just trying to help.
   24. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: December 09, 2020 at 10:00 AM (#5993293)
I'm sure human trafficking is involved in prostitution but from the Kraft thing it seemed like that label gets attached to many prostitution stings as it's a lot easier to rally around fighting human trafficking.

Exactly. What the cops call a "human trafficking sting" is normally just prostitution. When they say they've solved a bunch of human trafficking cases normally what they mean is they found some teenagers who ran away from home, which were categorized as "possible trafficking" when they were reported to missing persons. It's one of those labels they put on everything they can because it sounds extra bad and makes it seem like big resources are needed to fight it. Like vastly overestimating what sort of group of people constitutes a "gang".

From the other comments here, looks like people are quickly realizing this.

I think most of the real trafficking that goes on is more like illegal immigrants being brought in to work on a farm. This is clearly a problem but not something that excites people's emotions.
   25. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 10:17 AM (#5993298)
I think the excerpt likely greatly overstates the severity of O'Nora's crimes, but I think a lot of people here are greatly underestimating the frequency of actual trafficking in the U.S.

Did y'all see this article in the NY Times?

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/12/04/opinion/sunday/pornhub-rape-trafficking.html
   26. RoyalFlush Posted: December 09, 2020 at 10:25 AM (#5993301)
I think most of the real trafficking that goes on is more like illegal immigrants being brought in to work on a farm. This is clearly a problem but not something that excites people's emotions.


I think you're underestimating the amount of immigrants brought here under false pretenses to be sex workers against their will.

I also think a lot of people here are assuming that most prostitutes are independent contractors and not indentured servants.
   27. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 10:38 AM (#5993304)
I think you're underestimating the amount of immigrants brought here under false pretenses to be sex workers against their will.

I also think a lot of people here are assuming that most prostitutes are independent contractors and not indentured servants.


Agree.

I also think being coerced to work on a farm for low wages is nothing like being coerced to have sex with strange men.
   28. Jobu is silent on the changeup Posted: December 09, 2020 at 12:06 PM (#5993324)
Well, there wasn't, and he didn't. I'm very uncomfortable with people being arrested for crimes they never committed.
But isn't this more logically similar to arresting somebody for hiring a hitman but catching them before the murder happens than it is to any whimsical "thought crime"?
   29. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 12:41 PM (#5993337)
I think a fair amount of prostitution involves human trafficking (or something very close to it) and that can be true even when it isn’t immigrants. And I don’t have a problem with going after Johns whose demand fuels that industry. But just because a prosecutor or cop says it was a “human trafficking” sting does not make it so, and the press should report on these things responsibly and critically.
   30. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:12 PM (#5993352)
The bit you posted doesn't change my opinion, though, unless he did something else not specified in that excerpt. So he "arrived at a local hotel to pay for sex." Did he actually do it? I'm not interested in trying to determine his intentions, as obvious as they may seem. It sounds to me like no crime was committed, and the argument is that, "We think he would have committed a crime if there had been a prostitute here instead of a cop." Well, there wasn't, and he didn't. I'm very uncomfortable with people being arrested for crimes they never committed.
That's your takeaway? That they don't give Nobel Prizes for Attempted Chemistry? Rather than "why the #### is this illegal in the first place"?
   31. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:13 PM (#5993353)
I think the excerpt likely greatly overstates the severity of O'Nora's crimes, but I think a lot of people here are greatly underestimating the frequency of actual trafficking in the U.S.
Something that rounds to "zero."
   32. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:20 PM (#5993355)
Something that rounds to "zero."

Read the NYT article I linked. It's not close to zero.

In any case we wouldn't argue that if only 10% of an industries workers were exposed to unsafe conditions, we could just drop all effort to enforce safety laws.
   33. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:32 PM (#5993359)
Read the NYT article I linked. It's not close to zero.
I read it when it was published; it's an op/ed, not an article. And it mentions no statistics, and describes a grand total of three people with the term "trafficking," which is not helpful anyway without more facts because — as this thread has discussed — people nowadays commonly use the word as a dysphemism for prostitution. (Yes, the woman named "Cali" probably was, based on the description. Which is why I said rounds to zero, rather than actually is zero.) Just because someone under 18 is engaged in prostitution does not automatically make it "trafficking." (Which isn't a defense of the practice — just a desire for accurate terminology.)

