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Thursday, February 03, 2011

Wrigley Field, other buildings damaged by storm

A panel of the Wrigley Field roof above the press box was damaged by extreme winds during the blizzard, Cubs spokesman Peter Chase said.

Part of the panel, made of fiberboard, broke away and the Cubs are working with the city to monitor the situation and to ensure there aren’t any public safety issues, Chase said.

Guapo Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:23 AM | 94 comment(s) Login to Bookmark
  Tags: cubs, media

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   1. Go-Kart Mozart Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:57 AM (#3742252)
I live on the far north side of Chicago in Rogers Park and I couldn't even see across the street from my back porch last night.
   2. Chicago Joe Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:33 AM (#3742280)
I have three feet of snow in front of my house. The south side of the street has maybe a foot of snow. The wind was ridiculous-didn't seems so much like snow as very thick fog swirling about, until you walked out into it and felt the snow pelting you like grapeshot. They say the winds reached 70 mph last night.
   3. Go-Kart Mozart Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:38 AM (#3742282)
Let's play 2!
   4. Shredder Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:46 AM (#3742286)
I post on another forum under the name Highllini (don't ask). There's a bunch of pictures on this thread, and I think you can still view it if you're not a member.

The thunder-snow last night was pretty awesome, and it was blowing sideways last night. I went out at about 8:30 this morning to shovel and we probably got another 2-3 inches after that. There are about 10 steps leading to my front door, and this morning, there was no definition to those steps, and that's after two shoveling shifts yesterday. It looked like a sledding hill.

Everything seems to be getting back to normal in my neighborhood. I'll be able to walk to the train pretty easily tomorrow. And I should be able to catch my flight Utah on Friday for a weekend of skiing. Fortunately I won't have to drive anywhere for a couple weeks, so I'm not going to spend a lot of time digging my car out. This was pretty cool, though. I've only been in Illinois for 12 years, and I was back in L.A. on winter break when we had the 1999 storm, so I've never seen anything like this before.
   5. Go-Kart Mozart Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:47 AM (#3742288)
I've only been here a year so it goes without saying that this is the worst I've seen.
   6. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:55 AM (#3742293)
Last week during the big snowstorm that hit the East Coast I was walking to the Dupont Circle metro station when Channel 7 (ABC) stopped me and wanted to do an interview with me. I declined because they were shutting down the metro and I needed to get home. I don't know if they used the footage of me walking up to them or not but the reason they wanted to interview me was that I was wearing a black suit with a black overcoat and so the snow on me really stood out. The snow that was falling was of the fluffy clumpy kind and it was almost falling sideways so by the time I got to the metro station I looked like the abominable snowman. The reporter was cute and all but if she wasn't giving me a ride home then it really didn't matter.
   7. Kiko Sakata Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:56 AM (#3742294)
I've only been in Illinois for 12 years, and I was back in L.A. on winter break when we had the 1999 storm, so I've never seen anything like this before.


Even though 1999 apparently had more snow, this was a much more dramatic storm. From what I remember, the 1999 storm was kind of a typical Chicago snowstorm, that just lasted longer and put down a lot more snow than usual. Last night was just wild - thunder-snow, crazy gusting wind, just really, really awesome to watch (from the warmth and safety of my house).

Everything seems to be getting back to normal in my neighborhood.


Our sidewalks and alley were pretty well cleared by about 3:30. All we need now is for the city plows to get to the side streets and we'll be good to go.
   8. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:01 AM (#3742300)
Postcard I got from Chicago, circa 1967. Anything to cheer up a few Windy City folks:

KID--

Got rolled yesterday in the soul brother district (Chicago) by a couple of young boys (they had knives too). A soul sister (pretty) lured me upstairs into a tentament where I was like rolled. (They got my pants too) Chicago is still a great town. How is you gettin on.

MOE


And it still is a great town. My sympathies and hopes for a speedy recovery.
   9. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:08 AM (#3742306)
BTW for any non-Chicagoans who haven't been watching the news, here's the Trib's coverage. Apparently the storm was so bad that they couldn't deliver their print edition to many customers. (The Tulsa World couldn't deliver the paper for the first time since its beginning in 1905.)
   10. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:15 AM (#3742310)
Wusses. Call me when you get three feet of snow dumped on you like we did last February and then have another 14 to 20 inches dumped on you 3 days later.
   11. Kiko Sakata Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:21 AM (#3742315)
Call me when you get three feet of snow dumped on you like we did last February


I have to admit that I was a little bit surprised and embarrassed to learn that Chicago has never officially had even two feet of snow (the record is 23.0" in 1967) and that last night/today was only the third recorded snowfall of >20". It seems like big bad Chicago should have had more and bigger blizzards than that in its history.
   12. SoSH U at work Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:24 AM (#3742316)
Edit: Double Post
   13. SoSH U at work Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:26 AM (#3742317)
BTW for any non-Chicagoans who haven't been watching the news, here's the Trib's coverage. Apparently the storm was so bad that they couldn't deliver their print edition to many customers.


We didn't get the paper or the mail. We got about the same amount of snowfall here in The Region, but it wasn't as dramatic. I was lucky to get out of work early, or I could easily see my drive taking four hours. Still shorter than the Lake Shore Drive folks, however.


I have to admit that I was a little bit surprised and embarrassed to learn that Chicago has never officially had even two feet of snow (the record is 23.0" in 1967) and that last night/today was only the third recorded snowfall of >20". It seems like big bad Chicago should have had more and bigger blizzards than that in its history.


That surprised me as well.
   14. Meatwad Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:29 AM (#3742319)
south bend always gets it worse the chi. but last night today was unreal, it didnt stop snowing here til about 3 driving home around 10 last night was interesting, only got stuck 3 times. at least i dont have to deal with lake shore drive, which only has 100 cars left to clear!
   15. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:30 AM (#3742322)
I have to admit that I was a little bit surprised and embarrassed to learn that Chicago has never officially had even two feet of snow (the record is 23.0" in 1967) and that last night/today was only the third recorded snowfall of >20". It seems like big bad Chicago should have had more and bigger blizzards than that in its history

How often do >20" of snowfall actually happen in a 24 hour period? I'm guessing not too often.
   16. . . . . . . Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:34 AM (#3742323)
I have to admit that I was a little bit surprised and embarrassed to learn that Chicago has never officially had even two feet of snow (the record is 23.0" in 1967) and that last night/today was only the third recorded snowfall of >20". It seems like big bad Chicago should have had more and bigger blizzards than that in its history.


