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Saturday, January 04, 2020

Report: Wild boar behind Yoenis Cespedes’ ankle injury

Things are rarely boring with the New York Mets.

The latest example: a wild boar and Yoenis Cespedes.

The New York Post reported Friday that the fractured ankle Cespedes suffered in the spring came from a bizarre incident the injury-plagued outfielder had with an animal at his ranch in Port St. Lucie, Florida.

News of the injury itself isn’t new. Mets general manager Brodie Van Wagenen told reporters in May that Cespedes suffered multiple right ankle fractures in what he called a “violent” fall on the outfielder’s ranch that was not baseball-related. Details of what happened hadn’t come out until the Post’s story Friday, however.

So, where does this rank in the listing of bizarre injuries to baseball players?

 

QLE Posted: January 04, 2020 at 01:06 AM | 147 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: injury, mets being mets, wild boar, yoenis cespedes

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   101. Lassus Posted: January 06, 2020 at 04:34 PM (#5913338)
I've been out to Glacier twice and neither time felt the need to carry either a gun or bear spray (or bells). My last trip there, my brother and I had more than a dozen bear sightings over 5 days, both grizzlies and black bears. We didn't have a close enough encounter to present a legit threat to us, but at the same time, it was completely obvious that a close encounter was a constant possibility. Our closest encounter was actually with a herd of bighorn sheep that were stubbornly blocking our path and seemed to get antsy as we approached (we decided to go around them, with minor difficulty)
I've been to Glacier only once. It would have been twice but on one drive there was some kind of life-altering blizzard that I think literally had the official state response as "PLEASE STAY FAR AWAY". The second time, a girl I was traveling with and I planned on a relatively easy hike and one night camping. We saw SO MANY "The State of Montana and the Province of British Columbia not responsible for death, dismemberment, or mauling by grizzly bears" and "How to avoid being killed by grizzly bears" and "What to do when attacked by grizzly bears" signs and literature. Constantly. (The answer to the last one was basically: "Roll up into a ball and pray. Good luck." Coming from the Adirondacks, there were black bears all over the place that nobody really gives a shit about, it was really the way people in CA would laugh at you for fearing (not being annoyed, but literally afraid) coyotes.

SO anyhow, we've been wound up and primed by this "painful, frightening, certain gruesome death imminent" warnings and about 15/30 minutes into our hike, we hear something somewhere off to our right in the woods. We freeze, slightly panic, ready our whistle, and then slowly, slowly, slowly it gets closer ("DON'T RUN, YOU'RE DEAD THAT WAY") as I contemplate how I haven't really screwed this girl enough yet to be killed next to her, and my mom is really going to be upset, and who is going to get all my books, when... massive, slow-moving, moose walks by about two feet from us. I really could have reached out and touched him. We are immediately relieved and then also newly terrified as I've worked with cows and bulls, and this thing dwarfed them. It was like a massive Great Dane cow. It could have killed me by jerking it's head sideways. It probably wasn't even full grown.

So, it passed. We breathe, then in concert decided "Absolutely, positively, seriously, fuck this" and walked back, got in the car, and drove overnight straight to Seattle. Nature is great, and also terrifying.
   102. RJ in TO Posted: January 06, 2020 at 04:42 PM (#5913341)
The literature suggests that moose actually injure considerably more people than bears. Which I get - I never realized how big moose actually are until I saw a real one relatively close.
Moose are tough enough to run at high speeds through the woods without snapping their necks when their antlers catch a tree. They're strong as hell, and don't appreciated being bothered.

With that being said, I thought most moose injuries were more related to people hitting them in cars, and then having a thousand pounds of moose come through the windshield.
   103. flournoy Posted: January 06, 2020 at 04:44 PM (#5913342)
Are [bears] hunted for food in the US?


