Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Thursday, January 14, 2021

Mickey Mantle baseball card shatters record, sells for $5.2 million

Don’t put that in your bike spokes!

A Mickey Mantle baseball card has shattered a 5-month-old record for highest-selling sports card of all time, going for $5.2 million, PWCC Marketplace announced on Thursday.

The 1952 Topps Mickey Mantle PSA 9—PSA is a grading system that ranges from 1-10—took the record from a one-of-one Mike Trout rookie that sold for $3.94 million in August. It’s believed that there are only six PSA 9s of that Mantle card still in existence.

Rob Gough, the actor who acquired streetwear brand Dope in 2017, purchased the ‘52 Mantle, which former NFL lineman Evan Mathis sold in 2018 for $2.88 million.

“The 1952 Topps Mantle is the holy grail of sports cards,” Gough said. “As a kid ripping packs in the ‘90s, I always dreamt of owning one. ... I felt this Mantle was highly underpriced.”

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 14, 2021 at 06:23 PM | 55 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: baseball cards

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. Moeball Posted: January 14, 2021 at 07:03 PM (#5999819)
The 1952 Topps Mantle is the holy grail of sports cards


The T-206 Honus Wagner would like for someone to hold his bavarian brew, if anybody cares anymore.
   2. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 14, 2021 at 07:19 PM (#5999820)
My mom actually threw out a 1952 Mantle before I got back from college, but it never would've been graded anything remotely close to PSA-9. Probably more like PSA-1 at best. Ironically it was one of the few 1952 Topps cards I had, as I'd just discovered baseball cards that year (I was 8) as the Summer was winding down.

What steamed me even more was that she also threw away a postcard from Mecca signed by el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz (Malcolm X), addressed to Gloria Richardson, the leader of the civil rights movement in Cambridge MD where I'd been working. She said she didn't approve of Malcolm X, and that was that.

The moral of the story is that mothers have no eye for future value. To them everything is just clutter.
   3. Rally Posted: January 14, 2021 at 08:31 PM (#5999837)
Yankees spend a lot less than that for 18 years of Mickey Mantle.
   4. Joyful Calculus Instructor Posted: January 14, 2021 at 09:35 PM (#5999847)
Yankees spend a lot less than that for 18 years of Mickey Mantle.


The reserve clause really screwed the players for decades. Think about this: under today's rules, Mantle would have hit free agency after the 1957 season, assuming he didn't sign an extension before then. At that point, he had just turned 26, was coming off back to back MVP seasons with over 11 WAR each and had a 52.6 career WAR already, a .316/.427/.574 batting line and 207 home runs. Think of the kind of contract he could have gotten today! He got $65k the following year and maxed out at $100k per year.
   5. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 14, 2021 at 09:41 PM (#5999848)
I don't know if this is in TFA, but this exact same card sold for about half this amount two years ago.

There are also three PSA 10 1952 Topps Mantles, but I don't know if any of them have ever been sold publicly. PSA 8s go for about 300-500k.
   6. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: January 14, 2021 at 09:55 PM (#5999853)
The buyer was one "Kivas Fajo," I hear.
   7. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: January 14, 2021 at 09:57 PM (#5999855)

The moral of the story is that mothers have no eye for future value. To them everything is just clutter.


Of course, if so many Mantle cards hadn't been tossed out, they wouldn't have much value. Better to say mothers have a great eye for future value, they toss out just enough stuff so that what's left over becomes valuable.

   8. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: January 14, 2021 at 10:02 PM (#5999858)
I remember getting the 1984 Don Mattingly Donruss rookie card, and being like, "I got the next 1952 Mantle!" It was worth $100 overnight (which as a ten-year-old with no money was mind-blowing), and dreamed of what I would do when I bought my first car in high school with the proceeds from the 84 Mattingly. My parents ended up helping me getting a beat up 1985 Ford Escort. A boy could dream...

   9. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: January 14, 2021 at 10:16 PM (#5999863)
I remember getting the 1984 Don Mattingly Donruss rookie card, and being like, "I got the next 1952 Mantle!" It was worth $100 overnight (which as a ten-year-old with no money was mind-blowing), and dreamed of what I would do when I bought my first car in high school with the proceeds from the 84 Mattingly. My parents ended up helping me getting a beat up 1985 Ford Escort. A boy could dream...

