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Tuesday, November 30, 2021

MLB, union stopped blood testing for HGH due to pandemic

Major League Baseball and the players’ association stopped blood testing for Human Growth Hormone because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Blood testing for HGH began in 2012, and 412 samples with no positive results were collected in the year ending with the 2020 World Series. MLB and the union never publicly announced the stoppage in blood testing but its absence was revealed Monday when Thomas M. Martin, the independent administrator of the joint drug program, released his annual report.

The decision to interrupt blood testing during the pandemic was made because drawing blood is more invasive than urine testing and requires additional collectors who would have increased the number of people coming into contact with players and decreased social distancing. MLB and the union plan to resume blood testing next season.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 30, 2021 at 12:35 PM | 492 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: hgh, peds

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   401. Miserable, Non-Binary Candy is all we deserve CoB Posted: January 15, 2022 at 02:42 AM (#6061149)
Flop
   402. Lassus Posted: January 15, 2022 at 07:46 AM (#6061153)
Update -

1/1 - 12.7%
1/2 - 12.9%
1/3 - 13.4%
1/4 - 15.5%
1/5 - 16.1%
1/6 - 16.2%
1/7 - 16.9%
1/8 - 16.9%
1/9 - 17%
1/10 - 16.7%
1/11 - 16.7%
1/12 - 16.2%
1/13 - 16.8%
   403. Jack Sommers Posted: January 16, 2022 at 06:46 PM (#6061268)
What’s Holding Up New Omicron Vaccines?

Vaccine makers worry yet another variant will start dominating in the months it takes to roll out shots against this one

Debate over whether or not manufacturers should, or are willing to play whack-a-mole with variants while simultaneously developing a universal vaccine that might be ready in a couple of years.


   404. Greg Pope Posted: January 17, 2022 at 11:37 AM (#6061344)
I've been wondering about that. Moderna and Pfizer have said many times that with mRNA they can have a vaccine ready in 60 days. I know there are a lot of regulatory and trial hoops to jump through, though. So I understand that they didn't do it for delta. But omicron seems to break through the vaccines at a pretty high rate. It did for me. And my concern would be that the next variant will be branched off of omicron and so may be even more likely to break through. Whereas if we have an omicron vaccine that is 90% effective, then it might be as effective against the next variant as the original ones were against delta.

I get that it's not practical to chase everything but I think there should be a point where you develop a new one.
   405. base ball chick Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:03 PM (#6061348)
greg is right

trouble is that the vaccine thingy seems to be REactive, not PRO active

its all - well, omicron might could cause zillions of cases and have bidnesses where everyone out sick need to shut down, but like so what. and hospitals overful and HCWs quitting? like so what.

in mah not so umble opinyin, we gotta prepare for - next version is as contagious as omicron and makes people even sicker. looks like the antibodies don't stay around real too long and we gotta keep getting vaxxed anyhow. this virus changes often and fast. silly to pretend there is this long lasting "natcherill immuity" forever

i now know someone, not vaxxed, who has caught covid THREE times now
   406. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:04 PM (#6061349)
Omicron seems to spread quickly enough that by the time they have a vaccine for it, it will have already receded. But your logic makes sense about the next variant.

I think the prior vaccines were pretty effective against Delta so there wasn’t really a need for a new version, just get people boosters. The real issue was the large number of unvaccinated people here.
   407. bob gee Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:14 PM (#6061352)
It looks like omicron is, for active cases, receding in chunks of NY state at the same rate (or faster) than the speed at which it infected. This is incredibly good news, since we can use England as a guide for what will happen (2 weeks out).

The only problem is that hospitalizations are still significant, and it looks like it is still at the 10-14 to 1 rate of unvaxed vs vax in the hospitals. And for those with children who can't get a vaccine still have to be on the defensive.


   408. base ball chick Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:25 PM (#6061356)
AND
the next variation just might could be bad for people under 12. this virus changes a LOT and fast
   409. Tony S Posted: January 17, 2022 at 04:22 PM (#6061390)

Cases and hospitalizations are starting to come down in MD, which is very welcome news. Still way above last winter, but our health care workers will take any breathing room they can get.

I took my sweet time and caution de-icing my walkway and sidewalk this morning.
   410. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 17, 2022 at 04:47 PM (#6061393)
It looks like omicron is, for active cases, receding in chunks of NY state at the same rate (or faster) than the speed at which it infected. This is incredibly good news, since we can use England as a guide for what will happen (2 weeks out).

The only problem is that hospitalizations are still significant, and it looks like it is still at the 10-14 to 1 rate of unvaxed vs vax in the hospitals. And for those with children who can't get a vaccine still have to be on the defensive.
If the US follows South Africa (a big if), there will be a long tail of hospitalizations and deaths, as the early rise and fall of cases was more geared toward younger and/or otherwise less vulnerable groups. Reported deaths in NY also would not peak for at least another week, maybe two more. For reference, 7-day reported average deaths in NY state, including what was reported today, are already just below last winter's peak in NY. I think in some other states they are already above last winter.
   411. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 17, 2022 at 06:46 PM (#6061404)

I would look at some of the stats of the past few days with caution. It’s a holiday weekend, reporting will certainly be below normal levels for a Monday.

Cases definitely coming down in the Northeast but maybe not as quickly as the charts would indicate.
   412. Lassus Posted: January 18, 2022 at 09:54 AM (#6061456)
Still no update in the 7-day rolling average for % positive of tests for the county since 1/13/21, be very very curious to see what happens there.

