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Tuesday, November 30, 2021

MLB, union stopped blood testing for HGH due to pandemic

Major League Baseball and the players’ association stopped blood testing for Human Growth Hormone because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Blood testing for HGH began in 2012, and 412 samples with no positive results were collected in the year ending with the 2020 World Series. MLB and the union never publicly announced the stoppage in blood testing but its absence was revealed Monday when Thomas M. Martin, the independent administrator of the joint drug program, released his annual report.

The decision to interrupt blood testing during the pandemic was made because drawing blood is more invasive than urine testing and requires additional collectors who would have increased the number of people coming into contact with players and decreased social distancing. MLB and the union plan to resume blood testing next season.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: November 30, 2021 at 12:35 PM | 441 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: hgh, peds

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   401. MY PAIN IS NOT A HOLIDAY (CoB). Posted: January 15, 2022 at 02:42 AM (#6061149)
Flop
   402. Lassus Posted: January 15, 2022 at 07:46 AM (#6061153)
Update -

1/1 - 12.7%
1/2 - 12.9%
1/3 - 13.4%
1/4 - 15.5%
1/5 - 16.1%
1/6 - 16.2%
1/7 - 16.9%
1/8 - 16.9%
1/9 - 17%
1/10 - 16.7%
1/11 - 16.7%
1/12 - 16.2%
1/13 - 16.8%
   403. Jack Sommers Posted: January 16, 2022 at 06:46 PM (#6061268)
What’s Holding Up New Omicron Vaccines?

Vaccine makers worry yet another variant will start dominating in the months it takes to roll out shots against this one

Debate over whether or not manufacturers should, or are willing to play whack-a-mole with variants while simultaneously developing a universal vaccine that might be ready in a couple of years.


   404. Greg Pope Posted: January 17, 2022 at 11:37 AM (#6061344)
I've been wondering about that. Moderna and Pfizer have said many times that with mRNA they can have a vaccine ready in 60 days. I know there are a lot of regulatory and trial hoops to jump through, though. So I understand that they didn't do it for delta. But omicron seems to break through the vaccines at a pretty high rate. It did for me. And my concern would be that the next variant will be branched off of omicron and so may be even more likely to break through. Whereas if we have an omicron vaccine that is 90% effective, then it might be as effective against the next variant as the original ones were against delta.

I get that it's not practical to chase everything but I think there should be a point where you develop a new one.
   405. base ball chick Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:03 PM (#6061348)
greg is right

trouble is that the vaccine thingy seems to be REactive, not PRO active

its all - well, omicron might could cause zillions of cases and have bidnesses where everyone out sick need to shut down, but like so what. and hospitals overful and HCWs quitting? like so what.

in mah not so umble opinyin, we gotta prepare for - next version is as contagious as omicron and makes people even sicker. looks like the antibodies don't stay around real too long and we gotta keep getting vaxxed anyhow. this virus changes often and fast. silly to pretend there is this long lasting "natcherill immuity" forever

i now know someone, not vaxxed, who has caught covid THREE times now
   406. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:04 PM (#6061349)
Omicron seems to spread quickly enough that by the time they have a vaccine for it, it will have already receded. But your logic makes sense about the next variant.

I think the prior vaccines were pretty effective against Delta so there wasn’t really a need for a new version, just get people boosters. The real issue was the large number of unvaccinated people here.
   407. bob gee Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:14 PM (#6061352)
It looks like omicron is, for active cases, receding in chunks of NY state at the same rate (or faster) than the speed at which it infected. This is incredibly good news, since we can use England as a guide for what will happen (2 weeks out).

The only problem is that hospitalizations are still significant, and it looks like it is still at the 10-14 to 1 rate of unvaxed vs vax in the hospitals. And for those with children who can't get a vaccine still have to be on the defensive.


   408. base ball chick Posted: January 17, 2022 at 12:25 PM (#6061356)
AND
the next variation just might could be bad for people under 12. this virus changes a LOT and fast
   409. Tony S Posted: January 17, 2022 at 04:22 PM (#6061390)

Cases and hospitalizations are starting to come down in MD, which is very welcome news. Still way above last winter, but our health care workers will take any breathing room they can get.

I took my sweet time and caution de-icing my walkway and sidewalk this morning.
   410. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 17, 2022 at 04:47 PM (#6061393)
It looks like omicron is, for active cases, receding in chunks of NY state at the same rate (or faster) than the speed at which it infected. This is incredibly good news, since we can use England as a guide for what will happen (2 weeks out).

