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Monday, July 01, 2019

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (July 2019)

No summer doldrums this month — not when there’s a Sundance breakout drama, a new Pagan horror movie from the guy who gave you Hereditary and Quentin Tarantino’s valentine to old-school Sixties Tinseltown on the horizon.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: July 01, 2019 at 03:56 AM | 1020 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

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   201. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 07, 2019 at 10:29 PM (#5859730)
flop
   202. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: July 07, 2019 at 10:32 PM (#5859732)
She will definitely be one of the subjects when I get to the 30s and 40s. I’m embarrassed to admit that I’ve only seen two of her movies. Dark Victory and Petrified Forest.

Getting way ahead of things, I'd recommend Jezebel.
   203. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 07, 2019 at 10:33 PM (#5859733)
No mention of Claude Rains is complete without reference to this scene, with one of the most famous cuts in film history ...
   204. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 07, 2019 at 11:47 PM (#5859747)
Actually, I should have gone with this

A man who tells lies, like me, merely hides the truth. But a man who tells half-lies has forgotten where he put it.
   205. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: July 08, 2019 at 06:14 AM (#5859761)
Two film-watching suggestions-- take or ignore them:

Redford: swap the breezy and charming "Barefoot in the Park" for the inert "Great Gatsby"
Newman: swap the funny and forlorn "Slap Shot" for the dumb "Towering Inferno"
   206. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 08, 2019 at 06:23 AM (#5859763)
Former, can't say, but latter, oh yeah, go for Slap Shot and the Hansons


I'm telling you, Broom County is just visible upset by this display ...
C'mon down and get places for the home games!
Bring the kids!
We got entertainment for the whole family!


   207. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: July 08, 2019 at 08:29 AM (#5859770)
chisoxcollector --

Are you open to foreign actors? If so I might suggest Jean Gabin for the 1930s. To me he feels more like a Hollywood star than any of his European contemporaries. From 1936 to 1939 he starred in seven great or near-great movies (chronologically: They Were Five, The Lower Depths, Pépé le Moko, Grand Illusion, Port of Shadows, La Bête Humaine, and Le Jour Se Leve), which is a run that stacks up against anyone. Then the ####### Nazis showed up and Gabin's career was derailed for more than a decade. But he's still the most iconic male actor in French film history, or at least the most iconic actor who doesn't look like an ogre.

The seven 1936-1939 movies gets you three top shelf Jean Renoir films and two each from the best of Julien Duvivier and Marcel Carné. Watch those and you're halfway to a pretty solid greatest hits package of 1930s French cinema.
   208. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 08, 2019 at 08:56 AM (#5859771)
Alain Delon?
   209. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 08, 2019 at 09:12 AM (#5859776)
You get Le Samourai and Le Cercle Rouge to start ...
   210. Davo Posted: July 08, 2019 at 12:59 PM (#5859894)
   211. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 08, 2019 at 01:18 PM (#5859902)
Here's another recommendation for Slap Shot. I'm 100% not a hockey fan, but I really enjoyed this film.

As for Gatsby, I have a nostalgic fondness for it, but I wouldn't consider it one of redford's better films.
   212. My name is Votto, and I love to get blotto Posted: July 08, 2019 at 04:06 PM (#5859986)
December - Robert Duvall
Tender Mercies
The Great Santini
The Apostle


I love "The Apostle". It might be my all-time favorite drama. It's a perfect illustration of a certain style of preacher that abounds in the South.
   213. Davo Posted: July 08, 2019 at 05:31 PM (#5860026)
Netflix jumps into musicals with star-studded ‘The Prom’
Netflix is developing The Prom, an adaptation of the popular Broadway musical, as part of prolific showrunner Ryan Murphy’s deal with the company. The show features an all-star cast that includes the likes of Meryl Streep, James Corden, Nicole Kidman, Ariana Grande, Awkafina, and Andrew Rannels.

The film will have an Oscar-eligible theatrical release in late 2020, before going to Netflix’s streaming service.
   214. Omineca Greg Posted: July 08, 2019 at 05:50 PM (#5860034)
I just watched "Barefoot in the Park" (for the first time) last week. I thought it was very good, but it must also be said I find that time and place intriguing, and in this case, sexy beyond belief...so I was right in the target demo, as the kids say.
   215. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 08, 2019 at 06:49 PM (#5860067)
I am currently watching "Der Tatortreiniger," a German comedy (!) about a dude that cleans up crime scenes. It's actually pretty entertaining. Basically it involves his encounters with others at the scene.
   216. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: July 09, 2019 at 06:27 AM (#5860251)
I am currently watching - more or less for the first time - Seinfeld. About 2/3rds of the way through season 3 at the moment. Not sure I'll get all the way through before giving up.
   217. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 09, 2019 at 01:06 PM (#5860321)
Seinfeld is one of those shows that either clicks for you, or it does not. I think it's pretty funny, but I totally get why others don't.
   218. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 09, 2019 at 01:09 PM (#5860322)
I am currently watching "Der Tatortreiniger," a German comedy (!)
It's not a comedy. There are just certain aspects of German seriousness that foreigners don't understand.
   219. Davo Posted: July 09, 2019 at 01:13 PM (#5860327)
This #### is why no one ####### likes cinephiles.