Chicago is not near the ocean. That has two effects that make huge blizzards less common: less moisture for big storms and you don't have the big contrast in temperatures (from cold land to warm water) that you have along the East Coast. Even though places like NYC, Philly, and DC don't get a lot of snow in many winters (though not recently) and generally don't keep a snowpack for very long (though not recently), Atlantic-fueled Nor'easters are bigger snowmakers than what you see in the Midwest.

That being said, Chicago sees bigger storms than other places just to its west or south because the right storm track can result in some lake-enhancement with a NNE wind. That happened with this week's blizzard.

If you've never been through a full-on east coast blizzard, it is something else.
   17. Kiko Sakata Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:37 AM (#3742326)
Chicago sees bigger storms than other places just to its west or south because the right storm track can result in some lake-enhancement with a NNE wind.


This was the case last night.
   18. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:48 AM (#3742331)
I always found winters in Philly to be pretty mild compared to my childhood in Chicago and my short tenure in upstate NY. I don't know if it was being in a valley or what but it just never seemed bad. I think the most we ever got was 10 inches in a 24 period or so and it seemed like nothing ever got shut down (schools obviously did) during those snowstorms. Now on the flipside it seems like when I was a kid schools would almost never close and a storm would have to rage for a very long time to get them to close. Nowadays it seems like they will close a school down if they think that maybe snow will fall sometime next week.
   19. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:50 AM (#3742333)
Even though 1999 apparently had more snow

. . eh, it had the higher official measurement. I remember some controversy about that at the time, too. One weatherman (no idea who it was) noted that while Chicago reported 21 inches at O'Hare Airport, all the suburbs around O'Hare* reported no more than 14 inches. Something funny was up.

And it was an election year. Everyone in Chicago remembered the last giant storm: 1979 when a storm 6 weeks before the mayoral primary turned a seeming cakewalk for Mayor Bilandic into a shocking upset for Jane Byrne. In 1999, Daley certainly intended to do a better job handling the snow than Bilandic did in 1979, but if the official snowfall was higher than even '79 - why then it made any clean up seem that much more impressive (and any problems with the cleanup a bit more excusable).

From my own memory, while 1999 was a huge storm, this was bigger.

* For non-Chicagoans, O'Hare is totally surrounded by suburb, connected to Chicago by a road.
   20. Rafael Bellylard: The Grinch of Orlando. Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:51 AM (#3742334)
Seeing this stuff makes me thankful I've never lived anywhere that gets snow over 1/2", and that maybe 2-3 times in my entire life (I'm 50).

Snow is a good place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there.
   21. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:53 AM (#3742335)
Apparently the storm was so bad that they couldn't deliver their print edition to many customers.

Yeah, with snow coming down 2-3 inches per hour & wind gusting at/over 50 MPH, all plows could do was get the main arteries. Woke up, looked outside - you couldn't see street. Just one big unbroken pile of white broken up by houses and trees.
   22. . . . . . . Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:54 AM (#3742336)
I always found winters in Philly to be pretty mild compared to my childhood in Chicago and my short tenure upstate NY. I don't know if it was being in a valley or what but it just never seemed bad. I think the most we ever got was 10 inches in a 24 period or so and it seemed like nothing ever got shut down (schools obviously did) during those snowstorms.

Frequency of big East Coast snowtorms is highly variable and goes up and down in multidecadal cycles that aren't fully understood, but probably relate to sea-surface temperature pattersn in the North Atlantic. There was no big blizzard from, for example, 1983 to 1996 (which was the bulk of my childhood in NY). Currently we're in an unprecedented up-cycle for East Coast blizards- 3 of the top 7 blizzards in NYC history came in the last 12 months.
   23. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:56 AM (#3742338)
I have to admit that I was a little bit surprised and embarrassed to learn that Chicago has never officially had even two feet of snow (the record is 23.0" in 1967) and that last night/today was only the third recorded snowfall of >20". It seems like big bad Chicago should have had more and bigger blizzards than that in its history.

Chicago has bad weather but it's worst weather is better than a lot of places. No hurricanes. No serious earthquakes (unless the New Madrid goes off!), almost never any tornadoes (one about 20 years ago killed a few dozen people, but that was a place so far away that even now it's on the outskirts of suburbia), and even with snow - we're not by any oceans, and we're upwind of the lakes. Yeah, there's lake effect snow, but there are parts of the Upper Peninsula of MI that get around 250 inches a year.
   24. Lassus Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:57 AM (#3742339)
In Syracuse we have a word for a storm like this: "Tuesday".
   25. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:58 AM (#3742340)
And it was an election year. Everyone in Chicago remembered the last giant storm: 1979 when a storm 6 weeks before the mayoral primary turned a seeming cakewalk for Mayor Bilandic into a shocking upset for Jane Byrne. In 1999, Daley certainly intended to do a better job handling the snow than Bilandic did in 1979, but if the official snowfall was higher than even '79 - why then it made any clean up seem that much more impressive (and any problems with the cleanup a bit more excusable).

I should note: yes, this is also an election year, but the incumbent ain't up for reelection so he doesn't have as much incentive to cook the figures.
   26. SoSH U at work Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:58 AM (#3742341)
Frequency of big East Coast snowtorms is highly variable and goes up and down in multidecadal cycles that aren't fully understood, but probably relate to sea-surface temperature pattersn in the North Atlantic. There was no big blizzard from, for example, 1983 to 1996 (which was the bulk of my childhood in NY). Currently we're in an unprecedented up-cycle for East Coast blizards- 3 of the top 7 blizzards in NYC history came in the last 12 months.


I grew up near NYC from 1967-85, and I don't recall seeing one as big as the one we had last night. I did see a slightly larger one in SE Indiana (in terms of snowfall, though without the high winds), but that was truly out of the ordinary for there.

