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Sunday, December 01, 2019

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (December 2019)

Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend have known each other for 60 years. They love each other. “I used to say that I love him, but with my fingers crossed,” says Townshend of Daltrey. Townshend, gangly and hunched, his angular face having grown into his long nose, sits in a Dallas Ritz-Carlton suite wearing gray clothes on a white-hot day. “Now, I like him too. I like all his eccentricities, his foibles, his self-obsession, and his singer thing. Everything about him.” Daltrey feels the same. He sits in a comfy chair later the same afternoon. “I’ve always kind of known Pete cares for me,” says Daltrey, crossing his legs in blue cargo shorts. He’s a little impatient because my time with Townshend ran long. “I hope he realizes I care about him. I think my actions through our career have shown that.”

Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend have known each other for 60 years. They tolerate each other.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: December 01, 2019 at 08:16 AM | 53 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   1. PreservedFish Posted: December 01, 2019 at 09:40 AM (#5904679)
Mr. Fish, you're not down with The Wizard of Oz? I think it's ####### fantastic.


I like The Wizard of Oz, and Singing in the Rain. I liked La La Land. I think my specific problem is with musicals on stage. Maybe I'm more willing to suspend disbelief for the silver screen? On film, I can buy a person breaking into song. On stage, no matter how good, it just immediately makes me think of Waiting for Guffman or Planet of the Apes: The Musical. There's an inherent absurdity that I find it tough to get past.

When I was a kid I saw a Broadway production of Hello, Dolly, which was the oldest school musical I've ever seen on stage. I was bored to tears, but I suspect that if I saw it today I'd appreciate it as a kind of retro romp, an interesting time capsule of forgotten style.
   2. Omineca Greg Posted: December 01, 2019 at 12:15 PM (#5904683)
My parents took me to musicals back when I was a child. They were all old school productions, nothing contemporary like The Wiz or A Chorus Line. But I don't think I've seen a professional musical on the stage since...oh 1990 when I saw Cats, and I didn't really enjoy it.

Now that I live out in the toolies, we don't get many touring musicals here. If you want to see one, you have to go to Vancouver or Edmonton. It's probably a different experience for you, having lived in the city of shows. I have seen amateur productions on stage, both high school and adult, and you go into those with a tempered expectations.

I tried to watch Rent (on DVD) and I couldn't do it. It made me want to barf.

"Shut up and pay your ####### rent!" I would say.

"It's OK, Dad, it's just a show..."

"Just a show about trying to duck out of adult responsibilities...like paying your ####### rent! Maybe if you could dance better you'd have a job! I'm sorry, I'm out...I'm not going to waste my time watching this self-congratulatory piece of...of..."

"Tony bait?"

"Exactly, I was going to say 'logrolling piece of garbage', but you put it better."

"This show is a lot of things, but I don't think it's logrolling."

"Whatever, I've been rolling logs from before you were born."
   3. PreservedFish Posted: December 01, 2019 at 01:32 PM (#5904692)
They really were awful to that poor landlord. Is it really evil to ask the penurious artists to live up to their rental agreement?
   4. Lassus Posted: December 01, 2019 at 06:55 PM (#5904727)
Just saw Knives Out. I was a victim of oversized expectations. I expected more, but there was a truly amazing Thomas Pynchon joke.
   5. "RMc", the superbatsman Posted: December 02, 2019 at 01:06 PM (#5904870)
I was a victim of oversized expectations.

There was a lot of that for the director's last movie, too.
   6. Lassus Posted: December 02, 2019 at 01:13 PM (#5904875)
FYI, and this I'm sure isn't surprising, but both I and my Star Wars superfan wife were fully on the "Last Jedi rocks, angry baby fanboys" side of that wholly insignificant Intertube war.

We thought Knives Out was good, we just expected it to be better.
   7. PreservedFish Posted: December 02, 2019 at 01:21 PM (#5904880)
FYI, and this I'm sure isn't surprising, but both I and my Star Wars superfan wife were fully on the "Last Jedi rocks, angry baby fanboys" side of that wholly insignificant Intertube war.