Mike D’Angelo, ladies and gentlemen.
   220. chisoxcollector Posted: July 09, 2019 at 01:22 PM (#5860333)
All great ones as well; a few more I'd mention are "Philadelphia Story", which might provide another angle to get past the Hepburn issue, "Suspicion", another excellent Grant/Hitchcock pairing, and "His Girl Friday", which may be the origin point of all romantic comedy movies. I could go on about Cary Grant way too long, all I can say is he makes even the throw-away movies like "Room For One More" or "Father Goose" enjoyable.

I've seen, and enjoyed, all of those except Room For One More. Haven't seen that one yet.

I think the reason I was able to watch Philadelphia Story, but struggle to watch Bringing Up Baby, is that Hepburn is at peak annoying levels right from the get go. I vaguely remember something to do with her driving a car, and her being completely oblivious and inconsiderate.

I have a hard time watching movies where the characters do extremely stupid things. The only Cary Grant movie I've watched to completion and disliked is Arsenic & Old Lace. Everybody is such a moron in that movie!

Getting way ahead of things, I'd recommend Jezebel.

That is probably number 2 on the list, after All About Eve.

Redford: swap the breezy and charming "Barefoot in the Park" for the inert "Great Gatsby"
Newman: swap the funny and forlorn "Slap Shot" for the dumb "Towering Inferno"

Okay, Great Gatsby is out. Now I have to decide whether to watch Barefoot in the Park or The Contender in it's place.

Towering Inferno is also out, to be replaced by the Hanson Brothers!

Are you open to foreign actors? If so I might suggest Jean Gabin for the 1930s. To me he feels more like a Hollywood star than any of his European contemporaries. From 1936 to 1939 he starred in seven great or near-great movies (chronologically: They Were Five, The Lower Depths, Pépé le Moko, Grand Illusion, Port of Shadows, La Bête Humaine, and Le Jour Se Leve), which is a run that stacks up against anyone. Then the ####### Nazis showed up and Gabin's career was derailed for more than a decade. But he's still the most iconic male actor in French film history, or at least the most iconic actor who doesn't look like an ogre.

The seven 1936-1939 movies gets you three top shelf Jean Renoir films and two each from the best of Julien Duvivier and Marcel Carné. Watch those and you're halfway to a pretty solid greatest hits package of 1930s French cinema.

I am definitely open to foreign actors. I've considered Toshiro Mifune, but I've seen a lot of his bigger films, so I might end up scraping the bottom of the barrel.

I'll admit, I've never even heard of Jean Gabin. I've seen Kurosawa's version of The Lower Depths, but not this version. It certainly helps that I already own two of these on Blu-Ray (Depths, Grand Illusion). He is now firmly in the consideration set.

Alain Delon?

I have seen, and loved, Le Samourai. It is one of the most stylish films I've ever seen. I also own Purple Noon, but haven't watched it yet. Are there 3 other no doubt classics of his that I should watch, other than Le Cercle Rouge and Purple Noon?

I love "The Apostle". It might be my all-time favorite drama. It's a perfect illustration of a certain style of preacher that abounds in the South.

I've heard good things!
   221. Yonder Alonso in misguided trousers (cardinal) Posted: July 09, 2019 at 01:36 PM (#5860336)
To revisit Herzog and Fitzcarraldo from the previous page briefly, this is a fun read: Conquest Of The Useless, by Herzog. It's his journals from during the making of Fitzcarraldo.
   222. Davo Posted: July 09, 2019 at 02:17 PM (#5860345)
   223. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 09, 2019 at 03:42 PM (#5860414)
It's not a comedy. There are just certain aspects of German seriousness that foreigners don't understand.

Really? It sure seems like a comedy to me, or at least a "dramedy" if you will, but I'll defer to those more knowledgeable.

I just know I'm enjoying it.
   224. Lassus Posted: July 09, 2019 at 03:59 PM (#5860430)
I actually thought #218 was dry humor.
   225. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 09, 2019 at 04:02 PM (#5860431)
I actually thought #218 was dry humor.
It was German humor.
   226. Commissioner Bud Black Beltre Hillman Fred Posted: July 09, 2019 at 04:11 PM (#5860438)
Really? It sure seems like a comedy to me, or at least a "dramedy" if you will, but I'll defer to those more knowledgeable.

I just know I'm enjoying it.
Are you German?
   227. Dog on the sidewalk has an ugly bracelet Posted: July 09, 2019 at 04:29 PM (#5860446)
   228. Javy Joan Baez (chris h.) Posted: July 09, 2019 at 04:49 PM (#5860451)
It was German humor.

I suspected as much, but I wasn't nearly certain enough to go with it. ;-)
Are you German?