Don't give up hope. Today that Mattingly card is probably worth more than that Ford Escort!
   10. The Honorable Ardo Posted: January 14, 2021 at 10:26 PM (#5999867)
Think of the kind of contract he could have gotten today!
Trout got 12/$426 having just turned 27. Mantle a year younger? 12/$500 on talent alone. Then, too, Trout is famously clean-living; Mantle not so much. Not sure if that would get priced in.
   11. McCoy Posted: January 14, 2021 at 10:35 PM (#5999868)
It wasn't mothers that made the mantle card so valuable. It was the fact that Topps threw most of their cards into the ocean.
   12. Walt Davis Posted: January 15, 2021 at 12:01 AM (#5999876)
Rob Gough, the actor who acquired streetwear brand Dope in 2017, purchased the ‘52 Mantle, which former NFL lineman Evan Mathis sold in 2018 for $2.88 million.

I move in the wrong circles.

The reserve clause really screwed the players for decades. Think about this: under today's rules, Mantle would have hit free agency after the 1957 season, assuming he didn't sign an extension before then.

I once contemplated doing a series on this alternative reality. I've done a couple around here -- pretty sure I did Ernie, think I did Ryan. I don't remember if I did Seaver but I recall looking into it -- and the Mets still trade him. Mays of course would be off the charts.

It's somebody like Fregosi who is more interesting probably. He'd hit FA after his age 26 season with 34 WAR under his belt. Exceptional durability but coming of a season of only 4 WAR. He didn't have any super-wacky seasons (8 WAR was his best) so he wouldn't get Mookie money but he's comparable to Lindor and a year younger. Folks wouldn't have been too happy -- an 8 and a 5 WAR season left but then he got hurt and that was pretty much it. Some old farts might know, seems like he must have been hurt before they actually put him on the IL -- he played through the end of June but had a sub-600 OPS. The Mets being the Mets of course traded for him after that terrible season -- the bat rebounded OK (103 OPS+) but he never could stay on the field and only 24 more starts at SS.

In terms of extending him early, the Angels would have had to jump almost right away -- his 2nd full season was his 8 WAR season and he can be quite confident he'll clean up in arb and he's not gonna be that interested in signing away FA years and they're gonna cost plenty. But if they jump after his first full season, maybe they can get him through age 28 or something then, if they're smart enough to let him go, it might be the greatest arb buyout in history.

It's unlikely they'd have traded him in his early arb years -- the Angels were solid in the mid-60s at 75, 80, 84 wins. They cratered to just 67 wins in his last arb year so if they knew they were gonna stink, maybe he'd have been traded that offseason or at the deadline. The Tigers were running away with the AL but they might have been interested in an upgrade over Roy Oyler (20 OPS+), Tommy Matchick (60) and Tracewski (43). :-) The Cards were running away with the NL at the deadline too and Dal Maxvill was having his best season and you still didn't see too many across-league trades. So it's off to the Tigers for ... hmmm, Tigers system doesn't seem that good, they have to give up top SP prospect Les Cain (in AAA at 20, more than holding his own). We blast the Tigers for giving up way too much for a 2-month rental but then Cain struggles badly in 69, has a solid 1970 in the majors, then not so good and hurt. TINSTAAPP.

Then in the 68 series, the Tigers don't have to try Mickey Stanley at SS which forced Northrup into CF. But after a rough start, Northrup got hot and Stanley did fine as did Horton (the other option to sit in Fregosi's favor) and of course they won that series anyway. Most of the games were decided by 4+ runs so it's unlikely Fregosi could have even helped them win in 6 instead of 7.
   13. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 15, 2021 at 12:16 AM (#5999879)
Both moms and dumping the excess inventory in the ocean (at least that's the story) sure help with the value of the 52 Mantle, but the demand for the Mantle is really off the charts, and causes this card to be worth far far more than similarly scarce cards. PSA has graded these things 1404 times. That includes some amount of resubmission, but, still, that's not a rare card. And of course there are also copies graded by other companies, as well as some raw copies (I know of at least two).

It's silly, really. The 53 Bowman is a better looking card and can be had for a fraction of what this one costs. The 51 Bowman is actually his rookie card, and is also worth a fraction of the 52 Topps.

