Baseball for the Thinking Fan

Login | Register | Feedback

btf_logo
You are here > Home > Baseball Newsstand > Baseball Primer Newsblog > Discussion
Baseball Primer Newsblog
— The Best News Links from the Baseball Newsstand

Sunday, March 01, 2020

US-based pro sports leagues monitoring coronavirus outbreak

By request:

Major North American professional sports leagues are talking to health officials and informing teams about the coronavirus outbreak that has led to the first reported death in the U.S.

Officials from the National Basketball Association, National Hockey League and Major League Baseball say they are all consulting with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other organizations on a regular basis about COVID-19. Washington State reported Saturday that a man in his 50s died from the virus.

There are no immediate plans to cancel or postpone games or have them held in empty stadiums or arenas. Some of those contingencies have been taken in other countries, including Italy, where soccer matches were postponed until May.

Pro sports in the U.S. for now are going on as scheduled, though leagues are closely monitoring the situation. The NBA and NHL are in their regular seasons and MLB in spring training in Arizona and Florida with Opening Day less than a month way.

 

QLE Posted: March 01, 2020 at 12:56 AM | 8016 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: coronavirus

Reader Comments and Retorts

Go to end of page

Statements posted here are those of our readers and do not represent the BaseballThinkFactory. Names are provided by the poster and are not verified. We ask that posters follow our submission policy. Please report any inappropriate comments.

Page 41 of 81 pages ‹ First  < 39 40 41 42 43 >  Last ›
   4001. Eddo Posted: April 03, 2020 at 04:27 AM (#5936112)
South Korea has found something they can probably do for the long haul.

Thanks for replying to my (now-buried) comment, AuntBea. The sentence I quoted - can we say that's true? The rest of your #3999 implies that as soon as South Korea loosens at all, they'll be in bad shape. Does that mean they have to keep the measures in perpetuity? (Or until a vaccine or "miracle" treatment emerges?)

------

Have you come across anything Dr. Jennifer L. Kasten(*) has posted on Facebook (it's all public)? This is her latest post, and she's a bit more optimistic about things like total deaths, but in a way that is actually reassuring, not just her making bald assertions. Any thoughts on her material?

(*) Her bio describes her as "a pathologist with degrees in infectious disease epidemiology, mathematical modeling of epidemics, and fieldwork in epidemic control."
   4002. Tony S Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:26 AM (#5936126)
Have you come across anything Dr. Jennifer L. Kasten(*) has posted on Facebook (it's all public)? This is her latest post, and she's a bit more optimistic about things like total deaths, but in a way that is actually reassuring, not just her making bald assertions. Any thoughts on her material?


The most hopeful part of her post, to me, is her suggestion that the virus isn't as airborne-transmissable as feared; she's basically saying that only health-care workers have much to fear about being infected that way. But if that's the case, why is the virus still spreading so easily?

Because if the following is true (from her post):

The most important thing for the public to know (and health care workers) is that detecting virus, or viral RNA, on a surface does not mean the virus is viable/infective. As of now, there is no definitive evidence for airborne or aerosol transmission outside a hospital procedural setting (intubation, bronchoscopy, autopsy).


...then that has significant implications for how much social distancing is necessary.
   4003. Eddo Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:33 AM (#5936130)
The most hopeful part of her post, to me, is her suggestion that the virus isn't as airborne-transmissable as feared; she's basically saying that only health-care workers have much to fear about being infected that way. But if that's the case, why is the virus still spreading so easily?

I was confused by that. Judging by context ("The most important thing for the public to know (and health care workers) is that detecting virus, or viral RNA, on a surface does not mean the virus is viable/infective. As of now, there is no definitive evidence for airborne or aerosol transmission outside a hospital procedural setting (intubation, bronchoscopy, autopsy)."), I suspect airborne means something different than to us laypeople. I think what she's saying is that it's very unlikely that it's transmitting by any way except people breathing, coughing, or sneezing near others, i.e. it doesn't spread via living on surfaces of food or tables or whatnot. But really, I'm not sure.

This was a post that calmed me down a good amount, if we're talking about some of her more hopeful commentary.
   4004. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:41 AM (#5936132)
Spain
3/19   1326
3/20   1720   +398   +30%
3/23   2182   +462   +27%
3/24   2696   +514   +24%
3/25   3434   +738   +27%
3/26   4089   +655   +19%
3/27   4858   +769   +19%
3/28   5690   +832   +17%
3/29   6528   +838   +15%
3/30   7340   +812   +12%
3/31   8189   +849   +12%
4/01   9053   +864   +11%
4/02  10003   +950   +10%
4/03  10935   +932    +9%


Madrid
Date        total deaths    new deaths
March 10       21             13   (as of 9pm the prior evening, so would be prior to the shutdown)
March 11       31             10
March 12       56             25
March 13       81             35
March 14        ?              
March 15        ?
March 16      213
March 17      355            142
March 18      390             35
March 19      498            108
March 20      628            130
March 21      804            176
March 22     1021            217
March 23     1263            242
March 24     1535            272
March 25     1825            290
March 26     2090            265
March 27     2412            322
March 28     2757            345
March 29     3082            325
March 30     3392            310
March 31     3603            215
April 01     3865            262
April 02     4175            310
April 03     4483            308


Don't those UW projections for the US come off the peak pretty fast? We aren't seeing that in Madrid and Lombardy.
   4005. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:52 AM (#5936134)
The reason that France showed a crazy spike in deaths yesterday - 1,355, a 24-hour record, I believe, for any nation, at least until the US breaks it later this week - is that they all of a sudden counted a ton of nursing home deaths that had occurred over a period of days or even weeks.

Germany continues to climb in the wrong direction - I wonder when we'll stop talking about them as an exception.

I've also been paying attention to Sweden, but I tend to doubt that their numbers will ultimately tell us anything about their unique strategy. Different nations will inevitably have different death rates and different curves due to factors we will not ever understand. But so far, anyway, they have many more deaths than Finland, Denmark, & Norway.
   4006. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:55 AM (#5936135)
Not impressed with Kasten. She's citing the Lancet article I cited earlier, which estimated a 0.66% (not 0.6%), with a 95% confidence range of 0.39 to 1.33. Also, it relies heavily on data from China (and makes a ton of adjustments. It seems crazy to rely on a number like this now when we have data from places where many more people have died (like Spain and Italy) and where hopefully the official numbers are more transparent.

We can be virtually certain that the mortality rate has been higher, maybe much higher, than 0.66% at least in places like Italy and Spain where hospitals have been overwhelmed. Hospitals are likely to be overwhelmed in many parts of the US as well.