Very tentatively planning a trip to NYC the last weekend of February, our first since the same weekend of February 2020. Really hoping for relative sanity by then.
   413. Crosseyed and Painless Posted: January 18, 2022 at 10:24 AM (#6061459)
Cases looked like they stopped going up in Denmark, but now keep going up again, much different than in UK. Their hospitalizations have kept going up by their ICU number has been going down for a while. Deaths per million and excess deaths they are way below US and UK.

Caveat - as always, I have zero idea what any of this means. Just sharing something that caught my eye.
   414. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: January 18, 2022 at 11:26 AM (#6061464)
11 of 22 kids in my son’s class were at school on Friday.

Friday night we received an email saying one of those kids tested positive.

Last night my son started coughing but tested negative on the rapid test… earliest available pcr test that I can find is Wednesday. So I guess we’re “working from home” this week.
   415. Lassus Posted: January 18, 2022 at 11:40 AM (#6061468)
It looks like omicron is, for active cases, receding in chunks of NY state at the same rate (or faster) than the speed at which it infected.

Because you are all concerned about Utica (which, quite honestly, is probably a decent indicator of America, being a very very very very super-average small US city in the middle of mostly shit nowhere), here is the updated positivity rate:

1/9 - 17%
1/10 - 16.7%
1/11 - 16.7%
1/12 - 16.2%
1/13 - 16.8%
1/14 - 16.2%
1/15 - 15.3%
1/16 - 15.0%


So. Not collapsing per se, but as referenced above, receding.

   416. bob gee Posted: January 18, 2022 at 12:54 PM (#6061481)
Sorry Lassus, I was using the areas closer to NYC, and not the positive %, but the number of active cases.

I google (county) "covid" "dashboard" "new york" and for many of them, the first thing that pops up is a statistics page from the NYTimes (no click through necessary) showing active cases on a graph.

NYtimes also has a comparison of cases and 14 day change, the downstate areas are dropping nicely.
   417. Snowboy Posted: January 18, 2022 at 02:18 PM (#6061487)
EU regulator finds mRNA COVID-19 shots safe during pregnancy
Jan 18 (Reuters) - COVID-19 vaccines made using mRNA technology do not cause pregnancy complications for expectant mothers and their babies, the European Union's drug regulator said on Tuesday, following a detailed review of several studies.

The review based on studies involving around 65,000 pregnancies at different stages did not find any sign of higher risk of complications, miscarriages, preterm births or severe side-effects on the unborn babies from mRNA shots, the European Medicines Agency said.

   418. Lassus Posted: January 18, 2022 at 03:06 PM (#6061490)
Sorry Lassus, I was using the areas closer to NYC, and not the positive %, but the number of active cases.

Oh, no apology necessary. I honestly love the seven-day rolling average of positive tests as a gauge. I do think it's doing what everyone says, coming down slowly.
   419. Hot Wheeling American Posted: January 18, 2022 at 03:17 PM (#6061492)
EU regulator finds mRNA COVID-19 shots safe during pregnancy

That's nice. My wife got Pfizer at 6-7 months pregnant last April. Baby came a few weeks early, but that was due to the mother (pre-eclampsia). Baby was born and remains healthy (maybe too healthy??).
   420. SoSH U at work Posted: January 18, 2022 at 03:48 PM (#6061495)
Baby was born and remains healthy (maybe too healthy??).


I didn't realize baby health was like the quiet.

Nonetheless, congratulations.
   421. Tony S Posted: January 19, 2022 at 08:41 AM (#6061556)
Florida continues to break barriers.

Orange County Medical Director Dr. Raul Pino wrote an email to staff on Jan. 4th encouraging them to get vaccinated and boosted for COVID-19.

In it he wrote, “I have a hard time understanding how we can be in public health and not practice it.”

After sending the email he was placed on administrative leave.


Encouraging. Not requiring, not coercing. Simply urging public health workers to get a vaccine.

Apparently Florida has a problem with that.

   422. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 11:12 AM (#6061571)
Latest excess deaths numbers out in South Africa. According to this data, there have been just under 20,000 excess deaths so far in the Omicron wave. That's something like 20% of the delta wave, so overall 25% or more seems likely.
   423. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 19, 2022 at 01:40 PM (#6061581)
I'm doing better now. It was worse than a cold, but for this 3x vaxxed guy, not too bad. My wife and son managed to not get sick.

i now know someone, not vaxxed, who has caught covid THREE times now


You'd think there would be a conclusion to draw from this.
   424. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 19, 2022 at 01:46 PM (#6061582)
Hana Horka: Czech singer dies after catching Covid intentionally

Hana Horka, 57, was unvaccinated and had posted on social media that she was recovering after testing positive, but died two days later.

Her son, Jan Rek, said she got infected on purpose when he and his father had the virus, so she could get a recovery pass to access certain venues.

The Czech Republic reported a record number of Covid-19 cases on Wednesday.

Mr Rek and his father, who are both fully vaccinated, both caught Covid over Christmas. But he said his mother had decided not to stay away from them, preferring instead to expose herself to the virus.

...

Although she was unvaccinated, Jan Rek stressed that his mother did not believe in some of the more bizarre conspiracy theories about Covid vaccines.

"Her philosophy was that she was more OK with the idea of catching Covid than getting vaccinated. Not that we would get microchipped or anything like that," he said.