Anyway, nostalgia is one of the prime drivers of baseball card prices. Given that we're losing baby boomers at a pretty good clip, and that that pace isn't going to slack off, I'd be worried about holding expensive cards of post war stars.
   14. SoSH U at work Posted: January 15, 2021 at 12:23 AM (#5999881)
For some reason, my grandmother didn't throw out any of my dad's cards from the 1940-50s, and they were in remarkably good shape 40 years later. I'm pretty sure a '52 Mantle was in the set (it looked familiar before I learned how valuable that card was), but someone made off with it and a pretty valuable Williams card from the box we kept the cards in. I still have the cards to pass down to my son, but I've often wondered how much we lost from the theft (which had to be by someone we showed the cards too).

   15. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: January 15, 2021 at 12:57 AM (#5999884)
I remember getting the 1984 Don Mattingly Donruss rookie card, and being like, "I got the next 1952 Mantle!" It was worth $100 overnight

PSA-10's of that card are currently going for the staggering sum of $3000 a pop..... as I turn and look longingly at the 18 unopened boxes of 1984 Donruss sitting about 10 feet away from me.
   16. Rally Posted: January 15, 2021 at 09:29 AM (#5999895)
The reserve clause really screwed the players for decades. Think about this: under today's rules, Mantle would have hit free agency after the 1957 season, assuming he didn't sign an extension before then. At that point, he had just turned 26, was coming off back to back MVP seasons with over 11 WAR each and had a 52.6 career WAR already, a .316/.427/.574 batting line and 207 home runs. Think of the kind of contract he could have gotten today! He got $65k the following year and maxed out at $100k per year.


If 1957 Mickey was a free agent today (or better yet, after the 2019 season but before COVID) he'd end up with a Mike Trout contract, maybe a bit higher if he shopped to the highest bidder. If free agency had been won in the 1950s though, he'd probably end up with something like 150-250k.

Inflation adjusting means a 35 million dollar contract now is equivalent to about 3.5-4 million back then. But I don't even know if the Yankee total revenue reached 4 million back then. Looking at attendance and average ticket prices, I think the answer is no.
   17. winnipegwhip Posted: January 15, 2021 at 09:30 AM (#5999896)
When I showed my dad a picture of the 52 Mantle when I was a kid he said he remembered having that card. When I was in the attic at the farm I did find some 1952 Topps high numbers (Bobby Morgan and Cookie Lavegetto) amongst other cards but my uncle had claimed he found a bunch of cards and tossed them. I have a feeling a 52 Mantle was in there.
   18. McCoy Posted: January 15, 2021 at 09:49 AM (#5999898)
My dad and his parents kept nothing from his youth whereas my mom has kept everything. Alas most of it is worthless and what wouldn't be got played with as one would expect a little kid to do.
   19. gef, talking mongoose & suburban housewife Posted: January 15, 2021 at 09:52 AM (#5999899)
For some reason, my grandmother didn't throw out any of my dad's cards from the 1940-50s, and they were in remarkably good shape 40 years later. I'm pretty sure a '52 Mantle was in the set (it looked familiar before I learned how valuable that card was), but someone made off with it and a pretty valuable Williams card from the box we kept the cards in. I still have the cards to pass down to my son, but I've often wondered how much we lost from the theft (which had to be by someone we showed the cards too).


I think the only collection-related theft I ever suffered was back when I was maybe a high school junior, when a stack of something like 40 comics went away one day. Mostly these, I'm pretty sure, which some 4.5 decades later were still going for a couple of bucks each, tops. At the time I doubt I owned any comics worth the effort of stealing. (That changed within a year or so, though of course I wound up selling them all for an average of around 17 cents each to help finance the move from Arkansas to Phoenix for grad school. *sigh*)
   20. Mefisto Posted: January 15, 2021 at 10:15 AM (#5999904)
My mother threw out ALL of my baseball cards and ALL of my comic books.
   21. gef, talking mongoose & suburban housewife Posted: January 15, 2021 at 10:19 AM (#5999906)
My mother, for all her faults, threw out nothing of mine. The conniption fit (the phrase "stupid thief" might have been employed at least a couple of times) I threw at age 11 or so when she gave my Boris Karloff's Tales of the Frightened paperback to the public library might've been a factor in that inaction.
   22. McCoy Posted: January 15, 2021 at 10:42 AM (#5999909)
Two years ago when I went back home to pick up any stuff I wanted to keep my mom was more attached to my stuff than I was. They have since moved into a senior community and I have no idea what happened to all the star wars stuff that my mom claims is mine but I sure it's really her's.

