Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Thursday, August 04, 2022

The Baseball Stadium That “Forever Changed” Professional Sports

Among writers, meanwhile, Camden Yards was nothing short of a marvel. Peter Richmond, in his biography of the park, Ballpark: Camden Yards and the Building of an American Dream, called the stadium a “national showpiece.” In a celebration of the park published before it even opened, Goldberger wrote that Camden was “capable of wiping out in a single gesture 50 years of wretched stadium design, and of restoring the joyous possibility that a ball park might actually enhance the experience of watching the game of baseball.” George Will, who was once considered a candidate for MLB commissioner, declared in 2014 that Camden’s construction ranked among “the three most important things that have happened in baseball since the Second World War,” right up beside “Jackie Robinson taking the field in Brooklyn in 1947” and “free agency arriving in 1975.” Edward Gunts, a former architecture critic for the Sun, wrote that Camden Yards was sure to be “a seminal building” that would go on to “influence the way major-league sports facilities are designed from now on.” (Such predictions, of course, would prove prescient: In the years since the park’s opening, 21 baseball stadiums—most designed in Camden Yards’ distinct architectural likeness—have been built in or near city centers all across the country.)

Nobody, however, celebrated Camden Yards quite as conspicuously as Major League Baseball, which rather loudly incorporated the stadium into the mythic tale that it tells the world about itself. Bud Selig, the acting MLB commissioner at the time, remarked that “Camden Yards … changed everything. It really did. I’m not sure people grasp the significance of it.” The Orioles, meanwhile, began referring to Camden Yards using a trademarked honorific: “The Ballpark That Forever Changed Baseball.”

Three decades after the stadium opened, the Orioles still reference their home park in this way. Upon further investigation, however, their interpretation of exactly how Camden Yards “forever changed baseball” proves somewhat incomplete. Camden changed not only baseball but, arguably, all of professional sports. And not in ways altogether for the better.

RoyalsRetro (AG#1F) Posted: August 04, 2022 at 03:35 PM | 36 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: camden yards

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

   1. Doug Jones threw harder than me Posted: August 05, 2022 at 01:51 PM (#6090153)
One of the big things Camden Yards did was make people realize they could use owning an MLB team as a real-estate ploy, not just to get a new stadium built, but to get all kinds of other things, like the various ownership groups of the A's have been trying to do for 20 years.
   2. BDC Posted: August 05, 2022 at 02:50 PM (#6090164)
In the years since the park’s opening, 21 baseball stadiums—most designed in Camden Yards’ distinct architectural likeness—have been built in or near city centers all across the country


That phrasing makes it seem like all 21 of those teams had been playing in drab suburban parking lots before moving to downtown Camden Clones, which is not quite the case. The most dramatic Oriole-like moves were probably in Houston, San Diego, San Francisco, and Miami, with others like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Denver, Seattle (maybe?), and Detroit edging a bit closer to their center cities.

In Minneapolis, though, the downtown move had been made earlier, from Bloomington to the dome; and some other new parks got the team no closer to downtown (Philly, Cincinnati, Arlington, the NYC stadiums, Milwaukee, Atlanta – where the Braves eventually moved even further out).

I will happily be corrected on the facts or subjective impression some of the newer parks give of being closer to (or even further from) downtowns. I have not been to all those cities even, let alone all of the new & old parks, though I have seen many of them from the outside in the offseason.

IOW the phenomenon wasn't always about reshaping downtowns. Nor was it really about public subsidies for big-time sports, which I guess is a scandal but I have long since stopped worrying about; you'd have to have cities – and in some cases entire state higher-education systems – abjure major sports altogether to reverse that dynamic.

To me the Camden Yards phenomenon really does come down to architecture, and to a large extent the problem of "how do we make a premium, revenue-generating venue feel to the average cheap-seat fan like an inclusive, egalitarian, homey place?" Some parks do this better than others.
   3. NaOH Posted: August 05, 2022 at 03:55 PM (#6090181)
To me the Camden Yards phenomenon really does come down to architecture, and to a large extent the problem of "how do we make a premium, revenue-generating venue feel to the average cheap-seat fan like an inclusive, egalitarian, homey place?" Some parks do this better than others.