Yeah, there's lake effect snow.



And, usually the lake effect works our way, not toward Chicago.
   27. The Most Interesting Man In The World Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:00 AM (#3742343)
San Francisco today? Mid 60's and clear.
   28. OCF Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:04 AM (#3742344)
I was in Chicago for the January 1979 snowstorm - the Bilandic Blizzard (at least it was a factor in Bilandic losing his job a few months later). Or, actually, I wasn't there during the storm.

To explain: during that time I lived in Madison from Thursday evening through Monday morning and in Chicago from mid-day Monday through Thursday afternoon. There had been a huge, disruptive snow and ice storm around New Year's - I made it back to Chicago/Madison on Amtrak from points further west and south, through an ice storm. I think there was 10 or 12 inches of snow in Chicago. Then the next two weeks were freakishly cold, and nothing melted. The city of Chicago really hadn't done that effective a job of getting that New Year's snow out of the way. I went to Madison as usual on Thursday, and had trouble staying warm waiting in a bus shelter for a city bus. Once on the bus I saw a temperature sign on the capitol square: -2 degrees. I said something about that to my wife, and she said, "Oh, it was that warm?" It had been -28 that morning in Madison. Early Friday morning it started snowing, and the snow continued over the next 30 hours or so; by mid-day Saturday, Madison had about 12 inches. And by Sunday morning it was right back down to -28 degrees. Madison coped with the snow reasonably well, although you didn't really want to be out and around in the worst of it on Friday night and Saturday morning. I headed back to Chicago on Monday - a day of subzero temperatures and another 4" of snow, which is a combination of "That's not supposed to happen" with "That's not fair." I think I was using Greyhound that week - the trip may have been a little slow, but the bus got through. And I think on that occasion, I used the IC to get from the Loop to Hyde Park. Only then did I realize how utterly screwed up the city was. I said 12" in Madison but it had been 20" in Chicago, on top of the packed ice from the New Year's storm. The el was all screwed up. The main streets were all screwed up. The side streets were just completely abandoned to the snow, and the parked cars weren't moving. Snow was being dumped into Lake Michigan. Snowplow drivers were going on berserk rampages. My colleagues didn't understand how I'd even gotten into the city.

In that case, I don't think there was much lake-effect enhancement at Chicago; the city was just right on the center line of the path of a very big storm, with Madison a little north of that line.
   29. hokieneer Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:05 AM (#3742345)
EDIT: double post
   30. hokieneer Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:05 AM (#3742346)
I always found winters in Philly to be pretty mild compared to my childhood in Chicago and my short tenure in upstate NY. I don't know if it was being in a valley or what but it just never seemed bad. I think the most we ever got was 10 inches in a 24 period or so and it seemed like nothing ever got shut down (schools obviously did) during those snowstorms. Now on the flipside it seems like when I was a kid schools would almost never close and a storm would have to rage for a very long time to get them to close. Nowadays it seems like they will close a school down if they think that maybe snow will fall sometime next week.


I agree with the school closings. I'm in my late 20s, and I remember our school buses having chains on the tires to pick us up when there were several inches of snow and ice on the roads. Now I see schools closings for the POTENTIAL of 2-4" of accumulation.

I live in Charleston WV now, and I'm blessed with being in a valley. In my 4+ years of living here, most snow I've even seen in one storm is around 8-9". Go 40-50 miles south, east, or north and the snow fall goes up considerably (getting into the Allegheny mountains). My in-laws live around 60 miles east-south east of Charleston. During the storm last week, I think our accumulation was ~7", they had over 18". I grew up around 50 miles north-east of Charleston, and it was fairly routine for us to have 1-2 storms a season with over a foot of accumulation. The winters of 93 and 95(96?) were especially bad.
   31. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:31 AM (#3742350)
NYC has the most civic minded snow removal denizens ever, those union guys not withstanding. Every homeowner and half the renters are out every morning of snowfall in the winter scraping the sidewalk and icing it back to bare concrete. I moved to Seattle a few months ago after quite a while in New York -- here, they don't even use salt, as they believe it hurts the environment too much. In NYC, they pour it on the streets and sidwalks like the mayor puts it on his popcorn.

It's a striking contrast. The only Seattle daily paper left standing, the Seattle Times, had an awesome headline after an earlier winter dusting of merely 3 or so inches but countless transit interuptions: "why can't we handle snow"?

Well, partly because you refuse to use modern methods to deal with it. I applaud Seattle's environmental concern -- but they are lucky if they get a few inches twice a winter, that makes it a bit easier of a choice.
The weather here (on the west coast) really is so much better than the midwest and east coast. I used to hate those transplanted west coasters that were high and mighty about it, turns out they were right. I think the 50's and 40's of Seattle winter are nice, I can't even imagine California. Wait, yes I can, it sounds amazing.
   32. Srul Itza At Home Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:47 AM (#3742356)
I remember freezing cold weather.

I remember blizzards.

I remember sleet and ice storms.

I'm glad they're just memories now.

Aloha.
   33. OCF Posted: February 03, 2011 at 07:07 AM (#3742360)
I remember freezing cold weather.
I remember blizzards.
I remember sleet and ice storms.
I'm glad they're just memories now.


Different state for me: I can routinely see snow within 50 miles but it ain't gonna happen where I am (coastal Southern California).