Sad story. This is why telling people that Omicron is "mild" or just like the cold/flu without giving the proper context was so dangerous. This is a more general point rather than specific to this case -- if she wasn't vaccinated by the time Omicron hit, then she was ok with catching the prior variants too.
   425. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:23 PM (#6061585)
Yes, some seem to have a tendency to really want not to need a vaccine--to believe themselves "strong" enough to take on the virus without any real challenge. Or for some other related or unrelated reason. I can sort of, but not exactly, understand it. As an analogy to me basically never having had a flu shot I guess it makes some sense. The part that really rankles is this whole disinformation campaign amplifying these feelings with the result that a large number of people eschew vaccination. People have all kinds of unhealthy inklings, both for themselves and for society, stemming from all sorts of real or imagined phenomena. It's really terrible to see them amplified by irresponsible people with a meagaphone, the Joe Rogans, the DeSantises of the world and worse, with such predictable and avoidable results.
   426. Lassus Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:26 PM (#6061586)
As an analogy to me basically never having had a flu shot I guess it makes some sense.

I got my first flu shot ever the day after my booster, because I felt like I would be a ####### idiot otherwise. (And, to be clear, had been.)
   427. Perry Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:40 PM (#6061587)
Yeah, I never got a flu shot until about 5 years ago, when I was over 60, despite their being free and easy to get. In fact, my local supermarket chain literally PAYS ME to get it, in the form of a $10 certificate. My reasoning, such as it was, was that (1) I had never had flu, (2) who cares if I get flu, and (3) I really dislike needles. Emphasis on #3. Which was really, really ####### stupid. After getting the shot the first time I realized how dumb I'd been and haven't missed a year since.
   428. SoSH U at work Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:43 PM (#6061589)
I got my first one in 2020. When the knuckleheads started talking about how COVID was no worse than the flu because the flu had killed 60,000 Americans or some figure (or many times more than Levitt predicted, twice). My immediate thought was, "Damn, I didn't know the flu was that deadly."
   429. Crosseyed and Painless Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:46 PM (#6061590)
Even with less-than-ideal vaccination rates, it still sort of blows my mind that the excess deaths in Michigan were higher this winter than last winter. Scrolling through this site, its seems like Michigan's the only state in which that happened. Maybe Colorado's close?
   430. BDC Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:54 PM (#6061592)
I had a bad reaction to one of the famous swine-flu shots in 1976 (not any of the ghastly reactions, just like a bad case of the flu, which seemed counterproductive). That turned me against flu shots for about 35 years, but after that I became a pretty regular flu-shot getter. No great revelation, just that they were free and convenient and why not.
   431. Tony S Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:12 PM (#6061598)
I wasn't a flu shot guy either until 2020, until Covid finally motivated me to minimize ALL potential unpleasant health experiences. I wasn't making any big statement; it was just indifference.

There was the age factor too -- when you're in your 30's, you don't really relate to "the flu is bad for seniors" messaging. When your 50's creep up on you, suddenly you don't feel so far removed from it.
   432. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:33 PM (#6061602)
I had the real influenza* about 10 years ago, and it was a terrible, horrible few days. I've been getting the flu shot ever since. It helps that they hold free clinics at work.

One of the weird factors about our covid response is the US's colloquial usage of "the flu" to cover just about any illness. "the stomach flu" and other terms are thrown around for so many illnesses that are not the influenza virus. Many people think influenza is milder than it really is.

   433. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:35 PM (#6061603)
Even with less-than-ideal vaccination rates, it still sort of blows my mind that the excess deaths in Michigan were higher this winter than last winter. Scrolling through this site, its seems like Michigan's the only state in which that happened. Maybe Colorado's close?
It's still way too early for most states this winter for CDC data, especially since we are still on the upslope for reported deaths in every state for the omicron wave, and there are also major data lags. There will definitely be other states where this happens.
   434. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:38 PM (#6061604)
wrong thread.
   435. Tom Goes to the Ballpark Posted: January 19, 2022 at 04:58 PM (#6061617)
Yeah, I never got a flu shot until about 5 years ago, when I was over 60, despite their being free and easy to get. In fact, my local supermarket chain literally PAYS ME to get it, in the form of a $10 certificate. My reasoning, such as it was, was that (1) I had never had flu, (2) who cares if I get flu, and (3) I really dislike needles. Emphasis on #3. Which was really, really ####### stupid. After getting the shot the first time I realized how dumb I'd been and haven't missed a year since.
One of the surprising things (to me at least) I learned from the pandemic was how common the fear/hatred/extreme displeasure of needles is. I figured that it was something like 2-3% of the population, but some estimates put it north of 20%. The needle hesitant are ripe targets for antivaxx lunatics and if the fear of needles is as widespread as some of the more pessimistic estimates it explains a lot of the vaccine hesitancy we see.
   436. smileyy Posted: January 19, 2022 at 05:14 PM (#6061622)
Happy to see all the flu-shot hesitant coming around. As many have noted, the flu is no joke!
   437. RJ in TO Posted: January 19, 2022 at 05:57 PM (#6061625)
I had the real influenza* about 10 years ago, and it was a terrible, horrible few days. I've been getting the flu shot ever since. It helps that they hold free clinics at work.
For me, it was about 20 years ago, and resulted in a week of shivering uncontrollably, while also sweating so much I couldn't stay hydrated, while also lacking the strength to get up and get the liquids necessary to keep my hydrated. It was not the most fun time I've had.