Yes, but you can only keep 100 pounds of the meat, no matter how big the bear is. Really frustrating.
   104. Ziggy is done with Dominican discotheques Posted: January 06, 2020 at 04:50 PM (#5913344)
I went hiking in the Smokey Mountains last summer. We saw some old droppings on the trail and said "yep, there are bears around here" and then a few hundred feet further saw some very fresh droppings and said "yep, there are some bears right here" and started looking around. We spotted a cub way up in the top of a tree, and knowing about cubs and mommas, decided it was time to leave. I picked up my three year old and turned around. If you ask him what you do when you see a bear, he'll now tell you "go back to the car".

We also smelled what I assume was the Momma bear (and several other bears over the next few days). Sort of a sour-horse smell. Does that sound right?

The Smokeys must be crawling with those things, because although that was the most interesting sighting, we saw a bunch of them even though we were only there for a few days, and only took short hikes (we did, after all, have a three year old in tow).
   105. PreservedFish Posted: January 06, 2020 at 05:00 PM (#5913347)
Funny, my Glacier experience was packing in a couple pounds of raw ground beef to our backcountry campsite, thereby terrifying all of the other campers. We did 3 days, ~30 miles, and didn't see a damn bear. ####### gorgeous place though.
   106. Smitty* Posted: January 06, 2020 at 05:21 PM (#5913351)
Karl,

I’m only on Assassin’s Quest, but definitely planning on reading the rest of the various series set in that world. Really good stuff so far
   107. Howie Menckel Posted: January 06, 2020 at 05:21 PM (#5913353)
Another friend, an old butcher that's seen everything, says that the flavor varies wildly depending on the bear's recent diet, which can be blueberries or salmon or rotting raccoon carcasses or anything else.

yeah, bears are pretty much raccoons writ large - they're scavengers.

'round here, people have to "bear proof" their garbage cans because that's a favorite source of treats.

want to know a particular favorite of theirs? diapers, no kidding.

I mean, if you open Gerber's baby food for them directly, they'll probably love that. but indirect works for them, too.

now, who wants a bear burger?
   108. Brian C Posted: January 06, 2020 at 05:24 PM (#5913355)
Lassus, that's an incredible story. For me it would have been worth the 30 seconds of terror just to be able to tell it.

On the other hand, it pretty much illustrates my point - you were fine! By the sound of it, the animal just went about its business as if you weren't even there, as animals usually do.

I think moose are great. I enjoyed our moose sightings - four, all on the last day - more than the bear sightings. There's something majestic about them. They're just so huge and especially the bulls are super intimidating even from a fair distance with those gigantic antlers of theirs.
Funny, my Glacier experience was packing in a couple pounds of raw ground beef to our backcountry campsite, thereby terrifying all of the other campers. We did 3 days, ~30 miles, and didn't see a damn bear.

Most of the bears we saw were in the east side of the park, in the areas accessible from Swiftcurrent/Many Glacier. But, people reported them all over the place when we asked - up around Polebridge, along the Highline, Scenic Point, etc. There were enormous fires raging in the areas around the north end of Lake McDonald, not sure if that spurred them into other areas where they were more concentrated than normal - the first time I was there, my ex and I only saw 2. But I also think my brother and I are collectively more attentive spotters than my ex and I.
   109. Traderdave Posted: January 06, 2020 at 05:45 PM (#5913362)
I've never had it but those I know who have say bear meat varies wildly from one to another, depending on diet, as noted above. About 3/4 of them say it tastes like shlt, which makes sense in a way because the most visible & accessible - and therefore most easily hunted - bears live fairly close to humans and therefore survive on a diet of garbage, manure (seriously), and carrion. I've been invited to go bear hunting but declined because I saw no point in killing something that I very well may not eat.
   110. Misirlou cut his hair and moved to Rome Posted: January 06, 2020 at 05:58 PM (#5913363)
The most threatening thing I'm likely to bump into here is a badger.


