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Wednesday, January 13, 2021

MLB suspends political donations after DC riot

Major League Baseball is suspending all political contributions in the wake of last week’s invasion of the U.S. Capitol by a mob loyal to President Donald Trump, joining a wave of major corporations rethinking their efforts to lobby Washington.

“In light of the unprecedented events last week at the U.S. Capitol, MLB is suspending contributions from its Political Action Committee pending a review of our political contribution policy going forward,” the league said in a statement to The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Following the insurrection last week by Trump supporters while Congress attempted to certify the results of the presidential election, many companies have said they will avoid making donations to members of the House and Senate who voted to overturn President-elect Joe Biden’s victory over Trump. Others, like MLB, have postponed political giving to both political parties altogether.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: January 13, 2021 at 03:28 PM | 136 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: political

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   101. Mayor Blomberg Posted: January 15, 2021 at 10:34 PM (#6000051)
so what was your counter plan, Howie, or are you only offering whatabait?
   102. Howie Menckel Posted: January 15, 2021 at 10:40 PM (#6000052)
my plan was to, from the early stages, evaluate the undeniable harm from keeping businesses open vs the undeniable harm from shutting them down. I didn't have a dog in the ultimate hunt, as it were.

it was just bizarre to me how many people with no connection, at that point, to real life were bloviating only in one direction (and in the one more convenient for them).

whether that direction would prove better or not, in the long run, had nothing to do with it.

many states have taken vastly different routes, obviously.

if you want to tell me that you predicted many months ago that CA, NY, NJ etc would be exactly where they are now - compared to where states like FL, GA, TX, and other "death zones" are now - then bully for you.

I'm not much of a soothsayer - I have been surprised at many of the results from the different experiments.

a lot of bold predictions overall have - well, fared poorly.

for instance, the scientific tide seems to have turned against keeping pre-teen kids out of schools for the next 3-6 months, as some still suggest.
   103. SoSH U at work Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:01 PM (#6000056)
the most jaw-dropping moment in my 20+ years on this site came last spring, when a couple of posters were thankfully very honest and said that, 'why no, I don't know a single person who has faced economic distress due to the pandemic.'


What do you think this said about the posters who said this (and, for full disclosure, I may have been one of them). But I'm curious what made your jaw fall so fast and so far?
   104. rr doesn't talk to pawns Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:28 PM (#6000058)
Newsom has definitely done some stuff I do not agree with on COVID, as JCE suggests. But the whole thing is hugely complicated and the USA's political and cultural ecology are not cut out for this. I think that in looking at different states, it is probably a good idea to look beyond "Is the Governor a Democrat or a Republican?" and look at other various types of information--population distribution, etc.

103/SoSH:

I don't recall anyone saying that, but given the demographics of BTF, if it did happen, it is not really that surprising. A lot of the guys here do stuff that could be transitioned to working remotely. As a college professor (one of many around here) I am a perfect example. However, COVID is a nightmare for some adjuncts (I am lucky--FT, tenured) and for many of my students.
   105. SoSH U at work Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:35 PM (#6000060)
Like I said, I probably was one of them. At the time, I didn't know of anyone who had suffered financially due to COVID-19. But I'm also positive that fact doesn't say what BTF's Oracle of the Common Man is implying it does.

   106. rr doesn't talk to pawns Posted: January 15, 2021 at 11:38 PM (#6000062)
105

I have a buddy who works in tech--he said the same. Not personally knowing people doesn't mean that one is not aware of it, ofc.
   107. Joyful Calculus Instructor Posted: January 16, 2021 at 12:02 AM (#6000064)
However, COVID is a nightmare for some adjuncts


Yup, both schools that I work at made significant cuts this semester and as an adjunct, I was on the chopping block. Now I’m unemployed for the first time in over 9 years.
   108. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 16, 2021 at 12:12 AM (#6000066)
Trumpees don't think the election was stolen because of how the results came in. They think it was stolen because they keep being told that it was stolen.
Indeed. As someone on Twitter noted, people like Ted Cruz et al. were not claiming in the runup to January 6 that there actually was fraud. They were claiming that there were allegations of fraud.