The only problem is that hospitalizations are still significant, and it looks like it is still at the 10-14 to 1 rate of unvaxed vs vax in the hospitals. And for those with children who can't get a vaccine still have to be on the defensive.
If the US follows South Africa (a big if), there will be a long tail of hospitalizations and deaths, as the early rise and fall of cases was more geared toward younger and/or otherwise less vulnerable groups. Reported deaths in NY also would not peak for at least another week, maybe two more. For reference, 7-day reported average deaths in NY state, including what was reported today, are already just below last winter's peak in NY. I think in some other states they are already above last winter.
   411. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 17, 2022 at 06:46 PM (#6061404)

I would look at some of the stats of the past few days with caution. It’s a holiday weekend, reporting will certainly be below normal levels for a Monday.

Cases definitely coming down in the Northeast but maybe not as quickly as the charts would indicate.
   412. Lassus Posted: January 18, 2022 at 09:54 AM (#6061456)
Still no update in the 7-day rolling average for % positive of tests for the county since 1/13/21, be very very curious to see what happens there.

Very tentatively planning a trip to NYC the last weekend of February, our first since the same weekend of February 2020. Really hoping for relative sanity by then.
   413. Crosseyed and Painless Posted: January 18, 2022 at 10:24 AM (#6061459)
Cases looked like they stopped going up in Denmark, but now keep going up again, much different than in UK. Their hospitalizations have kept going up by their ICU number has been going down for a while. Deaths per million and excess deaths they are way below US and UK.

Caveat - as always, I have zero idea what any of this means. Just sharing something that caught my eye.
   414. Sleepy was just “inspecting the bunker”, y’all Posted: January 18, 2022 at 11:26 AM (#6061464)
11 of 22 kids in my son’s class were at school on Friday.

Friday night we received an email saying one of those kids tested positive.

Last night my son started coughing but tested negative on the rapid test… earliest available pcr test that I can find is Wednesday. So I guess we’re “working from home” this week.
   415. Lassus Posted: January 18, 2022 at 11:40 AM (#6061468)
It looks like omicron is, for active cases, receding in chunks of NY state at the same rate (or faster) than the speed at which it infected.

Because you are all concerned about Utica (which, quite honestly, is probably a decent indicator of America, being a very very very very super-average small US city in the middle of mostly shit nowhere), here is the updated positivity rate:

1/9 - 17%
1/10 - 16.7%
1/11 - 16.7%
1/12 - 16.2%
1/13 - 16.8%
1/14 - 16.2%
1/15 - 15.3%
1/16 - 15.0%


So. Not collapsing per se, but as referenced above, receding.

   416. bob gee Posted: January 18, 2022 at 12:54 PM (#6061481)
Sorry Lassus, I was using the areas closer to NYC, and not the positive %, but the number of active cases.

I google (county) "covid" "dashboard" "new york" and for many of them, the first thing that pops up is a statistics page from the NYTimes (no click through necessary) showing active cases on a graph.

NYtimes also has a comparison of cases and 14 day change, the downstate areas are dropping nicely.
   417. Snowboy Posted: January 18, 2022 at 02:18 PM (#6061487)
EU regulator finds mRNA COVID-19 shots safe during pregnancy
Jan 18 (Reuters) - COVID-19 vaccines made using mRNA technology do not cause pregnancy complications for expectant mothers and their babies, the European Union's drug regulator said on Tuesday, following a detailed review of several studies.

The review based on studies involving around 65,000 pregnancies at different stages did not find any sign of higher risk of complications, miscarriages, preterm births or severe side-effects on the unborn babies from mRNA shots, the European Medicines Agency said.

   418. Lassus Posted: January 18, 2022 at 03:06 PM (#6061490)
Sorry Lassus, I was using the areas closer to NYC, and not the positive %, but the number of active cases.

Oh, no apology necessary. I honestly love the seven-day rolling average of positive tests as a gauge. I do think it's doing what everyone says, coming down slowly.
   419. Hot Wheeling American Posted: January 18, 2022 at 03:17 PM (#6061492)
EU regulator finds mRNA COVID-19 shots safe during pregnancy

That's nice. My wife got Pfizer at 6-7 months pregnant last April. Baby came a few weeks early, but that was due to the mother (pre-eclampsia). Baby was born and remains healthy (maybe too healthy??).
   420. SoSH U at work Posted: January 18, 2022 at 03:48 PM (#6061495)
Baby was born and remains healthy (maybe too healthy??).


I didn't realize baby health was like the quiet.

Nonetheless, congratulations.
   421. Tony S Posted: January 19, 2022 at 08:41 AM (#6061556)
Florida continues to break barriers.

Orange County Medical Director Dr. Raul Pino wrote an email to staff on Jan. 4th encouraging them to get vaccinated and boosted for COVID-19.

In it he wrote, “I have a hard time understanding how we can be in public health and not practice it.”

After sending the email he was placed on administrative leave.


Encouraging. Not requiring, not coercing. Simply urging public health workers to get a vaccine.

Apparently Florida has a problem with that.