Maybe if we find better ways to treat people the rate will lower over time.
   4007. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:58 AM (#5936136)
I know a doctor that knows a doctor in an NYC hospital, and she's sent me some of his text messages. I think he's an endocrinologist or a nephrologist, so he treats people with advanced diabetes complications. Two days ago he said that so many of his regular patients were dying that he didn't know who he'd even treat next year. This morning, his message is that the hospital is "absolute carnage."
   4008. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:16 AM (#5936139)
From what I understand, diabetes, asthma, and hypertension are all pretty good indications of being hit by Covid-19 particularly hard. My wife has two of those. She hasn't left the flat in 3 weeks. Good thing the new Animal Crossing just came out!
   4009. BrianBrianson Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:22 AM (#5936142)
Jeez, I am really missing being outside. Even queueing to get into the grocery store, the first time I'd been outside this week, was epic. I really could use a vacation to like, northern Quebec. A hundred plus miles from the nearest human. Like, car runs out of gas so you die kinda place.
   4010. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:30 AM (#5936145)
@4008, it's not even all that clear that well controlled chronic conditions are safe. It's hard to tease out the diabetes story because all the studies I've seen lump all the diabetics together, probably due to sample size. Young Type 1s get put in the same group as old, sick, Type 2s. Obviously, for a lot of reasons, you'd rather be 30 and well controlled than 65 and not, but it looks to me* like a 30 year old Type 1 with tight control is closer in expected outcome to a 65 year old Type 2 with complications than they are to an otherwise healthy Type 1.

I'm not looking forward to getting this. I'm not 100% certain I will - I'm doing pretty good with social distancing and can actually take the entire summer off if I have to. But with the predicted peak, I don't think anyone can just assume they won't get it.

By the way, you guys saying you miss being outside - can you actually not go outside? I'm spending more time outdoors at home than I do at work for sure. Having the worst allergies in years due to this. Is this a difference in house vs. apartment?



* Not a medical doctor. And I certainly haven't read every relevant paper.

   4011. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:36 AM (#5936146)
Young Type 1s get put in the same group as old, sick, Type 2s. Obviously, for a lot of reasons, you'd rather be 30 and well controlled than 65 and not, but it looks to me* like a 30 year old Type 1 with tight control is closer in expected outcome to a 65 year old Type 2 with complications than they are to an otherwise healthy Type 1.

I also have T1D. I've done as much research as I could on this. Nobody really knows.

I think it's likely that the young, well-controlled T1 is better off than the 65-year old T2. But also obviously worse off than a person of the same age without T1, and still reasonably considered "higher risk."
   4012. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:40 AM (#5936150)
Exactly. Much better off than someone older and with complications. But it's easy to forget in this age that Type 1 diabetes should kill you and brings loads of undesirable physiological effects even when controlled. Though I might feel healthy and seem healthy, that health is on a knife edge. We're much less able to suffer an additional blow.

Not trying to be a downer. It's a freaking miracle we're alive at all, so enjoy it. Just take a little more care than most.


I don't recall knowing you're Type 1. How long? August will be 37 years for me.
   4013. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:44 AM (#5936153)
My father and his 2 brothers are all Type 1 diabetics in their 70s (and their father and uncle also had it). His older brother is also a former smoker and lung cancer survivor. None of them are leaving the house / apartment during this as far as I know.

My brother and I are very fortunate that neither of us has developed it.
   4014. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:45 AM (#5936154)
2 years. Just 2 years. I was diagnosed at age 36. It's an exciting new health problem. Which means I am probably lower risk than you are - less accumulated damage from hyperglycemia. But still at risk. And I'm glad I have a stockpile of about a year's worth of insulin.
   4015. BrianBrianson Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:49 AM (#5936155)
By the way, you guys saying you miss being outside - can you actually not go outside? I'm spending more time outdoors at home than I do at work for sure. Having the worst allergies in years due to this. Is this a difference in house vs. apartment?


I live in what's essentially the third floor (or, as we call it in Europe, 2nd floor) of a house, which doesn't have any kind of yard or balcony or anything (if you've only ever lived in America, it might be hard to picture, but the distance from my front door to the road where cars can drive is probably six inches, though cars park along the side of the street there normally).

Legally, I can write myself a permission form (attestation d'hébergement) to walk/run around the block for up to an hour, I believe. But (at least so far) I haven't; I'm trying to do my best part.
   4016. Zonk is Dominating the Battlespace Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:53 AM (#5936158)
So, whether the Capt of the TR was right or wrong, should have been relieved or not....

His crew certainly has a different opinion than his bosses....
   4017. Ben Broussard Ramjet Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:55 AM (#5936159)
2 years. Just 2 years. I was diagnosed at age 36. It's an exciting new health problem. Which means I am probably lower risk than you are - less accumulated damage from hyperglycemia. But still at risk. And I'm glad I have a stockpile of about a year's worth of insulin.


Whoa - 'welcome', I guess. Maybe we connected on this before, but you were diagnosed at the same age as my wife. 'How long have you had diabetes?', the student asked her in her hospital bed, recovering from DKA. ' . . . about 12 hours, I guess?' she answered. She was assuming that she'd eventually get T2, but that wasn't exciting enough, apparently.
   4018. Eddo Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:58 AM (#5936161)
Not impressed with Kasten. She's citing the Lancet article I cited earlier, which estimated a 0.66% (not 0.6%), with a 95% confidence range of 0.39 to 1.33. Also, it relies heavily on data from China (and makes a ton of adjustments. It seems crazy to rely on a number like this now when we have data from places where many more people have died (like Spain and Italy) and where hopefully the official numbers are more transparent.

We can be virtually certain that the mortality rate has been higher, maybe much higher, than 0.66% at least in places like Italy and Spain where hospitals have been overwhelmed. Hospitals are likely to be overwhelmed in many parts of the US as well.

Maybe if we find better ways to treat people the rate will lower over time.

Thanks for commenting. I believe she revised that estimate in a subsequent post, actually.

This is probably another area where South Korea is... confusing? If you divide deaths (174) by confirmed cases (10k), you get 1.7% mortality rate. But what Kasten points out in a lot of her posts is that the true denominator is the big question, and almost certainly higher than 10k (even in somewhere like South Korea, where they've been testing heavily). But of course, it has to be an estimate currently (and probably forever). And I can see how factoring China in so much is dubious.
   4019. Biscuit_pants Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:59 AM (#5936162)
for those of you who are Type 1 (and living in US) this might be a way to pass the time:

https://studies.jaeb.org/ndocs/t1dexi/Public/Participant/StudyInfo.aspx
   4020. SoSH U at work Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:00 AM (#5936163)

Jeez, I am really missing being outside. Even queueing to get into the grocery store, the first time I'd been outside this week, was epic. I really could use a vacation to like, northern Quebec. A hundred plus miles from the nearest human. Like, car runs out of gas so you die kinda place.


