Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Saturday, June 01, 2019

OT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (June 2019)

The 2018-19 TV season is history, so here’s [Deadline’s] annual list of summer premiere dates for new series and new seasons of returning shows. It covers hundreds of broadcast, cable and streaming series bowing from mid-May through August in various dayparts.

Lance Reddick! Lance him! Posted: June 01, 2019 at 07:30 AM | 1297 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: movies, music, off-topic, television, whatever else belongs under the rubric of 'popular culture'

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 4 of 13 pages ‹ First  < 2 3 4 5 6 >  Last ›
   301. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 07:46 AM (#5848929)
Flipping my comment...

Well, We Are the World and Ebony & Ivory were at least attempts at thoughtful songs. They just weren't very good at it. But that's very different than being intentionally and stridently mindless.



I think one issue here is that I really don't define "thoughtful" according to lyrical content. We Are the World and Ebony & Ivory are both extremely well-intentioned and espouse beautiful sentiments. But to me, they're thoughtless, because musically they are rancid treacle. (Can treacle go rancid? Not sure. Seems pretty stable. Anyway...)

I mean, so what do you think about Kanye? He's probably past his peak but for 10-15 years he was a massive star with massive critical acclaim, had a constantly evolving musical style that was massively influential, and routinely took on the type of overtly political and 'big idea' subject matter you favor. He did, of course, combine that with a ridiculous tabloid persona. But he cast a huge shadow on the entire music scene.
   302. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 08:41 AM (#5848935)
   303. Lassus Posted: June 06, 2019 at 09:08 AM (#5848941)
You know when you're coming at it from the angle of "kids today can't touch Bono and the Boss" you're kind of asking for it.

"Handel is only fourth rate. He is not even interesting."
- Tchaikovsky on Handel

"He'd be better off shovelling snow than scribbling on manuscript paper."
- Richard Strauss on Schoenberg


BTW, if you really want some of the best 'kids today' and 'old people suck' musical insults, there are right here on this page of composers trash-talking other composers.
   304. bunyon Posted: June 06, 2019 at 09:15 AM (#5848945)
What I imagine will happen is we either solve the technological issues to maintain our living standards through climate change and in the far future Earth re-equilibrates and we adapt, OR, we don't solve the technological challenge and, at some point, experience a massive die-off, to the point where the survivors can re-establish what we call a "modern" civilization in a more sustainable manner (due to their being fewer people) and Earth re-equilibrates. The third possibility is that the die-off is complete and Earth re-equilibrates without us. Life will start over. With the bees, perhaps.


Well, no, there's a case in between, where "modern" civilization was a dumb luck chance that Europe could dump off excess people due to disease depopulating the Americas/Australia that can't be repeated, and we end up back in a long term up and down off empires that never has the post-1750 takeoff we're in. So just re-cycling ~5000 BC to 1500 AD again and again, with no way out of the establish, grow, collapse civilizations.


Perhaps, but I don't think knowledge really ever dies completely. The knowledge gained by the Greeks and Romans stayed alive in various civilizations over the centuries. What the Chinese learned got transmitted. I think, short of extinction or near-extinction, humans will keep technology. It may be in isolated pockets of high living standards that hang on for centuries between peaks but it'll stay there.
   305. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 09:22 AM (#5848949)
OR, we don't solve the technological challenge and, at some point, experience a massive die-off, to the point where the survivors can re-establish what we call a "modern" civilization in a more sustainable manner (due to their being fewer people) and Earth re-equilibrates.

#thanoswasright?
   306. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 06, 2019 at 09:42 AM (#5848956)
It may be in isolated pockets of high living standards that hang on for centuries between peaks but it'll stay there.

If Mad Max has taught me anything is that we'll still have ATV's and guns and, in isolated cases, small flying machines.
   307. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 09:50 AM (#5848959)
From a 1-star Letterboxd review of “Avengers: Age of Ultron”

so, um. the first time i saw this in theaters, there wasn't anything super notable except for the fact that someone i was dating at the time made me wear a rope harness under my clothes. no, really. he also made me wear one to work at least once. (before anyone who's currently dating and/or domming me reads this & gets ideas: it would be a lot harder to get away with now, please don't make me try.) that was the time i saw it alone. i know i also saw it with my boyfriend.

this is what I live for
   308. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 10:35 AM (#5848981)
You know when you're coming at it from the angle of "kids today can't touch Bono and the Boss" you're kind of asking for it.
But that's not my angle. Be fair. My angle is, and has always been, "Pop music today is worse off than it was back when the market was such that artists like Bono and the Boss could be hugely popular, in addition to the mindless stuff."
   309. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 06, 2019 at 10:49 AM (#5848989)
This isn't to jump into the now vs then debate, but for a few months I had a job in a music library and they had a full set of a music review magazine that went back to the 1950's (I forget which one now). To kill time I used to flip through them to read contemporaneous reviews of what are now classic pop albums--Pet Sounds, Sgt Pepper, Blood on the Tracks etc.--and it was funny to read how dismissive many of the reviews were. I think the magazine's bent was largely high quality classical music recordings and the pop music reviews always read like they were slumming. I think they backhandedly praised Sgt Pepper as an ok example of the Music Hall genre. (I'm not a huge Beatles fan so maybe they were right!) Of course, and I think I've mentioned this before, but I got to meet Sam Phillips working there. Definitely the best of my very few celebrity meetings. In fact, I can't think of many celebrities I could hand choose that would be bigger than meeting him.
   310. Lassus Posted: June 06, 2019 at 10:50 AM (#5848990)
Weren't the most cerebral and message-driven singles of those careers before they were hugely popular?
   311. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 10:54 AM (#5848993)
I think one issue here is that I really don't define "thoughtful" according to lyrical content. We Are the World and Ebony & Ivory are both extremely well-intentioned and espouse beautiful sentiments. But to me, they're thoughtless, because musically they are rancid treacle. (Can treacle go rancid? Not sure. Seems pretty stable. Anyway...)
Fair enough, although it baffles me how people can completely disregard the lyrics in evaluating pop music. When you're considering whether a song is thoughtful or not, I don't think you can legitimately choose to ignore what it's "saying" expressly and focus only on what it's "saying" more impliedly through the music. Not gonna disagree with you on the musical merits of those two particular songs.