"Where there's smoke there's fire" doesn't work as an argument when you're the one who set off a smoke bomb.
   109. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 16, 2021 at 12:28 AM (#6000068)
Now I’m unemployed for the first time in over 9 years.
So not a joyful calculus instructor?
   110. Howie Menckel Posted: January 16, 2021 at 12:31 AM (#6000069)
What do you think this said about the posters who said this (and, for full disclosure, I may have been one of them). But I'm curious what made your jaw fall so fast and so far?


I already applauded their honesty, and how it helped me understand the entire tenor of the early debate here. it's not some condemnation from me.

I happen to have 2 siblings who work in retail and a brother-in-law in construction and another one in traveling sales, and nephews and nieces who are in construction or are flight attendants or car salesmen and vet techs and so on (and many of these are jobs at least at the midpoint of US wages, so I didn't see this as an extremely impoverished group. but we are still working our way up the collective ladder, and are decades behind many posters here, is all). there also is an intellectually disabled adult family member - and those are monthly costs that don't care about a pandemic.

all of these family members were severely impacted immediately. I was naive to think that most here had many similar family/friend urgent disruptions that threatened their own loved ones' next month's rent and car payment and so forth.

I also didn't say that "not knowing anyone" made it impossible to be fully empathetic to the impossible decisions that arose. but yeah, I kinda think it would make it tough for someone to fully weigh "keep open" or "shut down" equally if one option had no direct effect. and as I said before, that's called, well, being human.

an earlier revelation for me here was how many BBTF posters are descendants from not only before the Civil War period, but WAY before.

and that, too, understandably impacts some social discussions.

anyway, thanks for the feedback. believe it or not, we can do this.
   111. Joyful Calculus Instructor Posted: January 16, 2021 at 12:55 AM (#6000070)
[109] I actually haven’t even taught calculus since 2017. Done a lot of statistics the last few years.
   112. The Yankee Clapper Posted: January 16, 2021 at 01:33 AM (#6000071)
also, the 2012 results are not a mistype. democrats won a plurality of votes, and republicans kept the house in a landslide. gerrymandering is a hell of a drug.
There’s a good case, according to political science research, that that the inefficient distribution of Democratic voters harms their party more than gerrymandering. Due to the concentration of Democratic voters in large urban areas, even when Democrats draw all the lines they can’t avoid creating districts that are overwhelmingly Democratic, with their candidates routinely getting 80% - 90% of the vote. That’s a lot of “wasted votes” - you don’t get extra seats by winning some districts by huge margins, while losing most others by smaller margins. That’s how single-member districts work, and not just in the U.S. - the party with the most votes didn’t get the most seats in the last Canadian election.

The GOP benefits from its voters more evenly spread out in the remainder of the country. If all districts were compact, contiguous, and followed existing political boundaries where possible - the opposite of gerrymandering - it would still do well in redistricting.
   113. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 16, 2021 at 02:12 AM (#6000072)
YC, do you think there aren’t districts where Republicans get 80-90% of the vote?
   114. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 16, 2021 at 09:50 AM (#6000087)

but yeah, I kinda think it would make it tough for someone to fully weigh "keep open" or "shut down" equally if one option had no direct effect.

I think this is true, but probably also true if you didn’t know anyone who lost a loved one to COVID, didn’t have any friends who were doctors or nurses in the NYC metro area, etc.
   115. Howie Menckel Posted: January 16, 2021 at 10:43 AM (#6000093)
I think this is true, but probably also true if you didn’t know anyone who lost a loved one to COVID, didn’t have any friends who were doctors or nurses in the NYC metro area, etc.

that seems reasonable.

I have a niece who is an ER nurse in the Northeast. on one particular morning, her hospital lost 8 patients to COVID - Christmas morning, as it happened. my sister-in-law said that while her daughter is tough as nails (can confirm; and she is a wife and Mom and not yet 30), that day was as rough as she hopes it ever gets.