Ethnically, very much so, but it's been a few generations or so since we actually lived there.
   229. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: July 09, 2019 at 04:54 PM (#5860454)
I suspected as much, but I wasn't nearly certain enough to go with it. ;-)
<Schwarzenegger voice> It's not a humor.

Yes, I know Schwarzenegger is Austrian.
   230. Davo Posted: July 09, 2019 at 08:05 PM (#5860473)
@MagsVisaggs
What is the single best title you've ever heard? I don't care what it's for.

I offered The Little Girl Who Was Too Fond of Matches (a novel by Canadian author Gaetan Soucy) but, I don’t know, now I think it was hasty.

There are other, better answers at the link.
   231. Howie Menckel Posted: July 09, 2019 at 09:37 PM (#5860537)
I am currently watching - more or less for the first time - Seinfeld. About 2/3rds of the way through season 3 at the moment. Not sure I'll get all the way through before giving up.

I was always amazed at how many people who are not from the Northeast loved the show. seemed pretty regional to me - my region. great writing obviously, but the culture is pretty different. credit to those who gave it a shot and went with it.

my pals and I saw Jerry in a local comedy club after he got some Tonight Show appearances - but a year or two before he got his show. he killed, of course.
   232. Davo Posted: July 09, 2019 at 09:45 PM (#5860539)
I’m watching Vera Drake for the first time tonight! I just picked up a book on the films of Mike Leigh so I figured, ya know, maybe watch one?
   233. Davo Posted: July 10, 2019 at 12:36 AM (#5860618)
Rip Torn, Artie the Producer on 'The Larry Sanders Show,' Dies at 88

Torn was married from 1963-87 to the acclaimed actress Geraldine Page, whom he met at the Actors Studio in New York. One of the leading acting couples of their era, they founded the off-Broadway Sanctuary Theater Workshop in 1976. They were separated when she died of a heart attack in 1987 at age 62.

Torn also helped launch the Oscar-winning career of his cousin, actress Sissy Spacek, who was the daughter of his Uncle Ed.

(...After Torn met with Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy in an attempt to start an integrated national theater in 1963, he was targeted by the FBI and found trouble finding work in major motion pictures. "I began to see things in gossip columns, stories about me," he once said.

In 1970, on the day after Torn spoke out against the Vietnam War on The Dick Cavett Show, a bullet was fired through the window of his Manhattan home.
   234. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 10, 2019 at 01:33 AM (#5860621)
I’m watching Vera Drake for the first time tonight! I just picked up a book on the films of Mike Leigh so I figured, ya know, maybe watch one?


Mr. Turner
Happy-Go-Lucky
Topsy-Turvy
Naked

I'd go 3,2,1,4


   235. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: July 10, 2019 at 03:54 AM (#5860625)
I was always amazed at how many people who are not from the Northeast loved the show. seemed pretty regional to me - my region.


I think around the time it was at its peak, I was in a New York infatuation phase, but living in the Shires in the UK, and as a teenager wasn't able to just pick up and go, so TV and film were big outlets. (I'd lived on the East Coast for a few years as a child, so I also missed some very basic and mundane elements of the US.) I wasn't able/allowed to watch a lot of TV, so the occasional episodes of Seinfeld I caught had much more of a sense of 'place' to them than most other sitcoms of the period, it seemed to me. Friends, I'm looking at you.

Re-watching is also a reinforcement of how badly the cellphone destroys a lot of sitcom mechanics that Seinfeld relied upon in its early years. George is kept waiting at a payphone, Jerry gets arrested for public urination in a parking garage and no-one knows where he's gone . . .
   236. manchestermets Posted: July 10, 2019 at 08:04 AM (#5860630)
Mr. Turner
Happy-Go-Lucky
Topsy-Turvy
Naked

I'd go 3,2,1,4


In what I can only assume is a terrible accidental omission, you've missed out Life Is Sweet. Although I will admit that it can teach Seinfeld lessons about being regional.
   237. manchestermets Posted: July 10, 2019 at 08:07 AM (#5860631)
I was always amazed at how many people who are not from the Northeast loved the show. seemed pretty regional to me - my region. great writing obviously, but the culture is pretty different. credit to those who gave it a shot and went with it.


I'm struggling to think of anything in Seinfeld that might limit its appeal geographically - the major themes that come to mind are:

- Food (eating out, getting takeaway delivered, stealing from neighbours' fridge)
- Going to the movies
- Dating
- Having to deal with elderly parents and their foibles
- Working office jobs with those people
- Medical appointments
- Airline peanuts

All seems pretty universal to me.
   238. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: July 10, 2019 at 09:15 AM (#5860639)
I think there are a few other factors that might come into play. As far as I know, so far children don't even appear to exist in the Seinfeld universe. Everyone lives in and worries about the cost of renting apartments. Reliance on public transport and knowledge of the routes thereof. Basically, high-density urban living.

Those aren't factors unique to Seinfeld, of course, but so far it seems that it probably doubled down on them more than most of its peers.
   239. BrianBrianson Posted: July 10, 2019 at 09:21 AM (#5860641)
Aye RIP Rip Torn.