I mean, so what do you think about Kanye? He's probably past his peak but for 10-15 years he was a massive star with massive critical acclaim, had a constantly evolving musical style that was massively influential, and routinely took on the type of overtly political and 'big idea' subject matter you favor. He did, of course, combine that with a ridiculous tabloid persona. But he cast a huge shadow on the entire music scene.
Hmmmm, good question. I guess the first thing is I'd describe him as "massively overrated." Yes, he does aspire to some thoughtful material, but man, he's usually just such a ridiculous dipsh*t about it. I don't think he's nearly the "insightful genius" that people seem to credit him with being. He writes a lot of mindless stuff too ("Gold Digger," etc.).

Just to clarify, by the way - a song absolutely doesn't need to be political or have serious social commentary to be "thoughtful." Thoughtful songs can be written about love, or just about anything, really. I would say there are only a few song topics that are pretty much categorically mindless...off the top of my head, songs about dancing, partying, being at a club, boasting ("I have a lot of money"/ "I'm such a badass" / "I'm rapping about how good I am at rapping"), novelty songs. There might be a few others, but that's about it.
   312. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:11 AM (#5849001)
"I'm rapping about how good I am at rapping"


These are some of my favorites when done well, if only because - to be true to the theme - the degree of difficulty should be higher. Essentially 'pay very close attention to my technique, vocabulary, and flow for the whole song'. Abdominal's "I'm Good" is probably the first one that comes to mind.
   313. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:12 AM (#5849003)
The last Kanye album I listened to had these lyrics

To all my second-string #######, tryin' get a baby
Tryin' get a baby, now you talkin' crazy
I don't give a damn if you used to talk to JAY-Z
He ain't with you, he with Beyoncé, you need to stop actin' lazy
She Instagram herself like #BadBitchAlert
He Instagram his watch like #MadRichAlert
He only wanna see that ass in reverse


Which whatevs. But this is the one that samples Nina Simone’s “Strange Fruit.” FOH!

And I guess.....when I see the Pitchfork types praising stuff like that, it reads like so much wishful thinking and special pleading (and is a near-perfect analogy to the starfucking movie “critics” who fire off their “Actually Avengers 6 is a weighty criticism of western imperialism merely dressed up in genre trappings” takes oh FOH mate.)
   314. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:12 AM (#5849004)
I went to the Billboard Hot 100 from June 8, 1985, which admittedly is cherry picking to a degree. One thing I did notice is that only 8 songs out of the 40 (below) were recorded by people of color. The Top 40 for June 8, 2019 contains roughly 20 songs by or featuring people of color which reflects the rise of more diverse musical tastes (from rock) but also diversity in the industry itself and the relative decline of rock music. As primarily a fan of rock music, I do sort of wish that it hadn't declined in popularity (in much the same way that I enjoy it when more people root for the Mets, for instance) but I definitely understand that people (especially kids) in a more diverse country are gravitating towards more diverse music. You could argue that the industry is better for it in that sense. Put more simply, I recognize that as a middle aged white male, I am not the sole target audience for pop music in 2019, whereas in 1985 I might have been. Sorry if that's confusing. Anyway, here's the list of 8 songs in the 6/8/85 Top 40 performed by POC's.

32. Rhythm of the Night Debarge
29. We Are The World USA For Africa (Obviously a mixed group here but written by Lionel Richie)
26. You Give Good Love Whitney Houston
17. Raspberry Beret Prince
13. Smooth Operator Sade
9. Fresh Kool & the Gang
7. In My House Mary Jane Girls (This song is awesome)
4. Suddenly Billy Ocean
   315. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:14 AM (#5849007)
(Caveat that I know ####-all about music generally and hip-hop specifically. But I mean. I know how to read!)
   316. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:31 AM (#5849014)
These are some of my favorites when done well, if only because - to be true to the theme - the degree of difficulty should be higher. Essentially 'pay very close attention to my technique, vocabulary, and flow for the whole song'. Abdominal's "I'm Good" is probably the first one that comes to mind.

Kool Moe Dee's song I Go To Work is the best of this genre. I will fight anyone who disagrees about this!

I do not nor have ever cared for Kanye West. I really don't get it and was my first inkling that I'm hopelessly behind the times.

I made a recent trip to Rough Trade for a rare CD buying binge. Some stuff what I got:

Pi Ja Ma, Nice To Meet You: A pretty charming album by a young French woman in English. Evidently she's a pretty famous illustrator and tv personality in France. I don't really care. Glad I took a chance on the album, though.

Yak, Pursuit of Momentary Happiness: I think this one is going to grow on me. I guess the band I'd compare them to is Archers of Loaf? I'd recommend checking it out on Spotify before buying (if anyone but me still buys albums).

Mavis Staples, If All I Was Was Black: Mavis Staples is a national treasure and this is a great album. It's the one produced by Jeff Tweedy and goddam if it doesn't sound like Mavis Staples fronting a Wilco album. Awesome.

Beirut, Gallipoli: I love Beirut and if you like Beirut you'll like Gallipoli.

Stephen Malkmus, Groove Denied: A Malkmus solo electronic album. I'm not an expert on electronica but I like this one. Definitely worth a listen. Rushing the Acid Frat is my favorite song on it, probably because it sounds most like a Stephen Malkmus song.

Lesley Gore, California Nights: Not sure why I got this one. It was in the soul section and I noticed it was partially produced by Quincy Jones. I was hoping for a lost blue-eyed soul masterpiece but it's not really that. A couple of really good songs but I would have rather taken the chance on something else. Bad, one of the songs Jones produced is really good if you want to check something out on it.

Phoebe Bridgers, Stranger in the Alps: I feel like everyone already knows this album. She has a lovely, evocative voice.
   317. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:45 AM (#5849022)
One thing I did notice is that only 8 songs out of the 40 (below) were recorded by people of color.