One of the weird factors about our covid response is the US's colloquial usage of "the flu" to cover just about any illness. "the stomach flu" and other terms are thrown around for so many illnesses that are not the influenza virus. Many people think influenza is milder than it really is.


This is a very important point - people don't know how bad the flu actually is, because they've only ever had "the flu".
   438. catomi01 Posted: January 19, 2022 at 06:12 PM (#6061629)
I never got a flu shot...sounds like for a lot of the same reasons - young, relatively healthy, never got the flu, etc.

The first time I got it was in 2020, and even then it was only because I was in the hospital (side note - I don't recommend Kidney Stones and look forward to the vaccine for them), and they offered it, so I took it. This year when I scheduled my booster pfizer, they offered a flu shot too and I took them up on it. I imagine I'll keep up on it from here, if for no other reason than my grandmother yells at me each year to get it.

Side-Side Note - I don't recommend getting both the Flu Shot and a Covid shot at the same time - not real side effects except that both arms felt like I had thrown 300 pitches the night before for about 2 days....spread them out so you have at least one working arming at a time.
   439. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 06:14 PM (#6061630)
CDC's latest summary of projected reported deaths is out. The models they refer to (not their own, I believe), have an average that tops out at about 2600 per day for the week ending February 5. That would be well above the delta wave peak in September, but well below the peak from last January. Certainly much worse than what was being projected without Omicron, but also a little better than I was expecting for this Omicron wave.
   440. base ball chick Posted: January 19, 2022 at 06:15 PM (#6061631)
i can NOT bleeve how many "macho" men are fraid of a lil ol needle. and i know more males than females afraid of a needle. good lord

i had flu shots every year when i was a kid, then have not missed every year since being with Husband because of his bad asthma he can NOT be gettin no flu so we all got flu shots and i have not had no stupid flu. it's $25 if you got no ins, the viit to the acute care if you got no ins is $200 and the med is $150. last i looked. better to get the flu shot

one of my uncles died from flu. he was in his 60s and lived alone and he just got real sick real fast

the most amazing things i found out about flu this past covid time is that

1 - they got no idea how many people actually got the flu, they just guessing. same thing about dying from it
2 - just like covid, you can have it and have no symptoms
   441. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 19, 2022 at 09:36 PM (#6061647)
When I was a kid I had severe allergies to just about everything. So I got allergy shots for years (I seem to recall it being every week, but it was a long time ago that I was a kid, so I'm not 100% on that). The worst part of needles is the anticipation. Once I was used to them, and so didn't anticipate anything bad anymore, I hardly noticed getting a shot. The actual pain - the part that didn't depend on anticipating pain - was almost zero.
   442. Greg Pope Posted: January 20, 2022 at 02:32 PM (#6061750)
i can NOT bleeve how many "macho" men are fraid of a lil ol needle.

While I would never in a million years be described as "macho", I have an irrational fear of needles. When I have to get blood drawn I break out in a sweat. After they put the needle in it's possible for me to pass out, although that hasn't happened in a while. And afterwards I have to sit for 5 minutes before I can get up. One time last year the phlebotomist had to stick me three times to get the vein and I had to lay down after the second time.

Having said that, I have gotten the flu shot every year since I was about 35. Pretty much when the kids started getting them at the pediatrician. I figured I probably should so I go to Walgreens every year and get it done. Haven't passed out yet.
   443. SoSH U at work Posted: January 20, 2022 at 03:33 PM (#6061769)

When I was a kid I had severe allergies to just about everything. So I got allergy shots for years (I seem to recall it being every week, but it was a long time ago that I was a kid, so I'm not 100% on that). The worst part of needles is the anticipation. Once I was used to them, and so didn't anticipate anything bad anymore, I hardly noticed getting a shot. The actual pain - the part that didn't depend on anticipating pain - was almost zero.


I could have written this word for word. I used to have to get an allergy shot regularly when I was a kid, and, as a result, shots don't bother me.
   444. Benji Gil Gamesh VII - The Opt-Out Awakens Posted: January 20, 2022 at 08:09 PM (#6061793)
Happy to see all the flu-shot hesitant coming around. As many have noted, the flu is no joke!
Had never gotten a flu shot through about age 30/31. Had the very mistaken belief that the flu was only ever just a bad cold with a different name.

Then I actually got the flu. Was out of work (at a job I'd started just a month or two before) for nearly a week. Crushing fatigue, fever, chills, whole 9. Eyes sufficiently opened, annual flu shot ever since.
   445. Hot Wheeling American Posted: January 21, 2022 at 10:36 AM (#6061828)
While I would never in a million years be described as "macho", I have an irrational fear of needles. When I have to get blood drawn I break out in a sweat. After they put the needle in it's possible for me to pass out, although that hasn't happened in a while. And afterwards I have to sit for 5 minutes before I can get up. One time last year the phlebotomist had to stick me three times to get the vein and I had to lay down after the second time.

I've always been fine with shots as an adult, but there's something about a blood draw that gets me. I used to beat myself up about it pretty hard, but I've come around to thinking it's just inherently part of me and not something I can control. I had hoped I matured past it and so a few years ago went to give blood. I spent some time in the waiting room where, of course, someone was talking in detail about the process. My body didn't like that, and as soon as I sat down in the chair when I was called, even paler than usual, the nurse looked at me and said 'oh, I can't take blood from you'. So I went back to the waiting room to eventually get color back and leave :(
   446. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 21, 2022 at 11:13 AM (#6061832)

Meat Loaf has reportedly died from COVID.
   447. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 21, 2022 at 12:37 PM (#6061845)
Lot of "bat out of hell" headlines (which seems a little cruel).
   448. Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network) Posted: January 21, 2022 at 02:56 PM (#6061855)
I have an irrational fear of needles.