[the Irish, we're breeders: if you just take self, spouse, siblings, sibling spouses, their children, their children's spouses, and their one kid so far - I'm already up to 25. I have 34 first cousins, tough to keep up. but if they have 20 spouses and 34 kids - that's 113. but all 34 of my cousins are older than me. so there might be 15 of them/spouses gone, but their kids easily might have more than 15 kids; I know one of them has 4, including a set of twins who weighed a combined 20 pounds at birth. #breederships)]
   116. Mayor Blomberg Posted: January 16, 2021 at 12:10 PM (#6000097)
I already applauded their honesty, and how it helped me understand the entire tenor of the early debate here. it's not some condemnation from me.

Bullshit. Read the words with which you describe them and grow a little self-consciosness.
   117. The Yankee Clapper Posted: January 16, 2021 at 01:25 PM (#6000110)
YC, do you think there aren’t districts where Republicans get 80-90% of the vote?
Sure, just not nearly as many as the Democratic districts with such margins. Unlike Governor, Senate & President, there doesn’t seem to a readily available table with all the House results sortable by winning margin, but this has the percentages for the major party candidates in every race, and my quick count indicates that in 2020 76 Democratic House candidates won with 70% or more of the vote, compared to only 40 for the GOP. If you lower the threshold for wasted votes to 65%, the gap would probably increase. Some of those Districts were mandated by the Voting Rights Act, or simply reflect the population distribution and are reasonably compact, contiguous and consistent with existing political boundaries - so not really a gerrymander. Sure, there are some districts drawn by the GOP to favor their candidates where they had the power to do so, but that doesn’t account for MA, NY, NJ, IL, MD, CA, and other Democratic states.
   118. . . . . . . Posted: January 16, 2021 at 01:40 PM (#6000115)
YC is correct. A big part of that dynamic is that the south is ruby red but it’s because there’s pretty much a hard 60/40 split - districts where a Republican floor is 55 and ceiling is 65 absent deal girl/live boy - because of demographics. Those districts play as hyperpolarized districts because the 60% isn’t just slightly right, they’re very right. But in raw numbers there are way more Dems in those districts than there are Rs in some of the crazy 80-90% dem districts in urban districts.

That dynamic is so strong it even comes out in senate seats, which are (inherently) not gerrymandered or gerrymanderable.
   119. McCoy Posted: January 16, 2021 at 01:45 PM (#6000116)
The GOP has a current advantage in the Senate because every state gets two senators regardless of population. Plain and simple.

CA gets two. Wyoming gets two.
   120. McCoy Posted: January 16, 2021 at 01:49 PM (#6000117)
   121. McCoy Posted: January 16, 2021 at 01:51 PM (#6000118)
Regardless of the outcome in New York, the overall redistricting picture is the same: The GOP is in almost as good a position as it enjoyed in the last redistricting process, when Republicans controlled the drawing of 55 percent of congressional districts and Democrats controlled only 10 percent after 2010’s GOP wave. As a result, the House map has been more biased toward Republicans this decade than at any point since the 1970s (and Republicans have been able to win multiple chambers in state legislatures despite losing the statewide popular vote1). It now looks as if we’re headed for another 10 years of Republican-favoring maps. Democrats were able to win the House and several state legislatures in 2018 thanks to shifting vote patterns in the suburbs in particular, but Republicans in many states will now have the opportunity to draw new gerrymanders that account for this realignment.