Looking over his filmography, I think I've only seen him in Men in Black (& II), the first of which is really excellent, if a weird summer blockbuster, in Freddie got Fingered (essential viewing for anyone who likes to think about cinema, or spend sleepless nights weeping in terror), and Canadian Bacon (which is a bit ham fisted (PUN!), mildly amusing, but pretty forgetable).
   240. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: July 10, 2019 at 09:39 AM (#5860649)
Seinfeld is absolutely not my cup of tea. I tried it, a couple times actually - including some "Classic" episodes - and it left me completely uninterested and unamused.

But it existing never did me much harm, so I am glad it brought so much joy to so many. So long as I don't have to watch any and its cultural relevance has thankfully receded to the point of non-ubiquity.
   241. Davo Posted: July 10, 2019 at 10:22 AM (#5860665)
So.....saw my first Mike Leigh movie last night and my God am I in love.
   242. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 10, 2019 at 11:12 AM (#5860687)

In what I can only assume is a terrible accidental omission, you've missed out Life Is Sweet. Although I will admit that it can teach Seinfeld lessons about being regional.


Well, it's not an accident, I just haven't seen it... yet. But it's now on the list. Looking forward, thanks!

So.....saw my first Mike Leigh movie last night and my God am I in love.


Put everything on my list in #234 on your list and throw in what MM recommended, if he knows enough about my list to say it should be added to my list, it should be added to my list.

   243. Swoboda is freedom Posted: July 10, 2019 at 12:10 PM (#5860702)
David Thewlis is so good in Naked. Secrets and Lies is also quite good.
   244. Lassus Posted: July 10, 2019 at 12:43 PM (#5860729)
I saw Bohemian Rhapsody the other night. I know there has been ample criticism of inaccuracies in timelining and the HIV/Live Aid bits, but as far as the interpersonal relationships and portrayal of Mercury go, I admit I trust Brian May.
   245. phredbird Posted: July 10, 2019 at 01:09 PM (#5860744)

we don't have a thread for this, so i'm just going to say here that john mcenroe is as good a tennis commentator as he was a player. you'd think he'd have some kind of snarky delivery or something based on how we knew him as a player, but his experience as a champion has given his commentary a note of empathy to go with his great insights into how to play at championship level. i always feel like i'm just kind of sitting with him in the room, watching.

and his brother is no slouch either, so together they really are the best out there ...

that is all.
   246. PreservedFish Posted: July 10, 2019 at 01:14 PM (#5860748)
And I was about to ask if anyone else is watching the Tour de France - probably my single favorite sporting event.
   247. bunyon Posted: July 10, 2019 at 01:18 PM (#5860751)
I have no idea if anyone cares to see this or not but I subjected the soccer thread to my 6 weeks in Argentina so I may as well share the end. This is a ~29 minute video of the July 2 solar eclipse from northwest of San Juan. It's not why I was there but it made me even happier to be. No narration or music, save that of nature. You may want to fast forward.

https://youtu.be/Y9D_JzesEOc
   248. Davo Posted: July 10, 2019 at 01:24 PM (#5860758)
Man I still cannot get over how great Vera Drake was. Just a flawless movie from start to finish. It tries to do like 9 impossible things and does them all perfectly.
   249. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 10, 2019 at 01:41 PM (#5860760)
Rip Torn was also the heavy in a Columbo episode which is the pinnacle of actorly achievement. I had no idea that was him in Beastmaster! Ah Beastmaster. A perfect movie in its way.
   250. bunyon Posted: July 10, 2019 at 01:51 PM (#5860764)
I know Rip Torn best from Dodgeball.
   251. phredbird Posted: July 10, 2019 at 02:03 PM (#5860779)

if all rip torn ever did was the larry sanders show, he'd be in the TV hall of fame. he was brilliant.
   252. Hysterical & Useless Posted: July 10, 2019 at 02:24 PM (#5860789)
157. Lassus Posted: July 06, 2019 at 06:10 PM (#5859456)
Books I have just purged from my library:


Things Fall Apart is a great book and well worth reading.

Henry James should be purged. "He chews more than he can bite off." (V Woolf)
   253. Hysterical & Useless Posted: July 10, 2019 at 02:36 PM (#5860791)
I could go on about Cary Grant way too long,


The Awful Truth, with Irene Dunne, another great one.
   254. PreservedFish Posted: July 10, 2019 at 02:44 PM (#5860792)
I began reading Henry James' Washington Square when I was slightly drunk and I found his prose marvelously funny, acerbic and skeptical and richly layered with irony. When I resumed the novel sober I found none of those qualities, and it was a slog to finish. Usually I'd think that the alcohol just lowered my standards, but in this case it really feels like it opened up the doors of perception and allowed me access to his genius that I don't have in my normal state.
   255. Davo Posted: July 10, 2019 at 02:46 PM (#5860793)
Legendary director Brian De Palma to publish debut novel

EW can exclusively announce that the iconic Hollywood director will publish his debut novel, co-written by Susan Lehman, next spring with Hard Case Crime. Titled Are Snakes Necessary?, the book is described as “a blistering political satire” that doubles as a female revenge thriller. It follows a philandering senator who’s cheating on his Parkinson’s-afflicted wife with his campaign’s beautiful young videographer. When things go wrong, the senator calls in his fixer to set them right, with deadly consequences stretching from Washington to Paris.
   256. jmurph Posted: July 10, 2019 at 03:01 PM (#5860797)
That's at least the second novel John Edwards (appears to have) inspired.