In the 18 years I lived in northeastern Oklahoma, I remember snow as being pretty rare (although serious ice happened several times). There was one 9" late December snow with a very cold aftermath and one 16" mid-March snow in which it never actually got down to freezing, during or after. Everything else was smaller. It looks like this Groundhog Day storm probably socked my home town with at least 15", and it got very cold afterwards; that would put it beyond anything I remember from my childhood.
   34. BDC Posted: February 03, 2011 at 02:01 PM (#3742409)
Here in Arlington, three days before the Super Bowl, we have a quarter inch of snow over an inch or two of ice, and it's been there since Monday night. No thaw forecast till tomorrow afternoon. The university is closed for the third straight day and I haven't even tried to get out of my driveway. The only measure people take around here is to wait for the stuff to melt; driving or even walking is perilous. The severity of a storm is to some extent a product of how ready people are to deal with it.
   35. CFiJ Posted: February 03, 2011 at 02:32 PM (#3742430)
Since we're trading snow stories, I'm surprised that none of my Minnesota brethren have shown up to mention the Halloween blizzard of '91. From it's start in the late afternoon to midnight, it dropped 8 inches in the Twin Cities, clearly beating the record for snowfall in all of October. By the time it was over two days later, 28.4 inches in the Twin Cities, 37 inches in Duluth. Minnesotans are used to early winter; I recall when the big snow storms of November '98 had paralyzed the Midwest, I called home from Japan to make sure everyone was all right. When I asked how everyone was, my mom just said, "We're good. It snowed." But 8 inches on Hallow-frickin'-ween was a little too much even for us. I remember my kid brother and sister wading through knee deep snow trying to trick-or-treat.
   36. OMJ, urban D machine Posted: February 03, 2011 at 02:36 PM (#3742433)
Snow is a good place to visit, but I wouldn't want to live there.



The snow is fine, its the 38 and rainy that sucks.
   37. dlf Posted: February 03, 2011 at 02:49 PM (#3742440)
For our Chicago area residents: I have a client visit scheduled for tomorrow morning about 15 miles south of Gary, IN with a flight scheduled to get in to O'Hare tonight at 9:30. What are the odds of (a) the airport being open and (b) the roads sufficiently clear?
   38. DL from MN Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:04 PM (#3742455)
I went to college in Duluth. We had 22 inches of snow in a 24 hour period and didn't cancel classes. I had to get up at 5am to dig my car out of a snowbank to get to class for a test at 11. All I could see was the antenna (I have pictures). We had an entire January below zero another year. Snow really isn't a big deal if you're prepared for it. I agree that I'd rather take any snowstorm over mid-30s and rain. The only thing that I didn't like about Duluth was that winter was 2 months longer than southern MN.

I was further south on the Halloween blizzard so we got 2-3 inches of ice instead. No power and half the trees were broken due to the weight.
   39. Rafael Bellylard: The Grinch of Orlando. Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:04 PM (#3742456)
The snow is fine, its the 38 and rainy that sucks.


Spending a good part of my life living in either San Francisco or Orlando, I don't get that much, either.
   40. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:09 PM (#3742461)
In Syracuse we have a word for a storm like this: "Tuesday".

I can't say I miss living upstate. This week in Chicago has been plenty.
   41. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:11 PM (#3742463)
For our Chicago area residents: I have a client visit scheduled for tomorrow morning about 15 miles south of Gary, IN with a flight scheduled to get in to O'Hare tonight at 9:30. What are the odds of (a) the airport being open and (b) the roads sufficiently clear?

O'Hare is open, and it might even be running sort of normally by then, since it's been clear since around noon yesterday. I don't want to vouch for the roads south of Gary, but the interstates in Chicago shouldn't be too bad.
   42. Go-Kart Mozart Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:13 PM (#3742466)
37) i don't know whether the airport is open, but the main roads are fine at this point. it's only the side streets that are bad now. come to think of it, i don't see why they wouldn't be open by tomorrow morning, but i've found airports to be a bit arbitrary.

coke to gern.
   43. cardsfanboy Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:13 PM (#3742467)
I agree with the school closings. I'm in my late 20s, and I remember our school buses having chains on the tires to pick us up when there were several inches of snow and ice on the roads. Now I see schools closings for the POTENTIAL of 2-4" of accumulation


I think that has a lot to do with the school season starting sooner giving more room for snow days, and in St. Louis at least we had so many consecutive years where they didn't use up all the allocated snow days, that the schools got in a habit of using those days up for any excuse they could find, creating an environment where it's routine to call school off early.

This storm was a little weird out here, we got relatively nothing compared to expectations(maybe 5 inches) but if you go about 10-20 miles north they got hammered to an extent(not like Chicago of course). I had to walk my stupid dog about a half a dozen times during the 'storm' and it never actually snowed,(for the first 7 hours) just freezing rain that looked like snow after it solidified on the ground.
   44. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:16 PM (#3742471)
I think an acquaintance of mine was one of the idiots stranded on LSD during the storm; I'll have to verify. Something on Facebook about a "16-hour ordeal."
   45. SoSH U at work Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:17 PM (#3742472)
For our Chicago area residents: I have a client visit scheduled for tomorrow morning about 15 miles south of Gary, IN with a flight scheduled to get in to O'Hare tonight at 9:30. What are the odds of (a) the airport being open and (b) the roads sufficiently clear?


I can't imagine you'll have any problems on either end, though I'm not positive since 15 miles south of Gary is actually pretty rural.
   46. Kiko Sakata Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:18 PM (#3742474)
I have a client visit scheduled for tomorrow morning about 15 miles south of Gary, IN with a flight scheduled to get in to O'Hare tonight at 9:30. What are the odds of (a) the airport being open and (b) the roads sufficiently clear?


The Tribune is reporting 1,000 flight cancellations at O'Hare as of 7:30 this morning. They quote a spokesperson as "hoping" to be back on a normal schedule tomorrow (Friday).

As of last night, the State Police were reporting significant lane closures and/or icy conditions on various highways.

The Tribune has a Blizzard Blog that they update fairly regularly with reports on things like this:

I hope this link works (it's a ridiculously long URL)

EDIT: On the flight to O'Hare, I agree with SOSH, the issue right now is that no planes came in yesterday, so they don't have the planes in place. If your flight takes off on-time from your starting point, O'Hare will be glad to let it land.
   47. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:23 PM (#3742483)
O'Hare is open, and it might even be running sort of normally by then,

So if it's running normal, expect the normal delays.

i don't know whether the airport is open, but the main roads are fine at this point. it's only the side streets that are bad now.

Haven't left the house since the blizzard hit, but I heard from my mom that roads were still really bad on her way to work this morning. She wasn't driving on expressways but she wasn't taking side sreets either. I know my NIGHT class for today was canceled.