Let it never be forgotten that Camden Yards had the same architectural firm behind it as Tropicana Dome.
   4. Lonnie Smith for president Posted: August 05, 2022 at 05:12 PM (#6090188)
Any Primates out there with history in Memorial Stadium...? After the Colts left town and all the shenanigans per the article, a new park was just going to happen, whether it was needed (however you define that in the pre-luxury box era) or not. My memories are the '79 and '83 World Series on TV and the unceasing highlight reel of early Dreamboat Ripken. Memorial Stadium did not appear to be the same flavor of historic eyesore that many of the multi-purpose yards were, nor was it as steeped in nostalgia like Wrigley or Fenway. I'll hang up and take your answers off air. Thanks.
   5. McCoy Posted: August 05, 2022 at 05:22 PM (#6090189)
Camden Yards made baseball people realize that adults like Disneyland.

Being downtown was largely meaningless. What's important is being where the adults are.
   6. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 05, 2022 at 05:45 PM (#6090192)
Any Primates out there with history in Memorial Stadium...? After the Colts left town and all the shenanigans per the article, a new park was just going to happen, whether it was needed (however you define that in the pre-luxury box era) or not. My memories are the '79 and '83 World Series on TV and the unceasing highlight reel of early Dreamboat Ripken. Memorial Stadium did not appear to be the same flavor of historic eyesore that many of the multi-purpose yards were, nor was it as steeped in nostalgia like Wrigley or Fenway. I'll hang up and take your answers off air. Thanks.

Several points in response.

1. The idea of a new ballpark for the Orioles had its start in Edward Bennett Williams' repeated passive aggressive "I'm not sayin', but I might be sayin'" hints that if attendance didn't pick up, he was thinking about moving the Orioles to Washington. The 1979 season, with its 102 wins and its over 50% jump in attendance, temporarily put that idea on the back burner, but that's when the idea of a new ballpark began. Be assured that whether or not Williams ever would've gone through with such a move, Orioles fans took it very seriously, especially after a Washington Post editorial told Williams just to do it.

2. About Memorial Stadium: To an outside observer it probably didn't look much different from the Vet, Riverfront, and other such multiplexes, but by the early 80's if anything it had accumulated more first hand nostalgia for living fans than Fenway or Wrigley. You have to remember that from 1960 through 1984 the Orioles had the best combined record in all of Major League Baseball, and in only 2 of those 25 seasons (1961 and 1967) did they finish below .500. Their farm system was the envy of every other team, and "the Oriole way" was a model that many other teams tried (mostly unsuccessfully) to follow. All this when for most of that time Baltimore was really much more of a football down.

3. And from about 1977 through 1983, Memorial Stadium, with Wild Bill Hagy in Section 34, was just about the most entertaining place to see a ball game, bar none. No gimmicks other than Hagy, just great baseball with mostly homegrown stars that fans could identify with. It couldn't compare to Camden Yards in terms of architectural beauty (or food), but it was "Baltimore" in exactly the same way that Fenway and Wrigley "were" Boston and Chicago. You may have had to have been there, but if you had been, you would've instantly understood.
   7. Starring Bradley Scotchman as RMc Posted: August 05, 2022 at 06:23 PM (#6090197)
biography of the park

Can an inanimate object truly have a "biography"? I mean, it ain't alive, so that negates the "bio" part...
   8. cHiEf iMpaCt oFfiCEr JE Posted: August 05, 2022 at 07:32 PM (#6090204)
Let it never be forgotten that Camden Yards had the same architectural firm behind it as Tropicana Dome.
Heck, Populous (formerly HOK Group) was also the architect of the new Comiskey, which opened only one season before Camden Yards.
   9. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: August 05, 2022 at 10:10 PM (#6090234)
Brewers stayed put, west of downtown, for two reasons, 1. Location required no fuss, lift or fight and 2. Duh, tailgating. Downtown stadiums are fun and all that but not at the expense of giving up the tailgating tradition in Milwaukee.
   10. Where have you gone Brady Anderson? Posted: August 05, 2022 at 11:56 PM (#6090255)
My first major league game was at Memorial Stadium, but I was too young to really remember anything about the stadium. A guy at my church had great season tickets (second or third row behind home plate) and he would occasionally give tickets to people at church, so I went to a few games in the final years of Memorial Stadium and first years of Camden Yards. That guy was awesome.
   11. Baldrick Posted: August 06, 2022 at 03:29 AM (#6090266)
with others like Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Denver, Seattle (maybe?), and Detroit edging a bit closer to their center cities

Cascadia Park is located in the space that was basically the old Kingdome parking lot.
   12. John DiFool2 Posted: August 06, 2022 at 09:51 AM (#6090277)
Left unaddressed by the article are the Disposable Ballparks (c.f. Atlanta & Texas). If I were a citizen of such cities that kind of horsehockey by the team & local politicians would massively piss me off.
   13. BDC Posted: August 06, 2022 at 10:15 AM (#6090278)
Thanks, Baldrick – Seattle I don't know from, I was trying to figure it by map. Interesting how many of the parks stayed pretty much where they were (that being where the available land was).