EDIT: The Senator's Children is the other one, I haven't read it.
   257. PreservedFish Posted: July 10, 2019 at 03:13 PM (#5860800)
with deadly consequences stretching from Washington to Paris.


Paris? Not terribly exotic. I'd rather see the consequences stretch to Zanzibar or something.
   258. manchestermets Posted: July 10, 2019 at 06:09 PM (#5860825)
Unfortunately, the rules of literary stretching say that things can only stretch to Zanzibar from Addis Ababa.
   259. Davo Posted: July 10, 2019 at 06:14 PM (#5860827)
   260. Hysterical & Useless Posted: July 10, 2019 at 06:14 PM (#5860828)
Oh, additionally Lassus, Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief, a very good book in it's own right, was also the basis for the fine Spike Jonze/Charlie Kaufman film Adaptation.
   261. Davo Posted: July 10, 2019 at 08:56 PM (#5860859)
Comparison between the two animated versions of The Lion King.

Oh dear this is gonna be a train wreck.
   262. Jeremy Renner App is Dead and I killed it Posted: July 10, 2019 at 09:01 PM (#5860861)
261--based on that post I am taking the kids and expecting the movie to be amazing
   263. Davo Posted: July 10, 2019 at 09:14 PM (#5860864)
What about that clip looked amazing to you?
   264. Egregious Hidden Genitals (CoB). Posted: July 10, 2019 at 11:54 PM (#5860892)
To double cross post:

For those who don't remember it, Bouton briefly starred in a sitcom based on his book.


Bouton was also the bad guy in "The Long Goodbye", one of my favorite Altman films.

I can't say he's "good" in it, but he's at least cromulent.
   265. Howie Menckel Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:38 AM (#5860896)
USA Today celebrates this remake
Lion King, indeed?

well, they write about mainstream critics celebrating it, anyway

Germain Lussier
‏Verified account @GermainLussier

The Lion King is a wonderful adaptation of an iconic classic. It has a few small changes which enhance what was already great and everything else is right on point. The CG can be slightly distracting at times but the emotion quickly covers that. Loved it.
   266. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 11, 2019 at 08:50 AM (#5860915)
The Ringer has a nice article about David Berman going right now. I had no idea that when I bought Starlite Walker back in the day I was that hip! I also didn't realize that he went to college with Malkmus. I knew the early Silver Jews albums were collaborations with Pavement members, but I didn't know how far back the connection went. I tend not to get into the nuts and bolts of bands too much, to be honest. Good to see he has a new record out even if it's not a "Silver Jews" record. Anyway, The Silver Jews are great and you should check them out if you haven't.
   267. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:04 AM (#5860916)
As a meta-commentary on #265, Lussier is an io9.com writer who gets a certain amount of flak for liking everything.
   268. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:10 AM (#5860917)
Shooty - Listening to American Water on Youtube right now.

Nice enough, but I think the reason I'd never heard of it is that it's not entirely my type of thing. Would this be considered a lo-fi/Barlow descendant, or do I have my genres mis-identified?
   269. jmurph Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:14 AM (#5860919)
Oh, additionally Lassus, Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief, a very good book in it's own right, was also the basis for the fine Spike Jonze/Charlie Kaufman film Adaptation.

I say "that's how much #### fish" (or fill in a substitute for fish) like 20, 25 times a year. There's a lot of great stuff in that movie.
   270. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:27 AM (#5860924)
Nice enough, but I think the reason I'd never heard of it is that it's not entirely my type of thing. Would this be considered a lo-fi/Barlow descendant, or do I have my genres mis-identified?

Not sure. I've never really thought of what genre Silver Jews is. In my mind, I kind of lump them in with Leonard Cohen and Bob Dylan and other acts where the lyrics are the fun as much as the tune.
   271. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:39 AM (#5860928)
Adaptation is great. It might be a top 20 movie of all time for me. I almost can't believe the studio let Kauffman get away with it! I'd love to get an oral history of the development of that one.
   272. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 09:59 AM (#5860935)
Charlie Kaufman film Adaptation.