She has an original Death Star toy in the box.
   23. jacksone (AKA It's OK...) Posted: January 15, 2021 at 10:52 AM (#5999913)
I don't know if this is in TFA, but this exact same card sold for about half this amount two years ago.


It's in TFE

Rob Gough, the actor who acquired streetwear brand Dope in 2017, purchased the ‘52 Mantle, which former NFL lineman Evan Mathis sold in 2018 for $2.88 million.
   24. John Northey Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:16 AM (#5999914)
The money blown on this is nuts. Just a sign we have people who are far, far, far too rich. That people can spend over $2 mil on a baseball card (similar amount recently spent on a Batman #1) is nuts. $2 mil, half decently invested, would give you $100k+ a year (5% return). Most people could live on that for their entire lives - a majority of society will never make $100k in a year. Yet for some people that is what they spend on something that they will keep in a glass container forever, never to be touched. Something that they could easily print off a near perfect duplicate of. I'm surprised we don't hear of more counterfeit cards as with modern printers it would be child's play to make very good duplicates. Put them in sealed plastic cases, sell for a fraction of what the real ones are worth and say you are trying to just pay some bills and zip boom bang you get hundreds of dollars out of some cardboard and printer ink. Not going to do that myself, but I could see someone desperate for cash who has half decent computer skills doing it.
   25. Zonk is now Unified Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:21 AM (#5999916)
How does PSA work nowadays?

Is there some 'official' committee or group that determines grades or is it more like a loose confederation of bond rating agencies circa spring 2008 saying "Yup, looks like another AAA winner to me!"
   26. KronicFatigue Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:33 AM (#5999917)
Cosign the first half of #24. I will never ever understand owning things like this. Objectively, there's no actual value to it. You can objectively measure the quality of two different TVs. Nice cars go faster I suppose. Square footage. But this card is all about status. It looks exactly like a fake version of it.

People just have too much money if they're spending on this.

As for the 2nd part of #24, I imagine there's little market for getting this card on a "deal", b/c again, it has no real value and only exists for status. So paying more for it is part of the appeal.
   27. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:37 AM (#5999919)
Rob Gough is more of an entrepreneur than an actor. At least, that’s where he made all his money.

Kind of crazy how some people spend their money, but hey if one rich guy wants to overpay another rich guy for a collectible it’s not really any of my business. There’s a lot more destructive things to do with one’s money.

My grandfather saved some baseball cards that my mom and aunt had collected. Nothing super valuable — this 1957 card of Snider/Campanella/Hodges/Furillo was the best one and our version definitely isn’t a PSA 10. But it’s a great card and was an exciting find for my brother and me as kids.
   28. Steve Balboni's Personal Trainer Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:38 AM (#5999920)
I think #26 nails it - people spend millions on stuff like this, in part, because they can then say they spent $5 million on it. That's why they call it "F*** you money".
   29. Zonk is now Unified Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:41 AM (#5999922)
   30. Booey Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:46 AM (#5999923)
Like many of you, my childhood dreams of getting rich off my collection of 1980's baseball cards didn't pan out, but I did recently get some decent money from a local toy store for all my old '80's action figures that I had saved in storage for the past few decades. I'd played with all of them regularly as a kid, so none of them were in their original packaging, but I did take fairly good care of my toys and hung on to most the weapons, so I was able to get $1,100 for my GI Joe collection (and these were the 3 & 3/4" figures from the 1980's, not the original Barbie sized Joe's from the '60's). 90 figures at 10 bucks a pop, plus another $175 for the vehicles and even an extra $25 for the stack of file cards that came with them. I got an additional $200 for my He-Man collection and $150 for my Ninja Turtles.

Glad I didn't melt or blow up all my toys like my younger brother did with his (he was basically Sid from Toy Story).
   31. Zonk is now Unified Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:51 AM (#5999926)
I guess it depends, what's the line?

Assuming this is legit, were my net worth somewhere in the ~8-9 figure range? I could definitely see myself buying something like this.

~200k isn't 2m - but it would bring me pleasure to have something like this displayed in a well-apportioned library or study. Why/how would it bring me pleasure? I guess I'm not sure... conversation piece? Just glancing at it and considering more than a century of baseball history, thinking about long-dead players...