Man, I thought it was pretty brutal. I'm intrigued by the new tv show, but in general I'm running out of enthusiasm for this franchise.

I suppose if you were coming at it from the angle of "these movies are supposed to be stupid and fun, stop overthinking," I could kind of get it, but I feel like they're not actually presented and filmed as if they're supposed to be stupid and fun, at least not since Episode V.
   8. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: December 02, 2019 at 01:26 PM (#5904881)
Lassus - I didn't know or didn't remember that you are a Star Wars superfan, so you're apparently the perfect person to ask this random question that occurred to me the other day: Is someone like John Williams, who has had tremendous "pop" success with his film scores, respected as a composer among the classical music cognoscenti? Or is he considered a middlebrow sell-out?
   9. Lassus Posted: December 02, 2019 at 01:32 PM (#5904885)
I'm intrigued by the new tv show

I've watched the first four, and I find them boring as shit. Stunningly made, so blandly troperiffic.


I suppose if you were coming at it from the angle of "these movies are supposed to be stupid and fun, stop overthinking," I could kind of get it, but I feel like they're not actually presented and filmed as if they're supposed to be stupid and fun, at least not since Episode V.

-shrug- I would subjectively disagree. I thought Last Jedi was both fun and interesting in subverting various paradigms, to sound Straight Outta Liberal Arts. And their audience and critic scores are quite good. Honestly, I thought Force Awakens was great fun, but had no weight or value at all.


but in general I'm running out of enthusiasm for this franchise.

I get this, totally, and it's justified. But I am sci-fi ride or die, so my patience is long and I hate and love to a particular beat, mostly against various grains. I never liked Total Recall and this new commercial reminded me of my 12-year-old self bored to tears with all but the last three minutes of E.T..
   10. Lassus Posted: December 02, 2019 at 01:43 PM (#5904886)
Lassus - I didn't know or didn't remember that you are a Star Wars superfan, so you're apparently the perfect person to ask this random question that occurred to me the other day: Is someone like John Williams, who has had tremendous "pop" success with his film scores, respected as a composer among the classical music cognoscenti? Or is he considered a middlebrow sell-out?

Let's let Yo-Yo Ma answer:
Do you think John has received less respect in certain classical circles because he comes from the world of film?

You know, I think this is a question that might have had a “yes” answer 20, 30 years ago. But I think less and less. I think people are natural hierarchists. We live in a world where so many people are trying to prove how much they know and how important they are. It’s a very competitive world. Whether it’s politics, business, culture—everybody’s trying to get a leg up over someone else. And that’s just kind of boring after a while, and I think people are realizing that.
I'll take it as a point of pride that this was actually going to be similar to my own answer before I did some Googling. A lot of it is time. In the 70s? Hell yeah. Now? Less so.

Now, to be fair, Ma has always been more of a man of the people, classically. You'll get plenty of snobs looking down on Williams to this day, but the sheer scope and volume has brought out the respect of very very serious musicians very much out of the woodwork. I think Williams is seen as the real deal. Will Elfman get that later on? I'm guessing no. From elsewhere in the article:
Stéphane Denève, the French conductor who’s now associate conductor in Philadelphia, did a whole weekend of his music because it was like, “I just worshipped this guy’s music for so long, because everything is so artistically conceived.”
   11. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: December 02, 2019 at 02:57 PM (#5904934)
"Mr. Robot" on the USA network is crushing its final season. I didn't watch "Breaking Bad", "Sopranos" or anything else of this caliber in real-time, so the anticipation of every Sunday night episode is a new, magical feeling.
   12. Tin Angel Posted: December 02, 2019 at 06:15 PM (#5905030)
Thoughts on The Irishman, or did you guys cover that in the last thread? I thought it was great and Pesci phenomenal.
   13. yo la tengo Posted: December 02, 2019 at 07:26 PM (#5905048)
The wife and I watched it over the past three nights and Pesci was the highlight for me. DeNiro was captivating as well, but Pesci was something else. I was impressed by how patient the film was, did not go for easy thrills of violence. The violence was more of a drive by nature, presented almost as just a side fact of the lives of these people. I'm glad I watched it, not sure how often I will go back to it. Goodfellas, however, is one I revisit somewhat often
   14. PreservedFish Posted: December 02, 2019 at 08:44 PM (#5905060)
When I first heard of The Irishman, my response was, "Really? Do we need another Scorcese gangster thing?" Am I alone? Glad to see how well-reviewed it is, and I'm sure I'll get around to watching it eventually.
   15. Lassus Posted: December 03, 2019 at 09:57 AM (#5905148)
When I first heard of The Irishman, my response was, "Really? Do we need another Scorcese gangster thing?" Am I alone?