83% of Americans were white in 1980, 80% in 1990. So that is the fraction of artists you'd expect to be people of colour if music was maximally diverse.
   318. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:49 AM (#5849027)
a quick google search says that 61% of Americans are white now, which supports my point that as America becomes more diverse, musical tastes do as well.
   319. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:53 AM (#5849030)
@tvoti (TV critic Emily Vanderwerff)
For a long time, there was a woman who lived in my head, and she was sarcastic and fun and loved things a little too fiercely, and I liked her so much more than the person I thought I was.

Then one day I realized I could just be her? I already WAS her? It felt like waking up.
   320. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:02 PM (#5849032)
Fair enough, although it baffles me how people can completely disregard the lyrics in evaluating pop music. When you're considering whether a song is thoughtful or not, I don't think you can legitimately choose to ignore what it's "saying" expressly and focus only on what it's "saying" more impliedly through the music. Not gonna disagree with you on the musical merits of those two particular songs.


It's just how I'm wired, it's what I naturally focus on. It doesn't bother me in the slightest if a song is about "gold diggers" or if the chorus is just "mamasaymamasamamakusa" a billion times, or, to really emphasize the point, if the song is in a different language or is an instrumental, or if it's incomprehensible or if the meaning is totally obscure. I don't totally ignore lyrics but it's the rare song - a "Visions of Johanna" eg - that makes me perk up and really care. Or, conversely, a song has to have genuinely heinous and distracting lyrics for me to dislike it on that count.
   321. JJ1986 Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:03 PM (#5849033)
There was some discussion of Pulitzer winners for fiction a few pages ago here. I just finished Less and a few books ago read A Visit from the Goon Squad. I really liked the latter; she is able to write in different styles and voices in a way that most authors can't and it really engaged me. I found Less ridiculously slight; I wouldn't say it's bad, but I didn't get much out of it. And I might just not be smart enough, but I did not like how the narrator is both third-person and also the same narrator is a character, but that character clearly isn't narrating most of the book.
   322. Nasty Nate Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:04 PM (#5849034)
#320 reminds me, here's some life advice: don't date a woman named after a Bob Dylan lyric or song title...
   323. Hysterical & Useless Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:07 PM (#5849036)
The Cusk books keep catching my eye in bookstores - I like the cover design - do you recommend?

Hmmm...I would have to say I could only recommend with major caveats. If your principal interest in a novel is plot, she is definitely not for you. She is very interested in a specifically female point of view, ie, what it means, what it's like, to be a woman in contemporary western Euro-American society. One of the things that makes her books difficult (for me) is that I'm left with the feeling that she takes every injustice or indignity or slight experienced by any woman extremely personally. I don't think she's wrong to do so, but it can make her a wearying travel companion.

I've read Saving Agnes, her first novel. I didn't love it, but I didn't like the protagonist, so that made it rough.

Yes, her early books that I've read (Saving Agnes and The Country Life) are comic novels whose protagonists are...difficult to like. The things they do, the choices they make, often seem (to me) bizarre, ridiculous, stupid, but they result from the constraints within which Cusk believes young woman are expected to live. Now, I love women, and want to understand them, and hear about their experience of being human, rather than just accepting as a given that my male viewpoint is the correct and therefore default option. I think people who believe we live in a "post-racial" society are ignoring both history and contemporary testimony as a way of making things easy on themselves; I would say the same of anyone who believes we live in a "post-feminist" world where men and women are now equal and we should just get on with things.

   324. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:16 PM (#5849039)
320- I’ve been listening to the “R U Talkin REM RE: Me?” podcast lately, not because I have any strong opinions on REM, but because I love the comedic banter between the two hosts (Adam Scott and Scott Aukerman, who ARE huge REM fans).

One really interesting musical thing I’ve picked up is of how little importance the lyrics are, not just to the hosts but to the band itself. They play early versions of REM songs where Michael Stipe is just “singing” a list of names from the phone book, because all that they really care about is the melody and the cadence. (And they note that Stipe really mumbles the lyrics on the early albums so much it’s impossible to know what he’s saying....and REM tacitly approve of that because they never included the lyrics in any of their album releases.)

It’s been eye-opening!
   325. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:22 PM (#5849046)
(I grew up without much exposure to music at all—it’s why I care so little about it as an adult, I suspect—but the little I *was* exposed to came from my Mother, a poet whose formative music was the “sensitive”/folksy singer-songwriters of the 70s (Harry Chapin, Don McLean, Janis Ian, etc.) Her ideal song was just a great poem sung over an acoustic guitar.

So I think I too over-value the importance of lyrics, as a result of that.
   326. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:23 PM (#5849049)
I think a lot of the problem with pop music is that in the last, say, 10 years, pop culture has become if not dominated by, at least significantly influenced by club culture, which is pretty much the opposite of thoughtful and substantive. So all the emphasis on wealth, status, partying, trendiness, etc. that you find in the club scene is now in the songs on pop radio.
   327. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:28 PM (#5849053)
One really interesting musical thing I’ve picked up is of how little importance the lyrics are, not just to the hosts but to the band itself. They play early versions of REM songs where Michael Stipe is just “singing” a list of names from the phone book, because all that they really care about is the melody and the cadence. (And they note that Stipe really mumbles the lyrics on the early albums so much it’s impossible to know what he’s saying....and REM tacitly approve of that because they never included the lyrics in any of their album releases.)
I'm a big fan of REM as well - maybe this is just me rationalizing, but with the early stuff, you get the sense that Stipe was trying to express something, even if it was in his uniquely opaque way, with imagery that probably made sense only to him. And it worked very well with the music, of course. But he wasn't intentionally trying to write "don't think, just dance" songs. And then later on, of course, he showed that he could also write excellent lyrics that were more concrete and focused.
   328. Shooty would run in but these bone spurs hurt! Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:31 PM (#5849057)
If you find yourself worrying about lyrics, just think of Good Vibrations. Tough to find a better song than that. Also, when you start thinking lyrics are really deep, just read them without the accompanying tune and then compare them to say, something by Rilke. The song lyrics will sound idiotic (Unless they were written by Leonard Cohen, of course).