In any case we wouldn't argue that if only 10% of an industries workers were exposed to unsafe conditions, we could just drop all effort to enforce safety laws.
I feel like I've been away too long if you would direct that argument to me. But I don't understand the analogy anyway. If 10% of an industry's workers were exposed to unsafe conditions, we should probably target those unsafe conditions, not shut down the industry.
   34. flournoy Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:39 PM (#5993363)
When you're caught with bolt cutters outside a new car lot with a hole started in the fence 10 feet from you, it might actually be someone else's business.


Sure. In that case, the crime is breaking and entering, with your possession of the bolt cutters leading to reasonable suspicion that you're guilty. Possession of the bolt cutters itself is not a crime. Simply having the means to commit a crime doesn't make you guilty of that crime.

That's your takeaway? That they don't give Nobel Prizes for Attempted Chemistry? Rather than "why the #### is this illegal in the first place"?


I don't really know what this means, but I don't think prostitution should be illegal. I didn't make that the basis of my posts, because I don't think my thoughts on what the law should be are relevant to how the actual laws should be enforced.
   35. Mayor Blomberg Posted: December 09, 2020 at 01:44 PM (#5993364)
depletion -- NO, it absolutely is not. Mine was meant as a bitter comment on the degree to which it was not, it seems to me, being taken seriously in this thread.
Since I live in Houston, I get to read several articles a year about raids on boarded up houses in the area finding scores of women locked up in them, and people suffocating in the backs of trucks.

I'm very sorry that my tone was misinterpreted.
   36. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 02:17 PM (#5993379)
I don't really know what this means, but I don't think prostitution should be illegal. I didn't make that the basis of my posts, because I don't think my thoughts on what the law should be are relevant to how the actual laws should be enforced.
It means that complaining that they didn't wait until a crime was completed to arrest someone sounds a bit odd. Attempted murder is in fact a real crime, not a "thought crime."

And attempted prostitution would be a real crime if prostitution were a real crime. (Unless your comment is limited to the burglary tools issue, in which case I misread your comment somewhat. But in that case the problem I have with it is not that it's a "thought crime" - burglary is an actual crime - but that it is applied too expansively to common items even though the name of the crime makes it sound like it's limited to esoteric implements primarily used for crime. And in that case, let me combine the two topics here and tell you about women arrested for prostitution with the evidence being that they're carrying around multiple condoms.)
   37. . Posted: December 09, 2020 at 02:51 PM (#5993392)
Yeah, "human trafficking" is an attention-grabbing misuse of the phrase aimed to garner clicks and perpetuate outrage. But people should realize that it's not even close to the only term like that and it's probably not even close to the worst.
   38. . Posted: December 09, 2020 at 02:54 PM (#5993394)
depletion -- NO, it absolutely is not. Mine was meant as a bitter comment on the degree to which it was not, it seems to me, being taken seriously in this thread.
Since I live in Houston, I get to read several articles a year about raids on boarded up houses in the area finding scores of women locked up in them, and people suffocating in the backs of trucks.

I'm very sorry that my tone was misinterpreted.


You seem to have zero conception, even at more aged stage of life, that a term properly used to describe something bad can be misused to describe something different. The fact that human trafficking is really bad doesn't remotely mean someone who hooks up with a hooker is bad. Have you no capacity to distinguish between easily distinguishable things?
   39. Barnaby Jones Posted: December 09, 2020 at 03:08 PM (#5993398)
I think the excerpt likely greatly overstates the severity of O'Nora's crimes, but I think a lot of people here are greatly underestimating the frequency of actual trafficking in the U.S.

Did y'all see this article in the NY Times?


This article, though containing many awful stories, doesn't give any information about how widespread trafficking in particular is. I agree with David that "trafficking" is too often used as a synonym for prostitution. Cops often announce "100 people busted in trafficking sting" because that gets them praise and funding and the press repeats these press releases verbatim. But then you look at the actual citations and they are arresting a bunch of women for prostitution... you know, the victims, of any actual trafficking that's going on.