And of course downtown is not always perfect for a ballpark, as Tulo says. The Rays are very near downtown St. Petersburg, but in terms of convenience and ambiance it seems like they might as well be on the Moon. The Royals, by contrast, are way out east of central Kansas City, but the location and park are beautiful.
   14. BDC Posted: August 06, 2022 at 10:25 AM (#6090280)
Disposable Ballparks

I am notorious for enjoying new and apparently unnecessary stadiums, of course. The BDC Dome has meant that I can go to the midsummer day games they insist on the Rangers playing, without frying myself on contact with my seat. For that I will keep paying our perpetual half-cent Stadium Sales Tax, and gratefully.

Now that we have two MLB stadiums next to each other, there's actually more sports year-round than there was in the Ballpark alone. The Ballpark still stands, and has been reconverted to become a premium high-school football stadium (this is Texas, remember). The BDC Dome is also being used more & more for football (Army has taken to playing Air Force there, etc.), and for concerts too. The NFL team has its own place across the street, of course, but the BDC Dome is starting to be used more & more like the multi-purpose venues of the 1970s, even though the baseball field looks Camden-Yardsy enough.
   15. SandyRiver Posted: August 06, 2022 at 11:23 AM (#6090283)
Any Primates out there with history in Memorial Stadium...?

Took in a number of games during my years at Johns Hopkins - only an 8-block walk and student tickets were cheap. Als saw my 1st NFL game, Colts-Vikes in fall 1964, from walk-on bleachers in the north end zone. Rooted for MN so was not too popular with fellow bleacherites, but when Johnny U hit the game winner inside 2 minutes, I was forgiven. Saw Frank Robinson hit the 1st ever HR over the bleachers in spring 1966, right down the LF line. I was behind 1st and seeing the folks in the bleachers across from us looking over the back wall told the tale. Robbie was THE phenomenon in Balt that year. Also saw one of the very few times Luis Aparicio swung at a first pitch - he lined a triple leading off the Orioles' 1st, scored on a ground out, and that was the Birds' only run until they scored 2 in the 15th to pull out the 3-2 win.
   16. VCar Posted: August 06, 2022 at 11:57 AM (#6090286)
also spent a lot of my childhood at Memorial from 72 to 87, attending both O's and Colts games. multi-purpose stadiums were the norm back them, so I wasn;t too upset that both games had to be shoe-horned in there. for baseball it was symmetric without a lot of character, but not as cookie cutter as 3Rivers and the Vet. biggest baseball memory is game 1 of the 79 series, which was the only home game the O's won in that series. Stargell's 8th inning homer is still the 2nd longest I've seen hit in a game I attended. Flanagan pitched a complete game in a 5-4 win -- that would be managed a bit differently these days...

football memories include the 2OT playoff game against the Raiders in 77 and a lopsided playoff loss to the Steelers in 76, where a small plane carrying an ad banner crashed into the upper deck right after the game ended. luckily everyone had cleared out by then, so no one got hurt -- but if the game had still been close it could have been trouble.
   17. SandyRiver Posted: August 06, 2022 at 01:04 PM (#6090290)
Another Memorial memory was a Killebrew HR that reached the embankment 40-50 feet beyond the fence in right-center. My seat was 1/3 the way up in the 2nd deck and that line drive was silhouetted against the ground all the way
   18. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 06, 2022 at 01:57 PM (#6090291)
also spent a lot of my childhood at Memorial from 72 to 87, attending both O's and Colts games. multi-purpose stadiums were the norm back them, so I wasn;t too upset that both games had to be shoe-horned in there. for baseball it was symmetric without a lot of character, but not as cookie cutter as 3Rivers and the Vet. biggest baseball memory is game 1 of the 79 series, which was the only home game the O's won in that series. Stargell's 8th inning homer is still the 2nd longest I've seen hit in a game I attended. Flanagan pitched a complete game in a 5-4 win -- that would be managed a bit differently these days..