This is one time I'm grateful I'm a suburbanite. We live in a decent-sized house on an extremely quiet cul-de-sac, with our backyard connecting to a walking trail. I went for a short run yesterday, and saw three people the entire time and I never got within 10 feet of them.
   4021. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:06 AM (#5936164)
I live on a quiet country road. I can walk a half-mile to the actual forest without passing within 100 feet of another human, most of the time. We have a huge backyard. I am extraordinarily thankful for this.
   4022. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:06 AM (#5936165)

Jeez, I am really missing being outside. Even queueing to get into the grocery store, the first time I'd been outside this week, was epic. I really could use a vacation to like, northern Quebec. A hundred plus miles from the nearest human. Like, car runs out of gas so you die kinda place.


Just don't go to White Crow.
   4023. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:06 AM (#5936166)
Type 1 diabetes is, for some reason, becoming more common. I don't think anyone has any idea why. Type 2 makes sense (and, you can certainly develop both - my insulin dose rises exponentially with weight and I've been told off by my doctor for risking that).

Anyway, wow, welcome all. That's a lot of insulin needed on the board.



You guys should get outside. Sitting inside forever isn't healthy. There are still other health risks. I hope you can.
   4024. Tony S Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:06 AM (#5936167)

I'm a T2 (controlled; just need metformin) in my mid-fifties. I'm holing up in my room most of the time.

I take a nice four-mile walk around town every day. Sometimes stop to sit on a park bench for a little bit. Make an occasional foray into a grocery store or drugstore when needed. But that's about it.

Better bored and healthy than sick.

And I'll quit my job before going back in.
   4025. BrianBrianson Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:08 AM (#5936169)
I'd say my own dumb fault for moving from rural Pennsylvania to the outskirts of Paris over the summer, but obviously, I couldn't have actually anticipated this.
   4026. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:08 AM (#5936170)
for those of you who are Type 1 (and living in US) this might be a way to pass the time:

https://studies.jaeb.org/ndocs/t1dexi/Public/Participant/StudyInfo.aspx



Looks good. My doctor wants to move me to Dexcom but I'm on medtronic now.

I will say, as someone who started the adventure on cow and pork insulin with urine glucose testing the only thing available, that, if you have good insurance, treatment for diabetes really is a miracle. If you don't have insurance, I don't know what you do.
   4027. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:18 AM (#5936172)
Tony, that's what I meant. A long walk by yourself. But you have to get outside.

And definitely this is easy rural or suburban than urban.
   4028. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:22 AM (#5936174)
I'd say my own dumb fault for moving from rural Pennsylvania to the outskirts of Paris over the summer, but obviously, I couldn't have actually anticipated this.


I don't want to congratulate myself too much for moving to the country prior to the pandemic, but we did openly consider the safety issue in our decision, not just safety from street crime or burglary but safety from apocalyptic events. We watched 9/11 with our own eyes, we've been in earthquakes, we've had police choppers over our apartment because the Oakland riots came within a block of us.

I don't think we considered quality of life during a longterm quarantine event.
   4029. Tony S Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:31 AM (#5936178)
Tony, that's what I meant. A long walk by yourself. But you have to get outside.


One nice thing about where I live (Frederick, MD) is that it's an actual town, not a spread-out suburban tract. So walking around is easy. It's a pedestrian-friendly city.

And the streets and parks, while not empty, allow for keeping one's distance from others. Vehicle traffic is low enough now that one can briefly wander out into the street to overtake or avoid someone else walking.

I'd go nuts if I couldn't get out a bit. I'm halfway there as it is.
   4030. SoSH U at work Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:34 AM (#5936179)
One nice thing about where I live (Frederick, MD) is that it's an actual town, not a spread-out suburban tract.


We stopped there on our way to my son's graduation, and my wife and I concluded we would live there in a heartbeat.

   4031. Howie Menckel Posted: April 03, 2020 at 10:47 AM (#5936183)
age 58, could stand to lose 15 pounds, no underlying conditions that I know of.
I was the "have never had the flu or flu shot, only colds of my life were 1975 and 2002" guy.

found out real quick that guaranteed me nothing, so have been extremely cautious the last couple of weeks.

think I can say goodbye to the Feb. 29 20-minute roundtrip train ride to/fro NY Penn Station and two hours in that germ pool. but was in Newark for a conference on March 10-11 - the NBA suspended play on March 12, and the world did a 180 - and there was just a mix of 'elbow shakes' vs handshakes. hard to believe, now.

I had a student sit next to me on the first day, and I gotta say I was not a fan of her coughing.

have had an almost imperceptible cough for almost a week, but no other symptoms. it tracks well with my previous experience with these bugs, but it could be anything. when I consider that "I never get a cold," I guess I mean that I never develop enough symptoms to be sidetracked by it. crossing fingers, but not a lot else I can do. logically, correlation does not equal cause and effect, and this symptom is not that unfamiliar to me at this very minor level. could just as easily be, well, a cold symptom.

I will say that I can't even imagine what all this is like for anyone with an anxiety disorder or prone to panic attacks.

I haven't even considered going to a supermarket for at least three weeks. If I do venture for purchase, the convenience stores tend to be literally empty, except for a masked cashier behind a plastic sheeting - my kind of social distancing! If I see a customer inside, I wait outside until they leave.

per that consideration of whether 20 feet of social distancing is a lot safer than 6 feet - that's basically what I'm doing if I do go out. I ain't getting in the elevator with anyone, push the button with obscure parts of my jacket, and so on.

I can go to a local park, and it is virtually empty. you can do "40 feet" without a ton of effort, and there is no reason to touch anything at all. hell, I don't even sit on the benches. I don't want any trouble, nor to give any trouble.

   4032. bob gee Posted: April 03, 2020 at 11:18 AM (#5936188)
Cuomo's daily updates are live at : https://www.governor.ny.gov/
   4033. Howie Menckel Posted: April 03, 2020 at 12:15 PM (#5936206)
nah, too gloomy
   4034. Edmundo got dem ol' Kozma blues again mama Posted: April 03, 2020 at 12:56 PM (#5936221)
I ended up in the least desirable place yesterday -- the ER. I went to give blood on Tuesday but was rejected because my pulse was 47. It was in the 50s when I was younger and worked out regularly, but 47 is 10-20 lower than I've been in the recent past. I was at 66 at my physical in January. I called my doctor and he ordered up an EKG. I had the on Wednesday, and it confirmed the low pulse but found nothing of significance. The Cardiologist emailed him back and said that I should get an appointment for a Holter Monitor once this pandemic slows down. But go to the ER if I have shortness of breath, palpitations, other stuff.