Beware of the large, wooden ones. It may be a trap.
   111. Misirlou cut his hair and moved to Rome Posted: January 06, 2020 at 06:00 PM (#5913364)
With that being said, I thought most moose injuries were more related to people hitting them in cars, and then having a thousand pounds of moose come through the windshield.


My sister was bitten by a moose once. They have a nasti bite.
   112. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: January 06, 2020 at 06:02 PM (#5913365)

I've never encountered a bear on a hike, but my wife and I did stumble upon two moose (a mother and calf) while hiking in Grand Tetons. They were at a safe distance, thankfully.

Yes, but you can only keep 100 pounds of the meat, no matter how big the bear is. Really frustrating.

RDF.

   113. Omineca Greg Posted: January 06, 2020 at 06:34 PM (#5913368)
People here are really oversimplifying bear behaviour, and the level of threat they pose to people. They're complicated animals and can't be reduced to a couple of bullet (sorry!) points.

   114. Due to the leadership of Zonk... Posted: January 06, 2020 at 07:06 PM (#5913373)
Given the uneven reports on bear meat, this seems like a win-win for me.

When society finally gets done collapsing, I won't need to learn how to hunt bears... just avoid them.
   115. Meatwad Posted: January 06, 2020 at 09:00 PM (#5913397)
See Bears arnt the only problem in the wilderness, I have come across moutian loins, wolves, lots of bears, and all sorts of other animals. Its when you are by yourself that a hand gun makes sense for safty. When with a group pretty much no animal is interested in you.
   116. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: January 07, 2020 at 01:09 AM (#5913442)
A girl I was traveling with and I planned on a relatively easy hike and one night camping. ...About 15/30 minutes into our hike, we hear something somewhere off to our right in the woods. We freeze, slightly panic, ready our whistle, and then slowly, slowly, slowly it gets closer ("DON'T RUN, YOU'RE DEAD THAT WAY") as I contemplate how I haven't really screwed this girl enough yet to be killed next to her, and my mom is really going to be upset, and who is going to get all my books, when... massive, slow-moving, moose walks by about two feet from us.

Okay, the story checks out.
   117. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 07, 2020 at 08:55 AM (#5913464)
See Bears arnt the only problem in the wilderness, I have come across moutian loins, wolves, lots of bears, and all sorts of other animals.
I tells ya, Al, I got a bad case of moutian loins after a hike in Turkey Run back in aught-nine...
   118. Due to the leadership of Zonk... Posted: January 07, 2020 at 09:31 AM (#5913472)
The worst thing I have ever seen on a hike was the length of the trail back... that nearly made me give up right then and there. No matter what I pulled out of my arsenal and threatened it with, it just kept staring right back at me. I knew it would kill me if I ran, so all I could do was slowly walk towards it, using the recommended steady stream of complaints to keep it at bay.
   119. Traderdave Posted: January 07, 2020 at 10:27 AM (#5913479)
I have no fear of bears or pigs or moose or lions, but snakes scare the #### out of me. Kill em all.
   120. Tom Nawrocki Posted: January 07, 2020 at 10:56 AM (#5913491)
I met a guy in Alaska who had shot a moose two years earlier, and was still eating the meat from it, despite the fact that he had given a bunch of it away to his neighbors. He served me some moose stew, which was pretty good.
   121. . . . . . . Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:04 AM (#5913496)
Inspired by this thread, I got some wild boar sausage at a local italian butcher. Gamier than I remembered; also, the sausage needed more fatback. Pretty tasty, though - I like gamey meat. Totally different flavor profile than domestic pork.

I have no fear of bears or pigs or moose or lions, but snakes scare the #### out of me. Kill em all.