Speaking of Cohen, now that Hollywood is making a cottage industry of pop musician bio-pics, I think the only one I'd be interested in is a one about the affair of Janis Joplin and Leonard Cohen. How did that even work? Come on, Jim Jarmusch, that's got your name all over it. Harry Nilsson might be interesting, too.
   329. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:32 PM (#5849061)
a quick google search says that 61% of Americans are white now, which supports my point that as America becomes more diverse, musical tastes do as well.


You need a bit more google foo, it's ~75%. Unless you go to see a buddy cop movie starring Charlie Sheen and Louis C.K. with Cameron Diaz as the love interest and think "It's great that Hollywood is valuing diversity, casting all these actors of colour".

But, it's probably not right to think America is necessarily becoming more diverse, nor that musical tastes are becoming more diverse. Increasing ease of travel, communication, (and though it's incomplete, integration) probably mean that Americans are less diverse than they were 50 years ago (except marginally in skin tone). Well, and of course as the total number of people grows, it's probably inevitable they become more diverse in some root N process or something.
   330. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:34 PM (#5849066)
327- 100%. And of course a big reason the “club song” model is so prevalent is because it supports not just mindlessness, but mindless consumption, which is of course our state religion.
   331. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:35 PM (#5849067)


You need a bit more google foo, it's ~75%


Non Hispanic whites total 60.7% of the population.

Non Hispanic whites totaled 79.57% of the population in 1980 according to census scope.

http://www.censusscope.org/us/chart_race.html
   332. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:43 PM (#5849071)
Important breaking news: The hipster artist behind Leftfield Cards temporarily re-opens her online storefront.

I have a set of her baseball cards hanging on the wall, and I may just re-order my favorite t-shirt, as my original has been worn threadbare.
   333. Nasty Nate Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:49 PM (#5849074)
You need a bit more google foo, it's ~75%. Unless you go to see a buddy cop movie starring Charlie Sheen
Carlos Estevez? He pitches for the Rockies now.
   334. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:51 PM (#5849075)
Carlos Estevez? He pitches for the Rockies now.


Last seen pitching for the Indians. :)
   335. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:55 PM (#5849078)
Come on baby
Let's do the twist
Come on baby
Let's do the twist
Take me by my little hand
And go like this
E-yah twist
Baby, baby twist
Oh yeah, just like this
Come on little miss and do the twist
   336. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 06, 2019 at 12:58 PM (#5849083)
More songs could do with a well-timed "e-yah"
   337. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:05 PM (#5849087)
“Culture has gotten progressively worse” is theology. “Well, actually culture has always been bad, and well actually things now are the best they’ve ever been” is Logic.

If you disagree you have to come on my YouTube show to Debate Me. (Just not on Tuesdays, that’s our live “Race and IQ” call-in show.)
   338. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:13 PM (#5849095)
Come on baby
Let's do the twist
Come on baby
Let's do the twist
Take me by my little hand
And go like this
E-yah twist
Baby, baby twist
Oh yeah, just like this
Come on little miss and do the twist
Sigh. Please show me where I've argued that mindless songs about dancing have never existed until now.
   339. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:14 PM (#5849097)
   340. Dr. Vaux Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:18 PM (#5849099)
If there are words in a piece of music, then what they say has got be be considered part of what the piece of music represents. To me, it doesn't make sense to enjoy or approve of it if I don't enjoy or approve of that content--it's there, so it affects my experience of the whole. That's only part, although probably a significant part, of my general lack of interest in popular music. I simply much prefer music that's entirely abstract (even program music is almost entirely abstract, though perhaps my feeling on that is a version of not caring about the lyrics).
   341. Lassus Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:30 PM (#5849110)
For rock songs, (and classical and soul as well, I guess) I have mostly barely cared about the lyrics. Even Beatles tunes or whatnot. I don't care what any of the goofy lyrics in "Losing my Religion" are about. I did love the lyrics to Simon & Garfunkel, and for any of the lyrics to any MUSE songs I know I like to imagine what they are singing about. I guess there are plenty of lyrics I like and understand, such as Menthol's 1994 debut, which is hugely wordy.

But... the instant I don't understand the lyrics, I really don't care. It has always really been about the music and hooks for me first, and the lyrics generally a distant second. Like they are a bonus to what I already liked, not really informing it.
   342. Hysterical & Useless Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:32 PM (#5849112)
If there are words in a piece of music, then what they say has got be be considered part of what the piece of music represents

Which is why I can't get with gospel music. Yeah, it can be catchy, and some of the singers have great musical and emotional virtuosity, but when you get down to it they're singing about how great God and Jesus are, and well, I just don't agree with them. It's much easier for me to ignore stupid lyrics than those whose political content I find objectionable.
   343. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:33 PM (#5849113)
Menthol's 1994 debut
WOW!! Menthol reference!! I grew up in Champaign and used to go see them locally in the late '90s. My band at the time even had an original song that was basically a ripoff of "Stress Is Best." I just recently rediscovered their "lost album" (Danger: Rock Science!) on Spotify. I remember them playing those songs live, but apparently Capitol refused to put out the album, etc. It really holds up - it sounds like the missing link between the Cars and the Killers.
   344. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:39 PM (#5849117)
Sigh. Please show me where I've argued that mindless songs about dancing have never existed until now.


You didn't. You said there are more of them now, which may well be true. You also said that they're part and parcel of the stupiding of America, which I'm not sure about.
   345. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:40 PM (#5849118)
If there are words in a piece of music, then what they say has got be be considered part of what the piece of music represents. To me, it doesn't make sense to enjoy or approve of it if I don't enjoy or approve of that content--it's there, so it affects my experience of the whole.
Exactly. I don't understand people who say stuff like "Yeah, Celine Dion's lyrics are totally vapid, but she has such a beautiful voice!" You wouldn't say "That book contained no interesting or useful information - but the font was just superb!"
   346. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:42 PM (#5849119)
Non Hispanic whites total 60.7% of the population.


Yes, if you live in a world where Louis CK isn't white, then only ~60% of Americans are white.

I - uhm - I don't live in that world.

“Culture has gotten progressively worse” is theology.