Wednesday night, I wake and feel palpitations for about 10 seconds. I call the doctor's office in the morning and the nurse on duty says to go the ER. Since this heart stuff is new to me, I was plenty nervous, so I went. Turns out it was nothing, I suspect (now) it might have even been a stress reaction rather than some kind of heart anomaly. Anyway further tests, including several blood tests and a chest x-ray later, my results were declared "Unremarkable". The ER cardiologist nicely said that I should come if I have SEVERE palpitations. I felt pretty bad about using medical resources at this time but I didn't know any better. The hospital actually seemed pretty slow -- Lancaster PA is probably a week or two behind the Philly area. Today's local headline is about the pandemic peaking in 6-10 weeks. And this is only the end of week three, so we may not even be 1/4 of the way through the worst of it.

Anyway, I'm fine (so far). I touched as little of the hospital as I could and washed my hands when I was leaving and when I got home.
   4035. AuntBea odeurs de parfum de distance sociale Posted: April 03, 2020 at 01:19 PM (#5936231)
No way UK stays under 20k (officially) dead. The actual toll will be much greater.

+766 (officially) in Italy. +6%

Lombardy was +351 for 8311 total (+4.5%) 1455 new cases out of 6765 positive tests, for 21.5%. Seems we'll definitely hit .1% of Lombardy in the next week or two.

It is interesting that the numbers of positive tests seem to be going down on a daily basis. It's possible that the newly tested are a slice of the population that excludes more of those that got it earlier (whether they were tested or not), or that it includes those that already had it but no longer test positive because it has cleared their system. If this is the case, it's going to be hard to estimate from testing numbers what percentage of the population really has it.

   4036. Slivers of Maranville descends into chaos (SdeB) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 01:27 PM (#5936235)
I've had minor heart palpitations in the past, which appear in hindsight to have been stress-related. Did Holter Monitor etc. Not sure the same applies to your case, Edmundo, but a point of reference.
   4037. Moses Taylor, glorified meat shield Posted: April 03, 2020 at 01:38 PM (#5936238)
Type 1 diabetes is, for some reason, becoming more common.

My son, who is almost 9, was diagnosed on his 4th birthday. My niece was diagnosed around 20 months and is 3.5 years old now. I have to suspect something genetic here, but that's still the first 2 cases on our side.
   4038. Jeremy Renner App is Dead and I killed it Posted: April 03, 2020 at 01:52 PM (#5936242)
Guy in our building was getting constant nosebleeds and didn't want to bother going to have it checked because of the virus and not wanting to be a drain on those resources. But then his girlfriend found him passed out on the floor so he was taken to ER. He's on meds and back home. Girlfriend says it's stress.
   4039. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 01:57 PM (#5936243)
I hear you all about the stress reactions. I keep thinking I'm short of breath. Turns out I'm holding my breath.
   4040. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 01:58 PM (#5936244)
I've felt stressed out too about all this, but so far the major side effect has been a (welcome) increase in alcohol consumption. It does feel like the barbarians are at the gates. It's a strange, slow-burn fear.
   4041. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 01:59 PM (#5936246)

For what it's worth, my father despite being Type 1 diabetic and being pretty unathletic growing up, still ran 30+ marathons as an adult, several of them faster than anything I've ever run, and ran his last one at age 62.
   4042. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 02:06 PM (#5936249)
Oh yeah, I've actually gotten into gear since my diagnosis. I ran a Spartan Beast last fall - that was ~15 miles, ~7,000 ft vertical gain, ~30 obstacles and my 180 penalty burpees for failing 6 of those obstacles. I never would have even thought about doing something like that if I hadn't gotten T1. But now I've got something to prove.
   4043. It's regretful that PASTE was able to get out Posted: April 03, 2020 at 02:47 PM (#5936262)
Edmundo, I'm glad you're all right. You did the smart thing getting checked out. Now you have at least one fewer thing to worry about!

I was confused by that. Judging by context ("The most important thing for the public to know (and health care workers) is that detecting virus, or viral RNA, on a surface does not mean the virus is viable/infective. As of now, there is no definitive evidence for airborne or aerosol transmission outside a hospital procedural setting (intubation, bronchoscopy, autopsy)."), I suspect airborne means something different than to us laypeople. I think what she's saying is that it's very unlikely that it's transmitting by any way except people breathing, coughing, or sneezing near others, i.e. it doesn't spread via living on surfaces of food or tables or whatnot. But really, I'm not sure.


I think what she was trying to say is that you're not going to catch the coronavirus just from standing in the same place an infected person stood ten minutes ago. There has been speculation that the virus stays in the air and infectiously viable for up to 30 minutes; I think she's saying there's no evidence that is true, that pretty much the only way it is transferred is from an infected person shedding the virus directly into your face (via breathing from inside 6 feet, or coughing/sneezing from up to 20 feet.) But it's extremely transferrable in that one way.
   4044. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 03, 2020 at 02:52 PM (#5936264)
I've felt stressed out too about all this, but so far the major side effect has been a (welcome) increase in alcohol consumption.
Heh. Yeah, I've been enjoying some good wine before bed.
   4045. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 03, 2020 at 02:54 PM (#5936265)
I've felt stressed out too about all this, but so far the major side effect has been a (welcome) increase in alcohol consumption. It does feel like the barbarians are at the gates. It's a strange, slow-burn fear.
”The only thing we have to fear is fear itself”. That’s not really true, but it wasn’t true in March, 1933, either. I do think it helps a bit to maintain some optimism, rather than just wallowing in worst case scenarios. Maybe by the end of the month we’ll know whether there’s a basis for optimism.
   4046. Swoboda is freedom Posted: April 03, 2020 at 02:55 PM (#5936266)
Mnuchin says that checks will be going out in a matter of weeks and the IRS document says that checks will start going out in a couple of weeks. That isn't much contradiction.


It would probably be better for the economy if the checks went out later. When people could got out and spend it once the quarantine is done.
   4047. Dan The Mediocre is one of "the rest" Posted: April 03, 2020 at 02:58 PM (#5936269)
It would probably be better for the economy if the checks went out later. When people could got out and spend it once the quarantine is done.