I assume by tonight things will have improved considerably. Roads are already driveable - hell, the residential roads around me have been mostly plowed.
   48. Lassus Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:23 PM (#3742485)
NYC has the most civic minded snow removal denizens ever, those union guys not withstanding. Every homeowner and half the renters are out every morning of snowfall in the winter scraping the sidewalk and icing it back to bare concrete. I moved to Seattle a few months ago after quite a while in New York -- here, they don't even use salt, as they believe it hurts the environment too much. In NYC, they pour it on the streets and sidwalks like the mayor puts it on his popcorn. It's a striking contrast. The only Seattle daily paper left standing, the Seattle Times, had an awesome headline after an earlier winter dusting of merely 3 or so inches but countless transit interuptions: "why can't we handle snow"? Well, partly because you refuse to use modern methods to deal with it. I applaud Seattle's environmental concern -- but they are lucky if they get a few inches twice a winter, that makes it a bit easier of a choice.

Eh, I disagree. Salt melts ice, it doesn't shovel snow. I think primarily for Seattle (where I lived, as well as Portland) is that they just don't need to mobilize as residents for snow in the same way New Yorkers are used to. I DO think the streets are incredibly over-salted here, although I admit I'm hard-pressed to see how terrible that is for the concrete environment in which we live. It makes the street fall apart faster, I suppose. It also hurts the dogs.


I think an acquaintance of mine was one of the idiots stranded on LSD during the storm; I'll have to verify. Something on Facebook about a "16-hour ordeal."

Now THAT sounds like a seriously bad trip.

Thank you, try the lamb!
   49. just plain joe Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:29 PM (#3742496)
The snow is fine, its the 38 and rainy that sucks.


The 38 and rainy describes a typical winter in southwestern Indiana, with the occasional ice/sleet/snow storm thrown in to keep everyone on their toes. Here they start "pre-treating" the major roads with salt two days before any potential snow "event" because local governments here lack the equipment to deal with any real accumulation after the fact. Of course the downside of this is that they tend to run out of salt six weeks before the end of bad weather and have to scrounge for more.
   50. dlf Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:39 PM (#3742506)
Thanks for the help folks.
   51. Mark Edward Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:47 PM (#3742520)
It's not so much the snow that bothers me. I could walk or take public transportation to work so I don't need to worry about the whole driving-through-snow thing.

The bitter cold in Chicago sucks, though. It was pretty chilly walking to work this morning. I could do without that.

Also, I didn't know it could thunder/lightning during a snowstorm. I found that out Tuesday evening.
   52. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:53 PM (#3742529)
Yes, this morning was the first truly face-freezing morning I can remember in Chicago this year. And Tuesday night was also my first thundersnow experience.
   53. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:53 PM (#3742531)
Now THAT sounds like a seriously bad trip.

Yeah, the Trib beat you to it, with its "Bad LSD Trip" headlines...
   54. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 03:54 PM (#3742532)
So if it's running normal, expect the normal delays.

Well, yeah; I assumed that was a given.
   55. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:15 PM (#3742560)
I remember freezing cold weather.

I remember blizzards.

I remember sleet and ice storms.

I'm glad they're just memories now.

Aloha.


Why, you ###### ############# East Coast-deserting, hula-hoop hooping, miscegenating ##########, the ##### that brought you into the world must have had her ############# ##### replaced by a dumpster, because that's obviously where your sorry ############# ### came from. And I want to see your birth certificate and a blood sample.
   56. hokieneer Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:20 PM (#3742564)
The snow is fine, its the 38 and rainy that sucks.


diddo. I can shovel snow and buy a bag of rock salt. A snow storm and the few hours after can be semi-beautiful until all the removal starts.


Here in Arlington, three days before the Super Bowl, we have a quarter inch of snow over an inch or two of ice, and it's been there since Monday night. No thaw forecast till tomorrow afternoon. The university is closed for the third straight day and I haven't even tried to get out of my driveway. The only measure people take around here is to wait for the stuff to melt; driving or even walking is perilous. The severity of a storm is to some extent a product of how ready people are to deal with it.


My wife lived in Kileen for a while. She tells a story of a "bad" snow/ice storm one winter, where the accumulation was ~an inch of ice and a few inches of snow. She was working at an Applebees at the time and says most of the staff was flipping out and ended up spending the night in the Restaurant. On the way home she said she saw a car in the ditch every 1/4 mile or so. She's from WV originally, so she was highly amused at how unprepared and terrified people were over a little bit of snow.
   57. Lassus Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:24 PM (#3742567)
I remember freezing cold weather.
I remember blizzards.
I remember sleet and ice storms.
I'm glad they're just memories now.
Aloha.


I will take this as an open invitation to everyone to move to Hawaii and experience the paradise. Load up, people!
   58. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:31 PM (#3742576)
My wife lived in Kileen for a while. She tells a story of a "bad" snow/ice storm one winter, where the accumulation was ~an inch of ice and a few inches of snow. She was working at an Applebees at the time and says most of the staff was flipping out and ended up spending the night in the Restaurant. On the way home she said she saw a car in the ditch every 1/4 mile or so. She's from WV originally, so she was highly amused at how unprepared and terrified people were over a little bit of snow.

I can half-understand flipping out in those circumstances. It's not a question if you know how to handle the weather - does the driver of the car in front of you know how to handle it? If not - look out. Does the municipality know how to handle it?

That said, death itself might be preferable to spending all night in an Applebees.
   59. Forsch 10 From Navarone (Dayn) Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:51 PM (#3742598)
The drifts are the #####. My garage is blocked by a five-foot wall of snow, and I have no idea when they'll get around to plowing the alleys. Still, I'll take Chicago in February over Mississippi in August.
   60. scotto Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:55 PM (#3742603)
I was in Chicago for the last big blizzard, and of course this one. I don't mind them, but the stories about LSD strandings makes me think that people aren't quite as well prepared as they used to be. I'm surprised after about every snowfall how people don't seem to know the driving basics. As in, don't but if you must, go really, really easy on both accelerator and brake.