Oh no, nothing irrational about it at all. I'm in that camp too, but sure the heck got in line to get vax'd and boosted as soon as I could. I hate needles, but I hate the thought of undergoing the COVID Experience much much more. As a trumpet player, I wanted exactly zero part of that when the docs started talking about crippling pulmonary distress/damage. I've never even as much as smoked a cigarette (legal or otherwise) for the same reason.
   449. Eudoxus Posted: January 21, 2022 at 03:07 PM (#6061856)
I spent ten days in London over Christmas, just as (looking back) London was hitting its crazy-high omicron peak. (Just as we were leaving, I was seeing estimates that 15% of the London population had COVID at that moment.) Lots of time on crowded undergrounds and in crowded museums. Masked, but still. Returned home to discover that the test positivity rate in my county had jumped from 8% when I left to 20%. It's now up to 37.6%, which is just almost unbelievably high.

No sign of illness in me from any of that, so that whole story is my little advertisement for the efficacy of the Pfizer vaccine. (No booster yet - I'm not opposed, but I've been unpersuaded so far by the evidence for the need for boosters. Lowered antibody levels in particular seem bad evidence for lowered protection levels. But let me know if I've missed good evidence.)

(The rest of the family while we were in London did come down with something whose main symptoms were nauseau and fatigue. Not a great match for COVID, but I think within the omicron symptom range. Although we all tested negative when it was time to fly back. )

I wonder if vaccination levels would be significantly higher if the vaccine were available as an over-the-counter pill. There are the shot hesitancy issues people have mentioned, and I think often just some interact-with-medical-personnel issues. And it's just easier to quickly pick up a bottle of pills as you walk through the grocery store. I wonder if some people might have a level of ideological opposition to vaccination that prevents them from doing the more public act of making an appointment and showing up to have a person see them vaccinated, but might still be willing, in a moment of concern for their health, to say "what the hell" and pick up a pill to take.
   450. Tony S Posted: January 21, 2022 at 03:29 PM (#6061861)
The rest of the family while we were in London did come down with something whose main symptoms were nauseau and fatigue. Not a great match for COVID, but I think within the omicron symptom range. Although we all tested negative when it was time to fly back. )


I'm glad you're safe and healthy. Did your family have just a bad reaction to a French dinner? :)
   451. base ball chick Posted: January 21, 2022 at 03:46 PM (#6061869)
there will always be a significant number of people who actually really truly believe that they can't get sick and nothing can possibly be wrong with them. ever. (i've never got real too clear on whether or not they think they are immortal, but ah digress). they wouldn't swallow a pill neither.

this is partly why we got so many people around with high blood or diabetes who have not been diagnosed. won't stick they arm in a blood pressure machine at a store neither. one of my gf, her mother died from a stroke in her early 50s/late 40s and my gf she was always complaining about being tired and having HA and so i asked her if she checked her blood pressure and nope. so natcherilly when i dragged her to the blood pressure machine, it was real high so she says it is because she is nervous and i told her if she wanted to pretend wasn't nothing wrong with her she best write out something legal about who she wants taking care of her kids when she strokes. she got all Up Set but she did get to a clinic before this covid wave hit and got her some medicine. not sure whether she TAKES it or not but you see what i'm sayin

AND
even if covid is like a mild or severe cold, you can STILL get long lasting mental problems from it. it wold be real nice to have some like numbers on this but theres LOTS of people got no doctor/no ins and lots of people who refuse to go for anything besides a broken leg or something

i also don't know how many people are being counted as covid deaths if they die of complications from covid even if they are negative when they go back in the hospital

this is why the excess death count is important
   452. DCA Posted: January 21, 2022 at 04:15 PM (#6061877)
No sign of illness in me from any of that, so that whole story is my little advertisement for the efficacy of the Pfizer vaccine. (No booster yet - I'm not opposed, but I've been unpersuaded so far by the evidence for the need for boosters. Lowered antibody levels in particular seem bad evidence for lowered protection levels. But let me know if I've missed good evidence.)

Get a booster.

That's only among nursing home residents, which is a population of concern and also easy to collect data about. Most were vaccinated pretty early (fully vaxxed by February/March). Efficacy of booster shot against infection is 90%+ compared to unvaccinated and vaccinated with no booster. Recent weeks are almost all omicron and the efficacy is holding.

Booster is as effective against omicron as primary vaccination was against alpha/beta/delta. Unclear if it's the fact of the third dose, or the timing of the most recent dose. But if you are due for a booster, get one.
   453. smileyy Posted: January 21, 2022 at 04:21 PM (#6061879)
[449] I too highly recommend a booster. This article comes from studies that show that a booster (or 3rd shot in what should have been a 3-shot series, however you want to look at it) provides much better protection from Omicron.
   454. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 21, 2022 at 04:24 PM (#6061880)
I grew up seeing my dad give himself an insulin shot before every meal -- he'd usually do it right at the dinner table -- so am pretty fine with needles and blood draws. I sometimes need to sit down for a few minutes afterwards but have never had an issue with it being done. That being said, I never got a flu shot until a few years ago simply because I was lazy/busy and didn't realize how easy it was.