Possibly, but it doesn't help the people who are in a bad spot financially and can't go to the store. Which, to me at least, would be the main point.
   4048. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 03, 2020 at 02:59 PM (#5936270)
Yeah, but having people spending at least some of the money at local small businesses rather than Amazon would be good.
   4049. It's regretful that PASTE was able to get out Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:02 PM (#5936271)
It would probably be better for the economy if the checks went out later. When people could got out and spend it once the quarantine is done.


A lot of people need it to pay their rent, much less groceries.

I've talked to three different Pennsylvanians who filed for unemployment comp and got an email saying they need to call and answer some more questions on the phone. Then (of course) they call and sit on hold literally all day, and never get to talk to anyone. For several days now.

I didn't receive that email, but my three friends all would receive a lot more money than I would. I'm more than cynical enough to believe this is Pennsylvania's way of essentially denying benefits on a "means testing" basis (for the time being), because the state can't afford to pay them all out at once (but of course no one can admit that publicly if they want to continue having a political career).
   4050. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:06 PM (#5936272)
Yes to 4049. It isn't stimulus, it's keep people from being evicted.

I think we should have just prohibited payments for three months. No rents charged, no mortgages. Let the banks deal with it.
   4051. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:07 PM (#5936273)
It would probably be better for the economy if the checks went out later. When people could got out and spend it once the quarantine is done.
The article I saw indicated that the lowest income tax brackets would receive their checks first, with the highest bracket not getting theirs until September. I think that’s just for those who don’t do direct deposit/payment on their income taxes. Those who do will all get paid at once via direct deposit, IIRC.
   4052. Dan The Mediocre is one of "the rest" Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:07 PM (#5936274)
I didn't receive that email, but my three friends all would receive a lot more money than I would. I'm more than cynical enough to believe this is Pennsylvania's way of essentially denying benefits on a "means testing" basis (for the time being), because the state can't afford to pay them all out at once.


It may also not be equipped to handle the massive load of unemployment claims. It's nearly a year's worth in a span of 2 weeks.
   4053. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:14 PM (#5936275)
Oh yeah, I've actually gotten into gear since my diagnosis. I ran a Spartan Beast last fall - that was ~15 miles, ~7,000 ft vertical gain, ~30 obstacles and my 180 penalty burpees for failing 6 of those obstacles. I never would have even thought about doing something like that if I hadn't gotten T1. But now I've got something to prove.

Yeah, I started doing Tough Mudders / running / etc. after having a bit of a health scare of my own in my early 30s. Not diabetes related, but a similar feeling of wanting to prove something and just manage my health much more proactively.
   4054. Swoboda is freedom Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:19 PM (#5936277)
A lot of people need it to pay their rent, much less groceries.

I've talked to three different Pennsylvanians who filed for unemployment comp and got an email saying they need to call and answer some more questions on the phone. Then (of course) they call and sit on hold literally all day, and never get to talk to anyone. For several days now.


That should be fixed. But on a macro level, we are better off with increased unemployment checks going out to tide people over, then the stimulus in a few months so they can spend locally, rather than on Amazon. It needs to be a big shock of money into the economy, not dribbled out.
   4055. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:34 PM (#5936281)

France reporting another 1,120 deaths today. I assume this is similar to yesterday's count which included a backlog of previously uncounted deaths from nursing homes. But still terrible news.
   4056. Greg Pope Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:42 PM (#5936283)
pretty much the only way it is transferred is from an infected person shedding the virus directly into your face (via breathing from inside 6 feet, or coughing/sneezing from up to 20 feet.) But it's extremely transferrable in that one way.

I hear this a lot, that it's direct contact with a person and I shouldn't be worried about transfer. But I also hear that this virus is really easily transmitted, which is part of the problem. If I just stay away from people, then I shouldn't have to worry about cleaning nonstop? But they're also saying to open packages, then dispose of the package immediately and wash your hands. Also, there's all the articles about how long it stays on a surface, which seems to be much longer than numbers I have seen regarding cold and flu. I have to admit being very confused about all of this.

For example, my MIL is 86 with COPD. She hasn't left her house in about a month now, but my wife goes over to bring her food and other things. Assuming my wife stays physically away from her mother, do we need to worry? About things like door handles, counter tops, etc.

I know that advice from an Internet message board isn't gospel, but where can I find out the details on what "we" know?
   4057. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:47 PM (#5936284)
”The only thing we have to fear is fear itself”. That’s not really true, but it wasn’t true in March, 1933, either. I do think it helps a bit to maintain some optimism, rather than just wallowing in worst case scenarios. Maybe by the end of the month we’ll know whether there’s a basis for optimism.


Sure. I actually am optimistic - meaning that I think that ?00,000 Americans will die, and life will go on, and this will be remembered as a bizarre aberration, and hopefully none of my parents or in-laws will die, but they're old and if they do they can die knowing they've lived good lives and that they have people that love them.

As an American born to an affluent family, I've never really had to deal with fear of hunger, of poverty, of bodily harm. COVID is nothing compared to what, say, the Syrians have been dealing with, or what several billions of disadvantaged people deal with every day, but it's still a disconcerting reality check to my happy safe little bubble. And it isn't even here yet, not in my community, not in a real sense. The lockdown is here, but people aren't getting sick yet in Midcoast Maine, at least not in droves. It's still essentially something that's happening on television.
   4058. Mayor Blomberg Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:51 PM (#5936286)
One thing people could do to make this situation better* is to eat more fish.
My fishmonger had no flounder and said the boats aren't going out because normally he they bring in 5000 pounds but now they're lucky to sell 500.
Oysters? He tells me he just threw away $6000 worth -- Alabama, PEI, Cape Cod, and won't be getting any more. The suppliers are open but he can't move them.

* ok, better for me.
   4059. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 03, 2020 at 03:51 PM (#5936288)
If I just stay away from people, then I shouldn't have to worry about cleaning nonstop? But they're also saying to open packages, then dispose of the package immediately and wash your hands. Also, there's all the articles about how long it stays on a surface, which seems to be much longer than numbers I have seen regarding cold and flu. I have to admit being very confused about all of this.
Very much seconded. Various family members and friends (some prone to over-worrying) are leaving all delivery packages outside for 3 days, disinfecting all groceries, repeatedly scrubbing all home surfaces with bleach, etc. How much of that stuff is really necessary?
   4060. Fernigal McGunnigle Posted: April 03, 2020 at 04:03 PM (#5936290)
Very much seconded. Various family members and friends (some prone to over-worrying) are leaving all delivery packages outside for 3 days, disinfecting all groceries, repeatedly scrubbing all home surfaces with bleach, etc. How much of that stuff is really necessary?
A lot of it depends on the people in the household are, doesn't it? If you're high risk for one reason or another then it's likely that almost no precaution is truly excessive.