No. I suppose I can understand superhero weariness (although there have been a lot more gangster movies) by my reaction to mob movies. I'll probably see it, but it's not a priority at this point.)
   16. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: December 03, 2019 at 12:14 PM (#5905200)
Townshend


In another recent interview, Pete said that he was glad that Moon and Entwistle were gone because they were difficult to play with. Really tough look.
   17. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: December 03, 2019 at 12:30 PM (#5905214)
Also I love musicals, especially stuff by Sondheim.
   18. vortex of dissipation Posted: December 03, 2019 at 12:40 PM (#5905222)
In another recent interview, Pete said that he was glad that Moon and Entwistle were gone because they were difficult to play with. Really tough look.


The same interview. I can see his point, that he was reduced to keeping time on rhythm guitar while Keith and John did their thing, but IMO, that's a major factor in what made The Who so great, especially live. Lead drums, lead bass, rhythm guitar is not a line-up many bands could make work the way The Who did.
   19. PreservedFish Posted: December 03, 2019 at 12:59 PM (#5905238)
So was Pete Townshend ... not a pedophile? Not totally discredited? I thought that was a thing.
   20. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: December 03, 2019 at 01:04 PM (#5905245)
The same interview. I can see his point, that he was reduced to keeping time on rhythm guitar while Keith and John did their thing, but IMO, that's a major factor in what made The Who so great, especially live. Lead drums, lead bass, rhythm guitar is not a line-up many bands could make work the way The Who did.


I mean, yeah absolutely! I was just saying it was kind of tasteless to go with "thank God they're gone."

So was Pete Townshend ... not a pedophile? Not totally discredited? I thought that was a thing.


I was never completely satisfied with his explanation that it was for research, but the authorities were, so I don't know.
   21. vortex of dissipation Posted: December 03, 2019 at 02:38 PM (#5905302)
I was just saying it was kind of tasteless to go with "thank God they're gone."


Agreed.
   22. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 09:14 AM (#5905454)
I saw an interesting obituary in the Times yesterday: Andre Daugin, a chef from Gascony. Apparently Monsieur Daugin was more or less the first person in history to serve duck breast cooked like a steak: seared 'a la minute,' and pink on the inside.

Read this 1971 article on the restaurant's famous duck breast, which Daugin was still serving as with an inscrutable name on his menu, a mystery meat, because nobody would have ordered it if he had been up front about what it actually was.

Nowadays this is just how you serve duck breast - any other preparation is considered aberrant and wasteful. I find it amazing to think that in such recent past it was totally unheard of.
   23. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: December 04, 2019 at 09:31 AM (#5905462)

Nowadays this is just how you serve duck breast


Can you do this with chicken? I have never heard of deliberately undercooking poultry which is naturally due to my ignorance. I would be afraid of getting sick.
   24. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 09:55 AM (#5905474)
Speaking as a (part-time) food safety professional ... I'm not actually sure.

You almost never see deliberately undercooked poultry. Part of that is flavor/texture - nobody wants to eat rare white meat, whether chicken or pork. (Except in Japan, and I have eaten chicken sashimi at a Japanese restaurant in Berkeley.)

Chickens are basically riddled with salmonella and campylobacter. All of them, even the lovingly raised backyard chickens your hippie neighbor has. So you always have to assume that chicken is contaminated.

Duck is assumed to be just as contaminated. They may be less hazardous than chicken, but I haven't seen numbers on it.