When my brother and his wife had a baby, they made everyone get their flu shots before visiting. After doing it that first time, I now do it every year. Also, having older parents now, and understanding more about how the flu and vaccination works as a result of this pandemic, it seems like a no brainer.
   455. Lassus Posted: January 22, 2022 at 06:16 AM (#6061958)
Oneida County update

1/9 - 17%
1/10 - 16.7%
1/11 - 16.7%
1/12 - 16.2%
1/13 - 16.8%
1/14 - 16.2%
1/15 - 15.3%
1/16 - 15.0%
1/17 - 14.9%
(no idea why 1/18 is missing)
1/19 - 13.1%
1/20 - 12.5%


37% sounds insane. 12.5% is still above our previous high of 10.8% on 1/5/2021. For more comparison, we had come down to 6.8% on 1/20/21 from that 1/5/22 high. This time we are (so far) definitely moving down faster.


and I think often just some interact-with-medical-personnel issues.

The former, sure, but they've been giving them at pharmacies for a very long time by now.
   456. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 22, 2022 at 08:07 AM (#6061963)
(no idea why 1/18 is missing)

I assume they are reporting the prior day’s numbers and 1/17 was MLK day.

37% sounds insane.

There was a point a few weeks ago where the *national* 7-day average rate was 32%.
   457. base ball chick Posted: January 22, 2022 at 11:52 AM (#6061992)
and with this is all the people who are not testing because they don't want to miss work or their kidz kept out of skool/day care. and i know plenty of people like that
   458. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 23, 2022 at 03:02 PM (#6062113)
John Stockton thinks 100+ professional athletes have dropped dead on the field/court due to COVID vaccines.

During the interview, Stockton asserted that more than 100 professional athletes have died of vaccination. He also said tens of thousands of people – perhaps millions – have died from vaccines.

“I think it’s highly recorded now, there’s 150 I believe now, it’s over 100 professional athletes dead – professional athletes – the prime of their life, dropping dead that are vaccinated, right on the pitch, right on the field, right on the court,” Stockton said in the interview.


These people live in an alternate reality. The question is how many of our elected officials believe the same b.s.

Link.
   459. RJ in TO Posted: January 23, 2022 at 03:23 PM (#6062117)
There was a point a few weeks ago where the *national* 7-day average rate was 32%.
The province of Ontario had a positivity rate of 35% on December 31st. However, I'm not sure if the rate was being inflated by the limitations on available tests, so that only people who were showing symptoms were able to get (non-rapid) tests scheduled and done. I'd think the positivity rate would have been much lower (while the actual number of cases would have been much, much higher) if everyone who wanted a test could have got one.
   460. Tony S Posted: January 23, 2022 at 06:37 PM (#6062149)
So Mr. Stockton insists that over a hundred athletes have succumbed to vaccines, and he couldn't name a single one? Ok.

Let me guess. The interviewer didn't bother to challenge him.
   461. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 23, 2022 at 07:17 PM (#6062154)
The article pretty clearly calls the claim out as BS.
   462. smileyy Posted: January 23, 2022 at 10:14 PM (#6062184)
Not just died, but died on the court or on the field.
   463. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: January 24, 2022 at 07:58 AM (#6062195)
Many on the right are claiming that vaccines are killing thousands or millions. Given the level of slaughter, you'd think coming up with a name or two would be easy. But somehow it is not.

Stockton is a ####### #######.
   464. DCA Posted: January 24, 2022 at 08:47 AM (#6062198)
BLB, you don't understand.

People aren't dying from COVID. They are dying from car accidents and being assaulted by transgender antifa thugs (and vaccines!), but if they have COIVD then it gets marked as COVID on the death certificate.

But anything bad that happens after you get a vaccine is a direct result of the jab. 3.4 million Americans died last year. Probably about 2 million of those were vaccinated, and would be alive today if not.

Millions!
   465. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 24, 2022 at 09:10 AM (#6062199)
It's just bewildering to me that this became a political thing. For ages vaccine hesitancy was a very marginal wellness-yoga-granola thing. Lefties, albeit not very many of them. And then it switched, overnight, to a mainstream conservative thing.

Makes me wonder where MMR vaccine requirements for elementary school are headed.
   466. Lassus Posted: January 24, 2022 at 09:24 AM (#6062201)
Into the toilet, unless my pessimism is unrealized. Maybe I'm wrong, but I see measles turning into a legitimate problem by 2030 if not sooner.
   467. bob gee Posted: January 24, 2022 at 11:15 AM (#6062224)
465 - I have the exact same bewilderment. It was 5% of the population on this side of the spectrum, and 5% of the population on that side. And "those people" were rightly dismissed as nutjobs.

There's still the 5% on the left (I saw a Jordan Klepper piece in California, and that's the 5%) but a whole lot more on the other side.
   468. Bret Sabermatrician Posted: January 24, 2022 at 11:40 AM (#6062230)
Weird which athletes aren't told to shut up and dribble/pass.

By that logic, Aaron Rogers should have spent more time practicing with his receivers instead of gabbing about vaccines.
   469. Bret Sabermatrician Posted: January 24, 2022 at 11:47 AM (#6062232)
465/467 - the weirdest thing is, the anti-vaxxers on the right WORSHIP Trump, and the pro-vaccine left HATE Trump.

But if you believe Trump, we wouldnt have vaccines without him, yet the support for them are completely flipped. So much that the right boo him when he tells people to get his beautiful vaccines.