EDIT: Although the constant indoor bleaching is a bit much if you do the other things.
   4061. What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face? Posted: April 03, 2020 at 04:29 PM (#5936293)
A lot of it depends on the people in the household are, doesn't it? If you're high risk for one reason or another then it's likely that almost no precaution is truly excessive.
Point taken, but no one wants to get it, period, regardless of if they're at a relatively low risk of disastrous consequences.
   4062. Jay Z Posted: April 03, 2020 at 04:42 PM (#5936297)
I don't know, I know the answer is "it couldn't hurt."

IMO secondary transmissions are going to be a very, very rare way of getting COVID-19. You can't prove a negative, you are never going to be able to prove that something can't happen. You could go out for your walk, no one around for miles, but someone was around 2 hours ago, they are infected, the perfect droplet is blown around by the wind right there for you. I just got a package, it's in cardboard, cardboard does not hold the virus very well. But maybe it does, maybe the tests are wrong.

Fear factor is going to be a big thing until, until the hospital cases wane. Then that will probably wane as well.

A lot of society has shut down, I am okay with the economic consequences, but presumptively we will open back up again, and I can't see how we can do that and mollify fear factor 100%. Hotels are something I could see again, limit common space at first. It is common space, a lot of people in a common area with infected people there that is doing the spreading of COVID-19. Or close quarters with an infected individual for an extended period. Certainly if you want a room for a night, you can accomplish that in a hotel, have room service even, you aren't in anyone's direct presence except for the people you came with. But if you want to believe that COVID-19 is still lingering in your room from someone there three nights ago, well I guess it doesn't hurt you to believe that.

I am not trying light, but yes, some of what is being done is excessive, but it'll stay that way until the cases go way down for whatever reason. Then it'll probably go away for the vast majority.
   4063. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:00 PM (#5936299)
I'm not a doctor or anything so do whatever makes you feel comfortable. I don't see any harm in being excessively cautious right now, especially if you're at risk. That being said, I don't really understand things like leaving packages outside for 3 days. If the virus is on the outside of the box, I don't think it's going to become airborne in your home. Bring the box inside, unpack it by the front door, put it in the recycling bin, and then wash your hands.

If you're not going out, or you're washing your hands when you get home so that you're not transferring the virus to surfaces in your house, I don't see why you would need to be constantly cleaning the surfaces. I mean, we're trying to keep a neater home than normal because we have to spend 24 all day here, and it's the backdrop to our videoconferences etc. But we're not being excessive about it.

   4064. Karl from NY Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:03 PM (#5936301)
I don't see how basically anything can reopen until we're actually at herd immunity from either 70% having had it or a reliable vaccine.

Sports might manage a self-contained island, but there really is no endpoint in sight for opening up restaurants and movies and such.
   4065. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:14 PM (#5936304)
I don't see how basically anything can reopen until we're actually at herd immunity from either 70% having had it or a reliable vaccine.

Sports might manage a self-contained island, but there really is no endpoint in sight for opening up restaurants and movies and such.


I think that a reliable antibodies test for COVID will be a big moment. At some point you have to let people that we know to be immune out and about. If Joe Immunity doesn't have the virus and cannot spread it, why shouldn't he be allowed to go swimming in a public pool? And then you might as well let out some of the people without higher risk folks in their immediate family, with instructions that they still totally refrain from visiting grandma. It'll be a weird and awkward return to normalcy, but something has to happen. It's not gonna be a red light for 14 months then a green light. Imagine employers having COVID-immune positions and COVID-vulnerable positions and COVID-high risk positions. Imagine a bar where the bouncer asks to see your antibodies test. Imagine dating apps that promise verified COVID-immune only may join. The mind reels at the possibilities. It's a dystopian vision, and it seems almost inevitable.
   4066. Karl from NY Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:19 PM (#5936305)
How do you enforce that? Do you have goons checking everyone's immunity certificate at the entrance of every restaurant and office? If you don't, everyone will decide they're special enough to claim their way in.
   4067. It's regretful that PASTE was able to get out Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:21 PM (#5936306)
It was brought up a couple pages ago: you have Certified Immune people wear a prominent badge and allow entry to public places only to badge carriers. There are rumors the UK government is already discussing it.
   4068. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:23 PM (#5936308)
Maybe goons, maybe badges, maybe you don't enforce it, mindful of privacy concerns, and hope for the best. I don't now. I refuse to make predictions. It's too weird.
   4069. greenback used to say live and let live Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:25 PM (#5936309)
Yes, COVID-19 immunes will get to wear six-pointed yellow stars.
   4070. Karl from NY Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:26 PM (#5936310)
From the get-what-you-measure department: that creates incentive for people to deliberately catch it so they can get their badge. "Hurry up and get sick now so we're clear for Disneyworld in July!" I don't think this is workable until a vaccine.
   4071. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:29 PM (#5936311)
Yes, it does do that too.
   4072. Karl from NY Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:32 PM (#5936312)
To try some kind of optimistic proposal: I think the only solution short of herd immunity is treatment drugs. Hydroxychloroquine, favipiravir, TB vaccine as India is saying, whatever else. If those can be shown to work to reduce the mortality to a flu-like 0.01%, and get produced and distributed in sufficient quantity, that's our best chance at restarting society in 3-6 months instead of 18.
   4073. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:43 PM (#5936315)
That would be a lot better.
   4074. Jay Z Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:47 PM (#5936317)
Here's another question.

I live alone unless I have my kids, which I do 3 nights a week. Otherwise they live with my ex. Now as far as I know the ex is doing social distancing as am I (I go to the grocery once a week, work from home and otherwise no contact.) Now my ex's partner works at a hospital. As a security guard, so I don't know if he regularly gets exposed to anything. Still. He gets it, kids get it, I get it. So do I keep seeing my kids, or don't I? And for how long? 3 months, 6 months, 18 months, forever?

I have a long distance girlfriend. Haven't seen her since this started. How long until we see each other? 3 months, 6 months, 18 months, forever?

My mom is 95 years old, lives alone in a senior apartment. Has a pacemaker, otherwise in excellent health for age. But she is 95. How long until we see each other? 3 months, 6 months, 18 months, forever?

At some point we do seem to need a mass market test available quickly to the general public. So if you need to do a one on one thing or one on a few thing, at least everyone can get tested that they are not currently carrying the virus. Then it is a go/no go.