   32. Booey Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:57 AM (#5999927)
#26 - That's my opinion of jewelry, too. Fake gold and diamonds look just as good as the real stuff. I spent way more money than I could afford on Mrs Booey's wedding ring, and she probably gets more compliments on a $20 ring she sometimes wears with a big fake rock in the middle.
   33. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: January 15, 2021 at 12:32 PM (#5999936)
   34. Adam Starblind Posted: January 15, 2021 at 12:47 PM (#5999938)
In high school a kid stole my 1989 Upper Deck Ken Griffey Jr. rookie card -- which I got right at the top of the first pack of Upper Deck I ever opened.

About 20 years later when I was making grown-up money, I was able to acquire one for roughly the same roughly $60 it purported to be worth in 1989.
   35. Rally Posted: January 15, 2021 at 12:48 PM (#5999939)
Glad I didn't melt or blow up all my toys like my younger brother did with his (he was basically Sid from Toy Story).


Looking things up, I could probably get a similar price for my star wars toys. I have about 30 jawas, though only one is in his original packaging. Looks like the sandcraler I keep them in could fetch $500-800, which is more than I got for my Toyota Corolla when I traded it in a few years back.
   36. Lassus Posted: January 15, 2021 at 02:03 PM (#5999952)
My mother threw out ALL of my baseball cards and ALL of my comic books.

I know you're older than I am, but not so much older that my mother telling me of HER mother throwing away all of HER baseball cards and comic books doesn't seem even worse. She would have had this Mantle, easy.
   37. Walt Davis Posted: January 15, 2021 at 05:17 PM (#5999997)
Aren't baseball teams the ultimate Veblen good?
   38. KronicFatigue Posted: January 15, 2021 at 05:59 PM (#6000002)
Just glancing at it and considering more than a century of baseball history, thinking about long-dead players...


That's a good reason for owning it...and then letting a museum display it. Unless you're staring at it on your wall for hours a day, it feels wasted on your wall, even though you'd appreciate it.

I'm currently staring at three signed baseballs I own. Two were gifted to me and I presume valuable, the third is a worthless Nimmo ball that my daughter got at one of our first Mets game.

The first two bring me nothing but stress. I shouldn't own history, I'm stressed about whether the cases are protecting from the ink fading, God forbid my horse of a dog knocks it over and chews it up.

The third is obviously priceless and I enjoy looking at it as I pass by
   39. Mefisto Posted: January 15, 2021 at 08:16 PM (#6000024)
I know you're older than I am, but not so much older that my mother telling me of HER mother throwing away all of HER baseball cards and comic books doesn't seem even worse. She would have had this Mantle, easy.


Definitely worse.
   40. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 15, 2021 at 09:51 PM (#6000040)
How does PSA work nowadays?

Is there some 'official' committee or group that determines grades or is it more like a loose confederation of bond rating agencies circa spring 2008 saying "Yup, looks like another AAA winner to me!"
The latter, from what I can tell. Their business model is just one bad incentive after another, and yet collectors have given them essentially market-dictating autonomy.