I've been pretty clear I think it's just a selection bias, and an easy one to make.
   347. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:44 PM (#5849121)
Which is why I can't get with gospel music. Yeah, it can be catchy, and some of the singers have great musical and emotional virtuosity, but when you get down to it they're singing about how great God and Jesus are, and well, I just don't agree with them.


Ha, see, I don't have this problem at all. I mean, I probably agree with you on God and Jesus, but it doesn't bother me in the slightest to hear someone exalt them in song.
   348. Don August(us) Cesar Geronimo Berroa Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:45 PM (#5849122)
Come on baby
Let's do the twist
Come on baby
Let's do the twist
Take me by my little hand
And go like this
E-yah twist
Baby, baby twist
Oh yeah, just like this
Come on little miss and do the twist


Great, now I have this stuck in my head.
   349. PreservedFish Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:47 PM (#5849124)
Elroy, riddle me this. When you listen to "Pride (In the Name of Love)" for the one millionth time, are you still thinking about the lyrics? Feeling them deeply? Shedding a one millionth tear for MLK?

I can concentrate on and enjoy the music every time I hear a song, but meaning of the lyrics will eventually wash out, and the voice becomes just another instrument, almost devoid of content. Not in every case, but often.
   350. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 06, 2019 at 01:58 PM (#5849128)
Yes, if you live in a world where Louis CK isn't white, then only ~60% of Americans are white.


Hey, man. I just posted the apples to apples comparison of non-Hispanic whites from 1980 to 2019 and you're still going on about cameron diaz and louis ck. You must be one of the only people in North America clinging to the fiction that America isn't becoming more diverse. I don't know if you know how these censuses are tabulated, but I'm pretty sure that people are able to self-identify in the census and Louis CK (who you brought up) probably identifies as white. I'm done talking to you about this, though, because it's clear you have an agenda.
   351. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 02:09 PM (#5849131)
346- Time to break out the calipers!
   352. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 02:28 PM (#5849136)
because it's clear you have an agenda.


Yeah, an agenda that one should investigate what the facts are, rather than assume they're what you'd like them to be.

I don't know if you know how these censuses are tabulated, but I'm pretty sure that people are able to self-identify in the census and Louis CK (who you brought up) probably identifies as white.


Well, if you're copy-pasting the internet without reading it, it's not surprising you're confused. CK is white. He's from Mexico, so for the census he's white, but he's not non-Hispanic white.
   353. Panik on the streets of Flushing! (Trout! Trout!) Posted: June 06, 2019 at 03:20 PM (#5849152)
Imagine thinking that the United States isn't getting more diverse and citing Louis CK and Cameron Diaz as evidence, even after someone gives you numbers and links to a census website that show that the US is getting less and less white over the last few decades. And then doubling down on it with more info about Louis CK. How about you show how the US ISN'T getting less white, since another google search of the phrase "is America becoming more diverse?" yielded a bunch of articles including one from NPR and another from AARP about how America is getting older and less white pretty much right off the bat. Now, maybe Louis CK identifies as Mexican so he would qualify in the census as Hispanic. But even if that is the case, which ok fine, it is pretty clear to anyone who studies this stuff that the percentage of non-Hispanic white people has been shrinking in this country over the last 40-ish years. No matter what Louis CK and Cameron Diaz have to say about the matter. Like even if the numbers didn't support my case, it's pretty obvious to most people who are paying attention that the US is getting less white. It wouldn't even occur to me that America isn't becoming more diverse.
   354. Dr. Vaux Posted: June 06, 2019 at 03:53 PM (#5849159)
I may be completely misinterpreting this argument, but you seem to be talking past each other. "Hispanic white" people are as "white" as "Germanic white" people, or "Celtic white" people, or whatever other hair-splitting, archaic, and possibly impolite categories might be applied to human beings. To equate this clearly constructed concept of "whiteness" with a lack of diversity is ironic, then, given that the aforementioned categories do represent certain cultural differences that have, in the U.S., diminished in importance over the years but continue to be relevant for enough people that one can still take note of the origins of family traditions and so forth (so that more different ancestor groups would mean more diversity according to that definition of diversity). And that's not to mention that, partly though far from entirely because of ancestral traditions, the overall way of life in one part of the U.S. can be quite noticeably different from the way of life in another part. Indeed, that was probably more true in the 1980s than now, and in that respect, the country could possibly be said to be getting less diverse rather than more. From all this, one could suggest that given the diversity of ways in which diversity can be defined, it's always possible to make both arguments.

In any event, as applied to culture, one of the saddest aspects of the recent renewed obsession with ethnicity and "race" is that it belittles the creativity of individuals' experiences and ideas. To reduce some artist's achievements, whatever they might be, to such broad, clumsy, and (again) possibly impolite assumption weaving is the laziest kind of criticism, insults by its premise, and borders on dangerous racialism. Of course people's inputs affect their outputs, but it's their wondrous, miraculous individuality that is so precious.
   355. Lassus Posted: June 06, 2019 at 03:58 PM (#5849160)
I just recently rediscovered their "lost album" (Danger: Rock Science!) on Spotify.

Heh. I have this album on CD. I bought it in 2005. They are one of my favorite bright light burnt out meteor bands of the 90s, along with Oranger, Jellyfish, and Thirty-Ought-Six. Only I SAW all of those bands, I never saw Menthol, sadly.
   356. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 04:06 PM (#5849164)
“Coming up at 7 on the BBTF Race Science Power Hour: FBI Crime Statistics! And later we’ll be joined by our Argentinian correspondent Hans Friedrich von Gomez to ask: why is there no White History Month?”
   357. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 04:39 PM (#5849192)
How about you show how the US ISN'T getting less white


The US is getting less white. It was ~83% white people in 1980, and it's now ~77% white people.

If that upsets you, then look at yourself, rather than trying haphazardly to ascribe some bizarre ideology to me.
   358. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 05:43 PM (#5849218)
   359. Cowboy Popup Posted: June 06, 2019 at 06:52 PM (#5849231)
Kool Moe Dee's song I Go To Work is the best of this genre. I will fight anyone who disagrees about this!