Because the stuff I mentioned above actually does seem like more of a need, an important part of life, rather than just a nice to have. Especially as the months start to mount up. 18 months, that's 2 percent of a lifetime.
   4075. Mefisto Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:49 PM (#5936318)
If Joe Immunity doesn't have the virus and cannot spread it


If asymptomatic people can spread it, then I think we'll need good evidence that immune people cannot.
   4076. Srul Itza Posted: April 03, 2020 at 05:51 PM (#5936319)
It was brought up a couple pages ago: you have Certified Immune people wear a prominent badge and allow entry to public places only to badge carriers. There are rumors the UK government is already discussing it.


And there is your new business opportunity: Making and selling counterfeit badges.
   4077. Mefisto Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:04 PM (#5936322)
US deaths will most likely hit 8000 by the end of today, which means they're still doubling every 3 days. That's … bad.
   4078. Dan The Mediocre is one of "the rest" Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:06 PM (#5936323)
If asymptomatic people can spread it, then I think we'll need good evidence that immune people cannot.


And vaccinations don't always take, even in healthy people. So there is that added factor.
   4079. Crispix Attacksel Rios Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:10 PM (#5936324)
If asymptomatic people can spread it, then I think we'll need good evidence that immune people cannot.

I guess the science is being done now, but immune people shouldn't be able to spread it. You can spread it if the virus is reproducing in your cells and getting released into the saliva. If you're immune you will fight off the virus before that happens. Otherwise you're just experiencing another asymptomatic infection and you're not really immune.
   4080. It's regretful that PASTE was able to get out Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:11 PM (#5936325)
And there is your new business opportunity: Making and selling counterfeit badges.


I assume they'd be computerized swipe badges with photo ID, such as are used in many corporate buildings these days. Counterfeiting them might not be impossible, but it would be a challenge (and thus, very expensive).
   4081. Howie Menckel Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:12 PM (#5936327)
if only 1 out of 10 might not think of this.....

Yamiche Alcindor
@Yamiche
·
6m
Important.

Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams stressed washing hands before putting on the cloth face coverings CDC is recommending Americans wear.

He said: You do not want to put on a mask w/ dirty hands.

"If you choose to wear a face covering, wash your hands first," he said.
   4082. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:15 PM (#5936328)
You could open things back up slowly, but create incentives for people to still be extremely cautious. Like people who didn't continue to practice social distancing are further down the list for a hospital bed. People who have other health conditions or who got COVID despite social distancing get higher priority. It's probably not practical to monitor and too easy to evade, and it sounds too ruthless for our doctors to actually implement, but I'm just thinking out loud here.
   4083. Greg Pope Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:28 PM (#5936332)
I'm not a doctor or anything so do whatever makes you feel comfortable. I don't see any harm in being excessively cautious right now, especially if you're at risk.

But my question/confusion goes a step before that. Sometimes I hear that this virus spreads like wildfire, much more so than cold or flu. At other times I hear that you (more or less) can't get it without direct human contact. Can it possibly be both? I mean, with the flu I hear how it's on door handles and to wash, etc. after opening a door. So this is somehow more easily transmitted than the flu, but not in the same ways?

Again, just trying to wrap my head around this.
   4084. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 06:57 PM (#5936341)

Greg, I share your confusion. Don't know what to tell you. But even if this thing does live on door handles etc., as long as you wash your hands when you come into the house, it won't be on the door handles inside your home, right?
   4085. Howie Menckel Posted: April 03, 2020 at 07:10 PM (#5936344)
Johns Hopkins University
@JohnsHopkins
·
45m
BREAKING: The @US_FDA approved a clinical trial that will allow Johns Hopkins University researchers to test a therapy for #COVID19 that uses plasma from recovering patients.
   4086. bunyon Posted: April 03, 2020 at 07:45 PM (#5936347)
I'm not a doctor or anything so do whatever makes you feel comfortable. I don't see any harm in being excessively cautious right now, especially if you're at risk.

But my question/confusion goes a step before that. Sometimes I hear that this virus spreads like wildfire, much more so than cold or flu. At other times I hear that you (more or less) can't get it without direct human contact. Can it possibly be both? I mean, with the flu I hear how it's on door handles and to wash, etc. after opening a door. So this is somehow more easily transmitted than the flu, but not in the same ways?

Again, just trying to wrap my head around this.


Also not a doctor but, it seems to me, if people are contagious for a week before symptoms and a week after, an R0 of 2-3 is actually pretty low. I mean, how many people do you breath within six feet of in 2 weeks? If all of them were going to get it, R0 would be an order of magnitude higher.

But just because transmission through air for any individual interaction within six feet is low, when you likewise think about how many such interactions you personally have, you're at risk. Since you can't know which of those interactions is going to be the one that gets you, you have to avoid all of them.

I don't know if that's right but it's how I've been thinking about it. The weird thing about coronavirus is people infecting others without showing symptoms for a considerable period of time. If you were only contagious while symptomatic, we wouldn't be having this problem.

So, I don't think it is highly contagious in terms of a single interaction. But infected people can transmit it long enough to make their odds of spreading it high.

Happy to be corrected.

   4087. PreservedFish Posted: April 03, 2020 at 07:49 PM (#5936348)
Also not a doctor but, it seems to me, if people are contagious for a week before symptoms and a week after, an R0 of 2-3 is actually pretty low. I mean, how many people do you breath within six feet of in 2 weeks? If all of them were going to get it, R0 would be an order of magnitude higher.

Agreed.

You (generally) get this thing by being in close proximity to someone that is expectorating gazillions of copies of the virus more or less directly into your lungs. Not from the plastic handle on a jug of milk.
   4088. Sunday silence Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:05 PM (#5936350)
...create incentives for people to still be extremely cautious. Like people who didn't continue to practice social distancing are further down the list for a hospital bed. People who have other health conditions or who got COVID despite social distancing get higher priority.


This seems completely unworkable. For one thing, it seems unethical for professionals and others who might feel that way. Second there are any number of legal challenges one could make such as deprival of Due PRocess, Unusual Punishments, etc. People who do bad things go to jail or pay fines or whatever. They dont get to be deprived of medical treatments, for God sakes people.
   4089. Sunday silence Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:11 PM (#5936353)


You (generally) get this thing by being in close proximity to someone that is expectorating gazillions of copies of the virus more or less directly into your lungs.


I guess that's the conventional wisdom, but the way this thing has been going, I hesitate to make any conclusive claim. you might find the following interesting:

My daughter sent me this link to a video that explains that the more virulent RNA is probably being expelled by ordinary breathing rather than coughing. It has to do with the way the alveoli themselves are expelling the virus:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oWVCd2vPscs
   4090. Howie Menckel Posted: April 03, 2020 at 08:20 PM (#5936354)
per 4089, when we think of the size of the mouth vs two nostrils, perhaps there is a way to lessen the amount of alveoli?