Like, do they think this is a long con by Trump where millions of libs are getting killed by the vaxxes and theyre smarter by being in on it?

Or is it as simple as the people we hate think it's good, so even if our GOD says it's good, we have to hate it?
   470. SoSH U at work Posted: January 24, 2022 at 11:56 AM (#6062233)
Or is it as simple as the people we hate think it's good, so even if our GOD says it's good, we have to hate it?


Kind of, I think. It would have been interesting (and potentially tremendously helpful) had Trump done what other public figures had done and gotten the vaccine on camera, touting its efficacy from the beginning. I think the anti-vax positions of his followers have hardened too much to reverse course with him.

I've said from the very beginning that he was actually in the unique position at the start of the pandemic of doing the most good. Most of his opponents were going to simply follow the recommendations of the science community. But with consistent messaging, he had the potential to reach his followers, something Clinton would not have had any chance of doing had we used anything other than the dumbest electoral system and she was the 45th president.
   471. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 24, 2022 at 12:22 PM (#6062239)
There was an NBA player on the Hawks who had some blood clot issues and blamed it on the vaccine. A lot of folks online jumped on this story, without realizing that an NBA player has blood clot issues every couple of years (Chris Bosh was the most prominent recent example) and there were no doctors or team officials backing up his claim. I feel bad for him and it’s natural to wonder what caused the problem, but I wouldn’t base my own personal medical decisions on his one offhand comment that he made.
   472. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: January 24, 2022 at 01:09 PM (#6062251)
The problem (or at least an additional complication) is that Covid also causes heart damage, and it’s impossible to differentiate whether someone who gets a blood clot got it from a vaccine or from the disease. One in five Covid patients end up with heart damage- that’s crazy.

My dad found out he had Covid because he collapsed from chest pains; he thought he was having a heart attack. Pre-vaccine.
   473. Tony S Posted: January 24, 2022 at 01:46 PM (#6062257)
For ages vaccine hesitancy was a very marginal wellness-yoga-granola thing. Lefties, albeit not very many of them. And then it switched, overnight, to a mainstream conservative thing.


Yeah, funny how the primary media got all PC and began treating anti-vaxxers with kid gloves when the dominant ideological orientation of that crowd shifted to the other end of the spectrum.

Anti-vaxxers were ignorant dingbats then. They're ignorant dingbats now.

They're just "misunderstood", or "misinformed", or something is the main media narrative with these people. And it's rude for the rest of us to call them out.

We're two years into the pandemic and one year into the vaccines.

The deaths of the unvaccinated, some quite high-profile, keep piling up and up.

At this point, anybody who's anti-vax is certainly "misinformed", but it is 100% willful on their part, and it's time we stopped treating these hospital-clogging idiots so delicately.
   474. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: January 24, 2022 at 01:58 PM (#6062259)
I still think the best solution is to either allow insurance companies to not cover the costs of hospitalizations for the unvaxx’d, or force them to create a separate tranche in their actuarial tables so the rest of us don’t have to pay for their risk acceptance.
   475. Lassus Posted: January 26, 2022 at 10:54 AM (#6062588)
Oneida County rolling 7-day positivity percentage update:

1/9 - 17%
1/10 - 16.7%
1/11 - 16.7%
1/12 - 16.2%
1/13 - 16.8%
1/14 - 16.2%
1/15 - 15.3%
1/16 - 15.0%
1/17 - 14.9%
1/18 - no update
1/19 - 13.1%
1/20 - 12.5%
1/21 - 11.1%
1/22 - 11.3%
1/23 - 11%
1/24 - 10.7%


The descent has slowed to a bit of a crawl for the moment. Unsure how that tracks with elsewhere.
   476. Tony S Posted: January 26, 2022 at 02:16 PM (#6062635)
Similar pattern in Maryland. Cases have been going down steadily (if a bit jaggedly) here -- after peaking in the 17,000 range early in the month, daily cases are now in the 2K-3K range. Still a lot higher than pre-omicron, but the trend is unmistakable.

More importantly, space is finally opening up in hospitals a bit, allowing for broader treatment of non-Covid patients. I don't have a problem with antivaxxers committing mass suicide; it's mass murder where I draw the line.

   477. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 26, 2022 at 07:55 PM (#6062673)

Overall NY State cases have come down from a peak of 70-80k per day to 12-15k per day right now.
   478. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2022 at 07:59 AM (#6062694)
I'm hoping the dead cat isn't going to bounce too high in Manhattan before I get there next month.

This year is going to be interesting.
   479. Ron J Posted: January 27, 2022 at 08:23 AM (#6062697)
#478 Yeah. I have plans put on hold for two years. I'm looking forward to visiting my family in the New York/New Jersey area -- assuming it eventually becomes possible.
   480. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2022 at 08:44 AM (#6062701)
We have Canada plans we'd like to complete! An August 2020 Newfoundland/PEI road trip.
   481. RJ in TO Posted: January 27, 2022 at 11:40 AM (#6062727)
We have Canada plans we'd like to complete! An August 2020 Newfoundland/PEI road trip.
You might have some trouble with the PEI part, but the Newfoundland aspect should be reasonably manageable.
   482. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 27, 2022 at 12:55 PM (#6062741)
UK cases have levelled out completely at a pretty high number, which is surprising. I thought I saw somewhere that it was because younger age groups were having increasing cases?