That said, the House map overall might still be less biased in the 2020s than it was in the 2010s. While it’s true that Republicans are set to draw many more congressional districts than Democrats, they will still draw fewer than they did in 2011. In addition, at least 167 districts,2 or 38 percent of the House, will be drawn by independent commissions or by both parties sharing power.3 That’s up from 145 (33 percent) in 2011, in part because states such as Colorado, Michigan and Virginia passed redistricting-related ballot measures in recent years. These reforms should translate into fewer gerrymandered seats overall — by either party.
   122. Howie Menckel Posted: January 16, 2021 at 02:43 PM (#6000127)
Bullshit. Read the words with which you describe them and grow a little self-consciosness.


let's see: "I kinda think it would make it tough for someone to fully weigh "keep open" or "shut down" equally if one option had no direct effect. and as I said before, that's called, well, being human."

wow, upon further review..... sorry. no condemnation.
   123. The Yankee Clapper Posted: January 16, 2021 at 03:02 PM (#6000130)
The GOP has a current advantage in the Senate because every state gets two senators regardless of population. Plain and simple.
Democrats will control the Senate (narrowly) as soon as the final election results are certified. Equal representation in the Senate is enshrined in the Constitution, which even prevents any Amendment depriving a state of equal representation without its consent. That formula hasn’t always favored the GOP, although it arguably does now. However, it’s more than a little late to complain about a practice that has existed for 230+ years and can’t be changed.
   124. gef, talking mongoose & suburban housewife Posted: January 16, 2021 at 04:28 PM (#6000140)
[the Irish, we're breeders: if you just take self, spouse, siblings, sibling spouses, their children, their children's spouses, and their one kid so far - I'm already up to 25. I have 34 first cousins, tough to keep up. but if they have 20 spouses and 34 kids - that's 113. but all 34 of my cousins are older than me. so there might be 15 of them/spouses gone, but their kids easily might have more than 15 kids; I know one of them has 4, including a set of twins who weighed a combined 20 pounds at birth. #breederships)]


Until a few recentish deaths, I had something like 22 first cousins -- all on the (of course!) Irish side of the family, i.e. my dad's folks. (My mother, mostly Irish as well except for her disconcertingly Jewish father, was an only child.) We're not close, so offhand I have no idea how many spouses & children they've picked up along the way. I'm 4th-youngest of my generation.

I've mentioned before that my dad's siblings(he was the youngest by several years of the 7 offspring who lived to adulthood, & was also the first by several years to die) included 2 sets of twin girls, though the younger pair died at something like 3 & 6. The older twins in turned married twin brothers.

And of course, as also previously mentioned, my grandparents on that side were first cousins -- their dads (the older of whom I think had come over from Ireland, possibly in connection with the Potato Famine; he later served in an Alabama infantry regiment during the Late Unpleasantness) were brothers. Because Alabama (though they relocated to the Shreveport area, jesus, probably something like 110 years ago).
   125. McCoy Posted: January 16, 2021 at 05:18 PM (#6000149)
A little late? It's been a flaw in the system since the beginning and it's been a major issue for centuries. We had a civil war in part because of how we do the legislative branch.
   126. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 16, 2021 at 06:12 PM (#6000151)
The GOP has a current advantage in the Senate because every state gets two senators regardless of population. Plain and simple.

CA gets two. Wyoming gets two.
Again, as recently as 2009, Dems had 60 seats in the senate.


Yes, Wyoming. Also Rhode Island, Vermont, Maine, Delaware, New Hampshire, Hawaii.
   127. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 16, 2021 at 06:24 PM (#6000153)
Again, as recently as 2009, Dems had 60 seats in the senate.
2009 was a totally different world in our political culture. Might as well be 1909.
   128. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 16, 2021 at 06:34 PM (#6000156)
There have been no structural changes since 2009.
   129. The Yankee Clapper Posted: January 16, 2021 at 06:35 PM (#6000157)
A little late? It's been a flaw in the system since the beginning and it's been a major issue for centuries.
A flaw? Far from it - the Great Compromise made the Republic possible. The Constitution was ratified with equal representation in the Senate as one of its cornerstones, and every subsequent state has joined the Union fully aware of how the bicameral legislative branch functions. Surprising what some wish to cast aside merely because it doesn’t coincide with their short-term political goals.
   130. David Nieporent (now, with children) Posted: January 16, 2021 at 07:30 PM (#6000159)
Far from it - the Great Compromise made the Republic possible.
That's not a rebuttal to the argument that it's a flaw; that's an explanation of why it was implemented despite being a flaw.
The Constitution was ratified with equal representation in the Senate as one of its cornerstones, and every subsequent state has joined the Union fully aware of how the bicameral legislative branch functions. Surprising what some wish to cast aside merely because it doesn’t coincide with their short-term political goals.
You're just doing that thing you always do of confusing "is" and "ought."