3960. Howie Menckel Posted: April 02, 2020 at 05:48 PM (#5936006)
Anyone have any idea why "SHUT YOUR DAMN MOUTH!" is not part of the list of daily precautions?

I understand that someone coughing on you is not the only way to get this - but it is a major way, ain't it?

When I make occasional brief forays out, my mouth is closed at all times. If I make a purchase, I'm not saying "Hello" or "Thank you" or anything. I'm glad you have that protective plastic sheet; I'll see your sheet and raise you a closed mouth.

If you can't breathe through your nose - doesn't that quite possibly mean you are an at-risk person?

I'll nod or tip my cap to a friendly person who is 15 or 20 feet away, maybe. But I ain't talking (and hell, if I can make that adjustment, anybody can!).

maybe I'm missing something.
   4091. The Yankee Clapper Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:20 PM (#5936364)
Seen on the Internet:
First Time In History We Can Save The Human Race By Laying In Front Of The TV And Doing Nothing. LET’S NOT SCREW THIS UP!
   4092. Howie Menckel Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:30 PM (#5936365)
and just like that, I believe I will have dibs on which primate is the first (one of the first?) to have their Congressperson test positive. sigh

NJ freshman House member Mikie Sherrill's husband has it, and she has "symptoms" and is awaiting word on here results.

she's a 48-year-old former Navy helicopter pilot and federal prosecutor so she's young, badass, and seems pretty fit. she'll shoot this sucker down, one might say.
   4093. SoSH U at work Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:40 PM (#5936366)
and just like that, I believe I will have dibs on which primate is the first (one of the first?) to have their Congressperson test positive. sigh


I think Booey has you beat.
   4094. Mayor Blomberg Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:40 PM (#5936367)
As of 27 March, Howie:

Diaz-Balart (FL), McAdams (UT), Cunningham (SC) Kelly (PA), and, of course, Rand Paul.
   4095. Never Give an Inge (Dave) Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:51 PM (#5936368)
People who do bad things go to jail or pay fines or whatever. They dont get to be deprived of medical treatments, for God sakes people.

Like I said, it’s not really workable. But the outrage at the idea seems unwarranted. Every country rations healthcare, and will be doing so even moreso during this pandemic when hospitals are overwhelmed. In the US we do it by how much you’re willing to pay or how good your insurance is, in other countries they do it by queueing (or who you’re willing to bribe). Prioritizing people who didn’t knowingly take a large risk doesn’t seem obviously worse than those systems, although like I said initially I know it would never happen.
   4096. Howie Menckel Posted: April 03, 2020 at 09:58 PM (#5936369)
I think Booey has you beat.

I figured somebody might.
   4097. Kiko Sakata Posted: April 03, 2020 at 11:18 PM (#5936378)
I saw this story on the news tonight. Detroit bus driver complained on Facebook about a passenger repeatedly coughing without covering her mouth. The twist(?) ending really got me - literally stopped me in my tracks and elicited a "Holy ####!"
   4098. Weekly Journalist_ Posted: April 03, 2020 at 11:45 PM (#5936380)
Howie, she is my congressperson too. I'm in Pompton Lakes...how about you?
   4099. Kiko Sakata Posted: April 03, 2020 at 11:51 PM (#5936381)
Worldometers added total tests and Tests/1M population to their summary table. It looks like it's just on their world summary by country, not the U.S. page by state as of now, although if they have totals for the U.S., those have to have been compiled up from the state level, so I would guess that U.S. tests by state will show up there pretty soon. As I type this, they're showing 698,344 total tests in the U.S. (2,110 per 1 million people) with 277,467 positives (838/1m), so 39.7% testing positive - which seems higher than any state numbers I've seen, so they're probably missing some test numbers from some states. Anyway, new data to track if folks are interested.
   4100. smileyy Posted: April 04, 2020 at 12:12 AM (#5936383)
Someone very close to my family has fatigue, a lot h grade fever, somewhat crunchy noises in their lungs and a pending Coronavirus test. #### just got real for me.
Page 41 of 81 pages ‹ First  < 39 40 41 42 43 >  Last ›

You must be Registered and Logged In to post comments.

 

 

<< Back to main

News

All News | Prime News

Old-School Newsstand


BBTF Partner

Dynasty League Baseball

Support BBTF

donate

Thanks to
Mike Emeigh
for his generous support.

Bookmarks

You must be logged in to view your Bookmarks.

Hot Topics

NewsblogEmpty Stadium Sports Will Be Really Weird
(4668 - 10:53am, Jun 03)
Last: Sunday silence

NewsblogJudge: Len Dykstra’s reputation is so bad it’s legally impossible to libel him
(26 - 10:44am, Jun 03)
Last: Itchy Row

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-3-2020
(4 - 10:26am, Jun 03)
Last: What did Billy Ripken have against ElRoy Face?

NewsblogRoyals won’t lay off or furlough baseball operations employees despite MLB uncertainty
(2 - 9:45am, Jun 03)
Last: RoyalsRetro (AG#1F)

NewsblogOT – NBA CoronaThread 2020
(3190 - 8:52am, Jun 03)
Last: spivey

Hall of Merit2021 Hall of Merit Ballot Discussion
(287 - 8:40am, Jun 03)
Last: DL from MN

NewsblogSources: MLB mulls shorter season, full prorated salaries for players
(26 - 7:32am, Jun 03)
Last: Sunday silence

NewsblogOT: Wrestling Thread November 2014
(2438 - 11:17pm, Jun 02)
Last: Tubbs is Bobby Grich when he flys off the handle

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1926 Ballot
(21 - 11:06pm, Jun 02)
Last: Tubbs is Bobby Grich when he flys off the handle

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1927 Ballot
(5 - 11:02pm, Jun 02)
Last: Tubbs is Bobby Grich when he flys off the handle

Hall of MeritMost Meritorious Player: 1927 Discussion
(8 - 10:58pm, Jun 02)
Last: Tubbs is Bobby Grich when he flys off the handle

NewsblogMLBPA proposes 114-game season in counterproposal
(4 - 8:17pm, Jun 02)
Last: Rally

NewsblogMLB Network to celebrate Derek Jeter's career with 64 consecutive hours of Jeter programming
(57 - 8:13pm, Jun 02)
Last: Rally

NewsblogPrimer Dugout (and link of the day) 6-2-2020
(37 - 8:09pm, Jun 02)
Last: Eric J can SABER all he wants to

NewsblogRoy Steele, the A’s ‘Voice of God,’ dies
(8 - 3:20pm, Jun 02)
Last: Khrushin it bro

-->

Page rendered in 0.8153 seconds
46 querie(s) executed