   422. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 11:12 AM (#6061571)
Latest excess deaths numbers out in South Africa. According to this data, there have been just under 20,000 excess deaths so far in the Omicron wave. That's something like 20% of the delta wave, so overall 25% or more seems likely.
   423. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 19, 2022 at 01:40 PM (#6061581)
I'm doing better now. It was worse than a cold, but for this 3x vaxxed guy, not too bad. My wife and son managed to not get sick.

i now know someone, not vaxxed, who has caught covid THREE times now


You'd think there would be a conclusion to draw from this.
   424. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 19, 2022 at 01:46 PM (#6061582)
Hana Horka: Czech singer dies after catching Covid intentionally

Hana Horka, 57, was unvaccinated and had posted on social media that she was recovering after testing positive, but died two days later.

Her son, Jan Rek, said she got infected on purpose when he and his father had the virus, so she could get a recovery pass to access certain venues.

The Czech Republic reported a record number of Covid-19 cases on Wednesday.

Mr Rek and his father, who are both fully vaccinated, both caught Covid over Christmas. But he said his mother had decided not to stay away from them, preferring instead to expose herself to the virus.

...

Although she was unvaccinated, Jan Rek stressed that his mother did not believe in some of the more bizarre conspiracy theories about Covid vaccines.

"Her philosophy was that she was more OK with the idea of catching Covid than getting vaccinated. Not that we would get microchipped or anything like that," he said.


Sad story. This is why telling people that Omicron is "mild" or just like the cold/flu without giving the proper context was so dangerous. This is a more general point rather than specific to this case -- if she wasn't vaccinated by the time Omicron hit, then she was ok with catching the prior variants too.
   425. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:23 PM (#6061585)
Yes, some seem to have a tendency to really want not to need a vaccine--to believe themselves "strong" enough to take on the virus without any real challenge. Or for some other related or unrelated reason. I can sort of, but not exactly, understand it. As an analogy to me basically never having had a flu shot I guess it makes some sense. The part that really rankles is this whole disinformation campaign amplifying these feelings with the result that a large number of people eschew vaccination. People have all kinds of unhealthy inklings, both for themselves and for society, stemming from all sorts of real or imagined phenomena. It's really terrible to see them amplified by irresponsible people with a meagaphone, the Joe Rogans, the DeSantises of the world and worse, with such predictable and avoidable results.
   426. Lassus Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:26 PM (#6061586)
As an analogy to me basically never having had a flu shot I guess it makes some sense.

I got my first flu shot ever the day after my booster, because I felt like I would be a ####### idiot otherwise. (And, to be clear, had been.)
   427. Perry Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:40 PM (#6061587)
Yeah, I never got a flu shot until about 5 years ago, when I was over 60, despite their being free and easy to get. In fact, my local supermarket chain literally PAYS ME to get it, in the form of a $10 certificate. My reasoning, such as it was, was that (1) I had never had flu, (2) who cares if I get flu, and (3) I really dislike needles. Emphasis on #3. Which was really, really ####### stupid. After getting the shot the first time I realized how dumb I'd been and haven't missed a year since.
   428. SoSH U at work Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:43 PM (#6061589)
I got my first one in 2020. When the knuckleheads started talking about how COVID was no worse than the flu because the flu had killed 60,000 Americans or some figure (or many times more than Levitt predicted, twice). My immediate thought was, "Damn, I didn't know the flu was that deadly."
   429. Crosseyed and Painless Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:46 PM (#6061590)
Even with less-than-ideal vaccination rates, it still sort of blows my mind that the excess deaths in Michigan were higher this winter than last winter. Scrolling through this site, its seems like Michigan's the only state in which that happened. Maybe Colorado's close?
   430. BDC Posted: January 19, 2022 at 02:54 PM (#6061592)
I had a bad reaction to one of the famous swine-flu shots in 1976 (not any of the ghastly reactions, just like a bad case of the flu, which seemed counterproductive). That turned me against flu shots for about 35 years, but after that I became a pretty regular flu-shot getter. No great revelation, just that they were free and convenient and why not.
   431. Tony S Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:12 PM (#6061598)
I wasn't a flu shot guy either until 2020, until Covid finally motivated me to minimize ALL potential unpleasant health experiences. I wasn't making any big statement; it was just indifference.

There was the age factor too -- when you're in your 30's, you don't really relate to "the flu is bad for seniors" messaging. When your 50's creep up on you, suddenly you don't feel so far removed from it.
   432. Barry`s_Lazy_Boy Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:33 PM (#6061602)
I had the real influenza* about 10 years ago, and it was a terrible, horrible few days. I've been getting the flu shot ever since. It helps that they hold free clinics at work.

One of the weird factors about our covid response is the US's colloquial usage of "the flu" to cover just about any illness. "the stomach flu" and other terms are thrown around for so many illnesses that are not the influenza virus. Many people think influenza is milder than it really is.