That entire World Series was played under a constant drizzle, and in the upper deck we were also treated to the Pirates wives sitting behind us, singing "We Are Fam-i-lee". Those last two games were pure torture.

OYOH the two Angels LCS games were sublime: A walkoff homer by Brother Lo to win the first one, and a heart attack inducing near blown save by "Stan the Man Unusual" in the second game that somehow ended in a 9-8 win, in a game where at one point the O's were ahead by 9 to 1.

football memories include the 2OT playoff game against the Raiders in 77 and a lopsided playoff loss to the Steelers in 76, where a small plane carrying an ad banner crashed into the upper deck right after the game ended. luckily everyone had cleared out by then, so no one got hurt -- but if the game had still been close it could have been trouble.

I went to both of those games, and what I remember beyond what you wrote about the Steelers game was that I got a great midfield upper deck seat from a scalper for all of $5.00. Baltimore scalpers were famously reasonable in those days.

But next year for the Raiders game, it was blacked out and I was forced to buy a standing room only ticket and race from empty seat to empty seat before the real seat holder came back from the loo or the hot dog stand. At first I had a lower deck seat behind the Raiders bench and couldn't see over the players, but by overtime I was in a good upper deck seat that had been held by someone who for some inexplicable reason left after regulation. Like most of the crowd, I was walking along 33rd Street back to my car when I heard the plane crash into the upper deck.

But the best game in Memorial I ever went to was my first (I had to drive up from Washington), the 1975 "fog game" against the Dolphins that put the "Coats" into first place. They were trailing by 7-0 late in the game after a Larry Seiple punt put them back on their own 14 yard line, when Bert Jones and Lydell Mitchell drove them 86 yards for the tying touchdown. And then they repeated that drive in OT, starting from their own 4 after another Seiple punt, and winning it on a Toni Linhart FG that was totally obscured in the upper deck by the overhanging fog. I only knew the kick was good by the cheers from below. I'd always hated the Colts growing up in D. C., but from that point on I split my allegiances between the Skins and the Colts. Of course now I love the Ravens and wish the Snyders would just go away and die.
   19. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 06, 2022 at 02:01 PM (#6090292)
Saw Frank Robinson hit the 1st ever HR over the bleachers in spring 1966, right down the LF line.

That wasn't just the first HR over the Memorial Stadium bleachers, it was the only one. At a Yankees game in June of 1982, we were sitting in the upper deck behind 3B when Cal hit a foul ball over our heads and out of the park. If anyone else ever did that, I'd never seen it or heard about it.
   20. Lonnie Smith for president Posted: August 06, 2022 at 02:55 PM (#6090303)
FYI, Dorktown has an educational review of that Colts/Steelers plane crash game.
   21. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 06, 2022 at 03:06 PM (#6090304)
Lonnie, you might check that link. I got an error message.
   22. Lonnie Smith for president Posted: August 06, 2022 at 03:14 PM (#6090306)
Me, too. Sorry for the confusion. Does this much still work?
https://youtu.be/alcVZZuj_WE
   23. jingoist Posted: August 06, 2022 at 04:13 PM (#6090317)
Don Stanhouse aka, Stan the Msn Unusual.
Weaver would walk down the lockerroom corridor puffing furiously on his cigarette whenever Stanhouse would put guys on during his relief stint.
Wasn’t it Lowenstein who nicknamed him Stan the Man Unusual?
I really miss those O’s teams of 45 years ago; some of my very best baseball memories.
That and trying to find a driveway/lawn to park on during Oriole sellouts on 33rd street.
   24. VCar Posted: August 06, 2022 at 05:11 PM (#6090325)
thanks for posting that video Lonnie. I hadn't seen it b4
   25. cHiEf iMpaCt oFfiCEr JE Posted: August 06, 2022 at 06:51 PM (#6090329)
Any Primates out there with history in Memorial Stadium...?
I went to a game at Memorial Stadium in its final season but my only recollection of the experience was the bumper-to-bumper parking outside.
   26. cardsfanboy Posted: August 06, 2022 at 07:21 PM (#6090332)
Me, too. Sorry for the confusion. Does this much still work?