I'm all for stopping actual human trafficking, but this has often times just become law enforcement branding. That's what this looks like here as well.
   40. flournoy Posted: December 09, 2020 at 03:45 PM (#5993405)
Unless your comment is limited to the burglary tools issue, in which case I misread your comment somewhat. But in that case the problem I have with it is not that it's a "thought crime" - burglary is an actual crime - but that it is applied too expansively to common items even though the name of the crime makes it sound like it's limited to esoteric implements primarily used for crime.


That really is what my comment is limited to. I'm not interested in whether or not O'Nora solicited a prostitute. If he did, and the police have evidence of that, then the prescribed punishment (whatever that is) is appropriate since we live under the rule of law. I think this law should be changed, but that's a different matter.

What I find really insidious is the "possession of criminal tools" bit. If having the means to commit a crime itself makes you guilty of a crime, then we have thrown the constitution into a wood chipper.
   41. Ron J Posted: December 09, 2020 at 04:02 PM (#5993412)
#40 My nephew was busted for possession of burglary tools many years ago. Charges were dropped as what it boiled down to was kid driving a Lexus (his grandfather's) and having some construction tools in the car.

The cop made the assumption that the only way somebody that age could have a Lexus is if he's some sort of criminal. Seriously.
   42. SoSH U at work Posted: December 09, 2020 at 04:10 PM (#5993415)
What I find really insidious is the "possession of criminal tools" bit. If having the means to commit a crime itself makes you guilty of a crime, then we have thrown the constitution into a wood chipper.


You should know, possession of a wood chipper is itself a crime, established in the case, People v. Grimsrud.
   43. bigglou115 is not an Illuminati agent Posted: December 09, 2020 at 04:39 PM (#5993422)
I did a survey of my fellow criminal attorneys here in Arkansas, otherwise known as the state that went looking for people to kill in 2018 because their lethal injection drugs were about to expire.

Between us we'd probably seen criminal tools charged 3 dozen times, nobody had ever seen it stand on its own. That doesn't mean the possibility for abuse isn't there, but no prosecutor wants to go make the argument in court.
   44. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: December 09, 2020 at 05:33 PM (#5993437)
Between us we'd probably seen criminal tools charged 3 dozen times, nobody had ever seen it stand on its own. That doesn't mean the possibility for abuse isn't there, but no prosecutor wants to go make the argument in court.
To be fair, no prosecutor wants to go make any argument in court. They just want to pile on a bunch of charges so that the defendant will plead guilty to some subset of them.
   45. Zach Posted: December 09, 2020 at 07:42 PM (#5993453)
I'm thinking of the scene in the Netflix Ted Bundy movie where he's apprehended in a car with a sinister set of tools -- something like a rope, zip ties, gloves, a ski mask, and a big knife (I may be misremembering the details).

I'm not trying to go Godwin's law here -- I assume everybody in the thread is just as anti murder as I am -- I just remember the scene, and how the collection of tools tells a chilling story of what was on his mind.

Regarding whether it should be a crime -- I think that collecting the necessary set of tools and bringing them to a location where a crime can be committed is strong evidence that a criminal act was being planned. It's obviously stronger if the tools are not common objects, are closely associated with the crime, and if there is other evidence that a crime is being planned. In at least some cases, I could be persuaded that gathering the necessary set of tools is itself a step in the commission of the crime.

   46. Brian C Posted: December 09, 2020 at 07:58 PM (#5993457)
I'm not trying to go Godwin's law here -- I assume everybody in the thread is just as anti murder as I am -- I just remember the scene, and how the collection of tools tells a chilling story of what was on his mind.

True, although our interpretation of that set of objects is obviously biased by the fact that we already know he's a serial killer. The real question is how many of us have a random selection of things in the trunk of our cars that could be used to tell a story but in fact it's just random junk.
   47. puck Posted: December 09, 2020 at 08:32 PM (#5993464)
I also think being coerced to work on a farm for low wages is nothing like being coerced to have sex with strange men.

Even worse: working on a sex farm.
   48. Starring Bradley Scotchman as RMc Posted: December 10, 2020 at 08:11 PM (#5993654)
Even worse: working on a sex farm

How could you leave this behind?
   49. Starring Bradley Scotchman as RMc Posted: December 10, 2020 at 08:12 PM (#5993655)
.

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