I've gotten back into buying cards in the last few months after being out of it since around age 15, so I haven't been around in the hobby to get acculturated to the rise of PSA over the years. So now, coming back in and looking around, it's like moving back to your hometown after being gone for 25 years and finding out they've, like, elected a ferret as mayor. And the ferret is in its fourth term with a 70 percent approval rating.
   41. deleuze68 Posted: January 15, 2021 at 10:17 PM (#6000044)
Meanwhile the parent company of PSA, Collector's Universe, has more than tripled its market cap this year to $700 million and has just recently agreed to be taken private by a consortium led by Steve Cohen.
   42. Moeball Posted: January 19, 2021 at 08:57 AM (#6000462)
#27 Rich guys way overspending buying collectibles from other rich guys - worst to me was Ballmer paying $2B for the Clippers. Forbes had the team value estimated at around $700-800M and Ballmer spent way more than he needed to, especially with that toad Sterling being forced to sell. Instantly doubled values of every other team in the league, making MJ an instant billionaire. Also dramatically drove up values of teams in other sports as well as the market corrected for Clippers' relative low worth compared to other franchises. So Ballmer has his expensive collectible now. Obviously he's taken it out of the box and played with it.
   43. McCoy Posted: January 19, 2021 at 09:12 AM (#6000470)
The whole PSA thing is such a con. Was looking at Ryne Sandberg rookie card pricing and a 10 grading makes the card worth around 300 dollars. A 9 makes it 30 dollars. It's super expensive to get your cards graded so PSA has inserted themselves in the process and like so many other needless middlemen have soaked up profits and spiked prices.
   44. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 19, 2021 at 10:50 AM (#6000503)
The whole PSA thing is such a con. Was looking at Ryne Sandberg rookie card pricing and a 10 grading makes the card worth around 300 dollars. A 9 makes it 30 dollars. It's super expensive to get your cards graded so PSA has inserted themselves in the process and like so many other needless middlemen have soaked up profits and spiked prices.
As far as I can tell, card collecting isn't really about cards anymore. It's a d***-measuring competition to see who has the rarest, the mintiest, the most expensive, etc. PSA is of course fostering and monetizing this mentality - you can register your PSA cards and compete to see who has the highest PSA 1952 Topps set or whatever. The whole thing is pretty gross...which is why I buy raw 99 percent of the time.
   45. McCoy Posted: January 19, 2021 at 10:56 AM (#6000505)
I have never bought a PSA grades anything and I don't intend to but it does tick me off that PSA depresses the price of ungraded cards.
   46. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 19, 2021 at 11:06 AM (#6000510)
PSA depresses the price of ungraded cards.
That's not happening right now as far as I can tell - of course it depends on who's selling and how many eyeballs the auction has, but for example Greg Morris gets very healthy prices on his high-grade raw cards. Not "$28,000 for a 1977 Topps Nolan Ryan CUZ PSA 10!!!!" prices, but certainly healthy returns. I bought a couple cards from him early on and they're very nice looking, but I realized that when you're the one willing to pay the highest price out of 40 bidders or whatever, you're probably not getting a great deal.
   47. Obo Posted: January 19, 2021 at 11:38 AM (#6000515)
As far as I can tell, card collecting isn't really about cards anymore. It's a d***-measuring competition to see who has the rarest, the mintiest, the most expensive, etc.

Well that's grownups for you.
   48. phredbird Posted: January 19, 2021 at 06:18 PM (#6000650)

in other baseball news, Don Sutton has died.

I suppose BBTF will put up an obit from somewhere, soon.

   49. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 19, 2021 at 07:02 PM (#6000661)
Greg Morris


Hush. I've got a couple of snipes set and don't need any more competition.

I bought a couple cards from him early on and they're very nice looking, but I realized that when you're the one willing to pay the highest price out of 40 bidders or whatever, you're probably not getting a great deal.


Well, right. GM gets tons of eyeballs so the winner's curse does bite hard. But he's got good stuff and is totally above board.

I have never bought a PSA grades anything and I don't intend to but it does tick me off that PSA depresses the price of ungraded cards.


Graded cards do get better prices. But if you buy raw, that's a good thing! If you're looking to sell something high-end, go and get it graded. Until then, enjoy the lower prices. As Face says, the Hobby culture is horrible. So **** the Hobby-with-a-capital-H and just buy baseball cards that you like.
   50. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 19, 2021 at 07:34 PM (#6000668)
Hush. I've got a couple of snipes set and don't need any more competition.
Pretty sure that cat's been out of the bag for a while.
   51. TJ Posted: January 19, 2021 at 07:54 PM (#6000670)
So **** the Hobby-with-a-capital-H and just buy baseball cards that you like.


Agreed- it’s a hobby, and hobbies are supposed to be fun. I collect Hall of Famers, and one of my favorite things to do is buy a 3200 count box or two of random cards for $20 apiece or so and then sift through them to pull out Hall of Famers to add to my collection. So I now have about a hundred 1990 Craig Biggios, so what? It was fun finding them...
   52. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 19, 2021 at 08:08 PM (#6000674)
I’m collecting Hall of Famers too, but only 1985 and before (I started collecting as a kid in ‘86). I eventually want to try to complete the HOFers back to 1953 Topps (ain’t no way ‘52 is ever gonna happen), and also at least one contemporary card of as many HOFers as possible. The latter has led me to pick up a handful of tobacco cards, Goudeys, etc. which has been fun.
   53. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 19, 2021 at 11:15 PM (#6000731)
Seems to be some similar projects here. When I was a kid I set out to get one card of each HOFer issued during their playing days. Hard to do when you're mowing grass and shoveling snow to fund it. As an adult it's been easier - I'm 72% of the way there - but the pace has slowed down some as the cards have gotten more expensive. Most recent acquisition was a Cracker Jack Ed Walsh, which took up a good couple months worth of baseball card budget.
   54. Howie Menckel Posted: January 19, 2021 at 11:43 PM (#6000737)
I have cards of at least 150 HOFers - but I'm talking about mostly Topps cards from the last 15 years or so.