I have had a couple of terrifying snake experiences and I agree.
   122. The Good Face Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:15 AM (#5913508)
How does one have terrifying snake experiences? Short of stepping on one (or I guess squatting over one while taking a dump in the woods), it's pretty hard to run into an issue with a snake. Well, a buddy of mine did manage to get bit by a copperhead doing yard work a few years ago, but that was more hilarious than terrifying. Even he found it pretty funny after he got medical treatment and the swelling eventually went down.
   123. Lassus Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:24 AM (#5913516)
Rattlesnakes can be scary, but I'm not sure how often they really interact with humans outside of Hollywood. Was in the hot wilderness parts of CA and CO for the better parts of four years and never saw one.

Fell asleep next to a python?

Voldemort?
   124. Traderdave Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:42 AM (#5913531)
How does one have terrifying snake experiences?



When I was a kid in Louisiana I was taking a shortcut through a neighbor's yard out to the woods to play Tom Sawyer stuff with my friends. I came across a BIG water moccasin and while the details are sketchy the last thing I remember was seeing it coiled to strike and hissing and showing that cotton mouth. It fades to black after that.

Next thing I remember is neighbor, who was good friend and co-worker of my dad, carrying me into his house and calling my parents. He'd heard me scream and had chased (maybe killed?) the snake with a shovel. He showed the fang marks on his boot from where it had struck at him. If he hadn't been doing yard work that afternoon I wouldn't be here.

Does that qualify?
   125. PreservedFish Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:48 AM (#5913535)
Would this be enough to take out a very large water moccasin?
   126. . . . . . . Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:53 AM (#5913539)
How does one have terrifying snake experiences?


Hiking in the bighorn basin in wyoming with a group, guy immediately in front of me on the trail stepped on a rattlesnake he didnt' see, by the time i could react it was too late, somehow the snake slithered off literally between my legs. World's scariest nutmeg.

Clearing boxes behind a building on top of the palisades cliffs next to the Hudson River, lifted a carton to find a copperhead wintering over underneath, pissed myself.

Hiking in taconics, which are rattler infested, reached up onto a ledge and felt a snake, thought i was in deep ####, till a black rat snake slithered off.
   127. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:54 AM (#5913541)
He'd heard me scream and had chased (maybe killed?) the snake with a shovel.
By "shovel" I assume you mean "AK-47."
   128. PreservedFish Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:56 AM (#5913542)
pissed myself.


Literally?
   129. Meatwad Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:57 AM (#5913543)
Hiking through taller grass and you that rattle will get the heart rate up just a bit.
   130. manchestermets Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:59 AM (#5913544)
I prefer the snake spray to the shovel.
   131. Traderdave Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:01 PM (#5913547)
Hiking through taller grass and you that rattle will get the heart rate up just a bit.


I've never seen a rattler in California but I have heard rattles on two occasions, and the above is vastly understated.
   132. PreservedFish Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:02 PM (#5913548)
I saw a rattler in Cali, and wasn't terribly scared, but that was probably due to my own ignorance.
   133. . . . . . . Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:05 PM (#5913549)
Literally?


I'm sure a drop slipped out.
   134. The Good Face Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:05 PM (#5913550)
I saw a rattler in Cali, and wasn't terribly scared, but that was probably due to my own ignorance.


Nah, it's the rattlers you don't see that are the problem. They're not aggressive as far as snakes go; just don't step on them, touch them or get all up in their personal space and you're fine. But they're not always easy to see, even when you know they're close.
   135. Chip Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:13 PM (#5913551)
I've never seen a rattler in California but I have heard rattles on two occasions, and the above is vastly understated.


My wife and I were visiting Mt. Tamalpais one late October weekend in the mid-90s when we lived in SF, and on our descent from the summit took a wrong turn onto what turned out to be a closed trail—they were doing erosion control on it. We came around a corner and smack in the middle of the path not 8 feet in front of us was a coiled rattler. It started to rattle and my wife, who was behind me, turned and ran like a blur back up hill. I found myself backing up VERY SLOWLY until I was back out of sight around the curve in the trail.