   433. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:35 PM (#6061603)
Even with less-than-ideal vaccination rates, it still sort of blows my mind that the excess deaths in Michigan were higher this winter than last winter. Scrolling through this site, its seems like Michigan's the only state in which that happened. Maybe Colorado's close?
It's still way too early for most states this winter for CDC data, especially since we are still on the upslope for reported deaths in every state for the omicron wave, and there are also major data lags. There will definitely be other states where this happens.
   434. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 03:38 PM (#6061604)
wrong thread.
   435. Tom Goes to the Ballpark Posted: January 19, 2022 at 04:58 PM (#6061617)
Yeah, I never got a flu shot until about 5 years ago, when I was over 60, despite their being free and easy to get. In fact, my local supermarket chain literally PAYS ME to get it, in the form of a $10 certificate. My reasoning, such as it was, was that (1) I had never had flu, (2) who cares if I get flu, and (3) I really dislike needles. Emphasis on #3. Which was really, really ####### stupid. After getting the shot the first time I realized how dumb I'd been and haven't missed a year since.
One of the surprising things (to me at least) I learned from the pandemic was how common the fear/hatred/extreme displeasure of needles is. I figured that it was something like 2-3% of the population, but some estimates put it north of 20%. The needle hesitant are ripe targets for antivaxx lunatics and if the fear of needles is as widespread as some of the more pessimistic estimates it explains a lot of the vaccine hesitancy we see.
   436. smileyy Posted: January 19, 2022 at 05:14 PM (#6061622)
Happy to see all the flu-shot hesitant coming around. As many have noted, the flu is no joke!
   437. RJ in TO Posted: January 19, 2022 at 05:57 PM (#6061625)
I had the real influenza* about 10 years ago, and it was a terrible, horrible few days. I've been getting the flu shot ever since. It helps that they hold free clinics at work.
For me, it was about 20 years ago, and resulted in a week of shivering uncontrollably, while also sweating so much I couldn't stay hydrated, while also lacking the strength to get up and get the liquids necessary to keep my hydrated. It was not the most fun time I've had.

One of the weird factors about our covid response is the US's colloquial usage of "the flu" to cover just about any illness. "the stomach flu" and other terms are thrown around for so many illnesses that are not the influenza virus. Many people think influenza is milder than it really is.


This is a very important point - people don't know how bad the flu actually is, because they've only ever had "the flu".
   438. catomi01 Posted: January 19, 2022 at 06:12 PM (#6061629)
I never got a flu shot...sounds like for a lot of the same reasons - young, relatively healthy, never got the flu, etc.

The first time I got it was in 2020, and even then it was only because I was in the hospital (side note - I don't recommend Kidney Stones and look forward to the vaccine for them), and they offered it, so I took it. This year when I scheduled my booster pfizer, they offered a flu shot too and I took them up on it. I imagine I'll keep up on it from here, if for no other reason than my grandmother yells at me each year to get it.

Side-Side Note - I don't recommend getting both the Flu Shot and a Covid shot at the same time - not real side effects except that both arms felt like I had thrown 300 pitches the night before for about 2 days....spread them out so you have at least one working arming at a time.
   439. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: January 19, 2022 at 06:14 PM (#6061630)
CDC's latest summary of projected reported deaths is out. The models they refer to (not their own, I believe), have an average that tops out at about 2600 per day for the week ending February 5. That would be well above the delta wave peak in September, but well below the peak from last January. Certainly much worse than what was being projected without Omicron, but also a little better than I was expecting for this Omicron wave.
   440. base ball chick Posted: January 19, 2022 at 06:15 PM (#6061631)
i can NOT bleeve how many "macho" men are fraid of a lil ol needle. and i know more males than females afraid of a needle. good lord

i had flu shots every year when i was a kid, then have not missed every year since being with Husband because of his bad asthma he can NOT be gettin no flu so we all got flu shots and i have not had no stupid flu. it's $25 if you got no ins, the viit to the acute care if you got no ins is $200 and the med is $150. last i looked. better to get the flu shot

one of my uncles died from flu. he was in his 60s and lived alone and he just got real sick real fast

the most amazing things i found out about flu this past covid time is that

1 - they got no idea how many people actually got the flu, they just guessing. same thing about dying from it
2 - just like covid, you can have it and have no symptoms
   441. Ziggy: social distancing since 1980 Posted: January 19, 2022 at 09:36 PM (#6061647)
When I was a kid I had severe allergies to just about everything. So I got allergy shots for years (I seem to recall it being every week, but it was a long time ago that I was a kid, so I'm not 100% on that). The worst part of needles is the anticipation. Once I was used to them, and so didn't anticipate anything bad anymore, I hardly noticed getting a shot. The actual pain - the part that didn't depend on anticipating pain - was almost zero.
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