Yes it does.
   27. Lonnie Smith for president Posted: August 06, 2022 at 08:31 PM (#6090339)
Ta, 26. Happy confluence of things last-century Baltimore, that Dorktown and the above article. Haven't thought about Bert Jones in a while, for sure. Seemed like the Steelers or Raiders won the AFC every year when I was a kid, but there were some good times in that league that fell short of a Super Bowl.

As for the Orioles, they did enjoy a rather amazing duration of homegrown success. Maybe only the Athletics suffered the consequences of free agency more keenly...?

   28. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 06, 2022 at 09:13 PM (#6090348)
Great video, and when it got to mentioning the 3.5 point spread it reminded me that I spent a good hour that morning on the phone with my boss, talking each other into taking the Colts +3.5. Since he had more money, he told me to put down $500 with my bookie for him, while at that time I could only afford to put down $50. The bookie was an old dude I knew from the pool room I went to all the time, and I'd been betting with him all year.

Problem is that when the Steelers won in the blowout, I paid my $55 that night, but when he came around later that week to collect the $550 from my boss at his shop, he claimed that he'd bet on the Steelers! Which was complete BS, and led my bookie friend to cut off his action for the next few years. And when my bookie friend finally took him back, after another year of consistent losing he pulled the same #### again! Not too surprising that my boss later went into Chapter 11 twice, and that everyone who's had any real experience with him considers him the Donald Trump of the book business.
   29. Howie Menckel Posted: August 06, 2022 at 11:43 PM (#6090362)
Don Stanhouse aka, Stan the Msn Unusual.
Weaver would walk down the lockerroom corridor puffing furiously on his cigarette whenever Stanhouse would put guys on during his relief stint.

I remember Stanhouse being called "Full Pack" - because that was how many cigarettes Weaver sometimes would go through in an ultimately successful high-wire act before Stanhouse slammed the door.
   30. Baldrick Posted: August 07, 2022 at 07:12 AM (#6090378)
Thanks, Baldrick – Seattle I don't know from, I was trying to figure it by map.

Yep, it's a little further away from the city center now, but the area around the parks has also developed a bit compared to the Kingdome era. I certainly wouldn't go south of Pioneer Square just to hang out on a random day, but the park is plenty walkable from actual downtown neighborhoods.
   31. Belfry Bob Posted: August 07, 2022 at 08:37 AM (#6090379)
Memorial had to be replaced because it was a concrete deck placed atop an existing bowl back in '54, and it was crumbling. Upkeep was really expensive and growing ever more problematic. It wouldn't have lasted another decade.

So many memories there - the neighborhood parking, the outside vendors, the long ramp walks to the upper deck, Rex Barney, listening to Jon Miller on the radio, the horrorshow that was '88 (the year I moved to Baltimore), the joy that was '89, and the tears of the Last Game.
   32. VCar Posted: August 07, 2022 at 08:54 AM (#6090380)
Bob, I was also at the last game, driving down from CT where I had moved to. and I shed a few tears that day too. funny thing was we walked up and scalped for a reasonable price. O's got beat badly (appropriate that Cal grounded into a DP to end it - obligatory Frank Tanana mention). but the post-game ceremony was worth the price of admission by itself.
   33. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 07, 2022 at 12:38 PM (#6090397)
the outside vendors,

One of the more telling landmarks of MLB's insane greed was when they shut down those outside T-shirt vendors who were selling "unauthorized" T-shirts, all of which were far more imaginative than the "official" ones sold inside the stadium. One of the best was a shirt with a big portrait of Weaver with "The Earl of Baltimore" written along the bottom. But even better, during the famous 5-game Yankees series in 1980, when all attendance records were broken, there was a shirt that commemorated the O's three game sweep in Yankee Stadium the previous week by showing a maniacal looking cartoon Oriole "sweeping" various Yankees out of Yankee Stadium with a broom,** with the caption reading "The Bird's the Word in NY". Those copyright nannies are the worst.

** Right before the first game of the final 4 game Brewers series at the end of the 1982 season, during the Brewers' batting practice the Bird mascot was marching all around the sideline with a giant broom, while the crowd was chanting "SWEEP! SWEEP!" (A sweep would've given the Orioles the AL East championship.) The mascot then began dusting off the shoes of the Brewers' coaches, but suddenly he changed gears and started spraying one of them with a "gas" canister that was nothing but water mist, but could easily have been mistaken for something much more deadly. I don't remember how the coach reacted, but the crowd went absolutely wild.