Yeah, the guy that got dusted and buried by LL Cool J has the best and well structured "I am the ####\" rap song. And it came out in 1989 has never been surpassed even as rhyme schemes have gotten so much better.

I think we have to fight.
   360. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 07:18 PM (#5849239)
People misusing statistics just gets my goat. Sorry, eh?
   361. Omineca Greg Posted: June 06, 2019 at 07:47 PM (#5849247)
I would say there are only a few song topics that are pretty much categorically mindless...off the top of my head, songs about...boasting

No way!

I love this song, not mindless in the slightest. Marvin knows he's a jerk, and he wallows in it with wanton pleasure, but at the same time he's disgusted with the person he's become. Doesn't mean he's going to stop...because he can't. And it's not just about him, he's running down other people as well as himself, it's a complicated song from a complicated person.
   362. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 08:28 PM (#5849258)
Kevin Smith made a trilogy of horror movies set in Canada with Canadian accents that make Hugh Jackman's Wolverine sound like he's really from Tuktoyaktuk?

Wat?
   363. BrianBrianson Posted: June 06, 2019 at 08:56 PM (#5849261)
I'm watch Yoga Hosers, and Austin Butler is really giving it his all, bu the rest of 'em are giving a bad name to hoseheads.
   364. Jeremy Renner App is Dead and I killed it Posted: June 06, 2019 at 09:08 PM (#5849263)
Max Kepler is FIRE! (3 dingers so far)
   365. Davo Posted: June 06, 2019 at 09:20 PM (#5849266)
364- We aren’t ACTUALLY turning this into a German Power Appreciation Thread, that was just a bit!
   366. Lassus Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:29 PM (#5849283)
Menthol - Francis Scott Key

(The YOUTUBE version has a bad bass level. Odd.)

Full album.
   367. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 06, 2019 at 11:51 PM (#5849287)
Max Kepler is FIRE! (3 dingers so far)
Hey! Stay off topic!
   368. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 07, 2019 at 12:11 AM (#5849290)
Elroy, riddle me this. When you listen to "Pride (In the Name of Love)" for the one millionth time, are you still thinking about the lyrics? Feeling them deeply? Shedding a one millionth tear for MLK?

I can concentrate on and enjoy the music every time I hear a song, but meaning of the lyrics will eventually wash out, and the voice becomes just another instrument, almost devoid of content. Not in every case, but often.
"Feeling them deeply," no, not every time. But I certainly do appreciate them, and the meaning doesn't wash out. And when I see U2 live, even if they do play somewhat rote versions of it more often than not these days, I still appreciate that 20,000 people singing those words together is a hell of a lot better than 20,000 people singing "Party in the USA!! Shakin' my hips like yeah!!" And I'm sure you will mock this as cheesy, but for example, when I have a gig on or close to MLK day, sometimes I'll throw a medley of Pride/MLK in the set, and yeah, I do "feel" the lyrics when I'm singing them.
   369. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 07, 2019 at 12:13 AM (#5849291)
Kevin Smith made a trilogy of horror movies set in Canada with Canadian accents
In which the deranged serial killer apologizes to his victims. "I'm gonna kill you now, eh? Soary aboot that."
   370. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 08:52 AM (#5849302)
Malia Obama smokes with her boyfriend after seeing lesbian film in L.A.

The 20-year-old Harvard student was seen smoking outside of director Quentin Tarantino’s New Beverly Cinema theater after she and her beau saw The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant, a 1972 German film about a lesbian love triangle.

   371. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 09:02 AM (#5849304)
I do wonder if we’re ever going to see another filmmaker as prolific as Fassbinder.

I suppose someone like Joe Swanberg is close. Wrote and directed 18 feature films, 2 shorts and a TV show in the first 12 years of his career—starring in most of those too (as well as acting in his friends’ films).
   372. BrianBrianson Posted: June 07, 2019 at 09:38 AM (#5849308)
In which the deranged serial killer apologizes to his victims. "I'm gonna kill you now, eh? Soary aboot that."


So, maybe this is just me being a nationalist, but the fake accents that play to the weird "aboot" centric American impression of Canadian accents that I don't get (and they were prolific in Yoga Hosers). Nobody has ever pegged me as Canadian from the way I say "about", but it's routinely possible from words like pasta or drama, and sometimes even house or milk. Like, if you want to go cartoonish, why not just dub every line with Gordon Pinsent? Or have the cast spend two weeks in Vermilion Bay? A couple went with stereotypical Minnesota accent, which isn't that far off really, though it doesn't work with the low and lazy cadence - you gotta play it fast and chipper.

Like, Americans have been watchin' Trailer Park Boys & Letterkenny for some time, eh? They can handle it.

</rant>
   373. Lassus Posted: June 07, 2019 at 10:24 AM (#5849324)
but it's routinely possible from words like pasta or drama, and sometimes even house or milk.

These are the words that identify northern and western New Yorkers as well. We can kinda pass when we head through Ontario.
   374. The Good Face Posted: June 07, 2019 at 10:33 AM (#5849329)
Perhaps, but I don't think knowledge really ever dies completely. The knowledge gained by the Greeks and Romans stayed alive in various civilizations over the centuries. What the Chinese learned got transmitted. I think, short of extinction or near-extinction, humans will keep technology. It may be in isolated pockets of high living standards that hang on for centuries between peaks but it'll stay there.


Depends how much technology is lost in any given Dark Age. Because the low hanging fruit with respect to fossil fuels has been picked. The coal/oil that was relatively easily obtained is gone. Which means that humanity bootstrapping themselves into a second Industrial Revolution is unlikely; there's no energy sources available for a pre-Industrial civilization to fuel one. A depressing thought; if civilization craters, the long term destiny of mankind really will be something like "re-cycling ~5000 BC to 1500 AD again and again".
   375. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 07, 2019 at 10:41 AM (#5849331)
So, maybe this is just me being a nationalist, but the fake accents that play to the weird "aboot" centric American impression of Canadian accents that I don't get (and they were prolific in Yoga Hosers). Nobody has ever pegged me as Canadian from the way I say "about",
Really? That's interesting. I have instantly identified Canadians (admittedly with the occasional false Minnesota positive) on many occasions from hearing them say "about," as well as "sorry" and "been" (like "bean" as opposed to closer to "bin").

sometimes even house or milk
"House" is another instant identifier. With "milk," is it that you're using it like "This is the best bag of milk I've ever had"?
   376. BrianBrianson Posted: June 07, 2019 at 10:50 AM (#5849334)
I mean, it is sometimes that I'll say things like "As kids, we were always using homo as a slur. But now that I'm an adult, I've realised it's the best ######' milk there is". But also it gets pronounced kinda "melk", though that may be that my dad's side of the family is from back east.