That said, neither Chicago blizzard that I've experienced matched the northeast's Blizzard of '78. My suburban town northwest of Boston had school closed for at least two days, IIRC. When we ran out of milk I cross-country skiied to the Stop and Shop to get some. Sadly, I didn't have the radio on. We were also instructed to go to the high school and pick up class assignments that were missed due to school cancellation. I had at least two papers to write that I can recall. I got those by ski as well.

There are some great old photos of me standing next to an 8 foot of so wall of snow that we'd removed from our driveway. The snow drifts reached the sill of our second story windows. It was a helluva storm.

I had my ex take pictures of my son frolicking in the drifts behind their place. The snow is over his head in parts. He's going to love showing those photos to his kids as much as I do showing him my 1978 pictures.

What my town didn't have that I'm not happy to contend with now is the stupid Chicago dibs deal. #### that noise.
   61. rLr Is King Of The Romans And Above Grammar Posted: February 03, 2011 at 04:55 PM (#3742604)
That said, death itself might be preferable to spending all night in an Applebees.

Or in Killeen, Texas.

I'll take Chicago in February over Mississippi in August.

I'm with you. Five degrees in Ann Arbor is immeasurably preferable to ninety-eight in Durham.
   62. rLr Is King Of The Romans And Above Grammar Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:00 PM (#3742610)
There are some great old photos of me standing next to an 8 foot of so wall of snow that we'd removed from our driveway.

My father used to go on about the enormous piles of snow from that storm that ate up valuable parking spots in New York until well into March.

There was a snow pile twelve or fifteen feet high outside my high school after the blizzard of '96. We used to goof around on it until the exhaust turned it irremediably gray and gross. That was a great storm. First time in my lifetime that New York public schools were closed for snow. Then they gave us the next day off, too! Of course, when they reopened, the city buses were still all cracked out and my brother and I ended up walking the four miles, but it was fun.
   63. Gonfalon Bubble Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:05 PM (#3742619)
Last week during the big snowstorm that hit the East Coast I was walking to the Dupont Circle metro station when Channel 7 (ABC) stopped me and wanted to do an interview with me. I declined because they were shutting down the metro and I needed to get home. I don't know if they used the footage of me walking up to them or not but the reason they wanted to interview me was that I was wearing a black suit with a black overcoat and so the snow on me really stood out. The snow that was falling was of the fluffy clumpy kind and it was almost falling sideways so by the time I got to the metro station I looked like the abominable snowman. The reporter was cute and all but if she wasn't giving me a ride home then it really didn't matter.

You missed a perfect "BABA BOOEY BABA BOOEY BABA BOOEY HOWARD STERN'S PENIS" opportunity, young man.
   64. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:28 PM (#3742646)
I can understand flipping out over an inch of ice; that's some scary shite. A little snow, maybe not.
   65. Kiko Sakata Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:38 PM (#3742663)
I can understand flipping out over an inch of ice; that's some scary shite. A little snow, maybe not.


Yeah, I completely agree. I'm much happier in Chicago with 20 inches of snow than I would be in some parts of Indiana where they apparently have a one-inch layer of ice. The problem with snow is mostly getting stuck and you can see what's coming. With ice, it just sneaks up on you and you lose all control.

the stories about LSD strandings makes me think that people aren't quite as well prepared as they used to be


Chicagoans are cocky. I am about this stuff, too. We like to laugh at those silly East-Coasters who don't know how to handle a foot of snow like we hardy Midwesterners. And Chicago is good at recovery after the snow stops, but when it's actually snowing, the way to "handle" snow is to avoid it.

For this storm, they were predicting 25-foot waves off Lake Michigan. Thinking about that, it seems kind of obvious in retrospect that the smart move would have been to avoid the road that runs right alongside Lake Michigan. That said, I can't guarantee that if my normal commute was up Lake Shore Drive that I wouldn't have done the exact same thing.
   66. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:39 PM (#3742665)
My wife lived in Kileen for a while. She tells a story of a "bad" snow/ice storm one winter, where the accumulation was ~an inch of ice and a few inches of snow. She was working at an Applebees at the time and says most of the staff was flipping out and ended up spending the night in the Restaurant. On the way home she said she saw a car in the ditch every 1/4 mile or so. She's from WV originally, so she was highly amused at how unprepared and terrified people were over a little bit of snow.

And yet even the most experienced drivers can get caught unaware. I was driving from Indy to Bloomington in January of 1977, in the midst of what's still by far the most extended deep freeze spell of weather I've yet to experience in 66 years. It was twilight, but the skies were clear and so was the highway, or so I thought, until about half a mile ahead, I saw about a dozen cars sitting in the grassy median strip. What the hell are they doing there?

But within a matter of seconds after that question entered my mind, I was right there with them, the victim of a patch of highway ice that had somehow intruded onto the otherwise dry concrete. No amount of prior driving experience can prepare you for things like that. It could have happened in Buffalo just as easily as in Miami.
   67. Dag Nabbit at ExactlyAsOld.com Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:44 PM (#3742674)
the stories about LSD strandings makes me think that people aren't quite as well prepared as they used to be

I dunno. Stories of '67 are much worse than this one. '67 did have more snow, but not that much more. One of the TV stations note that there tons'o'abandoned cars on LSD in '67, again in '79, and now as well.
   68. McCoy Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:46 PM (#3742675)
When I worked on the lakefront in Wisconsin a few years back we had a partuicularly cold and wet winter. Didn't really snow a ton but it seemed like it stormed all the time, was really really cold, and consequently we got a lot of ice. Well, the parking lot for the place I worked at was right on the waterfront and the wind was really whipping around and it was sleeting pretty hard. All of the cars were covered in a very thick sheet of ice and the parking lot was another thick sheet of ice. As soon as you stepped out onto the parking lot the wind would whip you down the parking lot and out onto the busy street. You had to walk something like 100 feet upwind of where you car was so that you could get to it by the time the wind whipped you level to your car. I remember the first waitress stepping out onto the ice. At the time we didn't realize the parking was covered in ice and as soon as she stepped out onto the parking lot she was promptly blown out into the street. We thought it was quite hilarious at the time.
   69. Juilin Sandar to Conkling Speedwell (Arjun) Posted: February 03, 2011 at 05:50 PM (#3742682)
Quite a lot of snow outside. Last night city services were working feverishly to clear the streets (I'm in Hyde Park currently). Still haven't finished.
   70. ERROR---Jolly Old St. Nick Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:05 PM (#3742696)
When I worked on the lakefront in Wisconsin a few years back we had a partuicularly cold and wet winter. Didn't really snow a ton but it seemed like it stormed all the time, was really really cold, and consequently we got a lot of ice. Well, the parking lot for the place I worked at was right on the waterfront and the wind was really whipping around and it was sleeting pretty hard. All of the cars were covered in a very thick sheet of ice and the parking lot was another thick sheet of ice. As soon as you stepped out onto the parking lot the wind would whip you down the parking lot and out onto the busy street. You had to walk something like 100 feet upwind of where you car was so that you could get to it by the time the wind whipped you level to your car. I remember the first waitress stepping out onto the ice. At the time we didn't realize the parking was covered in ice and as soon as she stepped out onto the parking lot she was promptly blown out into the street. We thought it was quite hilarious at the time.