Bob, I was also at the last game, driving down from CT where I had moved to. and I shed a few tears that day too. funny thing was we walked up and scalped for a reasonable price. O's got beat badly (appropriate that Cal grounded into a DP to end it - obligatory Frank Tanana mention). but the post-game ceremony was worth the price of admission by itself.

IIRC the biggest cheer of the day was for when the Colts marching band came out and played the Colts marching song. That was halfway through the long and painful stretch between the Colts' departure and the Ravens' arrival. For me the final moment that sealed my Ravens fandom was when their marching band made that Colts marching song their own, even though they didn't inherit the cowboy-styled uniforms.

Another great Memorial moment came on Brooks Robinson Day in 1977, when during the ceremony Rex Barney introduced Robinson with this memorable line: "In New York, they named a candy bar after Reggie. In Baltimore, they name their children after Brooks."

   34. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 07, 2022 at 12:42 PM (#6090398)
I remember Stanhouse being called "Full Pack" - because that was how many cigarettes Weaver sometimes would go through in an ultimately successful high-wire act before Stanhouse slammed the door.

Stanhouse's WHIP numbers under Weaver were 1.500, 1.376 and 1.650, with a walk / strikeout ratio of 1.41. That might've had something to do with it.
   35. SandyRiver Posted: August 08, 2022 at 09:31 AM (#6090595)
One other facet at Memorial (maybe at CY as well?) was that one could get a surprisingly good little crabcake between 2 saltine crackers for pocket change. Only in Balimer.
   36. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: August 08, 2022 at 11:01 AM (#6090608)
When Memorial was briefly being used by one of the O's minor league affiliates, my wife and I went to a game and found Tippy Martinez selling tacos in one of the refreshment booths.

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Adam M
for his generous support.

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

Newsblog2022 MLB Field of Dreams Game: Four things to know with Cubs, Reds set to meet in Iowa
(14 - 11:55am, Aug 12)
Last: Barry`s_Lazy_Boy

NewsblogRodolfo Castro loses phone while diving into third in Pirates’ loss
(27 - 11:39am, Aug 12)
Last: David Nieporent (now, with children)

NewsblogTrevor Bauer Faces Sexual Battery Allegations in New Countersuit
(13 - 10:24am, Aug 12)
Last: cHiEf iMpaCt oFfiCEr JE

NewsblogThe Orioles' advantage is hiding in plain sight
(7 - 9:03am, Aug 12)
Last: shoelesjoe

NewsblogQuite a Sho: Ohtani ties Ruth, passes Ichiro in same game
(19 - 8:47am, Aug 12)
Last: Mefisto

NewsblogHow Government Devastated Minor League Baseball
(2 - 7:48am, Aug 12)
Last: Starring Bradley Scotchman as RMc

NewsblogOMNICHATTER for the week of August 8-15, 2022
(198 - 10:25pm, Aug 11)
Last: Itchy Row

NewsblogJason Heyward, despite another year left on contract, won't be back with Chicago Cubs in 2023, Jed Hoyer says
(36 - 10:21pm, Aug 11)
Last: Sweatpants

Newsblog2022 NBA Playoffs thread
(4141 - 10:08pm, Aug 11)
Last: rr would lock Shaq's a$$ up

NewsblogAs they take the Field of Dreams, where do the Chicago Cubs stand in their latest rebuild?
(2 - 7:18pm, Aug 11)
Last: Brian C

NewsblogVaughn Grissom makes history with HR, steal in debut
(10 - 6:17pm, Aug 11)
Last: the Hugh Jorgan returns

Newsblog‘A League of Their Own’: There’s Still No Crying in Baseball — Just Room for Fixing Old Errors
(62 - 5:35pm, Aug 11)
Last: Cris E

NewsblogSI:Is Nationals Starter Patrick Corbin Having the Worst Pitching Season Ever?
(9 - 5:19pm, Aug 11)
Last: Pat Rapper's Delight (as quoted on MLB Network)

NewsblogOT Soccer Thread - European Leages Return
(5 - 5:17pm, Aug 11)
Last: SoSH U at work

NewsblogDetroit Tigers fire general manager Al Avila after seven seasons
(22 - 5:06pm, Aug 11)
Last: Walt Davis

Page rendered in 1.0329 seconds
48 querie(s) executed