The US is having more reported deaths now (7-day average) than at any time other than last winter's peak. Worse than the original peak in reported deaths, though maybe not excess deaths--remains to be seen. Deaths are expected to increase a bit for one more week or so and then start to level off and drop.

Maybe the omicron wave could have been mild had the US been well vaccinated. Hasn't turned out that way.
   483. Lassus Posted: January 27, 2022 at 03:51 PM (#6062777)
I thought I saw somewhere that it was because younger age groups were having increasing cases?

Because Christmas happened, then the return to school significantly AFTER Christmas, I believe I read.


I won't do a daily counting, because there's (probably) a limit to even how annoying I can be, but the positive rate in my county is at least continuing to fall.
   484. Lassus Posted: January 28, 2022 at 07:51 AM (#6062837)
You might have some trouble with the PEI part, but the Newfoundland aspect should be reasonably manageable.

It's been awhile since we made the plans, and the only realistic re-attempt is 2023, I'm sure, even if it was wide open.

Just curious, though, is PEI shutting itself off from Newfoundland? Or did I misinterpret something? I know the conductor of the PEI Symphony and hadn't heard much about that.
   485. Tony S Posted: January 28, 2022 at 09:13 AM (#6062845)
Florida leading the way again.

A Florida school district, the ninth largest in the nation, will no longer allow excused absences for students who remain at home due to Covid-19 concerns.

Orange County Public Schools, which has over 206,000 students at 202 Orlando-area schools, made the announcement Wednesday, saying parents "keeping students home during the increased Covid-19 cases" will no longer be able to get excused absences for their children starting Jan. 31.



I guess their famous "parental rights" don't extend to parents' rights to keep their children alive and healthy.


   486. base ball chick Posted: January 28, 2022 at 11:02 AM (#6062859)
485. Tony S Posted: January 28, 2022 at 09:13 AM (#6062845)
Florida leading the way again.

A Florida school district, the ninth largest in the nation, will no longer allow excused absences for students who remain at home due to Covid-19 concerns.

Orange County Public Schools, which has over 206,000 students at 202 Orlando-area schools, made the announcement Wednesday, saying parents "keeping students home during the increased Covid-19 cases" will no longer be able to get excused absences for their children starting Jan. 31.





I guess their famous "parental rights" don't extend to parents' rights to keep their children alive and healthy.


- "parental rights" means they have ONLY the rights to

1 - pretend covid doesn't exist and kids should not wear a mask and other kids should be shamed into not wearing a mask too. same with teachers and anyone else at the skool

2 - pretend all non-white "Christians" are bad people and so are LGBTQ and no one should talk about them and we should remove any book that talks about them from libraries (i'm waiting for the part where they get to punish KIDS/parents whose parents gave them books about Those Others or talked about Them - or kids that do any kind of talking about Them - of course, with our almost completely segregated skools, parents who want "rights" are prolly already segregated)
   487. smileyy Posted: January 28, 2022 at 01:17 PM (#6062887)
Double secret probation for Florida kids who parents keep them home for Covid concerns, and who say the word "gay".
   488. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: January 28, 2022 at 01:34 PM (#6062890)
and with this is all the people who are not testing because they don't want to miss work or their kidz kept out of skool/day care. and i know plenty of people like that


My sister and I are currently in a huge fight about this. She just moved from DC to Colorado Springs, and took a bunch of time off work for the move; then caught Covid and was knocked on her butt for a week, so she’s out of pto. Her husband has not moved yet so he can’t help her.

Her kids are all sick, but the older two are only feeling fatigued and sniffles, and since they are vaccinated, the school says they can cone back. One is seriously symptomatic, so he’s staying home, but she’s sending the other two kids to school. Not testing them, because if they tested positive they’d have to stay home. After I told her “what about all the other parents who are out of sick time” she sent me the cdc guidance, which she is apparently following.

Insanity.
   489. RJ in TO Posted: January 28, 2022 at 01:44 PM (#6062893)
Just curious, though, is PEI shutting itself off from Newfoundland? Or did I misinterpret something? I know the conductor of the PEI Symphony and hadn't heard much about that.
Each of the provinces has had their own standards for what is and isn't allowed. PEI, for much of the pandemic, has been fairly restrictive about the terms under which non-residents can visit, and the nature of access to the province makes it much easier for them to enforce this. You've basically got your choice between the bridge, the ferries, or flying in, and all of them put you in common spots where it's easy for the province to tell you no.

By the summer, perhaps it'll be fine, but perhaps not.
   490. smileyy Posted: January 28, 2022 at 03:01 PM (#6062907)
she sent me the cdc guidance, which she is apparently following.


I am so unhappy with the CDC who seems more interested in lubricating the gears of the economy and educational system (and thus by proxy the economy) with sick/dying people rather than actually trying to control disease, as might be suggested by the organization's name.
   491. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 28, 2022 at 07:02 PM (#6062949)

Since Florida reports data on a weekly basis and has a worse lag than most states, we may just now seeing the deaths from the Omicron wave being reported today. Deaths went from 470 two weeks ago to 605 last week to 1,192 this past week. Cases there took 4-5 weeks to peak, and peaked about 2 weeks ago, so I have no idea whether we are near the peak in reported deaths or whether they might potentially double or triple from here.
   492. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 29, 2022 at 11:31 AM (#6062992)
If I had to take a WAG, reported deaths in FL will probably peak at around 2-3x the current level, in a week or so. (The peak has already happened, it just hasn’t been reported yet).
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