There may well be arguments in favor of the current design, but "They couldn't get people to agree 230 years ago without doing it that way" isn't one of them, nor is "That's the way it is."
   131. McCoy Posted: January 16, 2021 at 07:31 PM (#6000160)
The great compromise is what empowered slaveholders and sent us into a civil war followed by well over a century of violent and deadly racism.
   132. McCoy Posted: January 16, 2021 at 07:39 PM (#6000162)
Re 126. That the Dems can do well is not actually a rebuttal that the system creates a system that plays favorite with various demographics.

Also not all senators are up for election at the same time as you well know.
   133. sunday silence (again) Posted: January 17, 2021 at 06:19 PM (#6000215)

for instance, the scientific tide seems to have turned against keeping pre-teen kids out of schools for the next 3-6 months, as some still suggest.


Well here we go again with this...

When Covid first began I read some articles were suggesting that there was a split in the scientific community regarding this. WIth arguments put forth that it frees up front line providers who have little ones at home etc. I questioned this at the time in the thread we had going and people said "yes" that's a thing and there's reasons to go to school.

Then about I dunno 2 months into it we saw nationwide move to take everyone out of schools. So I brought it up again. And this time was meant by a few responses saying leaving them in school was never a thing. One of them by Slivers of Maranville who I've met in person and i know he's a really smart guy. So that made me a little confused.

Now we are back to this. Is this really a thing? That there's logic to keeping kids in school or is it all bullshet?

   134. Ron J Posted: January 17, 2021 at 07:24 PM (#6000220)
#133 The answer always was a tricky one (in terms of getting support). It's something that should be decided on a case by case basis -- depending on how the region itself is doing. This is something most decision makers aren't comfortable with.

And the second point has to do with priorities. They induce less stress on the system that for instance having bars open. But it's generally proven harder to close bars than schools.
   135. Howie Menckel Posted: January 17, 2021 at 08:28 PM (#6000226)
yes - and no

excerpts re the split - and the turning tide I referenced:


"Alberto Carvalho has been able to do what hundreds of his fellow superintendents have not: fully open his district’s schools in the pandemic.

The head of Miami-Dade County Public Schools said he’s been able to rely on the advice of scientific experts and follow through on a plan that has worked and gained trust.

“We’ve been well-informed by public health and medical experts. We convened a task force of experts, in pediatric medicine, in immunology,” he told CNN, adding that one of the experts is Dr. Vivek Murthy, whom President-elect Joe Biden has nominated for US Surgeon General.

New York City is seeing a similar outcome after it reopened its public elementary schools last month, despite an increasing coronavirus test positivity rate in the city as a whole.

The city has conducted about 100,000 Covid tests in schools, and found a positivity rate of 0.68%, far below the citywide rate of just under 9%, according to New York City data.

The evidence that schools are not hotbeds of virus spread led New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to reverse a policy requiring schools to close if the community positivity rate hit 9% or higher.

But many school districts are not ready to reopen. Los Angeles, the second largest district behind New York City, remains fully online, as do San Francisco and Washington, DC.

On Monday, some Chicago students in pre-K and special education got to return to school for the first time since March. But the push to reopen schools was met with heavy resistance from the city’s teachers’ union, which argued that the city had not invested enough in measures to make in-person learning safe for staff and children.

Biden said reopening public schools is one of his priorities for his first 100 days in office."
   136. Hysterical & Useless Posted: January 18, 2021 at 02:07 PM (#6000294)
who gets to decide which claims are baseless, pal?


I think it's pretty clear when people loudly, persistently, preemptively allege massive fraud, while presenting NO EVIDENCE WHATSOEVER, their claims are most charitably described as baseless.

Other, harsher terms might be more accurate.
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