I am aware of the work of Pablo Neruda Charlie Kaufman.
   273. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 10:01 AM (#5860937)
From the Youtube comments on Starlite Walker:
This album makes me feel good. I like it when I'm smoking marijuana and I don't wanna hear anything else.
   274. PreservedFish Posted: July 11, 2019 at 10:10 AM (#5860939)
I've loved "American Water" for decades but I never actually purchased another Silver Jews album, for some reason. I think it's easy to see Barlow's lo-fi as a progenitor ... what I like it for is the combination of mild alt-country/americana influences and the mildly crunchy/textured Pavementy guitar sound, and I like Berman's voice and his attitude.
   275. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 11, 2019 at 10:11 AM (#5860940)
Youtube comments make my head spin. How can the comments on youtube be made by the same species that invented all the technology needed to create youtube? It's a paradox!
   276. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 10:29 AM (#5860943)
I legitimately don’t understand how people can watch that ghastly clip of the new CGI Lion King and say “Yes, these visuals looks great, I want to see more.” Would be nice if Master of the Horse could elaborate.
   277. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 10:50 AM (#5860945)
I legitimately don’t understand how people can watch that ghastly clip of the new CGI Lion King and say “Yes, these visuals looks great, I want to see more.” Would be nice if Master of the Horse could elaborate.

I know it's an easy target, and I promise I won't bring it up ever again, but this was exactly my thoughts when I saw clips of the live-action Speed Racer. So think of your own answer to that question and reverse-engineer from there, maybe.
   278. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 11:06 AM (#5860947)
Amy Adams' 'Woman in the Window' to Move to 2020 as Disney Retools Fox Film
The final movie from the shuttering Fox 2000 division, an adaptation of a hit book from producer Scott Rudin, will get reshoots after test screenings revealed audiences were confused.
   279. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 11:11 AM (#5860951)
But the animals can’t emote (they can barely move their faces), the only camera movement is a reverse dolly, and everything is beige.
   280. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: July 11, 2019 at 11:34 AM (#5860957)
The Disney remakes just seem very cynical and it's kind of depressing that they're making money on it. This isn't to make a comment on the quality of each individual film just that the project bums me out. I'm glad some indy directors are getting paid, though. Hopefully that will free them to chase their own projects.
   281. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 11:45 AM (#5860962)
just that the project bums me out.

Don't disagree with that.
   282. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:19 PM (#5860981)
Matt Patches on The Lion King
There’s a tremendous amount of craft in The Lion King, and under the direction of Jon Favreau (The Jungle Book, Chef), a complete absence of art. The CG water really looks like water. The CG rocks really look like rocks. The CG plants really look like plants. The CG dust really looks like dust. The CG fur really looks like fur. If Earth transforms into a husk of its former self in the next 100 years, The Lion King will play an important historical role in our future. But unlike with this year’s Dumbo, which pushed past the plot markers of the 1941 movie, or Aladdin, which saw an opportunity for the underserved Jasmine, the team behind The Lion King saw no room for improvement other than a hyper-realistic overhaul.

That photorealism never makes a case for itself. The majesty of Planet Earth is how cameras capture the instinctual, unaware behavior of animals. The Lion King can’t tap that energy while delivering a shot-for-shot remake of a movie in which lions dance on top of elephants. The “realism” neither brings the source material closer to any African culture or ecology, nor nuances the characters’ expressions. From the very first shot, the movie is caught in a limbo between raw nature footage and the imaginative power of cartooning. Turns out, two lions’ flirtatious “play-fighting” is super terrifying when rendered as two real lions baring their teeth and growling.

What sounds like a Disney purist’s best-case scenario feels more like the switch from sugar-coated chewables to swallowing knuckle-sized gel capsules. The expressive animation that made Simba innocent, Pumbaa a riot, and Scar so devilish is ditched for deadpan animal deepfakes.
   283. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:34 PM (#5860990)
The AV Club’s review holds no punches either
The Lion King, Disney’s latest attempt to make a new hit from the blueprint of one of its old ones, begins the exact same way as the 1994 animated smash on which it’s based: with a blood-red sun peaking over the horizon of the African Serengeti, a single chanting voice rising with it. What follows is a shot-for-shot recreation of that film’s spectacular opening musical number, “The Circle Of Life,” in which all the beasts in the kingdom take their place at the foot of a jutting rock, ready to pay respect to the young predator that will soon be calling them prey.

There’s a key difference, however. This time, the antelopes and giraffes and scurrying ants look exactly like actual antelopes and giraffes and scurrying ants. And that proves to be both the major technological achievement of the movie and its great miscalculation, its fundamental folly. The scene’s dramatic apex is supposed to be the interaction between the mighty lion Mufasa (a returning James Earl Jones, because who could replace him?) and the wise mandrill Rafiki (John Kani), who’s come to present the king’s newborn son to the world. But both characters have been so authentically rendered, with the limited range of facial motion their respective species possess, that we’re essentially just watching two animals stare blankly at each other. The emotional connection between them is entirely theoretical, supplied only by context or maybe by memories of what their hand-drawn ancestors more clearly conveyed.