These pathogens are all enteric and so are largely concentrated on the exterior of the meat which may have come in contact with guts or feces during the chicken's life or during the slaughtering process. They don't just live inside the muscles. This is true of all animals, but with beef in particular it is well-known that the pathogens cannot migrate to the interior of the meat, so it is perfectly safe to eat very rare beef or even raw beef if it's been prepared carefully. What they say is that chicken meat is more porous so that the pathogens can migrate to the interior. I don't know how true it is, and I don't know if that is any less true of duck.

In reality, "rare" duck is cooked to an interior temperature of about 130F. That's the temperature at which salmonella begins to die, so there's some pathogen reduction already occurring before it hits your mouth. At a higher temp, say 140, salmonella is totally eradicated in about 10 minutes. Because the pathogen load on the interior of the meat is likely to be low to begin with, realistically, you could probably eat medium-rare chicken breast all day long and be fine. Not that I would serve it to anyone that's immunocompromised.

So in summary, I suspect that ducks are somewhat less likely to carry pathogens, that the pathogens are almost never present in dangerous concentrations in the interior of the breast meat, and that even cooking it rare serves to further reduce the pathogen load, all of which makes infection exceedingly unlikely.

And I betcha you'd be fine with rare chicken too. But I'm not going to experiment on myself to find out.
   25. Lassus Posted: December 04, 2019 at 10:44 AM (#5905494)
But I'm not going to experiment on myself to find out.

Well, that's disappointing.
   26. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: December 04, 2019 at 10:57 AM (#5905500)
Nowadays this is just how you serve duck breast - any other preparation is considered aberrant and wasteful. I find it amazing to think that in such recent past it was totally unheard of.
Huh - yeah, that's news to me as well. I can't imagine well-done duck breast to be at all appealing. Seems like it would be dry and flavorless, much like an overcooked steak.

My wife and I have actually been cooking duck at home at lot more lately. I get the impression that producers are making a push to make it more available at markets and more "top of mind" for the average consumer. It's an underrated protein - makes a nice and easy weekday dinner.
   27. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:05 AM (#5905507)
The article mentions that duck breast was usually used in confits and pates and rillettes and the like, which is fine. Lean and overcooked doesn't matter as much when it's shredded and completely surrounded by fat. But it's amazing to think that generations of French chefs were thinking of duck breast as a cheap off-cut that you begrudgingly had to find a use for.
   28. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:11 AM (#5905514)
Thanks PF that was very informative!
   29. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:16 AM (#5905517)
But it's amazing to think that generations of French chefs were thinking of duck breast as a cheap off-cut that you begrudgingly had to find a use for.
Yet another reason to roll one's eyes at the Francophilia of the culinary world that was taken for granted up until very recently.
   30. Lassus Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:19 AM (#5905520)
I've had duck a few times and have been pretty indifferent. Too American? Too much chicken? Not sure. I've certainly eaten on four or five continents so far, so I don't think so. I just don't think I have a taste for it.
   31. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:20 AM (#5905523)
No. I suppose I can understand superhero weariness (although there have been a lot more gangster movies) by my reaction to mob movies. I'll probably see it, but it's not a priority at this point.)


There have been a lot more gangster movies in the entire history of cinema, I guess. But we've barely had any in years. What we have is a lot of action comedies and spy movies and movies about hitmen. Most of which are also comedies or highly stylized efforts like John Wick and Atomic Blonde. We also have heist movies about small groups of criminals. Nothing like Goodfellas or Casino.

I'm probably missing something but I think the last large-scale drama about organized crime was Black Mass in 2015. Then there were "Run All Night" and "White Boy Rick" which were about the 100th grossing movie of their respective years. And "Gotti" with Travolta which was a joke.
   32. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:23 AM (#5905525)
Have you ever bought a whole duck? It's a great project. De-bone the duck yourself, render the fat, confit the legs, make stock with the bones, cook the liver, cook the giblets, cook the breasts. Lots of different fun lessons for the amateur chef.
   33. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:28 AM (#5905530)
There were a ton of gangaster movies in the 90s. But at some point they dried up. I think around 2007 when The Departed seemed to put a bow on the whole thing, and American Gangster with Denzel Washington came out shortly thereafter, as if taking over from the traditional Italians and Irishmen and their associates.
   34. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:29 AM (#5905531)
Yet another reason to roll one's eyes at the Francophilia of the culinary world that was taken for granted up until very recently.