something fun about getting a Ty Cobb in, say, a 1974 Topps style - both front and back. if there's a fun fact in the 1974 set, there's one here and in the same place as well.

or you might get a Christy Mathewson in a 1955 Topps style, and so forth.

one oddity to me is that you might get a Lou Brock 1974 card - when there already WAS a real Lou Brock 1974 card. wtf.

I think Greg Maddux is the most famous HOFer I don't have in this respect. not sure if it's a licensing issue.

I have at least 30 different Mike Trout cards issued in the last 10 years - and I'm sure I'm missing plenty. a couple of dozen Jeters as well.

separately, I still have all 10,000 or so cards from my youth (across 4 sports, but at least half are baseball).

many years ago, I put the legends into a plastic album.

the Nolan Ryan/Jerry Koosman rookie card, also Carew, Bench, etc. are in there.

also OJ Simpson, Joe Namath, Wilt Chamberlain (including his Conquistadors card), Oscar Robertson, Bobby Orr, the Esposito brothers, and so on.

the cards look great in the plastic. take them out and - well, a rambunctious 6- to 10-year-old might have knocked a couple or three numbers off that "PSA status."

so be it. I ain't selling 'em anyway.
   55. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: January 20, 2021 at 07:42 PM (#6000864)
It wasn't mothers that made the mantle card so valuable. It was the fact that Topps threw most of their cards into the ocean.

And then Mr. Mint retrieved enough of them** to set himself up for life.

** from a truck driver, not from the ocean.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
JPWF13
for his generous support.

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogVeteran starter David Price offers to move to the bullpen if it helps the Dodgers
(2 - 1:08am, Mar 09)
Last: Joyful Calculus Instructor

NewsblogCanadian Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Rhéal Cormier dies at 53
(3 - 11:26pm, Mar 08)
Last: The Yankee Clapper

NewsblogLos Angeles Dodgers' Trevor Bauer pitches shutout inning vs. San Diego Padres with one eye closed
(27 - 11:21pm, Mar 08)
Last: base ball chick

NewsblogThe One Start, One Shutout Wonders
(5 - 11:15pm, Mar 08)
Last: SoSH U at work

NewsblogAlbert Pujols could keep playing to reach 700 career homers: 'If I’m close to it, why not?'
(168 - 10:57pm, Mar 08)
Last: base ball chick

NewsblogNBA 2020 Season kick-off thread
(1943 - 10:52pm, Mar 08)
Last: rr doesn't talk to pawns

NewsblogMLB suspends free agent Sam Dyson for entire 2021 season
(16 - 9:33pm, Mar 08)
Last: flournoy

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 3-8-2021
(4 - 9:26pm, Mar 08)
Last: vortex of dissipation

NewsblogOT - Soccer Thread - Winter Is Here
(913 - 5:32pm, Mar 08)
Last: Richard

NewsblogEmpty Stadium Sports Will Be Really Weird
(12245 - 4:09pm, Mar 08)
Last: .

Sox TherapyA Week Without Me
(7 - 3:03pm, Mar 08)
Last: Darren

NewsblogJake Odorizzi reaches 2-year deal with Houston Astros, source says
(16 - 12:32pm, Mar 08)
Last: The Gary DiSarcina Fan Club (JAHV)

NewsblogUniversal DH and expanded postseason unlikely for 2021 MLB season, per report
(35 - 8:07pm, Mar 07)
Last: Ron J

NewsblogWe found them: They're the worst team ever
(4 - 1:06pm, Mar 07)
Last: puck

NewsblogSource: Former Boston Red Sox CF Jackie Bradley Jr. to sign 2-year, $24M deal with Milwaukee Brewers
(28 - 11:58am, Mar 06)
Last: snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster)

Page rendered in 0.5297 seconds
48 querie(s) executed