Where are your video cameras when you really need them?
   71. zack Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:27 PM (#3742726)
I gotta say I don't get the ######## about tons of snow. A snowstorm in winter is wonderful! They're beautiful, all the sound is damped, it's warmer and brighter when they're done, drifts block the wind, and if you're lucky you don't have to go to work or school. Blizzards are the respite of winter life in the North!

...it's every other day of winter in the North that sucks. Old, crusty black-grey snow, slush, refrozen ice, wind that cuts through to your bones, unplowed sidewalks. Going trick-or-treating as a skier no matter what costume you are wearing. Snowstorms are great, winter is bad.

I thought I moved to the south when I moved to DC, but that hasn't stopped winter lately. And here no one shovels their sidewalk or knows how to drive. A few years ago, I saw someone clearing their windshield with a bag of rocksalt.
   72. hokieneer Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:32 PM (#3742732)
And yet even the most experienced drivers can get caught unaware.


Absolutely, no denying that. WV is full of very windy roads that go over and around mountains/hills, so any time you venture out on bad roads you are taking a risk that is greater than normal. The experience of having semi-bad winters combined with the terrain helps most drivers, but it's still very risky, and sometimes very stupid, to venture out. I have been out in bad conditions a few time were once I arrived at my destination I wished I would have never went out, and one time I never made it.

I do get some amusement from hearing/seeing people who are unaccustomed to winter weather react to what I would consider a small snow storm. Scenes like this amuse me. I'm sure everyone else gets amusement out unaccustomed people's reactions to their environmental conditions and lifestyle.
   73. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:34 PM (#3742736)
I can understand flipping out over an inch of ice; that's some scary shite. A little snow, maybe not.

Yeah, we had over 1" of ice on top of ~3" of snow in the NYC suburbs (Westchester). Didn't even attempt to leave the house until it rained for about 3 hours.

Even then, it too me and my wife ~3 hrs. to clear the driveway; me chopping and her shoveling.

You can't plow ice, and no homeowner keeps enough salt to melt a 150'x10' driveway of inch thick ice.

Thank God for the snow underneath. The areas my stupid neighbor shoveled (partially shared driveway) were much harder to chop.
   74. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:34 PM (#3742737)
Yeah, I completely agree. I'm much happier in Chicago with 20 inches of snow than I would be in some parts of Indiana where they apparently have a one-inch layer of ice.


Let's trade. It is like a four layer cake on the sidewalks/drives at least on the northside of Indy. I have packed slush, ice, more packed slush, more ice, and a dusting of snow. About 2 inches consistently. I could've skated around the neighborhood. It took me four hours to chisel about 350 square feet of driveway yesterday, just enough to get our cars out. I had to use a square edged spade garden shovel. My neighbor had a sledgehammer for a little while, and I saw a lady with a hand hammer for about five minutes before she gave up.

Then for the first time in my home owning life, my exterior drain pipe from the sump pump is frozen, so I had to get a plumber to reroute that to the sewer outtake before this starts to melt and fill the crock. My colleagues in Milwaukee had 18 inches and 1/2 the office made it in to work by noon. Instead, 2 1/2 days of screwing around with ice. I'm guessing I would've needed to get out there every 3 hours, and go through 400 pounds of rock salt to prevent the sheet cake from forming. I only keep about 75-100lbs on hand during the winter.
   75. rLr Is King Of The Romans And Above Grammar Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:36 PM (#3742740)
I gotta say I don't get the ######## about tons of snow. A snowstorm in winter is wonderful! They're beautiful, all the sound is damped, it's warmer and brighter when they're done, drifts block the wind, and if you're lucky you don't have to go to work or school. Blizzards are the respite of winter life in the North!

It's true. Blizzards are neat, so long as you can stay inside. It's a bit of a drag to shovel, but even that isn't that bad.
   76. rLr Is King Of The Romans And Above Grammar Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:37 PM (#3742742)
You can't plow ice, and no homeowner keeps enough salt to melt a 150'x10' driveway of inch thick ice.

Get a smaller driveway.
   77. snapper (history's 42nd greatest monster) Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:48 PM (#3742755)
Get a smaller driveway.

That's kind of tough. If I shorten it, it won't reach the street, and if I make it narrower, it's hard to fit the car.
   78. SoSH U at work Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:49 PM (#3742756)
I gotta say I don't get the ######## about tons of snow. A snowstorm in winter is wonderful! They're beautiful, all the sound is damped, it's warmer and brighter when they're done, drifts block the wind, and if you're lucky you don't have to go to work or school. Blizzards are the respite of winter life in the North!


It's true. Blizzards are neat, so long as you can stay inside. It's a bit of a drag to shovel, but even that isn't that bad.

Agreed. Just looking outside at the mountains of pure white snow (one of them my 8-year-old just scaled on the way to a friend's house) is very cool. When those piles start to get crusty and black, much less so.
   79. zack Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:50 PM (#3742758)
It took me four hours to chisel about 350 square feet of driveway yesterday, just enough to get our cars out. I had to use a square edged spade garden shovel. My neighbor had a sledgehammer for a little while, and I saw a lady with a hand hammer for about five minutes before she gave up.