Well, I don't know about that. Just about everyone would agree - whether they're in America, Spain or Japan - that for decades French chefs were miles beyond the rest of the world, at least with regards to fine dining. That advantage doesn't exist anymore, and dining is much less elitist than it used to be, so that the comparatively low-culture cuisines of Italy, Mexico, Thailand, and even France itself etc now get the applause they richly deserve.

French haute-cuisine is just one type of culinary language, a wonderful and enormously influential language, but it is just one thing, and everything is better now that it's recognized as just one thing.
   35. Lassus Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:29 AM (#5905532)
Have you ever bought a whole duck? It's a great project. De-bone the duck yourself, render the fat, confit the legs, make stock with the bones, cook the liver, cook the giblets, cook the breasts. Lots of different fun lessons for the amateur chef.

I mean, I could; but I'm not as inclined, as I've had it at good restaurants and I just haven't found it flavorful. If they couldn't get me to like it, I'm not sure WTF I could do to fix that. (Now, granted, sample size. Anyone could have a bad run and I'll certainly give it another shot at some point.)
   36. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:42 AM (#5905538)
It's objectively more flavorful than chicken. Doesn't mean you have to like it, but it really just is.
   37. manchestermets Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:49 AM (#5905543)
Mmm, duck is delicious in all its forms - pink cooked breast, confit legs and also roasted whole (until not pink, with crispy skin), which is the main way I've always had it. Oh, and also as Peking duck. Is it not a widely eaten meat in America? There are plenty of people hunting them, right?
   38. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:56 AM (#5905547)
Do you like duck with orange, duck with cherries, or duck surprise?
   39. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 11:57 AM (#5905549)
People don't buy it at the grocery store much - mine has it, in the freezer, but it's not on the radar of 99% of shoppers. It's expensive, too. It shows up at restaurants pretty often though. Chinese and Thai restaurants will have duck.

Certainly many people hunt duck, and cook their kill, but it doesn't seem like that bleeds over into mainstream food culture much.
   40. Lassus Posted: December 04, 2019 at 12:03 PM (#5905556)
It's objectively more flavorful than chicken. Doesn't mean you have to like it, but it really just is.

I am able to recognize this (see #30). I mean, I also like chicken white meat way more than dark meat, I'm sure it's generally subjective. The 'more' may be more of what I don't like. But I can give it a few more tries.
   41. the Centaur Nipple Paradox (CoB). Posted: December 04, 2019 at 12:23 PM (#5905568)
duck breast was usually used in confits and pates and rillettes and the like


Oh sweet jebus, duck rillettes, I'm like Homer condemned to Hell's Ironic Punishment Division around it.
   42. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: December 04, 2019 at 12:33 PM (#5905575)
Have you ever bought a whole duck? It's a great project. De-bone the duck yourself, render the fat, confit the legs, make stock with the bones, cook the liver, cook the giblets, cook the breasts. Lots of different fun lessons for the amateur chef.
We've gotten whole ducks (sans giblets) from our meat CSA before, but we've tried to cook them whole rather than breaking them down into various projects. Mostly unsuccessfully, I should add - the ducks are farm-raised downstate, free range, and thus tend to be smaller and tougher than store-bought birds. Maybe trying to cook them whole contributes to the toughness.
   43. PreservedFish Posted: December 04, 2019 at 12:45 PM (#5905583)
Duck is really tricky to cook whole, partially because of how much fat there is. I suggest slow-roasting it forever, until the meat is basically fall-off-the-bone. The leg tastes better that way, and the breast arguably does too once you've taken it past the well-done stage.
   44. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: December 04, 2019 at 12:49 PM (#5905586)
Thanks, will try that next time. Low temp, I assume?
   45. Omineca Greg Posted: December 04, 2019 at 07:56 PM (#5905739)
I roast quite a few ducks. They turn out nice, I don't know if I have any concrete advice. I go in with low expectations for the amount of meat I'm getting though...I roast the duck and serve the breasts, and that's one meal. Then for the next few days I make meals with the stripped meat from the rest of the bird, use the fat for cooking other foods, make soup with the bones, that sort of thing. For my wife and I that'll be four duck influenced meals, even if the sheer amount of meat I'm getting isn't a lot. And only the first meal seems festive, the rest seem kind of peasant-like (look, potatoes and duck fat are life sustaining!), but I like that aspect of it, YMMV.