These are the words that identify northern and western New Yorkers as well. We can kinda pass when we head through Ontario.


Wikipedia says upstate New York has some but not all features of Canadian raising, which jives. Whenever I'm in Springville or Watertown, I never think it sounds like Canada. Californians are usually the Americans I fail to notice the most (per Wikipedia, the Canadian & California vowel shifts are largely identical, so perhaps that).
   377. Lassus Posted: June 07, 2019 at 10:56 AM (#5849338)
Whenever I'm in Springville or Watertown, I never think it sounds like Canada.

I can see that. It might be more rural in nature, and it's not across the board.
   378. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 10:57 AM (#5849339)
THE MOST-WATCHED FOREIGN LANGUAGE MOVIES OF THE 2010S, BY THE 233 PEOPLE I FOLLOW ON LETTERBOXD

1. Elle (Paul Verhoeven, 2016) 139
2. Holy Motors (Leos Carax, 2012) 130
3. The Handmaiden (Park Chan-wook, 2016) 122
4. Blue is the Warmest Color (Abdellatif Kekhiche, 2013) 120
5. Two Days, One Night (The Dardenne Brothers, 2014) 119

6. Burning (Lee Chang-dong, 2018) 117
7. Toni Erdmann (Maren Ade, 2017) 116
8. The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer, 2012) 115
9. Phoenix (Christian Petzold, 2014) 113
10. Force Majeure (Ruben Ostlund, 2014) 107

10. Ida (Pawel Pawlikowski, 2013) 107
12. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (Ana Lily Amirpour, 2014) 104
13. The Assassin (Hou Hsiao-hsien, 2015) 102
14. Amour (Michael Haneke, 2012) 101
15. Goodbye to Language (Jean-Luc Godard, 2014) 100

16. Certified Copy (Abbas Kiarostami, 2010) 96
16. The Raid (Gareth Evans, 2011) 96
18. The Wind Rises (Hayao Miyazaki, 2013) 95
19. A Separation (Asghar Farhadi, 2011) 92
20. Drug War (Johnnie To, 2012) 91

21. Nocturama (Bertrand Bonello, 2016) 90
22. Shoplifters (Hirokazu Kore-eda, 2018) 87
22. Let the Sunshine In (Claire Denis, 2017) 87
24. Faces Places (Agnes Varda, 2017) 86
24. Stranger by the Lake (Alain Guiraudie, 2013) 86
   379. gef, talking mongoose & vexatious litigant Posted: June 07, 2019 at 10:58 AM (#5849340)
which jives.


*cringe*

Jibes, dammit.
   380. Lassus Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:02 AM (#5849341)
He's Canadian.
   381. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:07 AM (#5849342)
But also it gets pronounced kinda "melk", though that may be that my dad's side of the family is from back east.
Now that you mention it, I remember that being one of the "pronunciation things" that everyone talks about in the dorms during your freshman year of college (or university, for our Canadian friends). I forget whether the "melk" people were the Wisco/Minnesotans or the New York/New Jersey/Philly people though.
   382. Lassus Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:13 AM (#5849344)
Probably both - Wisconsin and New York have been the top milk producers for a very very long time, (both overtaken now by CA) and I got teased for switching AWAY from that pronunciation by my aunt the dairy farmer.
   383. BrianBrianson Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:21 AM (#5849346)
Jibes, dammit.


Aye, that too.
   384. Nasty Nate Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:24 AM (#5849347)
Are the 'aboot' and 'hewse' pronunciations more of a maritimes province thing, rather than Ontario or Quebec?
   385. jmurph Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:28 AM (#5849349)
"Melk" is everywhere (and wrong, it goes without saying), I'm not sure how regionally-specific it is. I'm thinking of three people right now who I know say it like that, one each from Phoenix, Pittsburgh, and southern Virginia.
   386. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:32 AM (#5849350)
Melky Cabrera has played for New York, Atlanta, Kansas City, San Francisco, Toronto, Chicago, Cleveland and Pittsburgh.
   387. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:48 AM (#5849355)
The actors can’t even tell the Marvel movies apart

While zesting a citrus fruit, Paltrow asks, “What is this TV show for?”

“We don’t really know. I started just filming. We were actually doing it when we were filming Spider-Man,” Favreau says, explaining that he started putzing around with the concept of The Chef Show on the Atlanta set of Spider-Man: Homecoming.

“Spider-Man?!?” Paltrow asked with perfect incredulity, as if it’s not only a film, but a concept she’s never heard of before.

Favreau says, “Well, yeah, when we were in Spider-Man together. Remember we were on Spider-Man?”

“We’re weren’t in Spider-Man,” she says dismissively, returning to her citrus fruit.

“Yes, we were,” Favreau says.

The camera zooms in on Paltrow, because this is serious now. “I was in Avengers,” she says with confidence.

“No, you were in Spider-Man also.”

“What?” Paltrow is beginning to look like her grasp on reality is loosening quickly, while Choi is just smiling at all this in the background.

“Remember Spider-Man in the end and…and…Tom Holland’s there, and you’re going to walk out and do a press conference?”