(...)Yet there’s something distracting, even uncanny-valley unnerving about hearing, say, John Oliver’s panicked voice projecting out from the clicking beak of a dead-eyed hornbill. The effect isn’t so different from what you’d get from dubbing over the chewing maw of a real animal, Mister Ed-style. And the lack of expressiveness becomes a real liability when it comes to caring about our hero, prince Simba (JD McCrary as a cub, Donald Glover as a grown lion), who sports the same placid, unchanging cat face when he’s confronted by the defining tragedy of his childhood as when he’s pouncing on a beetle.
   284. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 12:41 PM (#5860994)
I still expect the majority of critics will begrudgingly bend the knee and praise it, but, will be interesting to track.
   285. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 02:00 PM (#5861020)
Selections from io9's review. I personally do not feel as if this is "bending the knee", but others of a less generous nature may:

The Lion King Is a Gorgeous But Completely Unnecessary Retelling
Since Disney initiated its goal of remaking what feels like every one of the studio’s Renaissance-era animated features into live-action films, questions have abounded about what the point is. Is the goal to enhance the films with technology that wasn’t around in the early ‘90s? To give marginalized characters more depth? Enhance diversity? There has never been a hard and fast set of rules, short of “remind the audience why they loved it.”
“Who really cares about the story, when the technology is so utterly astounding?” appears to be the film’s mentality.
Unlike the previous film, where the actors’ vocal performances were brash and memorable—they were acting, regardless of whether they were on-camera—here everyone appears to have one basic tone and manner of speaking. This is felt most keenly with Ejiofer’s Scar. Gone is the fey theatricality of Jeremy Irons’ performance, and it’s replaced with little more than a basic baddie. Ejiofor has a lovely voice, but it’s so muted here.
The scene-stealers are Billy Eichner’s Timon and Seth Rogen’s Pumbaa, no surprise because their characters are the most divergent from the source material. Where the other actors are left to say nearly all the original film’s dialogue, Eichner and Rogen just seem to be naturally riffing off each other, to hilarious effect. They’re more of what the film should have focused on, familiar characters with a more modern edge (technology aside). Though their Timon and Pumbaa are no different than in the ‘94 movie, the banter and humor is sharper. Eichner sings and charms his way into audiences’ hearts with a Timon that’s so witty you’ll want to see it again for his performance alone.
The Lion King is extremely gorgeous and worthy of being seen on the biggest screen possible, but like the last few Disney features to come down the pipe it can’t help but feel completely unnecessary. Eichner and Rogen are worth the price of said admission, however, and families who have worn out their VHS and DVD copies will, no doubt, want to experience this again. It’s fun, it’s gorgeous, second verse same as the first.

   286. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 02:05 PM (#5861025)
277 I know it's an easy target, and I promise I won't bring it up ever again, but this was exactly my thoughts when I saw clips of the live-action Speed Racer. So think of your own answer to that question and reverse-engineer from there, maybe.

Well I have no idea why you didn’t like Speed Racer. I can guess it’s because the effects didn’t look “realistic,” and you took that to mean they were “bad.” That it was an expressionist film presumably never crossed your mind.

So reverse-engineering, this would mean people who like the new Lion King like it because the visuals are “realistic.” Except The Lion King is about animals that can talk and sing and dance and smile—which are all things real animals cannot do, which makes photo-realism a terrible fit for the film, as we can see in the clips from the movies in post 261.

So I’m no closer. Would love Master of the Horse to follow up.
   287. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 02:10 PM (#5861028)
I can guess it’s because the effects didn’t look “realistic,” and you took that to mean they were “bad.” That it was an expressionist film presumably never crossed your mind.

As I said, someone less generous.
   288. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: July 11, 2019 at 02:53 PM (#5861044)
So Davo, what do you think of the original Lion King?
   289. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: July 11, 2019 at 02:56 PM (#5861047)
Well I have no idea why you didn’t like Speed Racer.


Well let's see what some critics said ...
Young boys are the only suitable audience for Speed Racer, the elaborate live-action adaptation written and directed by "Matrix" creators Larry and Andy Wachowski. And even they might feel an urge to squirm.


At an exceedingly long 135 minutes, the film needs more than what might result from the explosion of a Crayola factory, and Speed Racer has nothing extra to offer - no heart, no excitement, no moments to cherish.


Gaudier than a Hindu-temple roof, louder than the Las Vegas night, Speed Racer is a cathedral of glitz.


There's more story, heart, and – cutting to the chase, the quick, and the dead – pure, unadulterated fun contained within a scant five minutes of Rockstar Games' new Grand Theft Auto IV video game than there is in the whole of Speed Racer.


Orgy, hell: The film is like a nightmare in which you're trapped in an arcade with screens on all sides and no eyelids. Based on an elemental but happily streamlined Japanese cartoon (an anime precursor), it's an eyesore, a shambles, with incoherent action and ear-buckling dialogue.
   290. BrianBrianson Posted: July 11, 2019 at 03:10 PM (#5861055)
Well I have no idea why you didn’t like Speed Racer. I can guess it’s because the effects didn’t look “realistic,” and you took that to mean they were “bad.” That it was an expressionist film presumably never crossed your mind.


What a weird assumption to make about a film with nifty effects, uninspired acting, and a long, boring story.
   291. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 03:18 PM (#5861056)
So Davo, what do you think of the original Lion King?