I don't want to admit how long it took me to find a picture of one of these things (since god knows what they are called), but I can't imagine living in an icy climate without one:

http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/ProductDetails.aspx?SKU=7213176

You just crack through the ice once and scrape the rest off. The heavier the head the better.
   80. rLr Is King Of The Romans And Above Grammar Posted: February 03, 2011 at 06:52 PM (#3742763)
That's kind of tough. If I shorten it, it won't reach the street, and if I make it narrower, it's hard to fit the car.

Live nearer to the street.
   81. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 03, 2011 at 07:04 PM (#3742784)
I don't want to admit how long it took me to find a picture of one of these things (since god knows what they are called), but I can't imagine living in an icy climate without one:

http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/ProductDetails.aspx?SKU=7213176

You just crack through the ice once and scrape the rest off. The heavier the head the better.


the key to using what you've posted, and the square spade that I used is not to use to much downward force. You will break these (the handles) if you get too forceful. This ace branded item works very well if it is just ice, but the spade (since it is much wider) is a bit more efficient when you have layers of ice.
   82. villageidiom Posted: February 03, 2011 at 07:22 PM (#3742796)
It looks like this Groundhog Day storm probably socked my home town with at least 15", and it got very cold afterwards; that would put it beyond anything I remember from my childhood.
A little before noon on the 1st, Tulsa had set a record for snowfall for the month of February. So, uh, yeah.
That said, neither Chicago blizzard that I've experienced matched the northeast's Blizzard of '78. My suburban town northwest of Boston had school closed for at least two days, IIRC.
IIRC in Medford they were closed for two weeks. Granted, the second of those was the normal February vacation week. But roads were closed for much of that first week.
   83. scotto Posted: February 03, 2011 at 07:33 PM (#3742811)
IIRC in Medford they were closed for two weeks. Granted, the second of those was the normal February vacation week. But roads were closed for much of that first week.


It might've been a whole week. I don't remember it exactly, hence my qualifier. There's a lot less memory tread on the tire, if you know what I mean.
   84. SuperGrover Posted: February 03, 2011 at 09:52 PM (#3742936)
The thunder-snow last night was pretty awesome


Yes, yes it was. I also enjoyed the snow vortexes all over the place near the Mart. Only quibble is I got kicked out of the bar at 9:30!

Fun times in downtown Chicago Wednesday.
   85. bads85 Posted: February 03, 2011 at 10:09 PM (#3742967)
http://www.acehardwareoutlet.com/ProductDetails.aspx?SKU=7213176


Man, I want of those awesome things, and I live in Southern California. Over the past two days,I felt the pain the east and midwest is feeling. Yesterday, I had to wear a sweter while playing golf. This morning, I had to put gas in my car, and the pump was so cold I almost wished I had gloves, then I thought, "Where would I put them when I have to take them off?" and realized they weren't worth the hassle. This winter is shaping up to be a real #####, isn't she?
   86. Tulo's Fishy Mullet (mrams) Posted: February 03, 2011 at 10:27 PM (#3742988)
This winter is shaping up to be a real #####, isn't she?


Old Man Winter is a woman?
   87. bads85 Posted: February 03, 2011 at 10:34 PM (#3742997)
Old Man Winter is a woman?


It is Mother Nature's world; Old Man Winter just lives in it -- plus it is a La Nina year.
   88. Spahn Insane Posted: February 03, 2011 at 10:59 PM (#3743025)
They're beautiful, all the sound is damped, it's warmer and brighter when they're done,

Well, unless they're followed immediately by a vicious cold front, as is the case with this Chicago blizzard. Today's the coldest day of the year.
   89. rLr Is King Of The Romans And Above Grammar Posted: February 03, 2011 at 11:17 PM (#3743036)
Man, I want of those awesome things, and I live in Southern California. Over the past two days,I felt the pain the east and midwest is feeling. Yesterday, I had to wear a sweter while playing golf. This morning, I had to put gas in my car, and the pump was so cold I almost wished I had gloves, then I thought, "Where would I put them when I have to take them off?" and realized they weren't worth the hassle. This winter is shaping up to be a real #####, isn't she?

Good Lord. The price for not having to shovel snow is golf? Oh, cruel fate!
   90. phredbird Posted: February 03, 2011 at 11:25 PM (#3743041)
San Francisco today? Mid 60's and clear.


had to go to my dentist in beverly hills early this morning. i was miserable. it was really chilly, i don't think it cracked 55 degrees. maybe in the sun.
   91. Eraser-X is emphatically dominating teh site!!! Posted: February 03, 2011 at 11:27 PM (#3743046)


Yes, yes it was. I also enjoyed the snow vortexes all over the place near the Mart. Only quibble is I got kicked out of the bar at 9:30!

Fun times in downtown Chicago Wednesday.


I also work in the Mart, but our office let us work from home yesterday and today.
   92. Shredder Posted: February 03, 2011 at 11:38 PM (#3743049)
Yes, yes it was. I also enjoyed the snow vortexes all over the place near the Mart. Only quibble is I got kicked out of the bar at 9:30!
What bar were in by the Mart? Don't tell me you were at the Shamrock Club. We eat lunch at that place all the time. I work across the river at Wacker and Franklin. I was a little bummed that the Gazro-Wagon didn't show up today.

On Tuesday I had to take a southbound brown line train all the way around the loop just so that I could get on a train. The northbound platform was completely packed. This was at about 3:30.
   93. This is going to be state of the art wall Posted: February 03, 2011 at 11:44 PM (#3743053)
I grew up in N. Michigan in the shadow of Lake Michigan. From January to April it is almost guaranteed to snow 3 days out of 4. The snow there piles up in ways that seem absurdly unlivable to me now.
   94. Eraser-X is emphatically dominating teh site!!! Posted: February 04, 2011 at 12:12 AM (#3743066)
We eat at Shamrock frequently as well. My predecessors were at the Chop House constantly, but I couldn't live with myself if I did that. I probably have spend the majority of my time up the block at Lou Malnati's. A lot of my co-workers eat in the Food Court, but it's truly atrocious so I avoid it as much as possible.

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