The easiest way for me to enjoy duck is to go down to the 燒味 shop and pick up a box of it. Hot, cold, room temperature, it doesn't matter, it always tastes good. There's a delicious plate of it, right there. One of the things I miss about Vancouver. And Hong Kong.
   46. Omineca Greg Posted: December 04, 2019 at 08:17 PM (#5905744)
Actually, I remember now, I came on to comment on something else, but got distracted...

Yet another reason to roll one's eyes at the Francophilia of the culinary world that was taken for granted up until very recently.
This was never the case with Baking. All over Europe, pastry chefs mock the values of the French approach to pastries. It's always intertwined with good old fashioned dislike of the French people themselves. "That pastry looks so whorish, it wouldn't look out of place on a shelf in a Paris bakery." The values of French baking are seen as out of whack, lurid and over the top. I'm sure French bakers say negative things about the Baking in other countries, but French bakers are like the Yankees, ask representatives from 15 European countries where the worst pastries are from (and by "worst" I mean "tawdry" or "boorish", and 14 (all except the Frenchman) are saying France!. I mean, they're saying it in all sorts of different ways, "França", "Franciaország", "Γαλλία", but they always mean, "France".
   47. Howie Menckel Posted: December 04, 2019 at 08:56 PM (#5905750)
Let's let Yo-Yo Ma answer:

I used to have a seatmate at work whose father was one of Ma's closest collaborators in classical music, and I learned what an unusual sort of fame that is.

for people who knew of his father, they were all utterly awed to be in the presence of the son of such a genius.

for the rest of us, it was "who?"

it amused me greatly.
   48. Lassus Posted: December 04, 2019 at 09:38 PM (#5905760)
Re: French pastry

I dunno, I watched this once and it didn't seem too mock-worthy. No jealousy involved?
   49. Lassus Posted: December 04, 2019 at 09:54 PM (#5905766)
Not from you, OG, in general.
   50. Omineca Greg Posted: December 04, 2019 at 10:07 PM (#5905767)
Jealousy, no.

Ethnocentricity, definitely.

It's not to do with the skills, that's not what your Austrian pastry chef is going to denigrate. The part in that film (which is quite excellent), where they have the whiteboard, and they're coming up with a brand new 13 layer slice, yeah, that's totally mockworthy. It's like the Spinal Tap of baking. It only would have been more perfect if they had named the pastry "Lèche ma Pompe d'Amour"

And to be clear, not by me. I'm not one to get drawn into the international squabbling of temperamental artists. Everyone with these strong opinions is better than me (they apprenticed in Europe, so that gives them a big leg up). To put it less fancifully, French baking is seen as too ego driven, and more about the auteur than the ingredients. I agree in that sense, that is to say, the complaints aren't fabricated out of the air, I totally get the argument. Whether that means it's any objectively worse...well, that's an open question.
   51. Lassus Posted: December 04, 2019 at 10:23 PM (#5905774)
Seems fair. I'm happy to mock the French. I think for an amateur baker, though, the mastery is still there, so.

You should hear the classical compositions I mock.
   52. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: December 06, 2019 at 03:12 PM (#5906329)
For those who need more mise in their scène, Cahiers du Cinema has named its ten best films from 2010-2019. #1 is going to piss off Spielberg.
   53. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: December 06, 2019 at 03:27 PM (#5906339)
Cahiers du Cinema has named its ten best films from 2010-2019.


Of which I've seen Under the Skin & Melancholia. I should probably catch the Twin Peaks flick, though the fact that I skipped (taped, but never watched) Season 2 back in the day & partially for that reason didn't watch the recentish cable revival gives me pause.

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