Definitely a heart-rate record set.
   136. SandyRiver Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:23 PM (#5913556)
SandyRiver, I was hiking up near the Flagstaff/Bigelow area and I spoke to a volunteer ranger type guy that said he feared the moose population is much, much lower than only years ago - that the spread of ticks has devastated them. Thoughts?

I think it was 3 years ago when Inland Fisheries and Game radio-collared a whole lot of moose, and found that 60% of calves failed to survive the winter. Some that were found soon after death had moose ticks essentially belly-to-belly over most of their skin, and blood loss to the little horrors was almost certainly a major player in that low survival. I've since heard that the tick issue, while still serious, has not been as grave in the past couple years, with better calf survival.

Weighing in on bear meat, though I've never eaten it - (A friend dropped a small - 120 lb - bear on our woodlot about 12 years ago, but he gave it to another friend and by the time I learned of the giving there was no meat to be had.) I've read that a key to bear is to have the animal cooled ASAP. A former co-worker tells of 2 different bears to illustrate. While in college he shot a small bear, size of my friend's animal, and treated it like a deer, hanging it for a couple days before having it cut. He said it was so rank that most of it went to his dog. Some years later his dad took a 330-lb bear, had the skin off and carcass cooled within a few hours, and the co-worker called it excellent eating.

I've seen bears perhaps 100 times in the Maine woods (most often from a vehicle) and never had issues, but was once scared by a moose. It was in a stand of tall spruce, no underbrush and 1.5 miles from my pickup, early October at the height of the moose rut. This large bull was coming right at me making low grunts, and when he got within about 25 yards I realized that if he got real close and found I was not the cow of his dreams, it might not go well. My little cruising axe would've just made him mad. I began hollering and throwing sticks, he lowered his head and swung it side by side to show me his rack - well over 50" spread, maybe 60. After a minute or two which seemed much longer, he decided I was neither his quarry nor a challenger bull. He then walked a quarter circle around me, keeping his distance, then resumed grunting and went about his business.
   137. Rally Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:33 PM (#5913560)
I’ve enjoyed the tangents on this thread. Whatever the exact injury was, it seems more improbable than most of the weird circumstances that pop up with OOTP baseball. Truth again stranger than fiction.
   138. Traderdave Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:49 PM (#5913563)
I've read that a key to bear is to have the animal cooled ASAP. A former co-worker tells of 2 different bears to illustrate. While in college he shot a small bear, size of my friend's animal, and treated it like a deer, hanging it for a couple days before having it cut. He said it was so rank that most of it went to his dog. Some years later his dad took a 330-lb bear, had the skin off and carcass cooled within a few hours, and the co-worker called it excellent eating.



That is the key to ANY game animal: field dress and cool ASAP.

I've served venison to several people who swore up and down they hated it until they really liked mine. Surely part of that was cooking (venison is very easy to screw up) but I'm convinced that 90% of it was handling. Guys that hang a deer in camp in weather above 40F and then drive it home strapped to their bumper or laying in the sun in back of a truck are probably the reason those folks thought it was lousy and excessively gamey.

   139. Der-K: at 10% emotional investment Posted: January 07, 2020 at 12:56 PM (#5913565)
How does one have terrifying snake experiences?

Not really terrifying but my only snake story of note: I get home from work one day to find my then partner in the garage holding a bloody shovel.
Her: "There's a six foot long snake in the garage!"
Me: "What type is it?"
Her: "Real pissed off!"

(I finished the job, it was big but harmless.)
   140. Mike A Posted: January 07, 2020 at 02:20 PM (#5913596)
I do a lot of wildlife photography and have encountered most of the animals discussed (no mountain lion yet), and I always say the two things that scare me most out there are snakes and lightning.

Seen thousands of gators and have had only two behave somewhat aggressively. Bears, moose, boar, coyotes, etc...same thing. As long as you leave them alone and keep a reasonable distance, you should be OK. (As a side, I've seen far too many people try to get close to buffalo, elk, etc...clueless tourists and big animals are a bad mix.)