I just saw it a few months ago, and I don’t think it’s even a good movie, but at least appreciated the use of color. Story is obviously trite, as it’s smack in the middle of their “let’s make movies for kids that parents can enjoy too” phase (just as the songs are in their “make everything sound like a Broadway musical” phase). And the reactionary elements are too striking to ignore.

I actually prefer the straight-to-video sequel (Simba’s Pride), to be honest. Despite the budgeted animation and absence of stars in the cast, they tell a story with genuine humanity, with characters choosing Love over Violence. And “My Lullaby” is a banger!
   292. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 03:22 PM (#5861059)
290- Lassus has said he only saw “clips” of Speed Racer before turning away in horror, which is why I’m guessing his objections were to the visuals and not the story (because it sounds like he didn’t watch long enough to get to the story elements.)

Could be wrong, of course. He’s mysterious!
   293. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 03:27 PM (#5861062)
There was actually dialogue in the clips. And some of those clips were 10 minutes worth of said dialogue on HBO as I folded laundry.

If you don't mind, I am curious what you think about the posted io9 review. Honest enough or a shill-job?
   294. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 04:09 PM (#5861078)
We’re getting closer to solving the mystery of Why Lassus Didn’t Like Speed Racer!!! By gum I’ve nearly cracked the case!!!

Re Lion King, I’m on this guy’s boat:

@bybowes
Not sure what's worse, the suspicion that people are being paid to say that ghastly Lion King footage looks good, or the possibility that they're saying that on their own
(kidding, of course)
   295. Lassus Posted: July 11, 2019 at 04:17 PM (#5861081)
We’re getting closer to solving the mystery of Why Lassus Didn’t Like Speed Racer!!! By gum I’ve nearly cracked the case!!!

I understand that dealing with someone who answers every question of yours is difficult when getting the same from you is like pulling teeth, but at least try. As you've now posted repeatedly about Lion King reviews, what do you think of the io9 review above?

The dialogue of Speed Racer was stilted, the action was cartoonish, and the plot was simple. Nothing I saw whenever it was on engaged me to continue watching. If it was meant to be impressionistic, it failed to make such an impression.
   296. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: July 11, 2019 at 04:21 PM (#5861082)
We’re getting closer to solving the mystery of Why Lassus Didn’t Like Speed Racer!!! By gum I’ve nearly cracked the case!!!


Yup, because it was a bad movie.
   297. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 04:23 PM (#5861085)
Yeah, review was blandly fine, whatevs.
   298. Graham & the 15-win "ARod Vortex of suck" Posted: July 11, 2019 at 04:31 PM (#5861089)
"Not sure what's worse, the suspicion that [Davo says this shit to get a rise out of people], or the possibility that [he actually believes it]"
   299. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 04:42 PM (#5861095)
The setup: K. Austen Collins reviews The Lion King for Vanity Fair
More than one person in your life is going to liken the photorealistic look of this movie to that of a video game cut scene — those scripted interstitial sequences that make video games feel more movie-like. They will not be entirely wrong.

More flatteringly, The Lion King is being hailed as a major advancement for movie technology—a movie “filmed” almost entirely in virtual reality. Wired magazine recently described it thusly: “They”—the film’s distinctive locales—“can live inside a kind of filmmaking video­game as 360-degree virtual environments full of digitized animals, around which Favreau and his crew could roam.”

The result? The fine digital craftsmanship of our new era, replete with all the vices it entails: nostalgic reenactments of scenes we’ve seen before; colorless voice acting by name-brand performers, the likes of Beyoncé and Donald Glover (who play adult Nala and Simba, respectively); and a color-drained visual palette befitting an early aughts movie about war in the Middle East. Early on, it was clear I’d be able to count every ridge, sub-ridge, and micro-ridge on the trunk of every elephant, and count out the strands of hair on Rafiki’s face. But watching all this made me feel a bit like Little Red Riding Hood visiting the Big Bad Wolf, wearing the guise of her grandmother. Simba, what large, inexpressive, marble-shined eyes you have! What an uncannily post-Botox emotional range you have!

The new Lion King isn’t a disaster. It’s a lesson: in what makes voice acting resonate, for starters, and in the strangeness of hearing animals emote vocally when their faces are pretty much limited to moving mouths and blinking eyes—no eyebrow action, no subtlety, no liveliness. It’s a lesson in why we value animation in the first place. We value it for, well, its animated nature: as a medium to convey emotions that are bigger onscreen than in real life, and exaggerated expressions, flights of fancy, a complete rejection of physics. But this film favors technological wizardry over its story—and its songs.

(...)So much of the new Lion King—the shots, their rhythm, the detail and content of every scene—felt as if it had been ripped directly from my memory banks, which got me thinking back to the interesting failure of Gus Van Sant’s shot-for-shot 1998 remake of Psycho. That movie was a case study in the difference between merely copying something and really reshaping it, getting one's hands dirty. The Lion King, ultimately, is simply a copy—not a true remake. It’s exactly the movie Disney wanted to make, which is good news for them—but a shame for us.

....and the punchline!
   300. Davo Posted: July 11, 2019 at 06:11 PM (#5861117)
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