“Oh! Yes!” Paltrow says.
   388. Lassus Posted: June 07, 2019 at 11:59 AM (#5849358)
Such biting, insightful pointless, clueless criticism. I have a number of working non-Marvel actor friends who quite easily forget what they've been in as the years pass; full shows, let alone one-line walk-on parts.
   389. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 12:02 PM (#5849359)
You ought to take a stress pill, Lassus. I can’t imagine being wound so tight a silly anecdote like that would make my blood boil.
   390. Hot Wheeling American Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:01 PM (#5849373)
So not plural actors, just Gwyneth?
   391. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:03 PM (#5849374)
So not plural actors, just Gwyneth?
In fairness, Gwyneth seems entirely likely to refer to herself as "we."
   392. Lassus Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:07 PM (#5849375)
You ought to take a stress pill, Lassus. I can’t imagine being wound so tight a silly anecdote like that would make my blood boil.

Maybe. Although I'd simply mark it as opposition and disagreement, I'm nowhere near bloodboil status. I simply find your constant, sniping superiority complex posts on popular culture to be an Achilles heel on my part; I will freely admit that is more my problem than yours, and that I should do better.
   393. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:08 PM (#5849376)
You should try reading stories like that and laughing, because they are very silly.
   394. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:12 PM (#5849378)
There’s an Otto Preminger interview where he gets asked about his 1947 film noir Daisy Kenyon, and after an uncomfortable pause he admits to the interviewer that he has no memory of it whatsoever.

...and I LOVE the movie, I think it’s just about perfect!!!
   395. BrianBrianson Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:21 PM (#5849383)
She probably means her and Favreau, who plays ... somebody in the Iron Man movies, and probably appears in all the MCU movies Paltrow does.
   396. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:42 PM (#5849402)
From Jezebel.com, making the rounds in a bad way on Film Twitter today: Actors Who Are Bad at Acting

This is a list of actors who are not really good actors, contrary to what you might think. These are people who make you stop and wonder, Hm, are they good?


This tweet thread was a good response to the substance, but most are attacking the article for even existing, a mean-spirited content-less listicle vomited into the inter webs to get those clicks.
   397. Mellow Mouse, Benevolent Space Tyrant Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:49 PM (#5849405)
I simply find your constant, sniping superiority complex posts on popular culture to be an Achilles heel on my part; I will freely admit that is more my problem than yours, and that I should do better.


I use them as an opportunity to feel superior to Davo, because seriously.
   398. Davo Posted: June 07, 2019 at 01:53 PM (#5849407)
Godard superfan David Bordwell's essay on Adieu au langage

Where, some will ask, is the emotion? We want to be moved by our movies. I suggest that with Late Godard, we are mostly not moved by the plot or the characters, though that can happen. What seizes me most forcefully is the virtuoso display of cinematic possibilities. The narrative is both a pretext and a source of words and sounds, forms and textures, like the landscape motifs that painters have used for centuries. From the simplest elements, even the clichés of sunsets and rainy reflections, the film’s composition, color, voices, and music wring out something ravishing.

We are moved, to put it plainly, by beauty–sometimes exhilarating, sometimes melancholy, often fragmentary and fleeting. Instead of feeling with the characters, we feel with the film. For all his exasperating perversities, Godard seeks cinematic rapture.
   399. Rennie's Tenet Posted: June 07, 2019 at 02:07 PM (#5849408)
Pittsburgh


I don't recall ever hearing a Pittsburgher say, "melk." I have heard something like "meelk," with the e's drawn out enough that you almost get a second syllable.
   400. BrianBrianson Posted: June 07, 2019 at 02:27 PM (#5849413)
From Jezebel.com, making the rounds in a bad way on Film Twitter today: Actors Who Are Bad at Acting


The thing about a Hot Take is that the only way to make money writing for the internet is to write things that are both wrong and make people upset enough to want to correct you. That people are responding means it's a good article, from an internet economics perspective.

Of course, the defence on merit relies less on serious morbid drama than you'd expect, which is nice. But still, I'd want to turn to Daniel Radcliffe's appearance on Extras was phenomenal acting. Nicholas Cage in Kick-Ass. Brie Larson in Scott Pilgram vs. The World. But people don't usually want to invoke those 'cause they're silly movies (or TV shows).
Page 4 of 13 pages ‹ First  < 2 3 4 5 6 >  Last ›

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
James Kannengieser
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogBillionaire Mike Repole joins A-Rod and J-Lo’s bid for the Mets
(32 - 6:31am, Jul 07)
Last: Gonfalon Bubble

NewsblogEmpty Stadium Sports Will Be Really Weird
(6531 - 6:00am, Jul 07)
Last: BrianBrianson

NewsblogPhillies’ Andrew McCutchen disses Yankees’ hair policy
(6 - 5:07am, Jul 07)
Last: MuttsIdolCochrane

NewsblogCleveland Indians look into changing name amid pressure
(166 - 2:17am, Jul 07)
Last: Mayor Blomberg

NewsblogOT Soccer Thread - Spring 2020
(368 - 11:59pm, Jul 06)
Last: AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale

NewsblogWith baby on the way, Trout unsure if he'll play
(58 - 10:01pm, Jul 06)
Last: RJ in TO

NewsblogNats’ Ryan Zimmerman, Joe Ross among first MLB players to opt out of 2020 season
(7 - 9:33pm, Jul 06)
Last: Walt Davis

NewsblogBill James: Why We Need Runs Saved Against Zero
(183 - 8:30pm, Jul 06)
Last: Rally

NewsblogCovid-19 test delays impacting multiple teams
(15 - 8:28pm, Jul 06)
Last: Ron J

NewsblogOT - Catch-All Pop Culture Extravaganza (July 2020)
(3 - 8:19pm, Jul 06)
Last: Morty Causa

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 7-6-2020
(26 - 7:49pm, Jul 06)
Last: JJ1986

NewsblogOT – NBA Revival Thread 2020
(466 - 7:36pm, Jul 06)
Last: tshipman

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1928 Results
(2 - 4:48pm, Jul 06)
Last: DL from MN

Newsblog8th? BBTF Central Park Softball Game: October 3
(54 - 4:00pm, Jul 06)
Last: Hysterical & Useless

NewsblogDodgers pitcher David Price opts out of 2020 MLB season
(14 - 2:19pm, Jul 06)
Last: Joe Bivens, Elderly Northeastern Jew

-->

Page rendered in 0.7859 seconds
48 querie(s) executed