But snakes...you just don't know where they're at and if you get unlucky, you're going to get bit. Biggest one I ever saw was a 7-foot Diamondback cruising through the scrubs in Florida. That'll wake you up.
   141. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: January 07, 2020 at 02:34 PM (#5913601)
Biggest one I ever saw was a 7-foot Diamondback cruising through the scrubs in Florida.
Looks like you're referring to this game. Aug. 26, 1999: Randy Johnson gives up one run on six hits, striking out nine as the D'Backs cruise to a 12-2 win in Miami. The Marlins' lineup featured Dave Berg, Bruce Aven, Danny Bautista, Chris Clapinski and Mike Redmond.
   142. flournoy Posted: January 07, 2020 at 02:56 PM (#5913620)
Man, Mike Redmond famously owned Tom Glavine. Maybe that didn't extend to all Hall of Fame lefties.
   143. Nasty Nate Posted: January 07, 2020 at 03:14 PM (#5913626)
Biggest one I ever saw was a 7-foot Diamondback cruising through the scrubs in Florida.

Looks like you're referring to this game. Aug. 26, 1999: Randy Johnson gives up one run on six hits, striking out nine as the D'Backs cruise to a 12-2 win in Miami. The Marlins' lineup featured Dave Berg, Bruce Aven, Danny Bautista, Chris Clapinski and Mike Redmond.
Well played, sir!
   144. Howie Menckel Posted: January 07, 2020 at 04:38 PM (#5913656)
we used to catch lizards when we were kids.

there was a rock wall in a neighbor's yard that often was sunny, so on a good day 20 or 30 might be basking at once.

excellent way to develop your hand-eye coordination - those suckers are fast!

halfway through one summer, we noticed that most of the 'baskers' had lost most of their respective tails. that's what happens when you're not QUITE fast enough to hold onto one.

at that point, we realized we had "overfished" - so we gave them rest of the summer off to regrow their tails.
   145. Rennie's Tenet Posted: January 07, 2020 at 07:03 PM (#5913693)
lifted a carton to find a copperhead wintering over underneath, pissed myself.


My German Shepherd gets into everything. We stepped stepped down onto a little beach by a stream, he stepped literally over a copperhead - two paws in front, two in back. I just called his name real quietly, and probably for the first ever he came trotting to me, while the snake took the opportunity to slide away.
   146. Brian C Posted: January 07, 2020 at 07:18 PM (#5913695)
But snakes...you just don't know where they're at and if you get unlucky, you're going to get bit. Biggest one I ever saw was a 7-foot Diamondback cruising through the scrubs in Florida. That'll wake you up.

Yeah, I was out for a walk once and the weather turned pretty quickly and earlier than forecasted, as will happen in Florida in the summer. So I was kinda rushing back to my car before the rain/lightning became a thing. And then, boom, big diamondback right on the edge of the path, all coiled up, maybe 8 feet in front of me. Hustling as I was, I'm extremely lucky that I saw it when I did - I always watch where I'm going for just that reason, but still.

I wasn't real sure what to do. I was in a hurry, after all, and I couldn't really get by it. I threw some small sticks at it to get it to move, and actually bounced one right off his stupid head, but he didn't move. Didn't even rattle, which annoyed me. So finally I got a big branch, with all the leaves still on it, and waved it at it. Finally it slowly and lazily moved off the path and I could get by.

Thing is, though, when it moved off the path, it went under the leaf litter and I couldn't even see it. If I would have walked off the path at all, I'd have no reason to think anything was there, certainly not a 6-foot rattlesnake - I wouldn't have guessed there was enough leaves for him to get under, much less completely disappear. In a way, that scared me more than seeing him in the path - made me feel like one step off the path could kill me.

It's like you say, you just don't know where they're at.
   147. Howie Menckel Posted: January 07, 2020 at 11:39 PM (#5913747)
last call for Boar a haul?
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